Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Genius is two percent inspiration, ninety-eight percent perspiration.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index G > Category: Growing

Growing Quotes (98 quotes)

...the need for a garden of rare palms and vines and ornamental trees and shrubs which would be near enough to a growing city to form a quiet place where children with their elders could peer, as it were, into those fascinating jungles and palm glades of the tropics which have for generations stimulated the imaginations of American youth.
Science quotes on:  |  Children (200)  |  City (78)  |  Elder (8)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Form (959)  |  Garden (60)  |  Generation (242)  |  Horticulture (9)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Jungle (22)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Rare (89)  |  Shrub (5)  |  Tree (246)  |  Youth (101)

Are coral reefs growing from the depths of the oceans? ... [The] reply is a simple negative; and a single fact establishes its truth. The reef-forming coral zoophytes, as has been shown, cannot grow at greater depths than 100 or 120 feet; and therefore in seas deeper than this, the formation or growth of reefs over the bottom is impossible.
On Coral Reefs and Islands (1853), 138.
Science quotes on:  |  Coral Reef (12)  |  Depth (94)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Formation (96)  |  Forming (42)  |  Greater (288)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growth (187)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Island (46)  |  Negative (63)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Reply (56)  |  Sea (308)  |  Simple (406)  |  Single (353)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Zoophyte (4)

Nature and nurture are an inseparable blend of influences that work together to produce our behavior. A growing band of researchers are demonstrating that the bedrock of behaviors that make up the concerns of everyday life, such as sex, language, cooperation, and violence have been carved out by evolution over the eons, and this Stone Age legacy continues to influence modern life today.
In Stone Age Present: How Evolution Has Shaped Modern Life: From Sex, Violence and Language to Emotions, Morals and Communities, (1995), 25-26.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Bedrock (2)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Blend (9)  |  Concern (228)  |  Continue (165)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Eon (11)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Everyday Life (14)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inseparable (16)  |  Language (293)  |  Legacy (14)  |  Life (1795)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Life (3)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nurture (16)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Sex (69)  |  Stone (162)  |  Stone Age (12)  |  Today (314)  |  Together (387)  |  Violence (34)  |  Work (1351)

Science for the Citizen is ... also written for the large and growing number of adolescents, who realize that they will be the first victims of the new destructive powers of science misapplied.
Science for the Citizen: A Self-Educator based on the Social Background of Scientific Discovery (1938), Author's Confessions, 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Citizen (51)  |  First (1283)  |  Large (394)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Power (746)  |  Realize (147)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Society (23)  |  Victim (35)  |  Will (2355)

A great ball of fire about a mile in diameter, changing colors as it kept shooting upward, from deep purple to orange, expanding, growing bigger, rising as it was expanding, an elemental force freed from its bonds after being chained for billions of years.
On the first atomic explosion in New Mexico, 16 Jul 1945.
From 'Drama of the Atomic Bomb Found Climax in July 16 Test', in New York Times (26 Sep 1945). This was the first of a series of articles by Laurence, who was the only civilian witness of the first bomb test. He was on a flight to see the dropping of a bomb on Nagasaki. Laurence, science writer for the NYT, had been requested for service to the War Department to explain the atomic bomb to the lay public.
Science quotes on:  |  Ball (62)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bigger (5)  |  Billion (95)  |  Bond (45)  |  Chained (2)  |  Change (593)  |  Color (137)  |  Deep (233)  |  Diameter (28)  |  Elemental (3)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Mile (39)  |  New (1216)  |  Orange (14)  |  Purple (3)  |  Rising (44)  |  Shooting (6)  |  Upward (43)  |  Year (933)

A neurotic person can be most simply described as someone who, while he was growing up, learned ways of behaving that are self-defeating in his society.
In Margaret Mead and Rhoda Bubendey Métraux (ed.), Margaret Mead, Some Personal Views (1979), 216.
Science quotes on:  |  Behave (17)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Describe (128)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Most (1731)  |  Neurotic (6)  |  Person (363)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Self (267)  |  Simple (406)  |  Society (326)  |  Way (1217)

A noble, logical diagram once recorded will never die, but long after we are gone be a living thing, asserting itself with ever-growing insistency. Remember that our sons and our grandsons are going to do things that would stagger us.
(1907) As quoted in 'Closing In', Charles Moore, Daniel H. Burnham, Architect, Planner of Cities (1921), Vol. 2, 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Amaze (4)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Do (1908)  |  Future (429)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Logical (55)  |  Long (790)  |  Never (1087)  |  Noble (90)  |  Record (154)  |  Recorded (2)  |  Remember (179)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)

A number of years ago, when I was a freshly-appointed instructor, I met, for the first time, a certain eminent historian of science. At the time I could only regard him with tolerant condescension.
I was sorry of the man who, it seemed to me, was forced to hover about the edges of science. He was compelled to shiver endlessly in the outskirts, getting only feeble warmth from the distant sun of science- in-progress; while I, just beginning my research, was bathed in the heady liquid heat up at the very center of the glow.
In a lifetime of being wrong at many a point, I was never more wrong. It was I, not he, who was wandering in the periphery. It was he, not I, who lived in the blaze.
I had fallen victim to the fallacy of the “growing edge;” the belief that only the very frontier of scientific advance counted; that everything that had been left behind by that advance was faded and dead.
But is that true? Because a tree in spring buds and comes greenly into leaf, are those leaves therefore the tree? If the newborn twigs and their leaves were all that existed, they would form a vague halo of green suspended in mid-air, but surely that is not the tree. The leaves, by themselves, are no more than trivial fluttering decoration. It is the trunk and limbs that give the tree its grandeur and the leaves themselves their meaning.
There is not a discovery in science, however revolutionary, however sparkling with insight, that does not arise out of what went before. “If I have seen further than other men,” said Isaac Newton, “it is because I have stood on the shoulders of giants.”
Adding A Dimension: Seventeen Essays on the History of Science (1964), Introduction.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Behind (137)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Certain (550)  |  Condescension (3)  |  Count (105)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Edge (47)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fad (10)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Giant (67)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Green (63)  |  Halo (7)  |  Heat (174)  |  Historian (54)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Hover (8)  |  Insight (102)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mid-Air (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Newborn (5)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Progress (465)  |  Regard (305)  |  Research (664)  |  Revolutionary (31)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Sparkling (7)  |  Spring (133)  |  Sun (385)  |  Surely (101)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Twig (14)  |  Vague (47)  |  Victim (35)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Wrong (234)  |  Year (933)

All change is relative. The universe is expanding relatively to our common material standards; our material standards are shrinking relatively to the size of the universe. The theory of the “expanding universe” might also be called the theory of the “shrinking atom”. …
:Let us then take the whole universe as our standard of constancy, and adopt the view of a cosmic being whose body is composed of intergalactic spaces and swells as they swell. Or rather we must now say it keeps the same size, for he will not admit that it is he who has changed. Watching us for a few thousand million years, he sees us shrinking; atoms, animals, planets, even the galaxies, all shrink alike; only the intergalactic spaces remain the same. The earth spirals round the sun in an ever-decreasing orbit. It would be absurd to treat its changing revolution as a constant unit of time. The cosmic being will naturally relate his units of length and time so that the velocity of light remains constant. Our years will then decrease in geometrical progression in the cosmic scale of time. On that scale man’s life is becoming briefer; his threescore years and ten are an ever-decreasing allowance. Owing to the property of geometrical progressions an infinite number of our years will add up to a finite cosmic time; so that what we should call the end of eternity is an ordinary finite date in the cosmic calendar. But on that date the universe has expanded to infinity in our reckoning, and we have shrunk to nothing in the reckoning of the cosmic being.
We walk the stage of life, performers of a drama for the benefit of the cosmic spectator. As the scenes proceed he notices that the actors are growing smaller and the action quicker. When the last act opens the curtain rises on midget actors rushing through their parts at frantic speed. Smaller and smaller. Faster and faster. One last microscopic blurr of intense agitation. And then nothing.
In The Expanding Universe (1933) , 90-92.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurd (59)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Agitation (9)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Allowance (6)  |  Animal (617)  |  Atom (355)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Body (537)  |  Calendar (9)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Common (436)  |  Constancy (12)  |  Constant (144)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Drama (21)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Expand (53)  |  Faster (50)  |  Finite (59)  |  Galaxies (29)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notice (77)  |  Number (699)  |  Open (274)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Owing (39)  |  Planet (356)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Progression (23)  |  Property (168)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Remain (349)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Rise (166)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Scene (36)  |  See (1081)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Space (500)  |  Speed (65)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Stage (143)  |  Sun (385)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Velocity (48)  |  View (488)  |  Walk (124)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

Almost daily we shudder as prophets of doom announce the impending end of civilization and universe. We are being asphyxiated, they say, by the smoke of the industry; we are suffocating in the ever growing mountain of rubbish. Every new project depicts its measureable effects and is denounced by protesters screaming about catastrophe, the upsetting of the land, the assault on nature. If we accepted this new mythology we would have to stop pushing roads through the forest, harnessing rivers to produce the electricity, breaking grounds to extract metals, enriching the soil with chemicals, killing insects, combating viruses … But progress—basically, an effort to organise a corner of land and make it more favourable for human life—cannot be baited. Without the science of pomiculture, for example, trees will bear fruits that are small, bitter, hard, indigestible, and sour. Progress is desirable.
Anonymous
Uncredited. In Lachman Mehta, Stolen Treasure (2012), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Announce (13)  |  Assault (12)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bitter (30)  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Corner (57)  |  Daily (87)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Doom (32)  |  Effect (393)  |  Effort (227)  |  Electricity (159)  |  End (590)  |  Extract (40)  |  Forest (150)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hard (243)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Impending (4)  |  Industry (137)  |  Insect (77)  |  Life (1795)  |  Metal (84)  |  Mining (18)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Mythology (18)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Progress (465)  |  Project (73)  |  Prophet (21)  |  River (119)  |  Rubbish (12)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Small (477)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Soil (86)  |  Sour (3)  |  Through (849)  |  Tree (246)  |  Universe (857)  |  Virus (27)  |  Will (2355)

An important scientific innovation rarely makes its way by gradually winning over and converting its opponents. What does happen is that its opponents gradually die out, and that the growing generation is familiarized with the ideas from the beginning.
Scientific Autobiography and Other Papers, trans. F. Gaynor (1950), 97. Quoted in David L. Hull, Science as a Process (1990), 379.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (305)  |  Generation (242)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Happen (274)  |  Idea (843)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Opponent (19)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Way (1217)  |  Winning (19)

As I strayed into the study of an eminent physicist, I observed hanging against the wall, framed like a choice engraving, several dingy, ribbon-like strips of, I knew not what... My curiosity was at once aroused. What were they? ... They might be shreds of mummy-wraps or bits of friable bark-cloth from the Pacific, ... [or] remnants from a grandmother’s wedding dress... They were none of these... He explained that they were carefully-prepared photographs of portions of the Solar Spectrum. I stood and mused, absorbed in the varying yet significant intensities of light and shade, bordered by mystic letters and symbolic numbers. As I mused, the pale legend began to glow with life. Every line became luminous with meaning. Every shadow was suffused with light shining from behind, suggesting some mighty achievement of knowledge; of knowledge growing more daring in proportion to the remoteness of the object known; of knowledge becoming more positive in its answers, as the questions which were asked seemed unanswerable. No Runic legend, no Babylonish arrowhead, no Egyptian hieroglyph, no Moabite stone, could present a history like this, or suggest thoughts of such weighty import or so stimulate and exalt the imagination.
The Sciences of Nature Versus the Science of Man: A Plea for the Science of Man (1871), 7-9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Against (332)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arrowhead (4)  |  Ask (411)  |  Bark (18)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Behind (137)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Choice (110)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Daring (17)  |  Engraving (4)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Explain (322)  |  Hieroglyph (2)  |  History (673)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Legend (17)  |  Letter (109)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Luminous (18)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Mummy (7)  |  Mystic (20)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Observed (149)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Portion (84)  |  Positive (94)  |  Present (619)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Question (621)  |  Remnant (7)  |  Remoteness (9)  |  Shade (31)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Shining (35)  |  Significant (74)  |  Solar Spectrum (3)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Stone (162)  |  Study (653)  |  Thought (953)  |  Wall (67)  |  Wedding (7)

Biology is a science of three dimensions. The first is the study of each species across all levels of biological organization, molecule to cell to organism to population to ecosystem. The second dimension is the diversity of all species in the biosphere. The third dimension is the history of each species in turn, comprising both its genetic evolution and the environmental change that drove the evolution. Biology, by growing in all three dimensions, is progressing toward unification and will continue to do so.
In 'Systematics and the Future of Biology', Systematics and the Origin of Species: on Ernst Mayr's 100th anniversary, Volume 102, Issues 22-26 (2005), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Biosphere (13)  |  Both (493)  |  Cell (138)  |  Change (593)  |  Continue (165)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ecosystem (24)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  First (1283)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Growth (187)  |  History (673)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Organism (220)  |  Organization (114)  |  Population (110)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Species (401)  |  Study (653)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unification (11)  |  Will (2355)

By its very nature the uterus is a field for growing the seeds, that is to say the ova, sown upon it. Here the eggs are fostered, and here the parts of the living [fetus], when they have further unfolded, become manifest and are made strong. Yet although it has been cast off by the mother and sown, the egg is weak and powerless and so requires the energy of the semen of the male to initiate growth. Hence in accordance with the laws of Nature, and like the other orders of living things, women produce eggs which, when received into the chamber of the uterus and fecundated by the semen of the male, unfold into a new life.
'On the Developmental Process', in H. B. Adelmann (ed.), Marcello Malpighi and the Evolution of Embryology (1966), Vol. 2, 861.
Science quotes on:  |  Accordance (10)  |  Become (815)  |  Cast (66)  |  Chamber (7)  |  Egg (69)  |  Embryology (17)  |  Energy (344)  |  Field (364)  |  Foster (12)  |  Fostering (4)  |  Growth (187)  |  Initiate (13)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Male (26)  |  Mother (114)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ovum (4)  |  Production (183)  |  Reception (15)  |  Require (219)  |  Say (984)  |  Seed (93)  |  Semen (5)  |  Strong (174)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Uterus (2)  |  Weak (71)  |  Woman (151)

Each workman would receive two or three important parts and would affix them together and pass them on to the next who would add a part and pass the growing article to another who would do the same … until the complete arm is put together.
Describing the first factory assembly line process. The product was Colt’s revolving chamber gun, nicknamed the “equalizer.”
Science quotes on:  |  Arm (81)  |  Assembly Line (3)  |  Complete (204)  |  Do (1908)  |  Next (236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Receive (114)  |  Technology (257)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)

Euclidean mathematics assumes the completeness and invariability of mathematical forms; these forms it describes with appropriate accuracy and enumerates their inherent and related properties with perfect clearness, order, and completeness, that is, Euclidean mathematics operates on forms after the manner that anatomy operates on the dead body and its members. On the other hand, the mathematics of variable magnitudes—function theory or analysis—considers mathematical forms in their genesis. By writing the equation of the parabola, we express its law of generation, the law according to which the variable point moves. The path, produced before the eyes of the student by a point moving in accordance to this law, is the parabola.
If, then, Euclidean mathematics treats space and number forms after the manner in which anatomy treats the dead body, modern mathematics deals, as it were, with the living body, with growing and changing forms, and thus furnishes an insight, not only into nature as she is and appears, but also into nature as she generates and creates,—reveals her transition steps and in so doing creates a mind for and understanding of the laws of becoming. Thus modern mathematics bears the same relation to Euclidean mathematics that physiology or biology … bears to anatomy.
In Die Mathematik die Fackelträgerin einer neuen Zeit (1889), 38. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 112-113.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Accordance (10)  |  According (237)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Appear (118)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Biology (216)  |  Body (537)  |  Change (593)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Consider (416)  |  Create (235)  |  Dead (59)  |  Deal (188)  |  Describe (128)  |  Doing (280)  |  Enumerate (3)  |  Equation (132)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Express (186)  |  Eye (419)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Generate (16)  |  Generation (242)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Grow (238)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Insight (102)  |  Invariability (5)  |  Law (894)  |  Living (491)  |  Living Body (3)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Member (41)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Operate (17)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parabola (2)  |  Path (144)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Point (580)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Property (168)  |  Relate (21)  |  Relation (157)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Same (157)  |  Space (500)  |  Step (231)  |  Student (300)  |  Theory (970)  |  Transition (26)  |  Treat (35)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Variable (34)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

For this we must make automatic and habitual, as early as possible, as many useful actions as we can, and guard against the growing into ways that are likely to be disadvantageous to us, as we should guard against the plague?
'The Laws of Habit', The Popular Science Monthly (Feb 1887), 434.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Against (332)  |  Automatic (16)  |  Disadvantage (10)  |  Early (185)  |  Guard (18)  |  Habit (168)  |  Must (1526)  |  Plague (41)  |  Possible (552)  |  Useful (250)  |  Way (1217)

Forests … are in fact the world’s air-conditioning system—the very lungs of the planet—and help to store the largest body of freshwater on the planet … essential to produce food for our planet’s growing population. The rainforests of the world also provide the livelihoods of more than a billion of the poorest people on this Earth… In simple terms, the rainforests, which encircle the world, are our very life-support system—and we are on the verge of switching it off.
Presidential Lecture (3 Nov 2008) at the Presidential Palace, Jakarta, Indonesia. On the Prince of Wales website.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Billion (95)  |  Body (537)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Earth (996)  |  Essential (199)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Food (199)  |  Forest (150)  |  Freshwater (3)  |  Largest (39)  |  Life (1795)  |  Livelihood (12)  |  Lung (34)  |  More (2559)  |  People (1005)  |  Planet (356)  |  Population (110)  |  Population Growth (8)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Rain Forest (29)  |  Simple (406)  |  Storage (6)  |  Store (48)  |  Support (147)  |  Switch (10)  |  System (537)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Verge (10)  |  World (1774)

Genuine religion has its root deep down in the heart of humanity and in the reality of things. It is not surprising that by our methods we fail to grasp it: the actions of the Deity make no appeal to any special sense, only a universal appeal; and our methods are, as we know, incompetent to detect complete uniformity. There is a principle of Relativity here, and unless we encounter flaw or jar or change, nothing in us responds; we are deaf and blind therefore to the Immanent Grandeur, unless we have insight enough to recognise in the woven fabric of existence, flowing steadily from the loom in an infinite progress towards perfection, the ever-growing garment of a transcendent God.
Continuity: The Presidential Address to the British Association (1913), 92-93.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Blind (95)  |  Change (593)  |  Complete (204)  |  Deep (233)  |  Deity (22)  |  Detect (44)  |  Down (456)  |  Enough (340)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Fail (185)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Garment (13)  |  Genuine (52)  |  God (757)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Heart (229)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Insight (102)  |  Know (1518)  |  Loom (20)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Principle (507)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reality (261)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Religion (361)  |  Root (120)  |  Sense (770)  |  Special (184)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Universal (189)

He who studies it [Nature] has continually the exquisite pleasure of discerning or half discerning and divining laws; regularities glimmer through an appearance of confusion, analogies between phenomena of a different order suggest themselves and set the imagination in motion; the mind is haunted with the sense of a vast unity not yet discoverable or nameable. There is food for contemplation which never runs short; you are gazing at an object which is always growing clearer, and yet always, in the very act of growing clearer, presenting new mysteries.
From 'Natural History', Macmillan's Magazine (1875), 31, 366.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Clearer (4)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Continuing (4)  |  Different (577)  |  Discerning (16)  |  Discover (553)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Food (199)  |  Gaze (21)  |  Glimmer (5)  |  Half (56)  |  Haunting (3)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Law (894)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Presenting (2)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Run (174)  |  Sense (770)  |  Set (394)  |  Short (197)  |  Study (653)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Through (849)  |  Unity (78)  |  Vast (177)

Here and elsewhere we shall not obtain the best insight into things until we actually see them growing from the beginning.
Aristotle
In Politics as quoted in James R. Newman, The World of Mathematics (1957). Vol. 1, 170.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (305)  |  Best (459)  |  Growth (187)  |  Insight (102)  |  Obtain (163)  |  See (1081)  |  Thing (1915)

How indispensable to a correct study of Nature is a perception of her true meaning. The fact will one day flower out into a truth. The season will mature and fructify what the understanding had cultivated. Mere accumulators of facts—collectors of materials for the master-workmen—are like those plants growing in dark forests, which “put forth only leaves instead of blossoms.”
(16 Dec 1837). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: I: 1837-1846 (1906), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Blossom (21)  |  Collector (9)  |  Correct (86)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Dark (140)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Flower (106)  |  Forest (150)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Master (178)  |  Material (353)  |  Mature (16)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Perception (97)  |  Plant (294)  |  Season (47)  |  Study (653)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Will (2355)  |  Workman (13)

Human evolution is nothing else but the natural continuation, at a collective level, of the perennial and cumulative process of “psychogenetic” arrangement of matter which we call life. … The whole history of mankind has been nothing else (and henceforth it will never be anything else) but an explosive outburst of ever-growing cerebration. … Life, if fully understood, is not a freak in the universe—nor man a freak in life. On the contrary, life physically culminates in man, just as energy physically culminates in life.
(1952). As quoted in Stephen Jay Gould, Hen's Teeth and Horse's Toes: Further Reflections in Natural History (1984, 1994), 246.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Call (769)  |  Continuation (20)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Cumulative (14)  |  Energy (344)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Explosive (23)  |  Freak (4)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Mankind (13)  |  Human (1468)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Matter (798)  |  Natural (796)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Perennial (9)  |  Process (423)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

I am reminded of the great French Marshal Lyautey, who once asked his gardener to plant a tree. The gardener objected that the tree was slow-growing and would not reach maturity for a hundred years. The Marshal replied, “In that case, there is no time to lose, plant it this afternoon.”
Address at the University of California, Berkeley, California (23 March 1962), in Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: John F. Kennedy (1962), 266. Kennedy used this story several times. The indicated source, Marshal Lyautey, has not been verified. Contact Webmaster if you know a primary source.
Science quotes on:  |  Afternoon (5)  |  Ask (411)  |  Gardener (4)  |  Great (1574)  |  Growth (187)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Lose (159)  |  Loss (110)  |  Maturity (14)  |  Object (422)  |  Plant (294)  |  Reach (281)  |  Slow (101)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Year (933)

I have been driven to assume for some time, especially in relation to the gases, a sort of conducting power for magnetism. Mere space is Zero. One substance being made to occupy a given portion of space will cause more lines of force to pass through that space than before, and another substance will cause less to pass. The former I now call Paramagnetic & the latter are the diamagnetic. The former need not of necessity assume a polarity of particles such as iron has with magnetic, and the latter do not assume any such polarity either direct or reverse. I do not say more to you just now because my own thoughts are only in the act of formation, but this I may say: that the atmosphere has an extraordinary magnetic constitution, & I hope & expect to find in it the cause of the annual & diurnal variations, but keep this to yourself until I have time to see what harvest will spring from my growing ideas.
Letter to William Whewell, 22 Aug 1850. In L. Pearce Williams (ed.), The Selected Correspondence of Michael Faraday (1971), Vol. 2, 589.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Direct (225)  |  Do (1908)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Formation (96)  |  Former (137)  |  Harvest (27)  |  Hope (299)  |  Idea (843)  |  Iron (96)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Particle (194)  |  Pass (238)  |  Polarity (5)  |  Portion (84)  |  Power (746)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Space (500)  |  Spring (133)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Variation (90)  |  Will (2355)  |  Zero (37)

I know Teddy Kennedy had fun at the Democratic convention when he said that I said that trees and vegetation caused 80 percent of the air pollution in this country. ... Well, now he was a little wrong about what I said. I didn't say 80 percent. I said 92 percent—93 percent, pardon me. And I didn’t say air pollution, I said oxides of nitrogen. Growing and decaying vegetation in this land are responsible for 93 percent of the oxides of nitrogen. ... If we are totally successful and can eliminate all the manmade oxides of nitrogen, we’ll still have 93 percent as much as we have in the air today.
[Reagan reconfirming his own pathetic lack of understanding of air pollutants.]
Address to senior citizens at Sea World, Orlando, Florida (9 Oct 1980). As quoted later in Douglas E. Kneeland, 'Teamsters Back Republican', New York Times (10 Oct 1980), D14.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Air Pollution (9)  |  All (4108)  |  Cause (541)  |  Country (251)  |  Decay (53)  |  Democratic (12)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Grow (238)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lack (119)  |  Little (707)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Pardon (7)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Say (984)  |  Still (613)  |  Successful (123)  |  Today (314)  |  Tree (246)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Wrong (234)

I observed on most collected stones the imprints of innumerable plant fragments which were so different from those which are growing in the Lyonnais, in the nearby provinces, and even in the rest of France, that I felt like collecting plants in a new world… The number of these leaves, the way they separated easily, and the great variety of plants whose imprints I saw, appeared to me just as many volumes of botany representing in the same quarry the oldest library of the world.
In 'Examen des causes des Impressions des Plantes marquees sur certaines Pierres des environs de Saint-Chaumont dans le Lionnais', Memoires de l’ Academie Royale des Sciences (1718), 364, as trans. by Albert V. and Marguerite Carozzi.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Botany (57)  |  Different (577)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Great (1574)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Library (48)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Observed (149)  |  Plant (294)  |  Province (35)  |  Quarry (13)  |  Rest (280)  |  Saw (160)  |  Stone (162)  |  Variety (132)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

I observed that plants not only have a faculty to correct bad air in six to ten days, by growing in it…but that they perform this important office in a complete manner in a few hours; that this wonderful operation is by no means owing to the vegetation of the plant, but to the influence of light of the sun upon the plant.
In Tobias George Smollett (ed.), 'Experiments Upon Vegetables', The Critical Review, Or, Annals of Literature (1779), 48, 334.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Bad (180)  |  Complete (204)  |  Hour (186)  |  Influence (222)  |  Light (607)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Observed (149)  |  Office (71)  |  Operation (213)  |  Owing (39)  |  Perform (121)  |  Photosynthesis (19)  |  Plant (294)  |  Sun (385)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Wonderful (149)

I remember growing up thinking that astronauts and their job was the coolest thing you could possibly do... But I absolutely couldn’t identify with the people who were astronauts. I thought they were movie stars.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Astronaut (32)  |  Cool (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  Growing Up (3)  |  Identify (13)  |  Job (82)  |  Movie (16)  |  People (1005)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Remember (179)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)

I strongly oppose cloning, as do most Americans. We recoil at the idea of growing human beings for spare body parts or creating life for our convenience. And while we must devote enormous energy to conquering disease, it is equally important that we pay attention to the moral concerns raised by the new frontier of human embryo stem cell research. Even the most noble ends do not justify any means.
'Address to the Nation on Stem Cell Research', (9 Aug 2001) in Public Papers Of The Presidents Of The United States, George W. Bush, 2001 (2004), Book 2, 955.
Science quotes on:  |  American (46)  |  Attention (190)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Cloning (8)  |  Concern (228)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Creating (7)  |  Devote (35)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Embryo (28)  |  End (590)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Equally (130)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Idea (843)  |  Important (209)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Moral (195)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Noble (90)  |  Oppose (24)  |  Part (222)  |  Recoil (6)  |  Research (664)  |  Spare (9)  |  Stem (31)  |  Stem Cell (11)  |  Strongly (9)

I trust ... I have succeeded in convincing you that modern chemistry is not, as it has so long appeared, an ever-growing accumulation of isolated facts, as impossible for a single intellect to co-ordinate as for a single memory to grasp.
The intricate formulae that hang upon these walls, and the boundless variety of phenomena they illustrate, are beginning to be for us as a labyrinth once impassable, but to which we have at length discovered the clue. A sense of mastery and power succeeds in our minds to the sort of weary despair with which we at first contemplated their formidable array. For now, by the aid of a few general principles, we find ourselves able to unravel the complexities of these formulae, to marshal the compounds which they represent in orderly series; nay, even to multiply their numbers at our will, and in a great measure to forecast their nature ere we have called them into existence. It is the great movement of modern chemistry that we have thus, for an hour, seen passing before us. It is a movement as of light spreading itself over a waste of obscurity, as of law diffusing order throughout a wilderness of confusion, and there is surely in its contemplation something of the pleasure which attends the spectacle of a beautiful daybreak, something of the grandeur belonging to the conception of a world created out of chaos.
Concluding remark for paper presented at the Friday Discourse of the the Royal Institution (7 Apr 1865). 'On the Combining Power of Atoms', Proceedings of the Royal Institution (1865), 4, No. 42, 416.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Aid (97)  |  Attend (65)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Call (769)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Clue (17)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Compound (113)  |  Conception (154)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Despair (40)  |  Discover (553)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Forecast (13)  |  Formula (98)  |  General (511)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hang (45)  |  Hour (186)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Isolated (14)  |  Labyrinth (10)  |  Law (894)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Measure (232)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  Movement (155)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Passing (76)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Represent (155)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  Single (353)  |  Something (719)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Surely (101)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Trust (66)  |  Unravel (14)  |  Variety (132)  |  Wall (67)  |  Waste (101)  |  Weary (11)  |  Wilderness (45)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

I venture to assert that the feelings one has when the beautiful symbolism of the infinitesimal calculus first gets a meaning, or when the delicate analysis of Fourier has been mastered, or while one follows Clerk Maxwell or Thomson into the strange world of electricity, now growing so rapidly in form and being, or can almost feel with Stokes the pulsations of light that gives nature to our eyes, or track with Clausius the courses of molecules we can measure, even if we know with certainty that we can never see them I venture to assert that these feelings are altogether comparable to those aroused in us by an exquisite poem or a lofty thought.
In paper (May 1891) read before Bath Branch of the Teachers’ Guild, published in The Practical Teacher (July 1891), reprinted as 'Geometry', in Frederic Spencer, Chapters on the Aims and Practice of Teaching (1897), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Arouse (12)  |  Assert (66)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Being (1278)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Rudolf Clausius (9)  |  Clerk (13)  |  Comparable (6)  |  Course (409)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Eye (419)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Infinitesimal Calculus (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Light (607)  |  Lofty (13)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Measure (232)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Poem (96)  |  Pulsation (4)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  See (1081)  |  Sir George Gabriel Stokes (3)  |  Strange (157)  |  Symbolism (3)  |  Sir J.J. Thomson (18)  |  Thought (953)  |  Track (38)  |  World (1774)

I was interested in flying beginning at age 7, when a close family friend took me in his little airplane. And I remember looking at the wheel of the airplane as we rolled down the runway, because I wanted to remember the exact moment that I first went flying... the other thing growing up is that I was always interested in science.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Airplane (41)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Close (69)  |  Down (456)  |  Exact (68)  |  Family (94)  |  First (1283)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Friend (168)  |  Growing Up (3)  |  Interest (386)  |  Little (707)  |  Looking (189)  |  Moment (253)  |  Other (2236)  |  Remember (179)  |  Roll (40)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Want (497)  |  Wheel (50)

If human thought is a growth, like all other growths, its logic is without foundation of its own, and is only the adjusting constructiveness of all other growing things. A tree cannot find out, as it were, how to blossom, until comes blossom-time. A social growth cannot find out the use of steam engines, until comes steam-engine-time.
Lo! (1931, 1941), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Engine (98)  |  Find (998)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Growth (187)  |  Human (1468)  |  Invention (369)  |  Logic (287)  |  Other (2236)  |  Progress (465)  |  Social (252)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Use (766)

Imagine a school-boy who has outgrown his clothes. Imagine the repairs made on the vestments where the enlarged frame had burst the narrow limits of the enclosure. Imagine the additions made where the projecting limbs had fairly and far emerged beyond the confines of the garment. Imagine the boy still growing, and the clothes, mended allover, now more than ever in want of mending—such is chemistry, and such is nomenclature.
Chemical Recreations (1834), 206, footnote.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Boy (94)  |  Burst (39)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Enclosure (4)  |  Garment (13)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Limit (280)  |  Mending (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  School (219)  |  Still (613)  |  Vestment (2)  |  Want (497)

In a moment the ashes are made, but a forest is a long time growing.
Momento fit cinis: diu sylva.
Cited as from Quæstionum Naturalium, Book III. 27 in Kate Louise Roberts (ed.) Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations (1922), 798.
Science quotes on:  |  Ash (20)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Fit (134)  |  Forest (150)  |  Grow (238)  |  Long (790)  |  Moment (253)  |  Time (1877)

In experimenting on the arc, my aim was not so much to add to the large number of isolated facts that had already been discovered, as to form some idea of the bearing of these upon one another, and thus to arrive at a clear conception of what takes place in each part of the arc and carbons at every moment. The attempt to correlate all the known phenomena, and to bind them together into one consistent whole, led to the deduction of new facts, which, when duly tested by experiment, became parts of the growing body, and, themselves, opened up fresh questions, to be answered in their turn by experiment.
In The Electric Arc (1902), Preface, iii. Ayrton described the growth of her published work on the electric arc, from a series of articles in The Electrician in 1895-6, to the full book, which “has attained to its present proportions almost with the growth of an organic body.”
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arc (12)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Body (537)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Form (959)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Idea (843)  |  Known (454)  |  Large (394)  |  Moment (253)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Open (274)  |  Question (621)  |  Test (211)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  Whole (738)

In India, rice is grown below sea level in Kuttanad in Kerala and at above 3,000 meters in Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh. The importance of rice as the mainstay of a sustainable food security system will grow during this century because of climate change. No other cereal has the resilience of rice to grow under a wide range of growing conditions.
In 'Science and Shaping the Future of Rice', collected in Pramod K. Aggarwal et al. (eds.), 206 International Rice Congress: Science, Technology, and Trade for Peace and Prosperity (2007), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Century (310)  |  Change (593)  |  Climate (97)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Condition (356)  |  Food (199)  |  Food Security (6)  |  Grow (238)  |  Importance (286)  |  India (16)  |  Other (2236)  |  Range (99)  |  Resilience (2)  |  Rice (4)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sea Level (5)  |  Security (47)  |  Sustainable (12)  |  Sustainable Agriculture (3)  |  System (537)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)

In science, attempts at formulating hierarchies are always doomed to eventual failure. A Newton will always be followed by an Einstein, a Stahl by a Lavoisier; and who can say who will come after us? What the human mind has fabricated must be subject to all the changes—which are not progress—that the human mind must undergo. The 'last words' of the sciences are often replaced, more often forgotten. Science is a relentlessly dialectical process, though it suffers continuously under the necessary relativation of equally indispensable absolutes. It is, however, possible that the ever-growing intellectual and moral pollution of our scientific atmosphere will bring this process to a standstill. The immense library of ancient Alexandria was both symptom and cause of the ossification of the Greek intellect. Even now I know of some who feel that we know too much about the wrong things.
Voices in the Labyrinth: Nature, Man, and Science (1979), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Doom (32)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Equally (130)  |  Failure (161)  |  Feel (367)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Greek (107)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Immense (86)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Last Word (10)  |  Last Words (6)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  Library (48)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Possible (552)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Georg Ernst Stahl (8)  |  Subject (521)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Wrong (234)

In these strenuous times, we are likely to become morbid and look constantly on the dark side of life, and spend entirely too much time considering and brooding over what we can't do, rather than what we can do, and instead of growing morose and despondent over opportunities either real or imaginary that are shut from us, let us rejoice at the many unexplored fields in which there is unlimited fame and fortune to the successful explorer and upon which there is no color line; simply the survival of the fittest.
In article urging African-Americans to engage in plant breeding to develop improved species.'A New Industry for Colored Men and Women', Colored American (Jan 1908, 14, 33. Cited in Linda O. McMurry, George Washington Carver, Scientist and Symbol (1982), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Become (815)  |  Color (137)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Dark (140)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Explorer (28)  |  Fame (50)  |  Field (364)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Morbid (3)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Research (664)  |  Shut (41)  |  Side (233)  |  Spend (95)  |  Strenuous (5)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Survival (94)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (40)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unlimited (22)

Instead of disbursing her annual millions for these dye stuffs, England will, beyond question, at no distant day become herself the greatest coloring producing country in the world; nay, by the very strangest of revolutions she may ere long send her coal-derived blues to indigo-growing India, her tar-distilled crimson to cochineal-producing Mexico, and her fossil substitutes for quercitron and safflower to China, Japan and the other countries whence these articles are now derived.
From 'Report on the Chemical Section of the Exhibition of 1862.' As quoted in Sir Frederick Abel, 'The Work of the Imperial Institute' Nature (28 Apr 1887), 35, No. 913, 620. Abel called the display of the first dye-products derived from coal tar at the Exhibition of 1862, “one of the features of greatest novelty.”
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Blue (56)  |  China (23)  |  Coal (57)  |  Color (137)  |  Country (251)  |  Crimson (4)  |  Derived (5)  |  Distilled (2)  |  Dye (10)  |  England (40)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Greatest (328)  |  India (16)  |  Japan (8)  |  Long (790)  |  Other (2236)  |  Producing (6)  |  Question (621)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Send (22)  |  Strangest (4)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

It is hard to think of fissionable materials when fashioned into bombs as being a source of happiness. However this may be, if with such destructive weapons men are to survive, they must grow rapidly in human greatness. A new level of human understanding is needed. The reward for using the atom’s power towards man’s welfare is great and sure. The punishment for its misuse would seem to be death and the destruction of the civilization that has been growing for a thousand years. These are the alternatives that atomic power, as the steel of Daedalus, presents to mankind. We are forced to grow to greater manhood.
Atomic Quest: A Personal Narrative (1956), xix.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Atomic Power (9)  |  Being (1278)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Death (388)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Fission (10)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Grow (238)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Hard (243)  |  Human (1468)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Material (353)  |  Misuse (13)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Punishment (14)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Reward (68)  |  Steel (21)  |  Survive (79)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Understanding (513)  |  War (225)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Welfare (25)  |  Year (933)

It is not failure but success that is forcing man off this earth. It is not sickness but the triumph of health... Our capacity to survive has expanded beyond the capacity of Earth to support us. The pains we are feeling are growing pains. We can solve growth problems in direct proportion to our capacity to find new worlds... If man stays on Earth, his extinction is sure even if he lasts till the sun expands and destroys him... It is no longer reasonable to assume that the meaning of life lies on this earth alone. If Earth is all there is for man, we are reaching the foreseeable end of man.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Assume (38)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Direct (225)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Expand (53)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Failure (161)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Foreseeable (3)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growth (187)  |  Health (193)  |  Last (426)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  New (1216)  |  New Worlds (5)  |  Pain (136)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Solve (130)  |  Stay (25)  |  Success (302)  |  Sun (385)  |  Support (147)  |  Survive (79)  |  Triumph (73)  |  World (1774)

It is one of the little ironies of our times that while the layman was being indoctrinated with the stereotype image of black holes as the ultimate cookie monsters, the professionals have been swinging round to the almost directly opposing view that black holes, like growing old, are really not so bad when you consider the alternative.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alternative (29)  |  Bad (180)  |  Being (1278)  |  Black Hole (17)  |  Black Holes (4)  |  Consider (416)  |  Cookie (2)  |  Directly (22)  |  Grow (238)  |  Image (96)  |  Irony (8)  |  Layman (21)  |  Little (707)  |  Monster (31)  |  Old (481)  |  Oppose (24)  |  Professional (70)  |  Really (78)  |  Round (26)  |  Stereotype (4)  |  Swing (11)  |  Time (1877)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  View (488)

It is raining DNA outside. On the bank of the Oxford canal at the bottom of my garden is a large willow tree, and it is pumping downy seeds into the air. ... [spreading] DNA whose coded characters spell out specific instructions for building willow trees that will shed a new generation of downy seeds. … It is raining instructions out there; it’s raining programs; it’s raining tree-growing, fluff-spreading, algorithms. That is not a metaphor, it is the plain truth. It couldn’t be any plainer if it were raining floppy discs.
The Blind Watchmaker (1986), 111.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Algorithm (5)  |  Bank (31)  |  Building (156)  |  Canal (17)  |  Character (243)  |  DNA (77)  |  Garden (60)  |  Generation (242)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Large (394)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  New (1216)  |  Outside (141)  |  Oxford (16)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Seed (93)  |  Specific (95)  |  Tree (246)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)

It was my good fortune to be linked with Mme. Curie through twenty years of sublime and unclouded friendship. I came to admire her human grandeur to an ever growing degree. Her strength, her purity of will, her austerity toward herself, her objectivity, her incorruptible judgement— all these were of a kind seldom found joined in a single individual... The greatest scientific deed of her life—proving the existence of radioactive elements and isolating them—owes its accomplishment not merely to bold intuition but to a devotion and tenacity in execution under the most extreme hardships imaginable, such as the history of experimental science has not often witnessed.
Out of My Later Years (1950), 227-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  All (4108)  |  Austerity (3)  |  Bold (22)  |  Marie Curie (32)  |  Deed (34)  |  Degree (276)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Element (310)  |  Execution (25)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Friendship (18)  |  Good (889)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Greatest (328)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  Objectivity (16)  |  Owe (71)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Single (353)  |  Strength (126)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Tenacity (10)  |  Through (849)  |  Will (2355)  |  Witness (54)  |  Year (933)

It... [can] be easily shown:
1. That all present mountains did not exist from the beginning of things.
2. That there is no growing of mountains.
3. That the rocks or mountains have nothing in common with the bones of animals except a certain resemblance in hardness, since they agree in neither matter nor manner of production, nor in composition, nor in function, if one may be permitted to affirm aught about a subject otherwise so little known as are the functions of things.
4. That the extension of crests of mountains, or chains, as some prefer to call them, along the lines of certain definite zones of the earth, accords with neither reason nor experience.
5. That mountains can be overthrown, and fields carried over from one side of a high road across to the other; that peaks of mountains can be raised and lowered, that the earth can be opened and closed again, and that other things of this kind occur which those who in their reading of history wish to escape the name of credulous, consider myths.
The Prodromus of Nicolaus Steno's Dissertation Concerning a Solid Body enclosed by Process of Nature within a Solid (1669), trans. J. G. Winter (1916), 232-4.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aught (6)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Bone (95)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Closed (38)  |  Common (436)  |  Composition (84)  |  Consider (416)  |  Credulous (9)  |  Definite (110)  |  Earth (996)  |  Escape (80)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extension (59)  |  Field (364)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Function (228)  |  Growth (187)  |  High (362)  |  History (673)  |  Kind (557)  |  Known (454)  |  Little (707)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Myth (56)  |  Name (333)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Occur (150)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overthrown (8)  |  Present (619)  |  Production (183)  |  Reading (133)  |  Reason (744)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Rock (161)  |  Side (233)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Wish (212)

Just as Americans have discovered the hidden energy costs in a multitude of products—in refrigerating a steak, for example, on its way to the butcher—they are about to discover the hidden water costs. Beginning with the water that irrigated the corn that was fed to the steer, the steak may have accounted for 3,500 gallons. The water that goes into a 1,000-pound steer would float a destroyer. It takes 14,935 gallons of water to grow a bushel of wheat, 60,000 gallons to produce a ton of steel, 120 gallons to put a single egg on the breakfast table.
From 'The Browning of America: Drought, Waste and Pollution Threaten a Water Shortage', Newsweek (23 Feb 1981), 26-30. In long excerpt in William Shurtleff and Akiko Aoyagi, History of Soymilk and Other Non-Dairy Milks (1226-2013) (2013), 1126-1127.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  America (127)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Breakfast (9)  |  Bushel (3)  |  Butcher (9)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Corn (19)  |  Cost (86)  |  Destroyer (4)  |  Discover (553)  |  Egg (69)  |  Energy (344)  |  Feed (27)  |  Float (30)  |  Floating (3)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Irrigation (11)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Product (160)  |  Production (183)  |  Refrigeration (3)  |  Single (353)  |  Steak (3)  |  Steel (21)  |  Steer (4)  |  Table (104)  |  Ton (21)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wheat (10)

Just as it will never be successfully challenged that the French language, progressively developing and growing more perfect day by day, has the better claim to serve as a developed court and world language, so no one will venture to estimate lightly the debt which the world owes to mathematicians, in that they treat in their own language matters of the utmost importance, and govern, determine and decide whatever is subject, using the word in the highest sense, to number and measurement.
In 'Sprüche in Prosa', Natur, III, 868.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Claim (146)  |  Court (33)  |  Debt (13)  |  Decide (41)  |  Determine (144)  |  Develop (268)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  French (20)  |  Govern (64)  |  Grow (238)  |  High (362)  |  Importance (286)  |  Language (293)  |  Lightly (2)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Matter (798)  |  Measurement (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Owe (71)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Progressive (17)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serve (59)  |  Subject (521)  |  Successful (123)  |  Treat (35)  |  Utmost (12)  |  Venture (18)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

Men can construct a science with very few instruments, or with very plain instruments; but no one on earth could construct a science with unreliable instruments. A man might work out the whole of mathematics with a handful of pebbles, but not with a handful of clay which was always falling apart into new fragments, and falling together into new combinations. A man might measure heaven and earth with a reed, but not with a growing reed.
Heretics (1905), 146-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Combination (144)  |  Construct (124)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Handful (13)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  New (1216)  |  Pebble (25)  |  Science (3879)  |  Together (387)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

Most people … do not know that when the white man came Honolulu was a treeless, sandy plain, with a fringe of cocoanut trees along the shore. Honolulu, as it is to-day, is the creation of the foreigner. It is his handiwork. Walk into one of the numerous yards where plants and trees and vines are growing, as though on their native soil, and you will find that every one of them has been imported within a comparatively recent period. … Here is the rubber tree, the banyan, the baobab, the litchee, the avocado, the mango, and palms innumerable.
In John Leavitt Stevens and W.B. Oleson, 'Honolulu, and Other Places of Interest', Picturesque Hawaii (1894), 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Avocado (3)  |  Comparatively (8)  |  Creation (327)  |  Do (1908)  |  Find (998)  |  Foreigner (3)  |  Fringe (6)  |  Grow (238)  |  Handiwork (6)  |  Import (5)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Native (38)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Palm (5)  |  People (1005)  |  Period (198)  |  Plain (33)  |  Plant (294)  |  Recent (77)  |  Rubber (9)  |  Sandy (2)  |  Shore (24)  |  Soil (86)  |  Tree (246)  |  Vine (3)  |  Walk (124)  |  White (127)  |  Will (2355)

Natural history is a matter of observation; it is a harvest which you gather when and where you find it growing. Birds and squirrels and flowers are not always in season, but philosophy we have always with us. It is a crop which we can grow and reap at all times and in all places and it has its own value and brings its own satisfaction.
From Under the Apple-Trees (1916), Preface.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bird (149)  |  Crop (25)  |  Find (998)  |  Flower (106)  |  Gather (72)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growth (187)  |  Harvest (27)  |  History (673)  |  Matter (798)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Observation (555)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Reap (17)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Season (47)  |  Squirrel (7)  |  Time (1877)  |  Value (365)

Nine out of the 10 big fish that were around when I was growing up–the swordfish, the tuna, the marlin, the shark–90 percent of them are gone. If there was that many sharks when I was a kid, there are now this many.
pbs.org/wnet/tavissmiley/interviews/actor-ted-danson/
Science quotes on:  |  Fish (120)  |  Growing Up (3)  |  Kid (15)  |  Marlin (2)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Shark (10)  |  Swordfish (2)  |  Tuna (4)

Once you go from 10 people to 100, you already don’t know who everyone is. So at that stage you might as well keep growing, to get the advantages of scale.
As quoted, without citation, in Can Akdeniz, Fast MBA (2014), 281.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Already (222)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Grow (238)  |  Keep (101)  |  Know (1518)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Scale (121)  |  Stage (143)

One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant teachers, but with gratitude to those who touched our human feelings. The curriculum is so much necessary raw material, but warmth is the vital element for the growing plant and for the soul of the child.
Carl Jung
From The Gifted Child collected in Collected Works (1954, 1971), Vol. 17, 144. Translated from 'Der Begabt', Psychologie und Erziehung (1946).
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Back (390)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Child (307)  |  Curriculum (10)  |  Element (310)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Gratitude (13)  |  Human (1468)  |  Look (582)  |  Material (353)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Plant (294)  |  Raw (28)  |  Soul (226)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Touch (141)  |  Vital (85)  |  Warmth (21)

Ploughing deep, your recipe for killing weeds, is also the recipe for almost every good thing in farming. … We now plough horizontally following the curvatures of the hills and hollows, on the dead level, however crooked the lines may be. Every furrow thus acts as a reservoir to receive and retain the waters, all of which go to the benefit of the growing plant, instead of running off into streams … In point of beauty nothing can exceed that of the waving lines and rows winding along the face of the hills and vallies.
In letter (17 Apr 1813) from Jefferson at Monticello to Charles Willson Peale. Collected in The Jefferson Papers: 1770-1826 (1900), 178-180.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Crooked (3)  |  Curvature (8)  |  Deep (233)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Face (212)  |  Farming (8)  |  Following (16)  |  Furrow (4)  |  Good (889)  |  Hill (20)  |  Hollow (4)  |  Horizontal (9)  |  Killing (14)  |  Level (67)  |  Line (91)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Plant (294)  |  Plough (13)  |  Ploughing (3)  |  Point (580)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recipe (7)  |  Reservoir (7)  |  Retain (56)  |  Row (9)  |  Running (61)  |  Stream (81)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Valley (32)  |  Water (481)  |  Water Conservation (3)  |  Weed (18)  |  Winding (8)

Science and technology, and the various forms of art, all unite humanity in a single and interconnected system. As science progresses, the worldwide cooperation of scientists and technologists becomes more and more of a special and distinct intellectual community of friendship, in which, in place of antagonism, there is growing up a mutually advantageous sharing of work, a coordination of efforts, a common language for the exchange of information, and a solidarity, which are in many cases independent of the social and political differences of individual states.
In The Medvedev Papers (1970).
Science quotes on:  |  Advantageous (10)  |  All (4108)  |  Antagonism (6)  |  Art (657)  |  Become (815)  |  Common (436)  |  Community (104)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Coordination (9)  |  Difference (337)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Effort (227)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Form (959)  |  Friendship (18)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Individual (404)  |  Information (166)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Language (293)  |  More (2559)  |  Political (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Technology (45)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sharing (11)  |  Single (353)  |  Social (252)  |  Special (184)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Technologist (7)  |  Technology (257)  |  Unite (42)  |  Various (200)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worldwide (16)

Science can never be a closed book. It is like a tree, ever growing, ever reaching new heights. Occasionally the lower branches, no longer giving nourishment to the tree, slough off. We should not be ashamed to change our methods; rather we should be ashamed never to do so.
Papers of Charles V. Chapin, M.D.: A Review of Public Health Realities (1934), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Change (593)  |  Closed (38)  |  Do (1908)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Tree (246)

Science is triumphant with far-ranging success, but its triumph is somehow clouded by growing difficulties in providing for the simple necessities of human life on earth.
In Science and Survival (1966).
Science quotes on:  |  Cloud (104)  |  Earth (996)  |  Human (1468)  |  Life (1795)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Success (302)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Triumphant (10)

Several times every day I observed the portions of the polyp with a magnifying glass. On the 4th December, that is to say on the ninth day after having cut the polyp, I seemed in the morning to be able to perceive, on the edges of the anterior end of the second part (the part that had neither head nor arms), three little points arising from those edges. They immediately made me think of the horns that serve as the legs and arms of the polyp. Nevertheless I did not want to decide at once that these were actually arms that were beginning to grow. Throughout the next day I continually observed these points: this excited me extremely, and awaited with impatience the moment when I should know with certainty what they were. At last, on the following day, they were so big that there was no longer any room for doubt that they were actually arms growing at the anterior extremity of this second part. The next day two more arms started to grow out, and a few days later three more. The second part thus had eight of them, and they were all in a short time as long as those of the first part, that is to say as long as those the polyp possessed before it was cut. I then no longer found any difference between the second part and a polyp that had never been cut. I had remarked the same thing about the first part since the day after the operation. When I observed them with the magnifying glass with all the attention of which I was capable, each of the two appeared perceptibly to be a complete polyp, and they performed all the functions that were known to me: they extended, contracted, and walked.
Mémoires, pour servir à l'histoire d'un genre de polyps d'eau douce à bras en forme de cornes (1744), 7-16. Trans. John R. Baker, in Abraham Trembley of Geneva: Scientist and Philosopher 1710-1784 (1952), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anterior (4)  |  Appeared (4)  |  Arising (22)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Attention (190)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Capable (168)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Complete (204)  |  Cut (114)  |  Difference (337)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Edge (47)  |  End (590)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extremity (7)  |  First (1283)  |  Function (228)  |  Glass (92)  |  Grow (238)  |  Horn (18)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impatience (13)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Leg (34)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Magnifying (2)  |  Magnifying Glass (3)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Morning (94)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Next (236)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Operation (213)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performed (3)  |  Point (580)  |  Polyp (4)  |  Portion (84)  |  Possess (156)  |  Remark (28)  |  Room (40)  |  Say (984)  |  Short (197)  |  Start (221)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Walk (124)  |  Want (497)

Sir Edward has calculated that quick-growing Indian eucalyptus trees have a yield of nine and one-quarter tons of wood an acre a year. As the wood contains 0.8 per cent of the solar energy reaching the ground in the tropics in the form of heat, Sir Edward has suggested that in theory eucalyptus forests could provide a perpetual source of fuel. He has said that by rotational tree planting and felling, a forest of twenty kilometers square would enable a wood consuming power station to provide 10,000 kilowatts of power.
In 'British Hope to Use Green Trees of Jungles As Source of Power for New Steam Engine,' New York Times (27 Jun 1953), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Acre (12)  |  Enable (119)  |  Energy (344)  |  Forest (150)  |  Form (959)  |  Ground (217)  |  Heat (174)  |  Indian (27)  |  Kilometer (10)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Power (746)  |  Renewable Energy (14)  |  Solar Energy (20)  |  Square (70)  |  Station (29)  |  Theory (970)  |  Ton (21)  |  Tree (246)  |  Wood (92)  |  Year (933)  |  Yield (81)

Suppose [an] imaginary physicist, the student of Niels Bohr, is shown an experiment in which a virus particle enters a bacterial cell and 20 minutes later the bacterial cell is lysed and 100 virus particles are liberated. He will say: “How come, one particle has become 100 particles of the same kind in 20 minutes? That is very interesting. Let us find out how it happens! How does the particle get in to the bacterium? How does it multiply? Does it multiply like a bacterium, growing and dividing, or does it multiply by an entirely different mechanism ? Does it have to be inside the bacterium to do this multiplying, or can we squash the bacterium and have the multiplication go on as before? Is this multiplying a trick of organic chemistry which the organic chemists have not yet discovered ? Let us find out. This is so simple a phenomenon that the answers cannot be hard to find. In a few months we will know. All we have to do is to study how conditions will influence the multiplication. We will do a few experiments at different temperatures, in different media, with different viruses, and we will know. Perhaps we may have to break into the bacteria at intermediate stages between infection and lysis. Anyhow, the experiments only take a few hours each, so the whole problem can not take long to solve.”
[Eight years later] he has not got anywhere in solving the problem he set out to solve. But [he may say to you] “Well, I made a slight mistake. I could not do it in a few months. Perhaps it will take a few decades, and perhaps it will take the help of a few dozen other people. But listen to what I have found, perhaps you will be interested to join me.”
From 'Experiments with Bacterial Viruses (Bacteriophages)', Harvey Lecture (1946), 41, 161-162. As cited in Robert Olby, The Path of the Double Helix: The Discovery of DNA (1974, 1994), 237.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Become (815)  |  Break (99)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Condition (356)  |  Decade (59)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Divide (75)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enter (141)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Find (998)  |  Grow (238)  |  Happen (274)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hour (186)  |  Infection (27)  |  Influence (222)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Listen (73)  |  Long (790)  |  Lysis (4)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Media (13)  |  Minute (125)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Month (88)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  People (1005)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Problem (676)  |  Say (984)  |  Set (394)  |  Simple (406)  |  Solve (130)  |  Squash (4)  |  Stage (143)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Trick (35)  |  Virus (27)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

The belief is growing on me that the disease is communicated by the bite of the mosquito. … She always injects a small quantity of fluid with her bite—what if the parasites get into the system in this manner.
Letter (27 May 1896) to Patrick Manson. In The Great Malaria Problem and Its Solution: From the Memoirs of Ronald Ross (1988), 72. Ross asked for Manson’s opinion; the ellipsis above, in full is: “What do you think?” As quoted in William Derek Foster, A History of Parasitology (1965), 173. (It was for this insight that Ross was awarded a Nobel Prize.)
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Bite (17)  |  Disease (328)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Injection (9)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mosquito (14)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Small (477)  |  System (537)  |  Think (1086)

The cutting of primeval forest and other disasters, fueled by the demands of growing human populations, are the overriding threat to biological diversity everywhere. (1992)
The Diversity of Life (1999), 259
Science quotes on:  |  Biodiversity (11)  |  Biological (137)  |  Cutting (6)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Demand (123)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Forest (150)  |  Human (1468)  |  Other (2236)  |  Population (110)  |  Primeval (15)  |  Threat (30)

The first effect of the mind growing cultivated is that processes once multiple get to be performed in a single act. Lazarus has called this the progressive “condensation” of thought. ... Steps really sink from sight. An advanced thinker sees the relations of his topics is such masses and so instantaneously that when he comes to explain to younger minds it is often hard ... Bowditch, who translated and annotated Laplace's Méchanique Céleste, said that whenever his author prefaced a proposition by the words “it is evident,” he knew that many hours of hard study lay before him.
In The Principles of Psychology (1918), Vol. 2, 369-370.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Advanced (11)  |  Author (167)  |  Nathaniel Bowditch (3)  |  Call (769)  |  Condensation (12)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Effect (393)  |  Evident (91)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  First (1283)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hour (186)  |  Instantaneous (3)  |  It Is Evident (5)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (62)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Multiple (16)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Preface (8)  |  Process (423)  |  Progressive (17)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Relation (157)  |  See (1081)  |  Sight (132)  |  Single (353)  |  Sink (37)  |  Sophistication (9)  |  Step (231)  |  Study (653)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Thought (953)  |  Topic (21)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Word (619)  |  Younger (21)

The golden age of mathematics—that was not the age of Euclid, it is ours. Ours is the age when no less than six international congresses have been held in the course of nine years. It is in our day that more than a dozen mathematical societies contain a growing membership of more than two thousand men representing the centers of scientific light throughout the great culture nations of the world. It is in our time that over five hundred scientific journals are each devoted in part, while more than two score others are devoted exclusively, to the publication of mathematics. It is in our time that the Jahrbuch über die Fortschritte der Mathematik, though admitting only condensed abstracts with titles, and not reporting on all the journals, has, nevertheless, grown to nearly forty huge volumes in as many years. It is in our time that as many as two thousand books and memoirs drop from the mathematical press of the world in a single year, the estimated number mounting up to fifty thousand in the last generation. Finally, to adduce yet another evidence of a similar kind, it requires not less than seven ponderous tomes of the forthcoming Encyclopaedie der Mathematischen Wissenschaften to contain, not expositions, not demonstrations, but merely compact reports and bibliographic notices sketching developments that have taken place since the beginning of the nineteenth century.
In Lectures on Science, Philosophy and Art (1908), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  19th Century (33)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Admit (45)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Bibliography (3)  |  Book (392)  |  Center (33)  |  Century (310)  |  Compact (13)  |  Condense (13)  |  Congress (19)  |  Course (409)  |  Culture (143)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Development (422)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Dozen (10)  |  Drop (76)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Exposition (15)  |  Generation (242)  |  Golden (45)  |  Golden Age (10)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grow (238)  |  Huge (25)  |  Hundred (229)  |  International (37)  |  Journal (30)  |  Kind (557)  |  Last (426)  |  Light (607)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Membership (5)  |  Memoir (13)  |  Mere (84)  |  Merely (316)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Mount (42)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Notice (77)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Ponderous (2)  |  Press (21)  |  Publication (101)  |  Report (38)  |  Reporting (9)  |  Represent (155)  |  Require (219)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Score (8)  |  Single (353)  |  Sketch (8)  |  Society (326)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Title (18)  |  Two (937)  |  Volume (19)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

The greatest scandal of the century in American psychiatry … is the growing mania among thousands of inept therapists, family counselors, and social workers for arousing false memories of childhood sexual abuse.
In 'Notes of a Fringe-Watcher: The Tragedies of False Memories', Skeptical Inquirer (Fall 1994), 18, 464.
Science quotes on:  |  20th Century (36)  |  Abuse (22)  |  American (46)  |  Arouse (12)  |  Century (310)  |  Childhood (38)  |  False (100)  |  Family (94)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Inept (4)  |  Mania (3)  |  Memory (134)  |  Psychiatry (26)  |  Scandal (5)  |  Sexual (26)  |  Social (252)  |  Therapist (2)  |  Thousand (331)

The growing complexity of civilized life demands with each age broader and more exact knowledge as to the material surroundings and greater precision in our recognition of the invisible forces or tendencies about us.
From Presidential Address (5 Dec 1896) to the Biological Society of Washington, 'The Malarial Parasite and Other Pathogenic Protozoa', Popular Science Monthly (Mar 1897), 642.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Broader (3)  |  Civilized (18)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Demand (123)  |  Exact (68)  |  Force (487)  |  Greater (288)  |  Grow (238)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Material (353)  |  More (2559)  |  Precision (68)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Surrounding (13)  |  Tendency (99)

The inspirational value of the space program is probably of far greater importance to education than any input of dollars... A whole generation is growing up which has been attracted to the hard disciplines of science and engineering by the romance of space.
Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, Buzz Aldrin, Edwin E. Aldrin et al., First on the Moon (1970), 376.
Science quotes on:  |  Discipline (77)  |  Education (378)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Generation (242)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hard (243)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Romance (15)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Engineering (16)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Program (7)  |  Value (365)  |  Whole (738)

The most ominous conflict of our time is the difference of opinion, of outlook, between men of letters, historians, philosophers, the so-called humanists, on the one side and scientists on the other. The gap cannot but increase because of the intolerance of both and the fact that science is growing by leaps and bounds.
The History of Science and the New Humanism (1931), 69.Omnious;Conflict;Difference;Opinion;Outlook;Men OfLetters;Historian;Philosopher;Humanist;So-Called;Scientist;Gap;Intolerance;Fact;Growth;Leap;Bound
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Bound (119)  |  Call (769)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Difference (337)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Gap (33)  |  Growth (187)  |  Historian (54)  |  Humanist (7)  |  Increase (210)  |  Intolerance (8)  |  Leap (53)  |  Letter (109)  |  Man Of Letters (3)  |  Most (1731)  |  Ominous (4)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outlook (30)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Side (233)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Time (1877)

The open society, the unrestricted access to knowledge, the unplanned and uninhibited association of men for its furtherance—these are what may make a vast, complex, ever growing, ever changing, ever more specialized and expert technological world, nevertheless a world of human community.
'Science and the Common Understanding' (1954), 95. Reprinted in John Dewey and Julius A. Sigler, Classical Selections On Great Issues, Vol. 8, Science, Technology, and Society (1997), 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Access (20)  |  Association (46)  |  Community (104)  |  Complex (188)  |  Expert (65)  |  Furtherance (4)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  More (2559)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Open (274)  |  Society (326)  |  Technological (61)  |  Vast (177)  |  World (1774)

The professor may choose familiar topics as a starting point. The students collect material, work problems, observe regularities, frame hypotheses, discover and prove theorems for themselves. … the student knows what he is doing and where he is going; he is secure in his mastery of the subject, strengthened in confidence of himself. He has had the experience of discovering mathematics. He no longer thinks of mathematics as static dogma learned by rote. He sees mathematics as something growing and developing, mathematical concepts as something continually revised and enriched in the light of new knowledge. The course may have covered a very limited region, but it should leave the student ready to explore further on his own.
In A Concrete Approach to Abstract Algebra (1959), 1-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Choose (112)  |  Collect (16)  |  Concept (221)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Course (409)  |  Develop (268)  |  Discover (553)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Doing (280)  |  Enrich (24)  |  Experience (467)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Frame (26)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Light (607)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  New (1216)  |  Observe (168)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Professor (128)  |  Prove (250)  |  Ready (39)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Revise (6)  |  Rote (4)  |  Secure (22)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Static (8)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  Student (300)  |  Subject (521)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Think (1086)  |  Topic (21)  |  Work (1351)

The result is that a generation of physicists is growing up who have never exercised any particular degree of individual initiative, who have had no opportunity to experience its satisfactions or its possibilities, and who regard cooperative work in large teams as the normal thing. It is a natural corollary for them to feel that the objectives of these large teams must be something of large social significance.
In 'Science and Freedom: Reflections of a Physicist', Isis, 1947, 37, 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Degree (276)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feel (367)  |  Generation (242)  |  Individual (404)  |  Initiative (17)  |  Large (394)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Never (1087)  |  Objective (91)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Regard (305)  |  Result (677)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Significance (113)  |  Social (252)  |  Something (719)  |  Team (15)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Work (1351)

The senses at first let in particular Ideas, and furnish the yet empty Cabinet: And the Mind by degrees growing familiar with some of them, they are lodged in the Memory, and Names got to them.
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690). Edited by Peter Nidditch (1975), Book I, Chapter 2, Section 15, 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Degree (276)  |  Empty (80)  |  First (1283)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Idea (843)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Name (333)  |  Sense (770)  |  Understanding (513)

The Sierra Club is a very good and a very powerful force for conservation and, as a matter of fact, has grown faster since I left than it was growing while I was there! It must be doing something right.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Conservation (168)  |  Doing (280)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fast (45)  |  Faster (50)  |  Force (487)  |  Good (889)  |  Grow (238)  |  Leave (130)  |  Matter (798)  |  Must (1526)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Right (452)  |  Sierra Club (2)  |  Something (719)

The techniques have galloped ahead of the concepts. We have moved away from studying the complexity of the organism; from processes and organisation to composition.
[Commenting that growing use of new technologies and techniques, from molecular biology to genomics, has proved a mixed blessing.]
Quoted in Andrew Jack, "An Acute Talent for Innovation", Financial Times (1 Feb 2009).
Science quotes on:  |  Biology (216)  |  Blessing (24)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Composition (84)  |  Concept (221)  |  Drug (57)  |  Molecular Biology (27)  |  New (1216)  |  Organisation (7)  |  Organism (220)  |  Process (423)  |  Research (664)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Technique (80)  |  Technology (257)  |  Use (766)

The transition from sea-floor spreading to plate tectonics is largely a change of emphasis. Sea-floor spreading is a view about the method of production of new oceans floor on the ridge axis. The magnetic lineations give the history of this production back into the late Mesozoic and illuminate the history of the new aseismic parts of the ocean floor. This naturally directed attention to the relation of the sea-floor to the continents. There are two approaches: in the first, one looks back in time to earlier arrangements of the continents; in the second, one considers the current problem of the disposal of the rapidly growing sea floor.
'The Emergence of Plate Tectonics: A Personal View', Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, 1975, 3, 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Attention (190)  |  Back (390)  |  Change (593)  |  Consider (416)  |  Continent (76)  |  Current (118)  |  Direct (225)  |  First (1283)  |  History (673)  |  Late (118)  |  Look (582)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Method (505)  |  New (1216)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Plate Tectonics (20)  |  Problem (676)  |  Production (183)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sea-Floor Spreading (2)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transition (26)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)

The wreath of cigarette smoke which curls about the head of the growing lad holds his brain in an iron grip which prevents it from growing and his mind from developing just as surely as the iron shoe does the foot of the Chinese girl.
Quoted in Henry Ford, The Case Against the Little White Slaver (1914), Vol. 1, 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Chinese (22)  |  Cigarette (24)  |  Curl (3)  |  Development (422)  |  Foot (60)  |  Girl (37)  |  Grip (9)  |  Growth (187)  |  Hold (95)  |  Iron (96)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Shoe (11)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Sure (14)  |  Surely (101)

There is more danger of numerical sequences continued indefinitely than of trees growing up to heaven. Each will some time reach its greatest height.
Grundgesetz der Arithmetik(1893), Vol. 2, Section 60, In P. Greach and M. Black (eds., Translations from the Philosophical Writings of Gottlob Frege (1952), 204.
Science quotes on:  |  Danger (115)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Heaven (258)  |  More (2559)  |  Number (699)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Reach (281)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Series (149)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Will (2355)

This Academy [at Lagado] is not an entire single Building, but a Continuation of several Houses on both Sides of a Street; which growing waste, was purchased and applied to that Use.
I was received very kindly by the Warden, and went for many Days to the Academy. Every Room hath in it ' one or more Projectors; and I believe I could not be in fewer than five Hundred Rooms.
The first Man I saw was of a meagre Aspect, with sooty Hands and Face, his Hair and Beard long, ragged and singed in several Places. His Clothes, Shirt, and Skin were all of the same Colour. He had been Eight Years upon a Project for extracting Sun-Beams out of Cucumbers, which were to be put into Vials hermetically sealed, and let out to warm the Air in raw inclement Summers. He told me, he did not doubt in Eight Years more, that he should be able to supply the Governor's Gardens with Sunshine at a reasonable Rate; but he complained that his Stock was low, and interested me to give him something as an Encouragement to Ingenuity, especially since this had been a very dear Season for Cucumbers. I made him a small Present, for my Lord had furnished me with Money on purpose, because he knew their Practice of begging from all who go to see them.
I saw another at work to calcine Ice into Gunpowder; who likewise shewed me a Treatise he had written concerning the Malleability of Fire, which he intended to publish.
There was a most ingenious Architect who had contrived a new Method for building Houses, by beginning at the Roof, and working downwards to the Foundation; which he justified to me by the life Practice of those two prudent Insects the Bee and the Spider.
In another Apartment I was highly pleased with a Projector, who had found a device of plowing the Ground with Hogs, to save the Charges of Plows, Cattle, and Labour. The Method is this: In an Acre of Ground you bury at six Inches Distance, and eight deep, a quantity of Acorns, Dates, Chestnuts, and other Masts or Vegetables whereof these Animals are fondest; then you drive six Hundred or more of them into the Field, where in a few Days they will root up the whole Ground in search of their Food, and make it fit for sowing, at the same time manuring it with their Dung. It is true, upon Experiment they found the Charge and Trouble very great, and they had little or no Crop. However, it is not doubted that this Invention may be capable of great Improvement.
I had hitherto seen only one Side of the Academy, the other being appropriated to the Advancers of speculative Learning.
Some were condensing Air into a dry tangible Substance, by extracting the Nitre, and letting the acqueous or fluid Particles percolate: Others softening Marble for Pillows and Pin-cushions. Another was, by a certain Composition of Gums, Minerals, and Vegetables outwardly applied, to prevent the Growth of Wool upon two young lambs; and he hoped in a reasonable Time to propagate the Breed of naked Sheep all over the Kingdom.
Gulliver's Travels (1726, Penguin ed. 1967), Part III, Chap. 5, 223.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Academy (35)  |  Acorn (4)  |  Acre (12)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Applied (177)  |  Architect (29)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Beam (24)  |  Bee (40)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Breed (24)  |  Building (156)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cattle (18)  |  Certain (550)  |  Charge (59)  |  Chestnut (2)  |  Composition (84)  |  Continuation (20)  |  Crop (25)  |  Cucumber (4)  |  Date (13)  |  Deep (233)  |  Device (70)  |  Distance (161)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Dry (57)  |  Dung (7)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Face (212)  |  Field (364)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Fit (134)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Food (199)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Garden (60)  |  Governor (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Growth (187)  |  Gunpowder (16)  |  Hermetic Seal (2)  |  Hog (4)  |  House (140)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Ice (54)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Ingenuity (39)  |  Insect (77)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invention (369)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Labour (98)  |  Lamb (6)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Lord (93)  |  Low (80)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marble (20)  |  Mast (3)  |  Method (505)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Money (170)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Pillow (4)  |  Pin (18)  |  Plow (7)  |  Practice (204)  |  Present (619)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Project (73)  |  Projector (3)  |  Publish (36)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Raw (28)  |  Root (120)  |  Save (118)  |  Saw (160)  |  Seal (18)  |  Search (162)  |  Season (47)  |  See (1081)  |  Sheep (11)  |  Side (233)  |  Single (353)  |  Skin (47)  |  Small (477)  |  Something (719)  |  Soot (9)  |  Sowing (9)  |  Spider (14)  |  Substance (248)  |  Summer (54)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunbeam (3)  |  Supply (93)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Vial (4)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Waste (101)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wool (4)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)

This field [stem cell research] isn’t growing, it’s exploding.
Quoted in Andrea Dorf and Joe Levine 'Help From The Unborn Fetal-Cell', Time magazine (12 Jan 1987).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Field (364)  |  Research (664)  |  Stem (31)  |  Stem Cell (11)

Through [the growing organism's] power of assimilation there is a constant encroachment of the organic upon the inorganic, a constant attempt to convert all available material into living substance, and to indefinitely multiply the total number of individual organisms.
In History of the Human Body (1919), 2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Assimilation (13)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Available (78)  |  Constant (144)  |  Conversion (17)  |  Encroachment (2)  |  Growth (187)  |  Indefinitely (10)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inorganic (13)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Material (353)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Number (699)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organism (220)  |  Power (746)  |  Substance (248)  |  Through (849)  |  Total (94)

Throw out opium, which the Creator himself seems to prescribe, for we often see the scarlet poppy growing in the cornfields, as if it were foreseen that wherever there is hunger to be fed there must also be a pain to be soothed; throw out a few specifics which our art did not discover, and it is hardly needed to apply; throw out wine, which is a food, and the vapors which produce the miracle of anaesthesia, and I firmly believe that if the whole materia medica [medical drugs], as now used, could be sunk to the bottom of the sea, it would be all the better for mankind,—and all the worse for the fishes.
'Currents and Counter-Currents in Medical Science', Address to Massachusetts Medical Society (30 May 1860). In Medical Essays 1842-1882 (1891), 202-3.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anaesthesia (4)  |  Apply (160)  |  Art (657)  |  Better (486)  |  Creator (91)  |  Discover (553)  |  Drug (57)  |  Food (199)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Must (1526)  |  Opium (7)  |  Pain (136)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Specific (95)  |  Vapor (12)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wine (38)

To the Victorian scientist, science was the pursuit of truth about Nature. In imagination, each new truth discovered could be ticked off on a list kept perhaps in a celestial planning office, so reducing by one the total number of truths to be discovered. But the practising scientist now knows that he is dealing with a living, growing thing. His task is never done.
Opening remark in article 'Musical Acoustics Today', New Scientist (1 Nov 1962), 16 No. 311, 256.
Science quotes on:  |  Celestial (53)  |  Dealing (10)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Know (1518)  |  List (10)  |  Living (491)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Office (71)  |  Planning (20)  |  Practising (2)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Task (147)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tick (9)  |  Total (94)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Victorian (6)

Today the world changes so quickly that in growing up we take leave not just of youth but of the world we were young in. … Fear and resentment of what is new is really a lament for the memories of our childhood.
From 'On The Effecting of All Things Possible', Presidential Address to the British Association for the Advancement of Science, Exeter (3 Sep 1969). In Pluto’s Republic (1982), 336.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (593)  |  Childhood (38)  |  Fear (197)  |  Lament (11)  |  Leaving (10)  |  Memory (134)  |  New (1216)  |  Resentment (6)  |  Today (314)  |  World (1774)  |  Young (227)  |  Youth (101)

We can make an exception of opium “which the creator seems to prescribe, as we often see the scarlet poppy growing in the corn fields” but all other receipts of Omniscience must be condemned. The purple fox-glove, the many-tinted veratrum the lilac stramonium they are all “'noxious” but a little opium it helps the imagination.
[Criticizing the medical use of noxious psychoactive drugs.]
'Dr. Holmes vs. the Medical Profession', a summary of his address to the Anniversary Meeting of the Massachusetts Medical Society (May 1860), in Maryland and Virginia Medical Journal reprinted in American Medical Gazette and Journal of Health? (Oct 1860), 11, 757.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Condemnation (15)  |  Corn (19)  |  Creator (91)  |  Drug (57)  |  Exception (73)  |  Field (364)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Little (707)  |  Must (1526)  |  Noxious (6)  |  Omniscience (3)  |  Opium (7)  |  Other (2236)  |  See (1081)  |  Use (766)

We have chosen to write the biography of our disease because we love it platonically — as Amy Lowell loved Keats — and have sought its acquaintance wherever we could find it. And in this growing intimacy we have become increasingly impressed with the influence that this and other infectious diseases, which span — in their protoplasmic continuities — the entire history of mankind, have had upon the fates of men.
Rats, Lice and History (1935)
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Become (815)  |  Biography (240)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Disease (328)  |  Fate (72)  |  Find (998)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Mankind (13)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Influence (222)  |  Love (309)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Other (2236)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Write (230)

We of an older generation can get along with what we have, though with growing hardship; but in your full manhood and womanhood you will want what nature once so bountifully supplied and man so thoughtlessly destroyed; and because of that want you will reproach us, not for what we have used, but for what we have wasted...So any nation which in its youth lives only for the day, reaps without sowing, and consumes without husbanding, must expect the penalty of the prodigal whose labor could with difficulty find him the bare means of life.
'Arbor Day: A Message to the School-Children of the United States', 15 Apr 1907. In Presidential Addresses and State Papers (1910), Vol. 11, 1207-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Bare (33)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Expect (200)  |  Find (998)  |  Generation (242)  |  Labor (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Reap (17)  |  Sowing (9)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)  |  Youth (101)

What was really great about 'Star Trek' when I was growing up as a little girl is not only did they have Lt. Uhura played by Nichelle Nichols as a technical officer—she was African. ... At the same time, they had this crew that was composed of people from all around the world and they were working together to learn more about the universe. ... So that helped to fuel my whole idea that I could be involved in space exploration as well as in the sciences.
As quoted in 'Then & Now: Dr. Mae Jemison' (19 Jun 2005) on CNN web site.
Science quotes on:  |  African (10)  |  African American (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Crew (9)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Girl (37)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  International (37)  |  Involved (90)  |  Learn (629)  |  Little (707)  |  More (2559)  |  Officer (12)  |  People (1005)  |  Science (3879)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Exploration (13)  |  Star (427)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

When air has been freshly and strongly tainted with putrefaction, so as to smell through the water, sprigs of mint have presently died, upon being put into it, their leaves turning black; but if they do not die presently, they thrive in a most surprizing manner. In no other circumstances have I ever seen vegetation so vigorous as in this kind of air, which is immediately fatal to animal life. Though these plants have been crouded in jars filled with this air, every leaf has been full of life; fresh shoots have branched out in various , and have grown much faster than other similiar plants, growing in the same exposure in common air.
This observation led me to conclude that plants, instead of affecting the air in the same manner with animal respiration, reverse the effects of breathing, and tend to keep the atmosphere sweet and wholesome, when it is become noxious, in consequence on animals living and breathing, or dying and putrefying in it.
In order to ascertain this, I took a quantity of air, made thoroughly noxious, by mice breathing and dying in it, and divided it into two parts; one of which I put into a phial immersed in water; and to the other (which was contained in a glass jar, standing in water) I put a sprig of mint. This was about the beginning of August 1771, and after eight or nine days, I found that a mouse lived perfectly well in that part of the air, in which the sprig of mint had grown, but died the moment it was put into the other part of the same original quantity of air; and which I had kept in the very same exposure, but without any plant growing in it.
'Observations on Different Kinds of Air', Philosophical Transactions (1772), 62, 193-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Life (19)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Become (815)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Branch (150)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Carbon Dioxide (22)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Common (436)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Death (388)  |  Divided (50)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effect (393)  |  Faster (50)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Glass (92)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Jar (9)  |  Kind (557)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mint (4)  |  Moment (253)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Noxious (6)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plant (294)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Respiration (13)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Smell (27)  |  Spring (133)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Taint (10)  |  Tainted (5)  |  Tend (124)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Thrive (18)  |  Thriving (2)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  Various (200)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Water (481)  |  Wholesome (12)

When April wind wakes the call for the soil, I hold the plough as my only hold upon the earth, and, as I follow through the fresh and fragrant furrow, I am planted with every foot-step, growing, budding, blooming in a spirit of spring.
Science quotes on:  |  April (9)  |  Biography (240)  |  Call (769)  |  Earth (996)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Plant (294)  |  Plough (13)  |  Soil (86)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spring (133)  |  Step (231)  |  Through (849)  |  Wind (128)

When I observe the luminous progress and expansion of natural science in modern times, I seem to myself like a traveller going eastwards at dawn, and gazing at the growing light with joy, but also with impatience; looking forward with longing to the advent of the full and final light, but, nevertheless, having to turn away his eyes when the sun appeared, unable to bear the splendour he had awaited with so much desire.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 197-198.
Science quotes on:  |  Advent (6)  |  Await (5)  |  Bear (159)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Desire (204)  |  East (18)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Eye (419)  |  Final (118)  |  Forward (102)  |  Gaze (21)  |  Impatience (13)  |  Joy (107)  |  Light (607)  |  Longing (19)  |  Looking (189)  |  Luminous (18)  |  Modern (385)  |  Myself (212)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Observe (168)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Splendor (17)  |  Splendour (8)  |  Sun (385)  |  Time (1877)  |  Traveler (30)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unable (24)

When I was growing up, I always knew I’d be in the top of my class in math, and that gave me a lot of self-confidence. [But now that students can see beyond their own school, they see that] there are always going to be a million people better than you at times, or someone will always be far better than you. I feel there’s an existential angst among young people. I didn’t have that. They see enormous mountains, where I only saw one little hill to climb.
From address at a conference on Google campus, co-hosted with Common Sense Media and the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop 'Breakthrough Learning in the Digital Age'. As quoted in Technology blog report by Dan Fost, 'Google co-founder Sergey Brin wants more computers in schools', Los Angeles Times (28 Oct 2009). On latimesblogs.latimes.com website. As quoted, without citation, in Can Akdeniz, Fast MBA (2014), 280.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Angst (2)  |  Better (486)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Class (164)  |  Climb (35)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Existential (2)  |  Feel (367)  |  Hill (20)  |  Little (707)  |  Lot (151)  |  Mountain (185)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Saw (160)  |  School (219)  |  See (1081)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Confidence (9)  |  Student (300)  |  Time (1877)  |  Top (96)  |  Will (2355)  |  Young (227)

Year after year, the slow sure records grow.
Awaiting their interpreter.
In Watchers of the Sky (1922), 253.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Awaiting (2)  |  Grow (238)  |  Interpreter (8)  |  Record (154)  |  Slow (101)  |  Year (933)

You have … been told that science grows like an organism. You have been told that, if we today see further than our predecessors, it is only because we stand on their shoulders. But this [Nobel Prize Presentation] is an occasion on which I should prefer to remember, not the giants upon whose shoulders we stood, but the friends with whom we stood arm in arm … colleagues in so much of my work.
From Nobel Banquet speech (10 Dec 1960).
Science quotes on:  |  Arm (81)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Friend (168)  |  Further (6)  |  Giant (67)  |  Grow (238)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Organism (220)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Remember (179)  |  Remembering (7)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Stand (274)  |  Standing (11)  |  Today (314)  |  Work (1351)

You know we’re constantly taking. We don’t make most of the food we eat, we don’t grow it, anyway. We wear clothes other people make, we speak a language other people developed, we use a mathematics other people evolved and spent their lives building. I mean we’re constantly taking things. It’s a wonderful ecstatic feeling to create something and put it into the pool of human experience and knowledge.
Expressing the driving force behind his passion. Interview with Rolling Stone writer, Steven Levy (late Nov 1983). As quoted in Nick Bilton, 'The 30-Year-Old Macintosh and a Lost Conversation With Steve Jobs' (24 Jan 2014), on New York Times blog web page. Levy appended a transcript of the interview to an updated Kindle version of his book, Insanely Great: The Life and Times of Macintosh, the Computer that Changed Everything.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Building (156)  |  Clothes (9)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Create (235)  |  Creating (7)  |  Develop (268)  |  Eat (104)  |  Ecstatic (3)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Food (199)  |  Grow (238)  |  Human (1468)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Language (293)  |  Live (628)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Pool (15)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Spent (85)  |  Taking (9)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Use (766)  |  Wearing (2)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Wonderful (149)

[Euclid's Elements] has been for nearly twenty-two centuries the encouragement and guide of that scientific thought which is one thing with the progress of man from a worse to a better state. The encouragement; for it contained a body of knowledge that was really known and could be relied on, and that moreover was growing in extent and application. For even at the time this book was written—shortly after the foundation of the Alexandrian Museum—Mathematics was no longer the merely ideal science of the Platonic school, but had started on her career of conquest over the whole world of Phenomena. The guide; for the aim of every scientific student of every subject was to bring his knowledge of that subject into a form as perfect as that which geometry had attained. Far up on the great mountain of Truth, which all the sciences hope to scale, the foremost of that sacred sisterhood was seen, beckoning for the rest to follow her. And hence she was called, in the dialect of the Pythagoreans, ‘the purifier of the reasonable soul.’
From a lecture delivered at the Royal Institution (Mar 1873), collected postumously in W.K. Clifford, edited by Leslie Stephen and Frederick Pollock, Lectures and Essays, (1879), Vol. 1, 296.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aim (165)  |  Alexandria (2)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Attain (125)  |  Beckoning (4)  |  Better (486)  |  Body (537)  |  Book (392)  |  Call (769)  |  Career (75)  |  Conquest (28)  |  Element (310)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Extent (139)  |  Follow (378)  |  Following (16)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guide (97)  |  Hope (299)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Museum (31)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rest (280)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Scale (121)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Thought (17)  |  Soul (226)  |  Start (221)  |  State (491)  |  Student (300)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

[The parasite that causes malaria] edges through the cells of the stomach wall of the mosquito and forms a cyst which grows and eventually bursts to release hundreds of sporozoites into the body cavity of the mosquito ... As far as we can tell, the parasite does not harm the mosquito ... It has always seemed to me, though, that these growing cysts ... must at least give the mosquito something corresponding to a stomach-ache.
In The Prevalence of People (1955, 1962), 165.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Burst (39)  |  Bursting (3)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cavity (8)  |  Cell (138)  |  Edge (47)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Form (959)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growth (187)  |  Harm (39)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Malaria (10)  |  Mosquito (14)  |  Must (1526)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Release (27)  |  Something (719)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Stomachache (3)  |  Tell (340)  |  Through (849)  |  Wall (67)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.