Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: Face

Face Quotes (69 quotes)

Changements arrivées dans le globe: Quand on a vu de ses yeux une montagne s’avancer dans une plaine, c’est-à-dire un immense rocher de cette montagne se détacher et couvrir des champs, un château tout entier enfoncé dans la terre, un fleuve englouti qui sort ensuite de son abîme, des marques indubitables qu’un vaste amas d’eau inondait autrefois un pays habité aujourd’hui, et cent vestiges d’autres révolutions, on est alors plus disposé à croire les grands changements qui ont altéré la face du monde, que ne l’est une dame de Paris qui sait seulement que la place où est bâtie sa maison était autrefois un champ labourable. Mais une dame de Naples, qui a vu sous terre les ruines d’Herculanum, est encore moins asservie au préjugé qui nous fait croire que tout a toujours été comme il est aujourd’hui.
Changes That Have Occurred in the Globe: When we have seen with our own eyes a mountain progressing into a plain; that is to say, an immense boulder separating from this mountain and covering the fields; an entire castle broken into pieces over the ground; a river swallowed up which then bursts out from its abyss; clear marks of a vast amount of water having once flooded regions now inhabited, and a hundred vestiges of other transformations, then we are much more willing to believe that great changes altered the face of the earth, than a Parisian lady who knows only that the place where her house was built was once a cultivated field. However, a lady from Naples who has seen the buried ruins of Herculaneum, is much less subject to the bias which leads us to believe that everything has always been as it is today.
From article 'Changements arrivées dans le globe', in Dictionnaire philosophique (1764), collected in Œuvres Complètes de Voltaire (1878), Vol. 2, 427-428. Translated by Ian Ellis.
Science quotes on:  |  Abyss (20)  |  Alteration (22)  |  Belief (400)  |  Bias (15)  |  Boulder (5)  |  Breaking (3)  |  Built (7)  |  Buried (2)  |  Castle (4)  |  Change (291)  |  Country (121)  |  Cover (23)  |  Disappearance (21)  |  Earth (487)  |  Entire (29)  |  Erosion (18)  |  Eye (159)  |  Field (119)  |  Flood (26)  |  Geologic History (2)  |  Herculaneum (2)  |  House (36)  |  Inhabitation (2)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Lady (6)  |  Land (83)  |  Mark (28)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Move (58)  |  Paris (9)  |  Place (111)  |  Plain (24)  |  River (68)  |  Rock (107)  |  Ruin (23)  |  Sinking (6)  |  Today (86)  |  Transformation (47)  |  Vast (56)  |  Vestige (4)  |  Water (244)

Quelquefois, par exemple, je me figure que je suis suspendu en l’air, et que j’y demeure sans mouvement, pendant que la Terre tourne sous moi en vingt-quatre heures. Je vois passer sous mes yeux tous ces visages différents, les uns blancs, les autres noirs, les autres basanés, les autres olivâtres. D’abord ce sont des chapeaux et puis des turbans, et puis des têtes chevelues, et puis des têtes rasées; tantôt des villes à clochers, tantôt des villes à longues aiguilles qui ont des croissants, tantôt des villes à tours de porcelaine, tantôt de grands pays qui n’ont que des cabanes; ici de vastes mers, là des déserts épouvantables; enfin, toute cette variété infinie qui est sur la surface de la Terre.
Sometimes, for instance, I imagine that I am suspended in the air, and remain there motionless, while the earth turns under me in four-and-twenty hours. I see pass beneath me all these different countenances, some white, others black, others tawny, others olive-colored. At first they wear hats, and then turbans, then heads with long hair, then heads shaven; sometimes towns with steeples, sometimes towns with long spires, which have crescents, sometimes towns with porcelain towers, sometimes extensive countries that have only huts; here wide seas; there frightful deserts; in short, all this infinite variety on the surface of the earth.
In 'Premier Soir', Entretiens Sur La Pluralité Des Mondes (1686, 1863), 43. French and translation in Craufurd Tait Ramage, Beautiful Thoughts from French and Italian Authors (1866), 117-118.
Science quotes on:  |  Black (27)  |  Country (121)  |  Crescent (2)  |  Desert (27)  |  Earth (487)  |  Hair (19)  |  Hat (8)  |  Hut (2)  |  Imagine (40)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Porcelain (4)  |  Sea (143)  |  Space Flight (21)  |  Spire (4)  |  Steeple (3)  |  Surface (74)  |  Tawny (2)  |  Tower (12)  |  Variety (53)  |  White (38)

Question: Show how the hypothenuse face of a right-angled prism may be used as a reflector. What connection is there between the refractive index of a medium and the angle at which an emergent ray is totally reflected?
Answer: Any face of any prism may be used as a reflector. The con nexion between the refractive index of a medium and the angle at which an emergent ray does not emerge but is totally reflected is remarkable and not generally known.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 182-3, Question 29. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Angle (15)  |  Answer (201)  |  Connection (86)  |  Emergent (3)  |  Examination (60)  |  Howler (15)  |  Hypotenuse (3)  |  Index (2)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Medium (12)  |  Prism (4)  |  Question (315)  |  Ray (32)  |  Reflection (50)  |  Reflector (3)  |  Refraction (7)  |  Remarkable (34)  |  Show (55)  |  Total (29)

A discovery is like falling in love and reaching the top of a mountain after a hard climb all in one, an ecstasy not induced by drugs but by the revelation of a face of nature that no one has seen before and that often turns out to be more subtle and wonderful than anyone had imagined.
'True Science', review of Peter Medawar, Advice to a Young Scientist (1980). In The London Review of Books (Mar 1981), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Climb (14)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Drug (40)  |  Ecstasy (5)  |  Fall (89)  |  Hard (70)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Inducement (3)  |  Love (164)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Reach (68)  |  Revelation (29)  |  Wonder (134)

Across the road from my cabin was a huge clear-cut—hundreds of acres of massive spruce stumps interspersed with tiny Douglas firs—products of what they call “Reforestation,” which I guess makes the spindly firs en masse a “Reforest,” which makes an individual spindly fir a “Refir,” which means you could say that Weyerhauser, who owns the joint, has Refir Madness, since they think that sawing down 200-foot-tall spruces and replacing them with puling 2-foot Refirs is no different from farming beans or corn or alfalfa. They even call the towering spires they wipe from the Earth's face forever a “crop”--as if they'd planted the virgin forest! But I'm just a fisherman and may be missing some deeper significance in their nomenclature and stranger treatment of primordial trees.
In David James Duncan, The River Why (1983), 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Acre (7)  |  Bean (3)  |  Cabin (3)  |  Call (68)  |  Clear-Cut (7)  |  Corn (10)  |  Crop (16)  |  Deeper (3)  |  Difference (208)  |  Douglas Fir (2)  |  Earth (487)  |  Farming (7)  |  Fisherman (4)  |  Forever (42)  |  Hundred (46)  |  Individual (177)  |  Madness (26)  |  Massive (2)  |  Miss (16)  |  Nomenclature (129)  |  Plant (173)  |  Primordial (7)  |  Product (72)  |  Reforestation (3)  |  Replacement (8)  |  Road (47)  |  Significance (60)  |  Spire (4)  |  Stranger (9)  |  Stump (2)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Tiny (25)  |  Towering (4)  |  Treatment (88)  |  Tree (143)

And from my pillow, looking forth by light
Of moon or favouring stars, I could behold
The antechapel where the statue stood
Of Newton with his prism and silent face,
The marble index of a mind for ever
Voyaging through strange seas of Thought, alone.
'Residence at Cambridge', The Prelude, or, Growth of a Poet's Mind: An Autobiographical Poem (1850), Book 3, 57-58.
Science quotes on:  |  Chapel (2)  |  Index (2)  |  Marble (10)  |  Moon (132)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (258)  |  Pillow (2)  |  Poem (85)  |  Prism (4)  |  Silence (32)  |  Star (251)  |  Statue (9)  |  Thought (374)

Apprehension, uncertainty, waiting, expectation, fear of surprise, do a patient more harm than any exertion. Remember he is face to face with his enemy all the time.
In Notes on Nursing: What it is, and What it is Not (1860), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  Apprehension (9)  |  Enemy (52)  |  Exertion (8)  |  Expectation (46)  |  Fear (113)  |  Harm (31)  |  Patient (116)  |  Remember (53)  |  Surprise (44)  |  Uncertainty (37)  |  Waiting (9)

Art has a double face, of expression and illusion, just like science has a double face: the reality of error and the phantom of truth.
'The Lie of the Truth'. (1938) translated by Phil Powrie (1989). In Carol A. Dingle, Memorable Quotations (2000), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Double (12)  |  Error (230)  |  Expression (82)  |  Illusion (38)  |  Phantom (5)  |  Reality (140)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Truth (750)

At first, the sea, the earth, and the heaven, which covers all things, were the only face of nature throughout the whole universe, which men have named Chaos; a rude and undigested mass, and nothing more than an inert weight, and the discordant atoms of things not harmonizing, heaped together in the same spot.
Describing the creation of the universe from chaos, at the beginning of Book I of Metamorphoses, lines 5-9. As translated by Henry T. Riley, The Metamorphoses of Ovid, Vol I: Books I-VII (1858), 1-2. Riley footnoted: “A rude and undigested mass.—Ver. 7. This is very similar to the words of the Scriptures, ‘And the earth was without form and void,’ Genesis, ch. i. ver. 2.”
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Creation (211)  |  Discord (9)  |  Earth (487)  |  First (174)  |  Harmonize (4)  |  Heap (12)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Inert (9)  |  Mass (61)  |  Name (118)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Rude (5)  |  Sea (143)  |  Throughout (2)  |  Together (48)  |  Undigested (2)  |  Universe (563)  |  Weight (61)

Before the seas, and this terrestrial ball,
And Heav’n’s high canopy, that covers all,
One was the face of Nature; if a face:
Rather a rude and indigested mass:
A lifeless lump, unfashion’d, and unfram’d,
Of jarring seeds; and justly Chaos nam’d.
As translated by John Dryden, et al. and Sir Samuel Garth (ed.), Metamorphoses (1998), 3. Ovid started writing the 14 books of Metamorphoses in about 1 a.d.. Dryden died in 1700. He had translated about one-third of the full Metamorphoses. His work was finished by others, and the translation was published in 1717.
Science quotes on:  |  Ball (20)  |  Canopy (3)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Cover (23)  |  Digested (2)  |  Frame (17)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Jar (9)  |  Justly (3)  |  Lifeless (10)  |  Lump (2)  |  Mass (61)  |  Name (118)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Rude (5)  |  Sea (143)  |  Seed (52)  |  Terrestrial (14)

But here it may be objected, that the present Earth looks like a heap of Rubbish and Ruines; And that there are no greater examples of confusion in Nature than Mountains singly or jointly considered; and that there appear not the least footsteps of any Art or Counsel either in the Figure and Shape, or Order and Disposition of Mountains and Rocks. Wherefore it is not likely they came so out of God's hands ... To which I answer, That the present face of the Earth with all its Mountains and Hills, its Promontaries and Rocks, as rude and deformed as they appear, seems to me a very beautiful and pleasant object, and with all the variety of Hills, and Valleys, and Inequalities far more grateful to behold, than a perfectly level Countrey without any rising or protuberancy, to terminate the sight: As anyone that hath but seen the Isle of Ely, or any the like Countrey must need acknowledge.
John Ray
Miscellaneous Discourses Concerning the Dissolution and Changes of the World (1692), 165-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledgment (10)  |  Appearance (77)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Confusion (34)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Country (121)  |  Deformation (3)  |  Disposition (14)  |  Earth (487)  |  Example (57)  |  Figure (32)  |  Footstep (5)  |  God (454)  |  Gratitude (10)  |  Hand (103)  |  Heap (12)  |  Hill (19)  |  Inequality (6)  |  Isle (4)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Objection (16)  |  Order (167)  |  Pleasantness (3)  |  Present (103)  |  Promontory (2)  |  Rise (51)  |  Rock (107)  |  Rubbish (8)  |  Rudeness (5)  |  Ruin (23)  |  Shape (52)  |  Sight (25)  |  Termination (3)  |  Valley (16)

Empirical sciences prosecuted purely for their own sake, and without philosophic tendency are like a face without eyes.
The World as Will and Idea translated by Richard Burdon Haldane Haldane, John Kemp (3rd. Ed.,1888), Vol. 2, 318-319.
Science quotes on:  |  Empirical (15)  |  Eye (159)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Prosecute (3)  |  Sake (17)  |  Science (1699)  |  Tendency (40)

Every living language, like the perspiring bodies of living creatures, is in perpetual motion and alteration; some words go off, and become obsolete; others are taken in, and by degrees grow into common use; or the same word is inverted to a new sense and notion, which in tract of time makes as observable a change in the air and features of a language as age makes in the lines and mien of a face.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (22)  |  Creature (127)  |  Language (155)  |  Obsolete (7)  |  Perpetual Motion (7)  |  Word (221)

Facts are certainly the solid and true foundation of all sectors of nature study ... Reasoning must never find itself contradicting definite facts; but reasoning must allow us to distinguish, among facts that have been reported, those that we can fully believe, those that are questionable, and those that are false. It will not allow us to lend faith to those that are directly contrary to others whose certainty is known to us; it will not allow us to accept as true those that fly in the face of unquestionable principles.
Memoires pour Servir a l'Histoire des Insectes (1736), Vol. 2, xxxiv. Quoted in Jacques Roger, The Life Sciences in Eighteenth-Century French Thought, ed. Keith R. Benson and trans. Robert Ellrich (1997), 165.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Certainty (97)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Fact (609)  |  Faith (131)  |  Falsity (12)  |  Fly (65)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Principle (228)  |  Questionable (3)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Report (31)  |  Sector (3)  |  Solidity (2)  |  Study (331)  |  Truth (750)  |  Unquestionable (6)

For they are not given to idleness, nor go in a proud habit, or plush and velvet garments, often showing their rings upon their fingers, or wearing swords with silver hilts by their sides, or fine and gay gloves upon their hands, but diligently follow their labours, sweating whole days and nights by their furnaces. They do not spend their time abroad for recreation, but take delight in their laboratory. They wear leather garments with a pouch, and an apron wherewith they wipe their hands. They put their fingers amongst coals, into clay, and filth, not into gold rings. They are sooty and black like smiths and colliers, and do not pride themselves upon clean and beautiful faces.
As translated in Paracelsus and Arthur Edward Waite (ed.), The Hermetic and Alchemical Writings of Paracelsus (1894, 1976), Vol. 1, 167.
Science quotes on:  |  Abroad (5)  |  Apron (2)  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Blacksmith (4)  |  Clay (9)  |  Clean (20)  |  Coal (41)  |  Day And Night (2)  |  Delight (51)  |  Diligence (14)  |  Filth (4)  |  Furnace (10)  |  Garment (6)  |  Glove (3)  |  Gold (55)  |  Habit (78)  |  Idleness (8)  |  Laboratory (120)  |  Labour (36)  |  Leather (3)  |  Pride (45)  |  Recreation (11)  |  Ring (14)  |  Silver (26)  |  Soot (7)  |  Sweat (12)  |  Sword (12)  |  Velvet (3)  |  Wear (12)  |  Wipe (6)

I am truly a ‘lone traveler’ and have never belonged to my country, my home, my friends, or even my immediate family, with my whole heart; in the face of all these ties, I have never lost a sense of distance and a need for solitude.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (33)  |  Country (121)  |  Distance (54)  |  Family (37)  |  Friend (63)  |  Heart (110)  |  Home (58)  |  Immediate (27)  |  Lose (53)  |  Need (211)  |  Sense (240)  |  Solitude (10)  |  Tie (21)  |  Traveler (18)  |  Truly (19)  |  Whole (122)

I can see him now at the blackboard, chalk in one hand and rubber in the other, writing rapidly and erasing recklessly, pausing every few minutes to face the class and comment earnestly, perhaps on the results of an elaborate calculation, perhaps on the greatness of the Creator, perhaps on the beauty and grandeur of Mathematics, always with a capital M. To him mathematics was not the handmaid of philosophy. It was not a humanly devised instrument of investigation, it was Philosophy itself, the divine revealer of TRUTH.
Writing as a Professor Emeritus at Harvard University, a former student of Peirce, in 'Benjamin Peirce: II. Reminiscences', The American Mathematical Monthly (Jan 1925), 32, No. 1, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (171)  |  Blackboard (6)  |  Calculation (67)  |  Capital (15)  |  Chalk (4)  |  Class (64)  |  Comment (8)  |  Creator (40)  |  Devised (3)  |  Divine (42)  |  Earnestly (3)  |  Elaborate (13)  |  Grandeur (15)  |  Greatness (34)  |  Handmaid (4)  |  Humanly (4)  |  Instrument (73)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Minute (25)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Rapidly (10)  |  Recklessly (2)  |  Result (250)  |  Rubber (3)  |  Truth (750)  |  Writing (72)

I gang my own gait and have never belonged to my country, my home, my friends, or even my immediate family, with my whole heart; in the face of all these ties I have never lost an obstinate sense of detachment, of the need for solitude–a feeling which increases with the years.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (33)  |  Country (121)  |  Detachment (3)  |  Family (37)  |  Feel (93)  |  Friend (63)  |  Gang (3)  |  Heart (110)  |  Home (58)  |  Immediate (27)  |  Increase (107)  |  Lose (53)  |  Need (211)  |  Obstinate (4)  |  Sense (240)  |  Solitude (10)  |  Tie (21)  |  Whole (122)  |  Year (214)

I have from my childhood, in conformity with the precepts of a mother void of all imaginary fear, been in the constant habit of taking toads in my hand, and applying them to my nose and face as it may happen. My motive for doing this very frequently is to inculcate the opinion I have held, since I was told by my mother, that the toad is actually a harmless animal; and to whose manner of life man is certainly under some obligation as its food is chiefly those insects which devour his crops and annoy him in various ways.
Letter to an unknown correspondent, quoted by Bowdler Sharpe, The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne (1900), Vol. 1, 69. In Averil M. Lysaght, Joseph Banks in Newfoundland and Labrador, 1766: his Diary, Manuscripts, and Collections (1971), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Annoyance (3)  |  Biography (227)  |  Childhood (23)  |  Conformity (9)  |  Crop (16)  |  Fear (113)  |  Habit (78)  |  Harmless (6)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Inculcate (5)  |  Insect (57)  |  Mother (59)  |  Motive (26)  |  Nose (9)  |  Obligation (13)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Precept (6)  |  Toad (7)  |  Void (17)

I have never looked upon ease and happiness as ends in themselves–this critical basis I call the ideal of a pigsty. The ideals that have lighted my way, and time after time have given me new courage to face life cheerfully, have been Kindness, Beauty, and Truth. Without the sense of kinship with men of like mind, without the occupation with the objective world, the eternally unattainable in the field of art and scientific endeavors, life would have seemed empty to me. The trite objects of human efforts–possessions, outward success, luxury–have always seemed to me contemptible.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Basis (60)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Call (68)  |  Cheerfully (2)  |  Contemptible (7)  |  Courage (39)  |  Critical (34)  |  Ease (29)  |  Effort (94)  |  Empty (26)  |  End (141)  |  Endeavor (33)  |  Eternally (3)  |  Field (119)  |  Give (117)  |  Happiness (82)  |  Human (445)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Kindness (10)  |  Kinship (3)  |  Life (917)  |  Light (246)  |  Luxury (12)  |  Mind (544)  |  New (340)  |  Object (110)  |  Objective (49)  |  Occupation (37)  |  Outward (3)  |  Possession (37)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Seem (89)  |  Sense (240)  |  Success (202)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Time (439)  |  Trite (2)  |  Truth (750)  |  Unattainable (6)  |  World (667)

I prefer not to eat food that has a face.
'Holy cow! We’re crazy to farm livestock like this', in The Times (16 Oct 2007)
Science quotes on:  |  Eat (38)  |  Food (139)  |  Meat (11)  |  Vegetarian (9)

If that's how it all started, then we might as well face the fact that what's left out there is a great deal of shrapnel and a whole bunch of cinders (one of which is, fortunately, still hot enough and close enough to be good for tanning). Trying to find some sense and order in this mess may be as futile as trying to … reconstruct the economy of Iowa from a bowl of popcorn. [On searching for evidence of the Big Bang.]
From essay 'First Person Secular: Blocking the Gates to Heaven', Mother Jones Magazine (Jun 1986), 48. Collected in The Worst Years of our Lives: Irreverent Notes from a Decade of Greed (1995), 267.
Science quotes on:  |  Big Bang (38)  |  Bowl (2)  |  Bunch (5)  |  Cinder (5)  |  Close (40)  |  Economy (46)  |  Find (248)  |  Futility (5)  |  Hot (17)  |  Left (13)  |  Mess (10)  |  Order (167)  |  Origin Of The Universe (13)  |  Reconstruction (13)  |  Sense (240)  |  Start (68)  |  Tanning (3)  |  Try (103)  |  Universe (563)

In human freedom in the philosophical sense I am definitely a disbeliever. Everybody acts not only under external compulsion but also in accordance with inner necessity. Schopenhauer’s saying, that ‘a man can do as he will, but not will as he will,’ has been an inspiration to me since my youth up, and a continual consolation and unfailing well-spring of patience in the face of the hardships of life, my own and others’. This feeling mercifully mitigates the sense of responsibility which so easily becomes paralysing, and it prevents us from taking ourselves and other people too seriously; it conduces to a view of life in which humour, above all, has its due place.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accordance (8)  |  Act (80)  |  Become (100)  |  Compulsion (11)  |  Conduce (2)  |  Consolation (7)  |  Continual (13)  |  Definitely (3)  |  Due (4)  |  Easily (16)  |  Everybody (16)  |  External (45)  |  Feel (93)  |  Freedom (76)  |  Human (445)  |  Humour (101)  |  Inner (27)  |  Inspiration (50)  |  Life (917)  |  Mitigate (2)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Ourselves (34)  |  Patience (31)  |  People (269)  |  Philosophical (14)  |  Place (111)  |  Prevent (27)  |  Responsibility (47)  |  Say (126)  |  Schopenhauers (2)  |  Sense (240)  |  Seriously (13)  |  Unfailing (3)  |  View (115)  |  Youth (57)

In light of new knowledge ... an eventual world state is not just desirable in the name of brotherhood, it is necessary for survival ... Today we must abandon competition and secure cooperation. This must be the central fact in all our considerations of international affairs; otherwise we face certain disaster. Past thinking and methods did not prevent world wars. Future thinking must prevent wars.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (37)  |  Affair (24)  |  Brotherhood (5)  |  Central (23)  |  Certain (84)  |  Competition (26)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Cooperation (27)  |  Desirable (5)  |  Disaster (36)  |  Eventual (5)  |  Fact (609)  |  Future (229)  |  International (18)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Light (246)  |  Method (154)  |  Name (118)  |  Necessary (89)  |  New (340)  |  Otherwise (16)  |  Past (109)  |  Prevent (27)  |  Secure (13)  |  State (96)  |  Survival (49)  |  Think (205)  |  Today (86)  |  War (144)  |  World (667)

In our way of life … with every decision we make, we always keep in mind the seventh generation of children to come. … When we walk upon Mother Earth, we always plant our feet carefully, because we know that the faces of future generations are looking up at us from beneath the ground. We never forget them.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beneath (6)  |  Carefully (9)  |  Child (189)  |  Decision (58)  |  Earth (487)  |  Foot (39)  |  Forget (40)  |  Future (229)  |  Generation (111)  |  Ground (63)  |  Keep (47)  |  Know (321)  |  Mind (544)  |  Mother (59)  |  Plant (173)  |  Walk (56)  |  Way Of Life (5)

In the beginning God created Heaven and Earth … Which beginning of time, according to our Cronologie, fell upon the entrance of the night preceding the twenty third day of Octob. in the year of the Julian Calendar, 710 [or 4004 B.C.]. Upon the first day therefore of the world, or Octob. 23. being our Sunday, God, together with the highest Heaven, created the Angels. Then having finished, as it were, the roofe of this building, he fell in hand with the foundation of this wonderfull Fabrick of the World, he fashioned this lowermost Globe, consisting of the Deep, and of the Earth; all the Quire of Angels singing together and magnifying his name therefore … And when the Earth was void and without forme, and darknesse covered the face of the Deepe, on the very middle of the first day, the light was created; which God severing from the darknesses, called the one day, and the other night.
In 'Annals of the Old Testament', The Annals of the World (1658), excerpted in Louis A. Ruprecht, God Gardened East: A Gardener's Meditation on the Dynamics of Genesis (2008), 53-54.
Science quotes on:  |  Angel (25)  |  Beginning (114)  |  Calendar (5)  |  Creation (211)  |  Darkness (25)  |  Day (38)  |  Earth (487)  |  Fabric (13)  |  Fall (89)  |  Fashion (24)  |  Finish (16)  |  Form (210)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Globe (39)  |  God (454)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Light (246)  |  Magnifying (2)  |  Name (118)  |  Night (73)  |  October (3)  |  Roof (10)  |  Singing (6)  |  Sunday (6)  |  Time (439)  |  Void (17)  |  Wonder (134)  |  World (667)  |  Year (214)

In the twenties the late Dr. Glenn Frank, an eminent social scientist, developed a new statement of the scientific code, which has been referred to as the “Five Fingers of the Scientific Method.” It may be outlined as follows: find the facts; filter the facts; focus the facts; face the facts; follow the facts. The facts or truths are found by experimentation; the motivation is material. The facts are filtered by research into the literature; the motivation is material. The facts are focused by the publication of results; again the motivation is material. Thus the first three-fifths of the scientific method have a material motivation. It is about time scientists acknowledge that there is more to the scientific convention than the material aspect. Returning to the fourth and fifth fingers of Dr. Frank's conception of the scientific method, the facts should be faced by the proper interpretation of them for society. In other words, a scientist must assume social responsibility for his discoveries, which means that he must have a moral motivation. Finally, in the fifth definition of the scientific method, the facts are to be followed by their proper application to everyday life in society, which means moral motivation through responsibility to society.
From 'Scientists and Society', American Scientist (Jul 1954), 42, No. 3, 495.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledgment (10)  |  Application (117)  |  Definition (152)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Everyday Life (4)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Fact (609)  |  Filter (6)  |  Find (248)  |  Focus (21)  |  Follow (66)  |  Glenn Frank (3)  |  Interpretation (61)  |  Literature (64)  |  Material (124)  |  Moral (100)  |  Motivation (21)  |  Publication (83)  |  Research (517)  |  Responsibility (47)  |  Result (250)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Social Scientist (3)  |  Society (188)  |  Truth (750)

It is for such inquiries the modern naturalist collects his materials; it is for this that he still wants to add to the apparently boundless treasures of our national museums, and will never rest satisfied as long as the native country, the geographical distribution, and the amount of variation of any living thing remains imperfectly known. He looks upon every species of animal and plant now living as the individual letters which go to make up one of the volumes of our earth’s history; and, as a few lost letters may make a sentence unintelligible, so the extinction of the numerous forms of life which the progress of cultivation invariably entails will necessarily render obscure this invaluable record of the past. It is, therefore, an important object, which governments and scientific institutions should immediately take steps to secure, that in all tropical countries colonised by Europeans the most perfect collections possible in every branch of natural history should be made and deposited in national museums, where they may be available for study and interpretation. If this is not done, future ages will certainly look back upon us as a people so immersed in the pursuit of wealth as to be blind to higher considerations. They will charge us with having culpably allowed the destruction of some of those records of Creation which we had it in our power to preserve; and while professing to regard every living thing as the direct handiwork and best evidence of a Creator, yet, with a strange inconsistency, seeing many of them perish irrecoverably from the face of the earth, uncared for and unknown.
In 'On the Physical Geography of the Malay Archipelago', Journal of the Royal Geographical Society (1863), 33, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (26)  |  Age (137)  |  Allowed (3)  |  Amount (20)  |  Animal (309)  |  Apparently (11)  |  Available (18)  |  Back (55)  |  Best (129)  |  Blind (35)  |  Boundless (11)  |  Branch (61)  |  Certainly (18)  |  Charge (29)  |  Collect (10)  |  Collection (38)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Country (121)  |  Creation (211)  |  Creator (40)  |  Cultivation (23)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Direct (44)  |  Distribution (21)  |  Earth (487)  |  Entail (4)  |  European (5)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Extinction (55)  |  Form (210)  |  Future (229)  |  Geographical (3)  |  Government (85)  |  Handiwork (5)  |  Higher (28)  |  History (302)  |  Immediately (9)  |  Important (124)  |  Inconsistency (4)  |  Individual (177)  |  Inquiry (33)  |  Institution (32)  |  Interpretation (61)  |  Invaluable (4)  |  Invariably (8)  |  Known (15)  |  Letter (36)  |  Life (917)  |  Living (44)  |  Long (95)  |  Look (46)  |  Lost (28)  |  Made (14)  |  Material (124)  |  Modern (104)  |  Museum (22)  |  National (20)  |  Native (11)  |  Natural (128)  |  Naturalist (49)  |  Necessarily (13)  |  Numerous (21)  |  Object (110)  |  Obscure (19)  |  Past (109)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Perish (23)  |  Person (114)  |  Plant (173)  |  Possible (100)  |  Power (273)  |  Preserve (38)  |  Professing (2)  |  Progress (317)  |  Pursuit (55)  |  Record (56)  |  Regard (58)  |  Remain (77)  |  Render (17)  |  Rest (64)  |  Satisfied (14)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Secure (13)  |  Seeing (48)  |  Sentence (20)  |  Species (181)  |  Step (67)  |  Strange (61)  |  Study (331)  |  Treasure (35)  |  Tropical (4)  |  Unintelligible (7)  |  Unknown (87)  |  Variation (50)  |  Volume (13)  |  Want (120)  |  Wealth (50)

Journalism must find the facts, it must not prejudge things in terms of conservatism or liberalism or radicalism; it must not decide in advance that it is to be conformist or non-conformist; it cannot fly in the face of facts without courting ultimate disaster.
Journalism must focus the facts; facts are not important for their own sake; they are important only as a basis for action; journalism must focus the facts it finds upon the issues its readers face.
Journalism must filter the facts; it must with conscientious care separate the facts from admixtures of prejudice, passion, partisanship, and selfish interest; facts that are diluted, colored, or perverted are valueless as a basis for action.
Journalism must face the facts; it must learn that the energy spent in trying to find ways to get around, under, or over the facts is wasted energy; facts have a ruthless way of winning the day sooner or later.
Journalism must follow the facts; journalism must say of facts as Job said, of God: though they slay us, yet shall we trust them; if the facts threaten to upset a paper's cherished policy, it always pays the journalist to re-examine his policy; that way lies realism, and realism is the ultimate good.
From address as president of the Wisconsin local chapter of Theta Sigma Phi, at its first annual Matrix Table (9 Jan 1926). quoted in 'Journalism News and Notes', in Robert S. Crawford (ed.), The Wisconsin Alumni Magazine (Feb 1926), 27, No. 4, 101. If you know any other example of Glenn Frank speaking about his five themes on facts, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Basis (60)  |  Energy (185)  |  Facts (3)  |  Filter (6)  |  Find (248)  |  Focus (21)  |  Follow (66)  |  Importance (183)  |  Issue (37)  |  Job (33)  |  Policy (23)  |  Realism (7)  |  Slaying (2)  |  Trust (40)  |  Waste (57)

Let him look at that dazzling light hung aloft as an eternal lamp to lighten the universe; let him behold the earth, a mere dot compared with the vast circuit which that orb describes, and stand amazed to find that the vast circuit itself is but a very fine point compared with the orbit traced by the stars as they roll their course on high. But if our vision halts there, let imagination pass beyond; it will fail to form a conception long before Nature fails to supply material. The whole visible world is but an imperceptible speck in the ample bosom of Nature. No notion comes near it. Though we may extend our thought beyond imaginable space, yet compared with reality we bring to birth mere atoms. Nature is an infinite sphere whereof the centre is everywhere, the circumference nowhere. In short, imagination is brought to silence at the thought, and that is the most perceptible sign of the all-power of God.
Let man reawake and consider what he is compared with the reality of things; regard himself lost in this remote corner of Nature; and from the tiny cell where he lodges, to wit the Universe, weigh at their true worth earth, kingdoms, towns, himself. What is a man face to face with infinity?
Pensées (1670), Section 1, aphorism 43. In H. F. Stewart (ed.), Pascal's Pensées (1950), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Aloft (4)  |  Amazement (9)  |  Ample (4)  |  Atom (251)  |  Behold (12)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Birth (81)  |  Bosom (8)  |  Cell (125)  |  Centre (19)  |  Circuit (12)  |  Circumference (12)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Conception (63)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Corner (24)  |  Course (57)  |  Dazzling (11)  |  Dot (5)  |  Earth (487)  |  Everywhere (14)  |  Failure (118)  |  God (454)  |  Halt (6)  |  Himself (10)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Imperceptibility (2)  |  Infinity (59)  |  Kingdom (34)  |  Light (246)  |  Lodge (2)  |  Look (46)  |  Lost (28)  |  Material (124)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Notion (32)  |  Nowhere (19)  |  Orb (5)  |  Pass (60)  |  Perception (53)  |  Reality (140)  |  Regard (58)  |  Remote (27)  |  Roll (7)  |  Sign (36)  |  Silence (32)  |  Space (154)  |  Speck (8)  |  Sphere (40)  |  Star (251)  |  Supply (31)  |  Thought (374)  |  Tiny (25)  |  Town (18)  |  Universe (563)  |  Vast (56)  |  Visibility (6)  |  Vision (55)  |  Worth (74)

My profession often gets bad press for a variety of sins, both actual and imagined: arrogance, venality, insensitivity to moral issues about the use of knowledge, pandering to sources of funding with insufficient worry about attendant degradation of values. As an advocate for science, I plead ‘mildly guilty now and then’ to all these charges. Scientists are human beings subject to all the foibles and temptations of ordinary life. Some of us are moral rocks; others are reeds. I like to think (though I have no proof) that we are better, on average, than members of many other callings on a variety of issues central to the practice of good science: willingness to alter received opinion in the face of uncomfortable data, dedication to discovering and publicizing our best and most honest account of nature’s factuality, judgment of colleagues on the might of their ideas rather than the power of their positions.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Account (45)  |  Actual (34)  |  Advocate (10)  |  Alter (19)  |  Arrogance (12)  |  Attendant (3)  |  Average (31)  |  Bad (78)  |  Best (129)  |  Better (131)  |  Both (52)  |  Central (23)  |  Charge (29)  |  Colleague (19)  |  Data (100)  |  Dedication (10)  |  Degradation (12)  |  Discover (115)  |  Factuality (2)  |  Foible (2)  |  Fund (12)  |  Good (228)  |  Guilty (4)  |  Honest (26)  |  Human Beings (19)  |  Idea (440)  |  Imagine (40)  |  Insufficient (6)  |  Issue (37)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Member (27)  |  Mildly (2)  |  Moral (100)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Often (69)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  Pander (2)  |  Plead (3)  |  Position (54)  |  Power (273)  |  Practice (67)  |  Press (16)  |  Profession (54)  |  Proof (192)  |  Receive (39)  |  Reed (5)  |  Rock (107)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Sin (27)  |  Source (71)  |  Subject (129)  |  Temptation (9)  |  Think (205)  |  Uncomfortable (3)  |  Value (180)  |  Variety (53)  |  Willingness (9)  |  Worry (27)

Nearly anyone in this line of work would take a bullet for the last pregnant dodo. But should we not admire the person who, when faced with an overwhelmingly sad reality beyond and personal blame or control, strives valiantly to rescue what ever can be salvaged, rather than retreating to the nearest corner to weep or assign fault?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (10)  |  Anyone (26)  |  Assign (5)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Blame (17)  |  Bullet (3)  |  Control (93)  |  Corner (24)  |  Dodo (5)  |  Fault (27)  |  Line (44)  |  Nearly (19)  |  Overwhelmingly (2)  |  Person (114)  |  Personal (49)  |  Pregnant (4)  |  Reality (140)  |  Rescue (8)  |  Retreat (9)  |  Sadness (26)  |  Salvage (2)  |  Strive (35)  |  Valiantly (2)  |  Weep (2)  |  Work (457)

One of the differences between the natural and the social sciences is that in the natural sciences, each succeeding generation stands on the shoulders of those that have gone before, while in the social sciences, each generation steps in the faces of its predecessors.
Skinner's Theory of Teaching Machines (1959), 167.
Science quotes on:  |  Difference (208)  |  Generation (111)  |  Natural Science (62)  |  Predecessor (18)  |  Shoulder (13)  |  Social Science (18)  |  Stand (60)  |  Step (67)

People will do anything, no matter how absurd, in order to avoid facing their own soul.
Carl Jung
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 121
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (20)  |  Avoid (34)  |  Matter (270)  |  Order (167)  |  People (269)  |  Soul (139)

Personality is the supreme realization of the innate idiosyncrasy of a living being. It is an act of high courage flung in the face of life.
Carl Jung
In The Development of Personality (1953), 171. https://books.google.com/books?id= Carl Gustav Jung - 195
Science quotes on:  |  Courage (39)  |  Fling (2)  |  Idiosyncrasy (2)  |  Innate (7)  |  Life (917)  |  Living Being (2)  |  Personality (40)  |  Psychology (125)  |  Realization (33)  |  Supreme (24)

Ploughing deep, your recipe for killing weeds, is also the recipe for almost every good thing in farming. … We now plough horizontally following the curvatures of the hills and hollows, on the dead level, however crooked the lines may be. Every furrow thus acts as a reservoir to receive and retain the waters, all of which go to the benefit of the growing plant, instead of running off into streams … In point of beauty nothing can exceed that of the waving lines and rows winding along the face of the hills and vallies.
In letter (17 Apr 1813) from Jefferson at Monticello to Charles Willson Peale. Collected in The Jefferson Papers: 1770-1826 (1900), 178-180.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (171)  |  Benefit (54)  |  Crooked (3)  |  Curvature (3)  |  Deep (81)  |  Erosion (18)  |  Farming (7)  |  Following (16)  |  Furrow (3)  |  Good (228)  |  Growing (15)  |  Hill (19)  |  Hollow (3)  |  Horizontal (3)  |  Killing (14)  |  Level (51)  |  Line (44)  |  Plant (173)  |  Plough (8)  |  Ploughing (3)  |  Point (72)  |  Receive (39)  |  Recipe (7)  |  Reservoir (4)  |  Retain (10)  |  Row (4)  |  Running (8)  |  Stream (27)  |  Valley (16)  |  Water (244)  |  Water Conservation (2)  |  Weed (14)  |  Winding (4)

Religious people split into three main groups when faced with science. I shall label them the ‘know-nothings’, the ‘know-alls’, and the ‘no-contests’.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Group (52)  |  Label (11)  |  Main (16)  |  People (269)  |  Religious (44)  |  Science (1699)  |  Split (11)

Science has blown to atoms, as she can rend and rive in the rocks themselves; but in those rocks she has found, and read aloud, the great stone book which is the history of the earth, even when darkness sat upon the face of the deep. Along their craggy sides she has traced the footprints of birds and beasts, whose shapes were never seen by man. From within them she has brought the bones, and pieced together the skeletons, of monsters that would have crushed the noted dragons of the fables at a blow.
Book review of Robert Hunt, Poetry of Science (1848), in the London Examiner (1848). Although uncredited in print, biographers identified his authorship from his original handwritten work. Collected in Charles Dickens and ‎Frederic George Kitton (ed.) Old Lamps for New Ones: And Other Sketches and Essays (1897), 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Beast (32)  |  Bird (96)  |  Blow (13)  |  Bone (57)  |  Book (181)  |  Crag (4)  |  Darkness (25)  |  Deep (81)  |  Dragon (5)  |  Earth (487)  |  Fable (5)  |  Footprint (12)  |  Great (300)  |  History (302)  |  Monster (21)  |  Piece (32)  |  Reading (51)  |  Rock (107)  |  Science (1699)  |  Shape (52)  |  Skeleton (15)  |  Stone (57)  |  Tracing (3)

Science is not about control. It is about cultivating a perpetual sense of wonder in the face of something that forever grows one step richer and subtler than our latest theory about it. It is about reverence, not mastery.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Control (93)  |  Cultivate (9)  |  Forever (42)  |  Grow (66)  |  Late (28)  |  Mastery (20)  |  Perpetual (10)  |  Reverence (24)  |  Rich (48)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sense (240)  |  Step (67)  |  Theory (582)  |  Wonder (134)

She has the sort of body you go to see in marble. She has golden hair. Quickly, deftly, she reaches with both hands behind her back and unclasps her top. Setting it on her lap, she swivels ninety degrees to face the towboat square. Shoulders back, cheeks high, she holds her pose without retreat. In her ample presentation there is defiance of gravity. There is no angle of repose. She is a siren and these are her songs.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ample (4)  |  Angle (15)  |  Back (55)  |  Behind (25)  |  Body (193)  |  Both (52)  |  Cheek (2)  |  Defiance (5)  |  Degree (48)  |  Golden (11)  |  Gravity (89)  |  Hair (19)  |  Hand (103)  |  High (78)  |  Hold (56)  |  Lap (4)  |  Marble (10)  |  Pose (5)  |  Presentation (12)  |  Quickly (9)  |  Reach (68)  |  Repose (5)  |  Retreat (9)  |  See (197)  |  Set (56)  |  Shoulder (13)  |  Siren (3)  |  Song (18)  |  Sort (32)  |  Square (10)  |  Top (20)

Speaking of libraries: A big open-stack academic or public library is no small pleasure to work in. You’re, say, trying to do a piece on something in Nevada, and you go down to C Floor, deep in the earth, and out to what a miner would call a remote working face. You find 10995.497S just where the card catalog and the online computer thought it would be, but that is only the initial nick. The book you knew about has led you to others you did not know about. To the ceiling the shelves are loaded with books about Nevada. You pull them down, one at a time, and sit on the floor and look them over until you are sitting on a pile five feet high, at which point you are late home for dinner and you get up and walk away. It’s an incomparable boon to research, all that; but it is also a reason why there are almost no large open-stack libraries left in the world.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Academic (12)  |  Big (33)  |  Book (181)  |  Boon (3)  |  C (2)  |  Call (68)  |  Card (3)  |  Catalog (5)  |  Ceiling (3)  |  Computer (84)  |  Deep (81)  |  Dinner (9)  |  Down (44)  |  Earth (487)  |  Find (248)  |  Five (14)  |  Floor (16)  |  Foot (39)  |  Get Up (2)  |  High (78)  |  Home (58)  |  Incomparable (7)  |  Initial (13)  |  Know (321)  |  Large (82)  |  Late (28)  |  Lead (101)  |  Leave (63)  |  Library (37)  |  Load (8)  |  Miner (5)  |  Online (2)  |  Piece (32)  |  Pile (8)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Point (72)  |  Public (82)  |  Pull (11)  |  Reason (330)  |  Remote (27)  |  Research (517)  |  Say (126)  |  Shelve (2)  |  Sit (24)  |  Small (97)  |  Speak (49)  |  Thought (374)  |  Time (439)  |  Try (103)  |  Walk (56)  |  Work (457)  |  World (667)

The beauty of crystals lies in the planeness of their faces.
In The Natural History of Crystals (1924), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (171)  |  Crystal (47)  |  Lie (80)

The book of Nature is the book of Fate. She turns the gigantic pages,—leaf after leaf,—never re-turning one. One leaf she lays down, a floor of granite; then a thousand ages, and a bed of slate; a thousand ages, and a measure of coal; a thousand ages, and a layer of marl and mud: vegetable forms appear; her first misshapen animals, zoophyte, trilobium, fish; then, saurians,—rude forms, in which she has only blocked her future statue, concealing under these unwieldy monsters the fine type of her coming king. The face of the planet cools and dries, the races meliorate, and man is born. But when a race has lived its term, it comes no more again.
From 'Fate', collected in The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Volume 6: The Conduct of Life (1860), 15. This paragraph is the prose version of his poem, 'Song of Nature'.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (137)  |  Animal (309)  |  Appearance (77)  |  Bed (20)  |  Birth (81)  |  Block (8)  |  Book (181)  |  Book Of Fate (2)  |  Book Of Nature (6)  |  Coal (41)  |  Coming (10)  |  Concealing (2)  |  Cool (9)  |  Dry (12)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Fate (38)  |  Fine (24)  |  First (174)  |  Fish (85)  |  Floor (16)  |  Form (210)  |  Future (229)  |  Gigantic (16)  |  Granite (6)  |  King (23)  |  Layer (14)  |  Leaf (43)  |  Life (917)  |  Measure (70)  |  Monster (21)  |  Mud (14)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Page (18)  |  Planet (199)  |  Race (76)  |  Returning (2)  |  Rude (5)  |  Saurian (2)  |  Statue (9)  |  Term (87)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Trilobite (4)  |  Turn (72)  |  Type (34)  |  Unwieldy (2)  |  Vegetable (19)  |  Zoophyte (4)

The dodo never had a chance. He seems to have been invented for the sole purpose of becoming extinct and that was all he was good for. … I’m not blaming the Dodo but he was a mess. He had an ugly face with a large hooked beak, a tail in the wrong place, wings too small … and a very prominent stomach.
In 'The Dodo', How to Become Extinct (1941), 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Beak (4)  |  Blame (17)  |  Chance (122)  |  Dodo (5)  |  Extinct (7)  |  Hook (4)  |  Invented (4)  |  Mess (10)  |  Place (111)  |  Prominent (5)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Small (97)  |  Stomach (18)  |  Tail (13)  |  Ugly (11)  |  Wing (36)  |  Wrong (116)

The long-range trend toward federal regulation, which found its beginnings in the Interstate Commerce Act of 1887 and the Sherman Act of 1890, which was quickened by a large number of measures in the Progressive era, and which has found its consummation in our time, was thus at first the response of a predominantly individualistic public to the uncontrolled and starkly original collectivism of big business. In America the growth of the national state and its regulative power has never been accepted with complacency by any large part of the middle-class public, which has not relaxed its suspicion of authority, and which even now gives repeated evidence of its intense dislike of statism. In our time this growth has been possible only under the stress of great national emergencies, domestic or military, and even then only in the face of continuous resistance from a substantial part of the public. In the Progressive era it was possible only because of widespread and urgent fear of business consolidation and private business authority. Since it has become common in recent years for ideologists of the extreme right to portray the growth of statism as the result of a sinister conspiracy of collectivists inspired by foreign ideologies, it is perhaps worth emphasizing that the first important steps toward the modern organization of society were taken by arch-individualists—the tycoons of the Gilded Age—and that the primitive beginning of modern statism was largely the work of men who were trying to save what they could of the eminently native Yankee values of individualism and enterprise.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (37)  |  Act (80)  |  Age (137)  |  America (74)  |  Authority (50)  |  Become (100)  |  Begin (52)  |  Beginnings (2)  |  Big Business (2)  |  Business (71)  |  Collectivism (2)  |  Commerce (14)  |  Common (92)  |  Consolidation (3)  |  Conspiracy (4)  |  Consummation (4)  |  Continuous (24)  |  Dislike (11)  |  Domestic (12)  |  Emergency (6)  |  Eminently (2)  |  Emphasize (6)  |  Enterprise (20)  |  Era (14)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Extreme (36)  |  Fear (113)  |  Federal (5)  |  Find (248)  |  First (174)  |  Foreign (20)  |  Gilded (2)  |  Give (117)  |  Great (300)  |  Growth (111)  |  Ideology (7)  |  Important (124)  |  Individualism (2)  |  Inspire (35)  |  Intense (11)  |  Large (82)  |  Largely (12)  |  Long-Range (2)  |  Measure (70)  |  Middle-Class (2)  |  Military (24)  |  Modern (104)  |  National (20)  |  Native (11)  |  Number (179)  |  Organization (79)  |  Original (36)  |  Part (146)  |  Portray (3)  |  Possible (100)  |  Power (273)  |  Predominantly (4)  |  Primitive (37)  |  Private (17)  |  Progressive (13)  |  Public (82)  |  Quicken (2)  |  Recent (23)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Repeat (27)  |  Resistance (23)  |  Response (24)  |  Result (250)  |  Right (144)  |  Save (46)  |  Sinister (8)  |  Society (188)  |  State (96)  |  Step (67)  |  Stress (8)  |  Substantial (7)  |  Suspicion (25)  |  Time (439)  |  Toward (29)  |  Trend (16)  |  Try (103)  |  Uncontrolled (2)  |  Urgent (7)  |  Value (180)  |  Widespread (9)  |  Work (457)  |  Worth (74)  |  Yankee (2)  |  Year (214)

The methods of science aren’t foolproof, but they are indefinitely perfectible. Just as important: there is a tradition of criticism that enforces improvement whenever and wherever flaws are discovered. The methods of science, like everything else under the sun, are themselves objects of scientific scrutiny, as method becomes methodology, the analysis of methods. Methodology in turn falls under the gaze of epistemology, the investigation of investigation itself—nothing is off limits to scientific questioning. The irony is that these fruits of scientific reflection, showing us the ineliminable smudges of imperfection, are sometimes used by those who are suspicious of science as their grounds for denying it a privileged status in the truth-seeking department—as if the institutions and practices they see competing with it were no worse off in these regards. But where are the examples of religious orthodoxy being simply abandoned in the face of irresistible evidence? Again and again in science, yesterday’s heresies have become today’s new orthodoxies. No religion exhibits that pattern in its history.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (37)  |  Analysis (123)  |  Arent (3)  |  Badly (9)  |  Become (100)  |  Compete (4)  |  Criticism (52)  |  Deny (29)  |  Department (33)  |  Discover (115)  |  Enforce (5)  |  Epistemology (7)  |  Everything (120)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Example (57)  |  Exhibit (12)  |  Fall (89)  |  Flaw (8)  |  Foolproof (3)  |  Fruit (63)  |  Gaze (12)  |  Ground (63)  |  Heresy (7)  |  History (302)  |  Imperfection (19)  |  Important (124)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Indefinitely (9)  |  Institution (32)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Irony (6)  |  Irresistible (6)  |  Limit (86)  |  Method (154)  |  Methodology (8)  |  New (340)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Object (110)  |  Orthodoxy (7)  |  Pattern (56)  |  Practice (67)  |  Privilege (16)  |  Question (315)  |  Reflection (50)  |  Regard (58)  |  Religion (210)  |  Religious (44)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Scrutiny (13)  |  See (197)  |  Show (55)  |  Simply (34)  |  Sometimes (27)  |  Status (18)  |  Sun (211)  |  Suspicious (3)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Today (86)  |  Tradition (43)  |  Turn (72)  |  Whenever (8)  |  Yesterday (14)

The most important and lasting truths are the most obvious ones. Nature cheats us with her mysteries, one after another, like a juggler with his tricks; but shews us her plain honest face, without our paying for it.
Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims (1837), 149.
Science quotes on:  |  Cheat (5)  |  Honest (26)  |  Important (124)  |  Juggler (2)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Trick (19)  |  Truth (750)

The one who stays in my mind as the ideal man of science is, not Huxley or Tyndall, Hooker or Lubbock, still less my friend, philosopher and guide Herbert Spencer, but Francis Galton, whom I used to observe and listen to—I regret to add, without the least reciprocity—with rapt attention. Even to-day. I can conjure up, from memory’s misty deep, that tall figure with its attitude of perfect physical and mental poise; the clean-shaven face, the thin, compressed mouth with its enigmatical smile; the long upper lip and firm chin, and, as if presiding over the whole personality of the man, the prominent dark eyebrows from beneath which gleamed, with penetrating humour, contemplative grey eyes. Fascinating to me was Francis Galton’s all-embracing but apparently impersonal beneficence. But, to a recent and enthusiastic convert to the scientific method, the most relevant of Galton’s many gifts was the unique contribution of three separate and distinct processes of the intellect; a continuous curiosity about, and rapid apprehension of individual facts, whether common or uncommon; the faculty for ingenious trains of reasoning; and, more admirable than either of these, because the talent was wholly beyond my reach, the capacity for correcting and verifying his own hypotheses, by the statistical handling of masses of data, whether collected by himself or supplied by other students of the problem.
In My Apprenticeship (1926), 134-135.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (11)  |  Apprehension (9)  |  Attention (76)  |  Attitude (47)  |  Beneficence (3)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Collected (2)  |  Compressed (3)  |  Conjuring (3)  |  Continuous (24)  |  Contribution (49)  |  Convert (15)  |  Curiosity (89)  |  Data (100)  |  Deep (81)  |  Distinct (29)  |  Enigma (5)  |  Enthusiastic (2)  |  Eye (159)  |  Eyebrow (2)  |  Fact (609)  |  Faculty (36)  |  Fascinating (17)  |  Figure (32)  |  Firm (19)  |  Friend (63)  |  Sir Francis Galton (16)  |  Gift (47)  |  Grey (6)  |  Guide (46)  |  Handling (7)  |  Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (12)  |  Humour (101)  |  Thomas Henry Huxley (119)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Impersonal (4)  |  Individual (177)  |  Ingenious (18)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Lip (3)  |  Listen (26)  |  John Lubbock (Lord Avebury) (25)  |  Man Of Science (27)  |  Memory (81)  |  Mental (57)  |  Method (154)  |  Misty (3)  |  Mouth (16)  |  Observation (418)  |  Penetrating (3)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Personality (40)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Physical (94)  |  Poise (2)  |  Problem (362)  |  Process (201)  |  Prominent (5)  |  Rapid (17)  |  Rapt (5)  |  Reach (68)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Regret (16)  |  Relevant (3)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Separate (46)  |  Smile (13)  |  Herbert Spencer (35)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Student (131)  |  Talent (49)  |  Tall (8)  |  Thin (7)  |  Train (25)  |  Uncommon (7)  |  Unique (24)  |  Upper (3)

The only thing we know for sure about the future is that it will be radically different from the past. In the face of this enormous uncertainty, the least we can do for future generations is to pass on as many of the planet’s resources as possible.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Conservation (139)  |  Different (110)  |  Enormous (33)  |  Future (229)  |  Generation (111)  |  Know (321)  |  Least (43)  |  Pass (60)  |  Past (109)  |  Planet (199)  |  Possible (100)  |  Radically (5)  |  Resource (47)  |  Uncertainty (37)

The real crisis we face today is a spiritual one; at root, it is a test of moral will and faith.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 28
Science quotes on:  |  Crisis (13)  |  Faith (131)  |  Moral (100)  |  Real (95)  |  Root (48)  |  Spiritual (45)  |  Test (96)  |  Today (86)

The traditional mathematics professor of the popular legend is absentminded. He usually appears in public with a lost umbrella in each hand. He prefers to face a blackboard and to turn his back on the class. He writes a, he says b, he means c, but it should be d. Some of his sayings are handed down from generation to generation:
“In order to solve this differential equation you look at it till a solution occurs to you.”
“This principle is so perfectly general that no particular application of it is possible.”
“Geometry is the science of correct reasoning on incorrect figures.”
“My method to overcome a difficulty is to go round it.”
“What is the difference between method and device? A method is a device which you used twice.”
In How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Absent-Minded (2)  |  Application (117)  |  Back (55)  |  Blackboard (6)  |  Class (64)  |  Correct (53)  |  Device (24)  |  Difference (208)  |  Differential Equation (9)  |  Difficulty (113)  |  Figure (32)  |  Generality (22)  |  Generation (111)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Incorrect (6)  |  Legend (8)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Method (154)  |  Occurrence (30)  |  Overcoming (3)  |  Particular (54)  |  Popular (21)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Principle (228)  |  Professor (39)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  French Saying (61)  |  Solution (168)  |  Tradition (43)  |  Twice (11)  |  Using (6)  |  Writing (72)

The X-ray spectrometer opened up a new world. It proved to be a far more powerful method of analysing crystal structure…. One could examine the various faces of a crystal in succession, and by noting the angles at which and the intensity with which they reflected the X-rays, one could deduce the way in which the atoms were arranged in sheets parallel to these faces. The intersections of these sheets pinned down the positions of the atoms in space.… It was like discovering an alluvial gold field with nuggets lying around waiting to be picked up.… It was a glorious time when we worked far into every night with new worlds unfolding before us in the silent laboratory.
In The History of X-ray Analysis (1943), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Alluvial (2)  |  Analyse (3)  |  Angle (15)  |  Arrangement (45)  |  Atom (251)  |  Crystal (47)  |  Deduce (8)  |  Discover (115)  |  Examine (24)  |  Glorious (17)  |  Gold (55)  |  Intensity (19)  |  Intersection (2)  |  Laboratory (120)  |  Lying (6)  |  Method (154)  |  New (340)  |  Night (73)  |  Nugget (2)  |  Parallel (16)  |  Pick Up (4)  |  Position (54)  |  Powerful (51)  |  Reflect (17)  |  Sheet (6)  |  Space (154)  |  Structure (191)  |  Waiting (9)  |  Work (457)  |  World (667)

There is a mask of theory over the whole face of nature, if it be theory to infer more than we see.
The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences: Founded Upon Their History (1840), Vol. 1, 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Inference (26)  |  Mask (7)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Seeing (48)  |  Theory (582)  |  Whole (122)

There's no art To find the mind's construction in the face.
Macbeth (1606), I, iv.
Science quotes on:  |  Construction (69)  |  Mind (544)

Truth travels down from the heights of philosophy to the humblest walks of life, and up from the simplest perceptions of an awakened intellect to the discoveries which almost change the face of the world. At every stage of its progress it is genial, luminous, creative. When first struck out by some distinguished and fortunate genius, it may address itself only to a few minds of kindred power. It exists then only in the highest forms of science; it corrects former systems, and authorizes new generalizations. Discussion, controversy begins; more truth is elicited, more errors exploded, more doubts cleared up, more phenomena drawn into the circle, unexpected connexions of kindred sciences are traced, and in each step of the progress, the number rapidly grows of those who are prepared to comprehend and carry on some branches of the investigation,— till, in the lapse of time, every order of intellect has been kindled, from that of the sublime discoverer to the practical machinist; and every department of knowledge been enlarged, from the most abstruse and transcendental theory to the daily arts of life.
In An Address Delivered Before the Literary Societies of Amherst College (25 Aug 1835), 16-17.
Science quotes on:  |  Awakened (2)  |  Change (291)  |  Comprehension (51)  |  Connection (86)  |  Creative (41)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Error (230)  |  Generalization (26)  |  Genial (3)  |  Genius (186)  |  Height (24)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Luminous (9)  |  Perception (53)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Progress (317)  |  Simplest (9)  |  Travel (40)  |  Truth (750)  |  Walk Of Life (2)  |  World (667)

We’ve arranged a global civilization in which most critical elements profoundly depend on science and technology. We have also arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology. This is a prescription for disaster. We might get away with it for a while, but sooner or later this combustible mixture of ignorance and power is going to blow up in our faces.
From The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark (1996), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Blow Up (4)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Combustible (2)  |  Critical (34)  |  Depend (56)  |  Disaster (36)  |  Element (129)  |  Global (14)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Mixture (22)  |  Power (273)  |  Prescription (14)  |  Profoundly (11)  |  Science (1699)  |  Technology (199)  |  Understand (189)

What monstrosities would walk the streets were some people’s faces as unfinished as their minds.
In Reflections on the Human Condition (1973), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Mind (544)  |  Monstrosity (3)  |  People (269)  |  Street (17)  |  Unfinished (2)  |  Walk (56)

When I was living with the Indians, my hostess, a fine looking woman, who wore numberless bracelets, and rings in her ears and on her fingers, and painted her face like a brilliant sunset, one day gave away a very fine horse. I was surprised, for I knew there had been no family talk on the subject, so I asked: “Will your husband like to have you give the horse away?” Her eyes danced, and, breaking into a peal of laughter, she hastened to tell the story to the other women gathered in the tent, and I became the target of many merry eyes. I tried to explain how a white woman would act, but laughter and contempt met my explanation of the white man’s hold upon his wife’s property.
Speech on 'The Legal Conditions of Indian Women', delivered to Evening Session (Thur 29 Mar 1888), collected in Report of the International Council of Women: Assembled by the National Woman Suffrage Association, Washington, D.C., U.S. of America, March 25 to April 1, 1888 (1888), Vol. 1, 240.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (99)  |  Bracelet (2)  |  Contempt (11)  |  Ear (21)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Family (37)  |  Finger (38)  |  Give (117)  |  Horse (40)  |  Hostess (2)  |  Husband (10)  |  Indian (17)  |  Laughter (22)  |  Live (186)  |  Man (345)  |  Paint (17)  |  Property (96)  |  Ring (14)  |  Story (58)  |  Sunset (15)  |  Surprise (44)  |  Talk (61)  |  White (38)  |  Wife (18)  |  Woman (94)

When Science from Creation's face
Enchantment's veil withdraws
What lovely visions yield their place
To cold material laws.
'To the Rainbow.' In Samuel Rogers, Thomas Campbell, et al, The Poetical Works of Rogers, Campbell, J. Montgomery, Lamb, and Kirke White (1830), 153.
Science quotes on:  |  Cold (38)  |  Creation (211)  |  Enchantment (8)  |  Law (418)  |  Material (124)  |  Science (1699)  |  Veil (12)  |  Vision (55)  |  Withdraw (5)

When the face, the back of the hand, or another part of the body the sensitivity of which is not too weakened by touch is brought near an electrified conductor, there is felt the impression of a fresh breeze, of a light breath, or of a cobweb.
In biography article by Louis Dulieu, in Charles Coulston Gillispie, Dictionary of Scientific Biographt (1980), Vol. 2, 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (193)  |  Breath (24)  |  Breeze (3)  |  Cobweb (4)  |  Conductor (8)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Electrostatics (4)  |  Hand (103)  |  Impression (51)  |  Sensitivity (6)

When the solution is simple, God is answering. Where the world ceases to be the scene of our personal hopes and wishes, where we face it as free beings admiring, asking and observing, there we enter the realm of Art and Science.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (10)  |  Answer (201)  |  Art (205)  |  Ask (99)  |  Cease (23)  |  Enter (20)  |  Free (59)  |  God (454)  |  Hope (129)  |  Observe (48)  |  Personal (49)  |  Realm (40)  |  Scene (10)  |  Science (1699)  |  Simple (111)  |  Solution (168)  |  Wish (62)  |  World (667)

When the uncultured man sees a stone in the road it tells him no story other than the fact that he sees a stone ... The scientist looking at the same stone perhaps will stop, and with a hammer break it open, when the newly exposed faces of the rock will have written upon them a history that is as real to him as the printed page.
In Nature's Miracles: Familiar Talks on Science (1899), Vol. 1, 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Break (33)  |  Culture (85)  |  Expose (9)  |  Fact (609)  |  Hammer (12)  |  History (302)  |  Look (46)  |  Man (345)  |  Open (38)  |  Page (18)  |  Print (9)  |  Reality (140)  |  Road (47)  |  Rock (107)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Stone (57)  |  Stop (56)  |  Story (58)  |  Telling (23)  |  Writing (72)

When we had no computers, we had no programming problem either. When we had a few computers, we had a mild programming problem. Confronted with machines a million times as powerful, we are faced with a gigantic programming problem.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Computer (84)  |  Confront (9)  |  Gigantic (16)  |  Machine (133)  |  Mild (3)  |  Million (89)  |  Powerful (51)  |  Problem (362)  |  Program (32)  |  Time (439)

Where the world ceases to be the scene of our personal hopes and wishes, where we face it as free beings admiring, asking and observing, there we enter the realm of Art and Science. If what is seen is seen and experienced is portrayed in the language of logic, we are engaged in science. If it is communicated through forms whose connections are not accessible to the conscious mind but are recognized intuitively as meaningful, then we are engaged in art.
'What Artistic and Scientific Experience Have in Common', Menschen (27 Jan 1921). In Albert Einstein, Helen Dukas, Banesh Hoffmann, Albert Einstein, The Human Side (1981), 37-38. The article was published in a German magazine on modern art, upon a request from the editor, Walter Hasenclever, for a few paragraphs on the idea that there was a close connection between the artistic developments and the scientific results belonging to a given epoch. (The magazine name, and editor's name are given by Ze'ev Rosenkranz, The Einstein Scrapbook (2002), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (11)  |  Admire (10)  |  Art (205)  |  Ask (99)  |  Cease (23)  |  Communicate (10)  |  Connection (86)  |  Conscious (25)  |  Engage (11)  |  Enter (20)  |  Experience (268)  |  Form (210)  |  Free (59)  |  Hope (129)  |  Language (155)  |  Logic (187)  |  Meaningful (14)  |  Mind (544)  |  Observe (48)  |  Personal (49)  |  Portray (3)  |  Realm (40)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Scene (10)  |  Science (1699)  |  See (197)  |  Wish (62)  |  World (667)

Why does a man want to be a scientist? There are many goals: fame, position, a thirst for understanding. The first two can be attained without intellectual integrity; the third cannot. … The thirst for knowledge, what Thomas Huxley called the ‘Divine dipsomania’, can only be satisfied by complete intellectual integrity. It seems to me the only one of the three goals that continues to reward the pursuer. He presses on, “knowing that Nature never did betray the heart that loved her”. Here is another kind of love, that has so many faces. Love is neither passion, nor pride, nor pity, nor blind adoration, but it can be any or all of these if they are transfigured by deep and unbiased understanding.
In Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin: An Autobiography and Other Recollections (1996), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Adoration (2)  |  Betray (7)  |  Blind (35)  |  Continue (38)  |  Deep (81)  |  Divine (42)  |  Fame (30)  |  Goal (81)  |  Heart (110)  |  Thomas Henry Huxley (119)  |  Integrity (11)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Kind (99)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Love (164)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Passion (54)  |  Pity (7)  |  Position (54)  |  Press On (2)  |  Pride (45)  |  Reward (38)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Third (11)  |  Thirst (9)  |  Unbiased (4)  |  Understand (189)  |  Want (120)

You can always tell the pioneers because they are face down in the mud with arrows in their backs.
Anonymous
Seen in various paraphrases, such as $ldquo;in the dirt”.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrow (13)  |  Back (55)  |  Dirt (8)  |  Mud (14)  |  Pioneer (23)  |  Tell (67)

[Dubious attribution] We are all continually faced with great opportunities which are brilliantly disguised as unsolvable problems.
Attributed. (?) Note: So far, Webmaster has been unable to find a primary source for this quote. It can be found seen quoted in several books, but always without citation. The earliest found with attribution to Mead is in Brian E. Walsh, Unleashing Your Brilliance (2005). However, earlier books attribute differently, for example to Lee Iacocca (2000), and to John Gardner (1986). Also found without any attribution (“it has been said”), without any citation, in Christopher H. Lovelock and Charles B. Weinberg, Readings in Public and Nonprofit Marketing (1978), 152. If you know the primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Continually (14)  |  Great (300)  |  Opportunity (43)  |  Problem (362)  |  Unsolvable (2)

[With] our critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what’s true, we slide, almost without noticing, back into superstition. … We have also arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology. We might get away with it for a while, but eventually this combustible mixture of ignorance and power is going to blow up in our faces.
In 'With Science on Our Side', Washington Post (9 Jan 1994).
Science quotes on:  |  Arranged (3)  |  Blow Up (4)  |  Combustible (2)  |  Critical (34)  |  Decline (11)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  Eventual (5)  |  Feel (93)  |  Good (228)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Mixture (22)  |  Power (273)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science And Technology (20)  |  Slide (5)  |  Superstition (50)  |  Technology (199)  |  True (120)  |  Understand (189)

“I should have more faith,” he said; “I ought to know by this time that when a fact appears opposed to a long train of deductions it invariably proves to be capable of bearing some other interpretation.”
Spoken by character, Sherlock Holmes, in A Study in Scarlet (1887), in Works of Arthur Conan Doyle (1902), Vol. 11, 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (77)  |  Bearing (8)  |  Capability (35)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Faith (131)  |  Interpretation (61)  |  Invariably (8)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Opposition (29)  |  Proof (192)  |  Train (25)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.