Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY™
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Politics is more difficult than physics.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Serve

Serve Quotes (34 quotes)

...for the animals, which we resemble and which would be our equals if we did not have reason, do not reflect upon the actions or the passions of their external or internal senses, and do not know what is color, odor or sound, or if there is any differences between these objects, to which they are moved rather than moving themselves there. This comes about by the force of the impression that the different objects make on their organs and on their senses, for they cannot discern if it is more appropriate to go and drink or eat or do something else, and they do not eat or drink or do anything else except when the presence of objects or the animal imagination [l'imagination brutalle], necessitates them and transports them to their objects, without their knowing what they do, whether good or bad; which would happen to us just as to them if we were destitute of reason, for they have no enlightenment except what they must have to take their nourishment and to serve us for the uses to which God has destined them.
[Arguing the uniqueness of man by regarding animals to be merely automatons.].
Les Préludes de l'Harmonie Universelle (1634), 135-139. In Charles Coulston Gillespie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1974), Vol. 9, 318.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Animal (309)  |  Appropriate (18)  |  Automaton (6)  |  Color (78)  |  Destiny (26)  |  Destitution (2)  |  Difference (208)  |  Discerning (7)  |  Drink (27)  |  Eat (38)  |  Enlightenment (11)  |  Equal (53)  |  God (454)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Impression (51)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Nourishment (16)  |  Object (110)  |  Odor (7)  |  Organ (60)  |  Passion (54)  |  Reason (330)  |  Resemblance (18)  |  Sense (240)  |  Sound (59)  |  Transport (10)  |  Uniqueness (7)

A great man quotes bravely, and will not draw on his invention when his memory serves him with a word as good.
In Lecture, second in a series given at Freeman Place Chapel, Boston (Mar 1859), 'Quotation and Originality', collected in Letters and Social Aims (1875, 1917), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Bravely (2)  |  Draw (25)  |  Good (228)  |  Great (300)  |  Invention (283)  |  Memory (81)  |  Quote (13)  |  Word (221)

A life is either all spiritual or not spiritual at all. No man can serve two masters.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 11
Science quotes on:  |  Life (917)  |  Master (55)  |  Spiritual (45)

A railroad may have to be carried over a gorge or arroya. Obviously it does not need an Engineer to point out that this may be done by filling the chasm with earth, but only a Bridge Engineer is competent to determine whether it is cheaper to do this or to bridge it, and to design the bridge which will safely and most cheaply serve.
From Address on 'Industrial Engineering' at Purdue University (24 Feb 1905). Reprinted by Yale & Towne Mfg Co of New York and Stamford, Conn. for the use of students in its works.
Science quotes on:  |  Bridge (22)  |  Chasm (7)  |  Cheaper (5)  |  Competent (10)  |  Design (92)  |  Determine (45)  |  Earth (487)  |  Engineer (72)  |  Filling (6)  |  Gorge (2)  |  Obviously (9)  |  Railroad (10)  |  Safely (3)

A research journal serves that narrow borderland which separates the known from the unknown.
Editorial, Vol. 1, Part 1, in the new statistics journal of the Indian Statistical Institute, Sankhayā (1933), as quoted and cited by MacTutor webpage for Mahalanobis. Also reprinted in Sankhyā: The Indian Journal of Statistics (Feb 2003), 65, No. 1, xii.
Science quotes on:  |  Borderland (3)  |  Journal (13)  |  Known (15)  |  Narrow (33)  |  Research (517)  |  Separate (46)  |  Unknown (87)

As was the case for Nobel's own invention of dynamite, the uses that are made of increased knowledge can serve both beneficial and potentially harmful ends. Increased knowledge clearly implies increased responsibility. We reject the notion advocated in some quarters that man should stop eating from the tree of knowledge, as if that were humanly possible.
From Nobel Banquet Speech (10 Dec 1981), in Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel 1981 (1981), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Advocate (10)  |  Beneficial (10)  |  Clearly (17)  |  Dynamite (5)  |  Harmful (10)  |  Humanly (4)  |  Imply (12)  |  Increased (3)  |  Invention (283)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Alfred Bernhard Nobel (15)  |  Notion (32)  |  Possible (100)  |  Potential (34)  |  Reject (21)  |  Responsibility (47)  |  Tree Of Knowledge (7)

Chemists do have a good sense of humor but lose it when they serve as referees.
A. Nickon and E. F. Silversmith, Organic Chemistry: The Name Game, Modern Coined Terms and Their Origins (1987), 293, footnote.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemist (79)  |  Humour (101)  |  Loss (62)  |  Referee (3)  |  Sense Of Humor (3)

Do the day’s work. If it be to protect the rights of the weak, whoever objects, do it. If it be to help a powerful corporation better to serve the people, whatever the opposition, do that. Expect to be called a stand-patter, but don’t be a stand-patter. Expect to be called a demagogue, but don’t be a demagogue. Don’t hesitate to be as revolutionary as science. Don’t hesitate to be as reactionary as the multiplication table. Don’t expect to build up the weak by pulling down the strong. Don’t hurry to legislate. Give administration a chance to catch up with legislation.
Speech (7 Jan 1914), to the State Senate of Massachusetts upon election as its president. Collected in Coolidge, Have Faith in Massachusetts (1919, 2004), 7-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Administration (8)  |  Build (80)  |  Catch (21)  |  Chance (122)  |  Corporation (4)  |  Expectation (46)  |  Legislation (8)  |  Multiplication Table (5)  |  Opposition (29)  |  People (269)  |  Reactionary (3)  |  Revolutionary (14)  |  Science (1699)  |  Strong (47)  |  Weak (36)  |  Work (457)

Every investigator must before all things look upon himself as one who is summoned to serve on a jury. He has only to consider how far the statement of the case is complete and clearly set forth by the evidence. Then he draws his conclusion and gives his vote, whether it be that his opinion coincides with that of the foreman or not.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 190.
Science quotes on:  |  Case (64)  |  Clearly (17)  |  Coincide (4)  |  Complete (43)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Consider (45)  |  Draw (25)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Far (77)  |  Investigator (28)  |  Jury (2)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Statement (56)  |  Summon (4)  |  Vote (11)

Everybody can be great. Because anybody can serve. You don’t have to have a college degree to serve … You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 253
Science quotes on:  |  Anybody (9)  |  College (27)  |  Degree (48)  |  Everybody (16)  |  Full (38)  |  Generate (11)  |  Grace (13)  |  Great (300)  |  Heart (110)  |  Love (164)  |  Need (211)  |  Soul (139)

From the point of view of a tapeworm, man was created by God to serve the appetite of the tapeworm.
In 'Philosophy, Religion, and So Forth', A Voice Crying in the Wilderness (1989), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Appetite (6)  |  Create (98)  |  God (454)  |  Point Of View (26)  |  Tapeworm (2)

Genius, without religion, is only a lamp on the outer gate of a palace. It may serve to cast a gleam of light on those that are without while the inhabitant sits in darkness.
Louis Klopsch, Many Thoughts of Many Minds (1896), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Cast (15)  |  Darkness (25)  |  Gate (8)  |  Genius (186)  |  Gleam (9)  |  Inhabitant (19)  |  Lamp (12)  |  Light (246)  |  Outer (7)  |  Palace (6)  |  Religion (210)  |  Sit (24)

I believe [the Department of Energy] should be judged not by the money we direct to a particular State or district, company, university or national lab, but by the character of our decisions. The Department of Energy serves the country as a Department of Science, a Department of Innovation, and a Department of Nuclear Security.
In letter (1 Feb 2013) to Energy Department employees announcing his decision not to serve a second term.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Character (82)  |  Company (28)  |  Country (121)  |  Decision (58)  |  District (7)  |  Innovation (38)  |  Judge (43)  |  Money (125)  |  Nuclear (24)  |  Particular (54)  |  Science (1699)  |  Security (27)  |  State (96)  |  University (51)

I should regard them [the Elves interested in technical devices] as no more wicked or foolish (but in much the same peril) as Catholics engaged in certain kinds of physical research (e.g. those producing, if only as by-products, poisonous gases and explosives): things not necessarily evil, but which, things being as they are, and the nature and motives of the economic masters who provide all the means for their work being as they are, are pretty certain to serve evil ends. For which they will not necessarily be to blame, even if aware of them.
From Letter draft to Peter Hastings (manager of a Catholic bookshop in Oxford, who wrote about his enthusiasm for Lord of the Rings) (Sep 1954). In Humphrey Carpenter (ed.) assisted by Christopher Tolkien, The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien (1995, 2014), 190, Letter No. 153.
Science quotes on:  |  Aware (18)  |  Blame (17)  |  Catholic (5)  |  Economy (46)  |  Elf (6)  |  Engage (11)  |  Evil (67)  |  Explosive (16)  |  Foolish (16)  |  Gas (46)  |  Lord Of The Rings (6)  |  Master (55)  |  Means (109)  |  Motive (26)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Peril (6)  |  Physical (94)  |  Poison (32)  |  Produce (63)  |  Provide (48)  |  Research (517)  |  Technology (199)  |  Wicked (3)  |  Work (457)

I wouldn’t miss this opportunity for anything. For the chance to work on these conservation issues, to serve my country, to work for this president, I’d do it all over again, every single minute.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Chance (122)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Country (121)  |  Issue (37)  |  Minute (25)  |  Miss (16)  |  Opportunity (43)  |  President (11)  |  Single (72)  |  Work (457)

If we use resources productively and take to heart the lessons learned from coping with the energy crisis, we face a future confronted only, as Pogo, once said, by insurmountable opportunities. The many crises facing us should be seen, then, not as threats, but as chances to remake the future so it serves all beings.
Utne Reader (Nov-Dec 1989).
Science quotes on:  |  Being (39)  |  Chance (122)  |  Confront (9)  |  Coping (3)  |  Crisis (13)  |  Energy (185)  |  Future (229)  |  Insurmountable (2)  |  Learning (174)  |  Lesson (32)  |  Opportunity (43)  |  Productive (10)  |  Resource (47)  |  Threat (24)

It is true that when pride releases energies and serves as a spur to achievement, it can lead to a reconciliation with the self and the attainment of genuine self-esteem.
In The Passionate State of Mind (1955), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  Attainment (35)  |  Energy (185)  |  Genuine (19)  |  Lead (101)  |  Pride (45)  |  Reconciliation (9)  |  Release (15)  |  Self (39)  |  Self-Esteem (4)  |  Spur (4)  |  True (120)

Nature does nothing in vain when less will serve; for Nature is pleased with simplicity and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes.
In Isaac Newton and Andrew Motte (trans.), The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1803), Vol. 2, 160. Newton's comment on his Rules of Reasoning Philosophy, Rule 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Affect (10)  |  Cause (231)  |  Less (54)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Please (10)  |  Pomp (2)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Superfluous (8)  |  Vain (26)

No physiologist who calmly considers the question in connection with the general truths of his science, can long resist the conviction that different parts of the cerebrum subserve different kinds of mental action. Localization of function is the law of all organization whatever: separateness of duty is universally accompanied with separateness of structure: and it would be marvellous were an exception to exist in the cerebral hemispheres.
The Principles of Psychology (1855), 607.
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (18)  |  Action (151)  |  Calm (13)  |  Cerebrum (6)  |  Connection (86)  |  Conviction (57)  |  Difference (208)  |  Duty (51)  |  Exception (33)  |  Existence (254)  |  Function (90)  |  Hemisphere (4)  |  Law (418)  |  Localization (2)  |  Marvel (24)  |  Mental (57)  |  Organization (79)  |  Part (146)  |  Physiologist (12)  |  Question (315)  |  Resistance (23)  |  Science (1699)  |  Structure (191)  |  Truth (750)  |  Universality (11)

Of all the constituents of the human body, bone is the hardest, the driest, the earthiest, and the coldest; and, excepting only the teeth, it is devoid of sensation. God, the great Creator of all things, formed its substance to this specification with good reason, intending it to be like a foundation for the whole body; for in the fabric of the human body bones perform the same function as do walls and beams in houses, poles in tents, and keels and ribs in boats.
Bones Differentiated by Function
Some bones, by reason of their strength, form as it were props for the body; these include the tibia, the femur, the spinal vertebrae, and most of the bony framework. Others are like bastions, defense walls, and ramparts, affording natural protection to other parts; examples are the skull, the spines and transverse processes of the vertebrae, the breast bone, the ribs. Others stand in front of the joints between certain bones, to ensure that the joint does not move too loosely or bend to too acute an angle. This is the function of the tiny bones, likened by the professors of anatomy to the size of a sesame seed, which are attached to the second internode of the thumb, the first internode of the other four fingers and the first internodes of the five toes. The teeth, on the other hand, serve specifically to cut, crush, pound and grind our food, and similarly the two ossicles in the organ of hearing perform a specifically auditory function.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem: (1543), Book I, 1, as translated by William Frank Richardson, in 'Nature of Bone; Function of Bones', On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book I: The Bones and Cartilages (1998), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Acute (6)  |  Anatomy (59)  |  Angle (15)  |  Attached (2)  |  Bastion (2)  |  Beam (9)  |  Bend (8)  |  Boat (13)  |  Body (193)  |  Bone (57)  |  Breast (6)  |  Constituent (13)  |  Creator (40)  |  Crush (6)  |  Cut (36)  |  Defense (15)  |  Devoid (5)  |  Differentiation (17)  |  Driest (2)  |  Exception (33)  |  Fabric (13)  |  Finger (38)  |  Food (139)  |  Form (210)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Framework (15)  |  Function (90)  |  God (454)  |  Grind (8)  |  Hand (103)  |  Hardest (2)  |  Hearing (27)  |  House (36)  |  Human (445)  |  Joint (11)  |  Keel (3)  |  Move (58)  |  Natural (128)  |  Organ (60)  |  Pole (14)  |  Pound (7)  |  Process (201)  |  Professor (39)  |  Prop (6)  |  Protection (23)  |  Reason (330)  |  Rib (4)  |  Seed (52)  |  Sensation (22)  |  Sesame (2)  |  Size (47)  |  Skull (5)  |  Specification (5)  |  Spine (5)  |  Strength (63)  |  Substance (73)  |  Teeth (11)  |  Tent (4)  |  Thumb (8)  |  Toe (5)  |  Vertebra (4)  |  Wall (20)

Science is not gadgetry. The desirable adjuncts of modern living, although in many instances made possible by science, certainly do not constitute science. Basic scientific knowledge often (but not always) is a prerequisite to such developments, but technology primarily deserves the credit for having the financial courage, the ingenuity, and the driving energy to see to it that so-called ‘pure knowledge’ is in fact brought to the practical service of man. And it should also be recognized that those who have the urge to apply knowledge usefully have themselves often made significant contribution to pure knowledge and have even more often served as a stimulation to the activities of a pure researcher.
Warren Weaver (1894–1978), U.S. mathematician, scientist, educator. Science and Imagination, ch. 1, Basic Books (1967).
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Adjunct (3)  |  Apply (38)  |  Basic (52)  |  Bring (53)  |  Certainly (18)  |  Constitute (19)  |  Contribution (49)  |  Courage (39)  |  Credit (16)  |  Deserve (14)  |  Desirable (5)  |  Development (228)  |  Drive (38)  |  Energy (185)  |  Fact (609)  |  Financial (5)  |  Ingenuity (27)  |  Instance (18)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Live (186)  |  Modern (104)  |  Often (69)  |  Possible (100)  |  Practical (93)  |  Prerequisite (4)  |  Primarily (9)  |  Pure (62)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Researcher (17)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Knowledge (5)  |  See (197)  |  Service (54)  |  Significant (26)  |  So-Called (18)  |  Stimulation (12)  |  Technology (199)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Urge (10)

The fact that, with respect to size, the viruses overlapped with the organisms of the biologist at one extreme and with the molecules of the chemist at the other extreme only served to heighten the mystery regarding the nature of viruses. Then too, it became obvious that a sharp line dividing living from non-living things could not be drawn and this fact served to add fuel for discussion of the age-old question of “What is life?”
Nobel Lecture (12 Dec 1946), 'The Isolation and Properties of Crystalline Tobacco Mosaic Virus', collected in Nobel Lectures in Chemistry (1999), 140.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (26)  |  Ancient (68)  |  Become (100)  |  Biologist (31)  |  Chemist (79)  |  Discussion (37)  |  Divide (24)  |  Draw (25)  |  Extreme (36)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fuel (27)  |  Life (917)  |  Line (44)  |  Live (186)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Non-Living (3)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Organism (126)  |  Overlap (4)  |  Question (315)  |  Regard (58)  |  Respect (57)  |  Sharp (12)  |  Size (47)  |  Virus (22)

The knowledge we have aquired ought not to resemble a great shop without order, and without inventory; we ought to know what we possess, and be able to make it serve us in our need.
In Hialmer Day Gould, New Practical Spelling (1905), 27
Science quotes on:  |  Great (300)  |  Inventory (6)  |  Know (321)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Need (211)  |  Order (167)  |  Possess (19)  |  Resemble (16)  |  Shop (11)

The power that produced Man when the monkey was not up to the mark, can produce a higher creature than Man if Man does not come up to the mark. What it means is that if Man is to be saved, Man must save himself. There seems no compelling reason why he should be saved. He is by no means an ideal creature. At his present best many of his ways are so unpleasant that they are unmentionable in polite society, and so painful that he is compelled to pretend that pain is often a good. Nature holds no brief for the human experiment: it must stand or fall by its results. If Man will not serve, Nature will try another experiment.
Back to Methuselah: a Metabiological Pentateuch (1921), xvii.
Science quotes on:  |  Another (7)  |  Best (129)  |  Brief (14)  |  Compelling (7)  |  Creature (127)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Fall (89)  |  Good (228)  |  Higher (28)  |  Himself (10)  |  Human (445)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Man (345)  |  Mark (28)  |  Monkey (37)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Pain (82)  |  Pleasant (16)  |  Polite (6)  |  Power (273)  |  Present (103)  |  Pretend (14)  |  Production (105)  |  Reason (330)  |  Result (250)  |  Save (46)  |  Society (188)  |  Stand (60)

The reason I cannot really say that I positively enjoy nature is that I do not quite realize what it is that I enjoy. A work of art, on the other hand, I can grasp. I can — if I may put it this way — find that Archimedian point, and as soon as I have found it, everything is readily clear for me. Then I am able to pursue this one main idea and see how all the details serve to illuminate it.
Søren Kierkegaard, translation by Howard Vincent Hong and Edna Hatlestad Hong Søren Kierkegaard’s Journal and Papers (1834), 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Archimedes (22)  |  Art (205)  |  Clear (52)  |  Detail (65)  |  Enjoy (23)  |  Find (248)  |  Grasp (43)  |  Idea (440)  |  Illuminate (12)  |  Nature (1029)  |  On The Other Hand (16)  |  Point (72)  |  Positively (2)  |  Pursue (10)  |  Realize (43)  |  Reason (330)  |  Say (126)

The scientist is not responsible for the laws of nature. It is his job to find out how these laws operate. It is the scientist’s job to find the ways in which these laws can serve the human will. However, it is not the scientist’s job to determine whether a hydrogen bomb should be constructed, whether it should be used, or how it should be used. This responsibility rests with the American people and with their chosen representatives.
In 'Back to the Laboratories', Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Mar 1950), 6, No. 3, 71. Quoted in L. Wolpert and A. Richards (eds.), A Passion for Science (1988), 9, but incorrectly attributed to Robert Oppenheimer.
Science quotes on:  |  American (34)  |  Choice (64)  |  Find (248)  |  Hydrogen Bomb (7)  |  Job (33)  |  Law Of Nature (52)  |  People (269)  |  Representative (9)  |  Responsibility (47)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Use (70)  |  Will (29)

The surgeon is a man of action. By temperament and by training he prefers to serve the sick by operating on them, and he inwardly commiserates with a patient so unfortunate as to have a disease not suited to surgical treatment. Young surgeons, busy mastering the technicalities of the art, are particularly alert to seize every legitimate opportunity to practice technical maneuvers, the more complicated the better.
American Journal of Surgery.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Alert (5)  |  Art (205)  |  Better (131)  |  Busy (21)  |  Complicated (38)  |  Disease (257)  |  Legitimate (8)  |  Maneuver (2)  |  Master (55)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Operate (12)  |  Opportunity (43)  |  Particularly (12)  |  Patient (116)  |  Practice (67)  |  Prefer (18)  |  Seize (10)  |  Sick (23)  |  Suit (7)  |  Surgeon (43)  |  Surgical (2)  |  Technical (26)  |  Technicality (4)  |  Temperament (8)  |  Training (39)  |  Treatment (88)  |  Unfortunate (6)  |  Young (72)

The whale that wanders round the Pole
Is not a table fish.
You cannot bake or boil him whole
Nor serve him in a dish.
Science quotes on:  |  Boil (9)  |  Dish (2)  |  Fish (85)  |  Marine Biology (23)  |  Whale (21)  |  Whole (122)

There are those who say that the human kidney was created to keep the blood pure, or more precisely, to keep our internal environment in an ideal balanced state. This I must deny. I grant that the human kidney is a marvelous organ, but I cannot grant that it was purposefully designed to excrete urine or to regulate the composition of the blood or to subserve the physiological welfare of Homo sapiens in any sense. Rather I contend that the human kidney manufactures the kind of urine that it does, and it maintains the blood in the composition which that fluid has, because this kidney has a certain functional architecture; and it owes that architecture not to design or foresight or to any plan, but to the fact that the earth is an unstable sphere with a fragile crust, to the geologic revolutions that for six hundred million years have raised and lowered continents and seas, to the predacious enemies, and heat and cold, and storms and droughts; to the unending succession of vicissitudes that have driven the mutant vertebrates from sea into fresh water, into desiccated swamps, out upon the dry land, from one habitation to another, perpetually in search of the free and independent life, perpetually failing, for one reason or another, to find it.
From Fish to Philosopher (1953), 210-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Architecture (35)  |  Balance (43)  |  Blood (95)  |  Cold (38)  |  Composition (52)  |  Contention (7)  |  Continent (39)  |  Creation (211)  |  Crust (17)  |  Denial (13)  |  Design (92)  |  Drought (9)  |  Dry (12)  |  Earth (487)  |  Enemy (52)  |  Environment (138)  |  Excretion (4)  |  Fact (609)  |  Failure (118)  |  Fluid (18)  |  Foresight (4)  |  Free (59)  |  Fresh (21)  |  Function (90)  |  Geology (187)  |  Grant (21)  |  Habitation (3)  |  Heat (90)  |  Homo Sapiens (19)  |  Human (445)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Independent (41)  |  Internal (18)  |  Keep (47)  |  Kidney (13)  |  Land (83)  |  Life (917)  |  Lowering (4)  |  Maintenance (13)  |  Manufacturing (21)  |  Marvel (24)  |  Organ (60)  |  Perpetual (10)  |  Physiology (66)  |  Plan (69)  |  Predator (5)  |  Purity (13)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Raise (20)  |  Reason (330)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Revolution (56)  |  French Saying (61)  |  Sea (143)  |  Search (85)  |  Sense (240)  |  Sphere (40)  |  State (96)  |  Storm (19)  |  Succession (39)  |  Swamp (5)  |  Unstable (8)  |  Vertebrate (13)  |  Vicissitude (4)  |  Water (244)  |  Welfare (16)

We are a caring nation, and our values should also guide us on how we harness the gifts of science. New medical breakthroughs bring the hope of cures for terrible diseases and treatments that can improve the lives of millions. Our challenge is to make sure that science serves the cause of humanity instead of the other way around.
Telephone remarks to the March for Life, in Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: George W. Bush, 2007 (), Book I)President Calls March for Life Participants (22 Jan 2007), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Breakthrough (13)  |  Cause (231)  |  Challenge (37)  |  Cure (88)  |  Disease (257)  |  Gift (47)  |  Guide (46)  |  Harness (15)  |  Hope (129)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Improve (39)  |  Life (917)  |  Medical (18)  |  Million (89)  |  Nation (111)  |  Science (1699)  |  Terrible (14)  |  Treatment (88)  |  Value (180)

We men who serve science serve only a reflection in a mirror.
In Alone (1938), 179.
Science quotes on:  |  Mirror (21)  |  Reflection (50)  |  Science (1699)

We should like to propose instead that the specificity of DNA self replication is accomplished without recourse to specific protein synthesis and that each of our complementary DNA chains serves as a template or mould for the formation onto itself of a new companion chain.
[Co-author with Francis Crick]
In James D. Watson and Francis H. C. Crick, 'The Structure of DNA', Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology (1953), 18, 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (57)  |  Companion (7)  |  Complementary (8)  |  DNA (67)  |  Formation (54)  |  Mold (26)  |  New (340)  |  Proposal (10)  |  Protein (43)  |  Recourse (6)  |  Replication (7)  |  Self (39)  |  Specific (30)  |  Synthesis (38)  |  Template (3)

When the body becomes Your mirror,
how can it serve?
When the mind becomes Your mind,
what is left to remember?
Once my life is Your gesture,
how can I pray?
When all my awareness is Yours,
what can there be to know?
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 190
Science quotes on:  |  Awareness (23)  |  Become (100)  |  Body (193)  |  Gesture (2)  |  Know (321)  |  Leave (63)  |  Life (917)  |  Mind (544)  |  Mirror (21)  |  Pray (13)  |  Remember (53)

[In] the realm of science, ... what we have achieved will be obsolete in ten, twenty or fifty years. That is the fate, indeed, that is the very meaning of scientific work. ... Every scientific “fulfillment” raises new “questions” and cries out to be surpassed rendered obsolete. Everyone who wishes to serve science has to resign himself to this.
Max Weber
The Vocation Lectures: Science as a Vocation, translated by Rodney Livingstone (2004), xxviii.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  Fate (38)  |  Fulfillment (9)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Obsolete (7)  |  Question (315)  |  Raise (20)  |  Realm (40)  |  Render (17)  |  Resign (2)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Surpass (12)  |  Wish (62)  |  Work (457)  |  Year (214)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

who invites your feedback

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.