Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Environmental extremists ... wouldn’t let you build a house unless it looked like a bird’s nest.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: Forming

Forming Quotes (42 quotes)

Πάντα ῥεῖ : all things are in flux. It is inevitable that you are indebted to the past. You are fed and formed by it. The old forest is decomposed for the composition of the new forest. The old animals have given their bodies to the earth to furnish through chemistry the forming race, and every individual is only a momentary fixation of what was yesterday another’s, is today his and will belong to a third to-morrow. So it is in thought.
In Lecture, second in a series given at Freeman Place Chapel, Boston (Mar 1859), 'Quotation and Originality', collected in Letters and Social Aims (1875, 1917), 200. The Greek expression, “panta rei” is a quote from Heraclitus.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Belong (162)  |  Body (537)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Composition (84)  |  Debt (13)  |  Decompose (9)  |  Earth (996)  |  Feed (27)  |  Fixation (5)  |  Flux (21)  |  Forest (150)  |  Form (959)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Momentary (4)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Past (337)  |  Race (268)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Will (2355)  |  Yesterday (36)

Are coral reefs growing from the depths of the oceans? ... [The] reply is a simple negative; and a single fact establishes its truth. The reef-forming coral zoophytes, as has been shown, cannot grow at greater depths than 100 or 120 feet; and therefore in seas deeper than this, the formation or growth of reefs over the bottom is impossible.
On Coral Reefs and Islands (1853), 138.
Science quotes on:  |  Coral Reef (12)  |  Depth (94)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Formation (96)  |  Greater (288)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Growth (187)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Island (46)  |  Negative (63)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Reply (56)  |  Sea (308)  |  Simple (406)  |  Single (353)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Zoophyte (4)

The classification of facts, the recognition of their sequence and relative significance is the function of science, and the habit of forming a judgment upon these facts unbiassed by personal feeling is characteristic of what may be termed the scientific frame of mind.
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Classification (97)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Formation (96)  |  Frame Of Mind (3)  |  Function (228)  |  Habit (168)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Personal (67)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Relative (39)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Significance (113)  |  Term (349)

Wenige sind imstande, von den Vorurteilen der Umgebung abweichende Meinungen gelassen auszusprechen; die Meisten sind sogar unfähig, überhaupt zu solchen Meinungen zu gelangen.
Few people are able to express opinions that dissent from the prejudices of their social group. The majority are even incapable of forming such opinions at all.
Original German in Essays Presented to Leo Baeck on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday (1954), 26. English text by Webmaster assisted by online translation tools.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Differ (85)  |  Environment (216)  |  Express (186)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Majority (66)  |  Opinion (281)  |  People (1005)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Social (252)

A research laboratory jealous of its reputation has to develop less formal, more intimate ways of forming a corporate judgment of the work its people do. The best laboratories in university departments are well known for their searching, mutual questioning.
In Editorial, 'Is Science Really a Pack of Lies', Nature (1983), 303, 1257. As quoted and cited in Bradley P. Fuhrman, Jerry J. Zimmerman, Pediatric Critical Care (2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Corporate (3)  |  Department (92)  |  Develop (268)  |  Do (1908)  |  Formal (33)  |  Intimate (15)  |  Jealous (3)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Known (454)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  More (2559)  |  Mutual (52)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Question (621)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Research (664)  |  Searching (5)  |  University (121)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

Although we know nothing of what an atom is, yet we cannot resist forming some idea of a small particle, which represents it to the mind ... there is an immensity of facts which justify us in believing that the atoms of matter are in some way endowed or associated with electrical powers, to which they owe their most striking qualities, and amongst them their mutual chemical affinity.
[Summarizing his investigations in electrolysis.]
Experimental Researches in Electricity (1839), section 852. Cited in Laurie M. Brown, Abraham Pais, Brian Pippard, Twentieth Century Physics (1995), Vol. 1, 51.
Science quotes on:  |  Affinity (27)  |  Atom (355)  |  Charge (59)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electrolysis (7)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Owe (71)  |  Particle (194)  |  Power (746)  |  Represent (155)  |  Representation (53)  |  Small (477)  |  Striking (48)  |  Way (1217)

Aluminum is at once as white as silver, as incorrodible as gold, as tenacious as iron, as fusible as copper, and as light as glass. It is easily worked; it is widely spread in nature, alumina forming the bases of most rocks; it is three times lighter than iron; in short, it seems to have been created expressly to furnish material for our projectile!
Planning a spacecraft to be fired from a cannon to the moon. In From the Earth to the Moon (1865, 1890), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Aluminum (6)  |  Base (117)  |  Copper (25)  |  Corrosion (4)  |  Form (959)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Glass (92)  |  Gold (97)  |  Iron (96)  |  Light (607)  |  Material (353)  |  Mineralogy (20)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ore (12)  |  Projectile (3)  |  Rock (161)  |  Short (197)  |  Silver (46)  |  Spread (83)  |  Time (1877)  |  White (127)  |  Work (1351)

Another argument of hope may be drawn from this–that some of the inventions already known are such as before they were discovered it could hardly have entered any man's head to think of; they would have been simply set aside as impossible. For in conjecturing what may be men set before them the example of what has been, and divine of the new with an imagination preoccupied and colored by the old; which way of forming opinions is very fallacious, for streams that are drawn from the springheads of nature do not always run in the old channels.
Translation of Novum Organum, XCII. In Francis Bacon, James Spedding, The Works of Francis Bacon (1864), Vol. 8, 128.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Already (222)  |  Argument (138)  |  Channel (21)  |  Color (137)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Divine (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enter (141)  |  Fallacious (12)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Hope (299)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Invention (369)  |  Known (454)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Run (174)  |  Set (394)  |  Stream (81)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Way (1217)

Any experiment may be regarded as forming an individual of a 'population' of experiments which might be performed under the same conditions. A series of experiments is a sample drawn from this population.
Now any series of experiments is only of value in so far as it enables us to form a judgment as to the statistical constants of the population to which the experiments belong. In a great number of cases the question finally turns on the value of a mean, either directly, or as the mean difference between the two qualities.
If the number of experiments be very large, we may have precise information as to the value of the mean, but if our sample be small, we have two sources of uncertainty:— (I) owing to the 'error of random sampling' the mean of our series of experiments deviates more or less widely from the mean of the population, and (2) the sample is not sufficiently large to determine what is the law of distribution of individuals.
'The Probable Error of a Mean', Biometrika, 1908, 6, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (162)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constant (144)  |  Determine (144)  |  Difference (337)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Enable (119)  |  Error (321)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Form (959)  |  Great (1574)  |  Individual (404)  |  Information (166)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Mean (809)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Number (699)  |  Owing (39)  |  Perform (121)  |  Population (110)  |  Precise (68)  |  Question (621)  |  Random (41)  |  Regard (305)  |  Sample (19)  |  Series (149)  |  Small (477)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Value (365)

Every river appears to consist of a main trunk, fed from a variety of branches, each running in a valley proportional to its size, and all of them together forming a system of vallies, communicating with one another, and having such a nice adjustment of their declivities that none of them join the principal valley on too high or too low a level; a circumstance which would be infinitely improbable if each of these vallies were not the work of the stream that flows in it.
Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Adjustment (20)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Branch (150)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Communication (94)  |  Consist (223)  |  Feeding (7)  |  Flow (83)  |  High (362)  |  Improbability (11)  |  Level (67)  |  Low (80)  |  Principal (63)  |  Proportionality (2)  |  River (119)  |  Run (174)  |  Running (61)  |  Size (60)  |  Stream (81)  |  System (537)  |  Together (387)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Valley (32)  |  Variety (132)  |  Work (1351)

Heaven forming each on other to depend,
A master, or a servant, or a friend,
Bids each on other for assistance call,
Till one man’s weakness grows the strength of all.
In 'Epistle II: Of the Nature and State of Man', collected in Samuel Johnson (ed.), The Works of the Poets of Great Britain and Ireland: Vol. 6: The Whole Poetical Works of Alexander Pope, Esq. (1800), Vol. 6, 374.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Assistance (20)  |  Call (769)  |  Depend (228)  |  Friend (168)  |  Grow (238)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Other (2236)  |  Servant (39)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Strength (126)  |  Weakness (48)

I am of opinion, then, ... that, if there is any circumstance thoroughly established in geology, it is, that the crust of our globe has been subjected to a great and sudden revolution, the epoch of which cannot be dated much farther back than five or six thousand years ago; that this revolution had buried all the countries which were before inhabited by men and by the other animals that are now best known; that the same revolution had laid dry the bed of the last ocean, which now forms all the countries at present inhabited; that the small number of individuals of men and other animals that escaped from the effects of that great revolution, have since propagated and spread over the lands then newly laid dry; and consequently, that the human race has only resumed a progressive state of improvement since that epoch, by forming established societies, raising monuments, collecting natural facts, and constructing systems of science and of learning.
'Preliminary discourse', to Recherches sur les Ossemens Fossiles (1812), trans. R. Kerr Essay on the Theory of the Earth (1813), 171-2.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Back (390)  |  Best (459)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Crust (38)  |  Dry (57)  |  Effect (393)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Farther (51)  |  Form (959)  |  Geology (220)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Individual (404)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Learning (274)  |  Man (2251)  |  Monument (45)  |  Natural (796)  |  Number (699)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Present (619)  |  Race (268)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Science (3879)  |  Small (477)  |  Spread (83)  |  State (491)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sudden (67)  |  System (537)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Year (933)

I have steadily endeavored to keep my mind free so as to give up any hypothesis, however much beloved (and I cannot resist forming one on every subject) as soon as the facts are shown to be opposed to it.
Science quotes on:  |  Beloved (3)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Free (232)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Oppose (24)  |  Resist (15)  |  Soon (186)  |  Subject (521)

If, then, the motion of every particle of matter in the universe were precisely reversed at any instant, the course of nature would be simply reversed for ever after. The bursting bubble of foam at the foot of a waterfall would reunite and descend into the water; the thermal motions would reconcentrate their energy, and throw the mass up the fall in drops re-forming into a close column of ascending water. Heat which had been generated by the friction of solids and dissipated by conduction, and radiation, and radiation with absorption, would come again to the place of contact, and throw the moving body back against the force to which it had previously yielded. Boulders would recover from the mud materials required to rebuild them into their previous jagged forms, and would become reunited to the mountain peak from which they had formerly broken away. And if also the materialistic hypothesis of life were true, living creatures would grow backwards, with conscious knowledge of the future but no memory of the past, and would become again unborn.
In 'The Kinetic Theory of the Dissipation of Energy', Nature (1874), 9, 442.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorption (12)  |  Against (332)  |  Back (390)  |  Backwards (17)  |  Become (815)  |  Body (537)  |  Boulder (8)  |  Broken (56)  |  Bubble (22)  |  Conduction (8)  |  Contact (65)  |  Course (409)  |  Creature (233)  |  Descend (47)  |  Drop (76)  |  Energy (344)  |  Fall (230)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Friction (14)  |  Future (429)  |  Grow (238)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Instant (45)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mass (157)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Memory (134)  |  Motion (310)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Mud (26)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Particle (194)  |  Past (337)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Required (108)  |  Solid (116)  |  Thermal (15)  |  Universe (857)  |  Water (481)  |  Waterfall (4)  |  Yield (81)

In the beginning of the year 1800 the illustrious professor conceived the idea of forming a long column by piling up, in succession, a disc of copper, a disc of zinc, and a disc of wet cloth, with scrupulous attention to not changing this order. What could be expected beforehand from such a combination? Well, I do not hesitate to say, this apparently inert mass, this bizarre assembly, this pile of so many couples of unequal metals separated by a little liquid is, in the singularity of effect, the most marvellous instrument which men have yet invented, the telescope and the steam engine not excepted.
In François Arago, 'Bloge for Volta' (1831), Oeuvres Completes de François Arago (1854), Vol. 1, 219-20.
Science quotes on:  |  Assembly (13)  |  Attention (190)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Bizarre (6)  |  Changing (7)  |  Cloth (6)  |  Column (15)  |  Combination (144)  |  Conceived (3)  |  Copper (25)  |  Couple (9)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effect (393)  |  Engine (98)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expected (5)  |  Hesitate (22)  |  Idea (843)  |  Illustrious (10)  |  Inert (14)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Invention (369)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Mass (157)  |  Metal (84)  |  Most (1731)  |  Order (632)  |  Pile (12)  |  Professor (128)  |  Say (984)  |  Scrupulous (6)  |  Separate (143)  |  Singularity (4)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Succession (77)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Unequal (12)  |  Wet (6)  |  Year (933)  |  Zinc (3)

It is possible with … carbon … to form very large molecules that are stable. This results from the stability of the carbon-to-carbon bond. You must have complexity in order to achieve the versatility characteristic of living organisms. You can achieve this complexity with carbon forming the molecular backbone.
From interview with Neil A. Campbell, in 'Crossing the Boundaries of Science', BioScience (Dec 1986), 36, No. 11, 739.
Science quotes on:  |  Backbone (9)  |  Bond (45)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Form (959)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Organism (220)  |  Possible (552)  |  Result (677)  |  Stability (25)  |  Stable (30)  |  Versatility (5)

It was obvious—to me at any rate—that the answer was to why an enzyme is able to speed up a chemical reaction by as much as 10 million times. It had to do this by lowering the energy of activation—the energy of forming the activated complex. It could do this by forming strong bonds with the activated complex, but only weak bonds with the reactants or products.
Quoted In Thomas Hager, Force of Nature: The Life of Linus Pauling (1995), 284.
Science quotes on:  |  Activation (6)  |  Answer (366)  |  Bond (45)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Reaction (16)  |  Complex (188)  |  Do (1908)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enzyme (17)  |  Formation (96)  |  Lowering (4)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Product (160)  |  Reactant (2)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Speed (65)  |  Strong (174)  |  Time (1877)  |  Weak (71)  |  Why (491)

Let us ... consider the ovum [egg] as a physical system. Its potentialities are prodigious and one's first impulse is to expect that such vast potentialities would find expression in complexity of structure. But what do we find? The substance is clouded with particles, but these can be centrifuged away leaving it optically structureless but still capable of development.... On the surface of the egg there is a fine membrane, below it fluid of high viscosity, next fluid of relatively low viscosity, and within this the nucleus, which in the resting stage is simply a bag of fluid enclosed in a delicate membrane.... The egg's simplicity is not that of a machine or a crystal, but that of a nebula. Gathered into it are units relatively simple but capable by their combinations of forming a vast number of dynamical systems...
As guest of honour, closing day address (Jun 1928), Sixth Colloid Symposium, Toronto, Canada, 'Living Matter', printed in Harry Boyer Weiser (ed.), Colloid Symposium Monograph (1928), Vol. 6, 15. Quoted in Joseph Needham, Chemical Embryology (1931), Vol. 1, 612-613.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Combination (144)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Consider (416)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Development (422)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dynamic (14)  |  Dynamical (15)  |  Egg (69)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expression (175)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Gather (72)  |  High (362)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Low (80)  |  Machine (257)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Nebula (16)  |  Next (236)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Number (699)  |  Ovum (4)  |  Particle (194)  |  Physical (508)  |  Potential (69)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Stage (143)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Substance (248)  |  Surface (209)  |  System (537)  |  Vast (177)  |  Viscosity (3)

Nature takes as much Pains in the Womb for the forming of a Beggar as an Emperor.
No. 3507 in Gnomologia: Adagies and Proverbs, Wise Sentences and Witty Sayings (1732), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Beggar (5)  |  Emperor (6)  |  Formation (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Pain (136)  |  Womb (24)

Nature! … She is the only artist; working-up the most uniform material into utter opposites; arriving, without a trace of effort, at perfection, at the most exact precision, though always veiled under a certain softness.
As quoted by T.H. Huxley, in Norman Lockyer (ed.), 'Nature: Aphorisms by Goethe', Nature (1870), 1, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrive (35)  |  Artist (90)  |  Certain (550)  |  Effort (227)  |  Exact (68)  |  Material (353)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Precision (68)  |  Softness (2)  |  Trace (103)  |  Uniform (18)  |  Utter (7)  |  Veil (26)

October 9, 1863
Always, however great the height of the balloon, when I have seen the horizon it has roughly appeared to be on the level of the car though of course the dip of the horizon is a very appreciable quantity or the same height as the eye. From this one might infer that, could the earth be seen without a cloud or anything to obscure it, and the boundary line of the plane approximately the same height as the eye, the general appearance would be that of a slight concavity; but I have never seen any part of the surface of the earth other than as a plane.
Towns and cities, when viewed from the balloon are like models in motion. I shall always remember the ascent of 9th October, 1863, when we passed over London about sunset. At the time when we were 7,000 feet high, and directly over London Bridge, the scene around was one that cannot probably be equalled in the world. We were still so low as not to have lost sight of the details of the spectacle which presented itself to our eyes; and with one glance the homes of 3,000,000 people could be seen, and so distinct was the view, that every large building was easily distinguishable. In fact, the whole of London was visible, and some parts most clearly. All round, the suburbs were also very distinct, with their lines of detached villas, imbedded as it were in a mass of shrubs; beyond, the country was like a garden, its fields, well marked, becoming smaller and smaller as the eye wandered farther and farther away.
Again looking down, there was the Thames, throughout its whole length, without the slightest mist, dotted over its winding course with innumerable ships and steamboats, like moving toys. Gravesend was visible, also the mouth of the Thames, and the coast around as far as Norfolk. The southern shore of the mouth of the Thames was not so clear, but the sea beyond was seen for many miles; when at a higher elevation, I looked for the coast of France, but was unable to see it. On looking round, the eye was arrested by the garden-like appearance of the county of Kent, till again London claimed yet more careful attention.
Smoke, thin and blue, was curling from it, and slowly moving away in beautiful curves, from all except one part, south of the Thames, where it was less blue and seemed more dense, till the cause became evident; it was mixed with mist rising from the ground, the southern limit of which was bounded by an even line, doubtless indicating the meeting of the subsoils of gravel and clay. The whole scene was surmounted by a canopy of blue, everywhere free from cloud, except near the horizon, where a band of cumulus and stratus extended all round, forming a fitting boundary to such a glorious view.
As seen from the earth, the sunset this evening was described as fine, the air being clear and the shadows well defined; but, as we rose to view it and its effects, the golden hues increased in intensity; their richness decreased as the distance from the sun increased, both right and left; but still as far as 90º from the sun, rose-coloured clouds extended. The remainder of the circle was completed, for the most part, by pure white cumulus of well-rounded and symmetrical forms.
I have seen London by night. I have crossed it during the day at the height of four miles. I have often admired the splendour of sky scenery, but never have I seen anything which surpassed this spectacle. The roar of the town heard at this elevation was a deep, rich, continuous sound the voice of labour. At four miles above London, all was hushed; no sound reached our ears.
Travels in the Air (1871), 99-100.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Attention (190)  |  Balloon (15)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Both (493)  |  Bound (119)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Building (156)  |  Canopy (6)  |  Car (71)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circle (110)  |  Claim (146)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Completed (30)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Country (251)  |  Course (409)  |  Curve (49)  |  Deep (233)  |  Detail (146)  |  Distance (161)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Down (456)  |  Ear (68)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Elevation (13)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Evident (91)  |  Extend (128)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Farther (51)  |  Field (364)  |  Flight (98)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Garden (60)  |  General (511)  |  Glance (34)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Golden (45)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  High (362)  |  Home (170)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Labour (98)  |  Large (394)  |  Limit (280)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Low (80)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mist (14)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  People (1005)  |  Present (619)  |  Pure (291)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Reach (281)  |  Remainder (7)  |  Remember (179)  |  Right (452)  |  Rising (44)  |  Rose (34)  |  Scene (36)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Ship (62)  |  Shrub (5)  |  Sight (132)  |  Sky (161)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Sound (183)  |  South (38)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Splendour (8)  |  Steamboat (6)  |  Still (613)  |  Suburb (6)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunset (26)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Thames (6)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Toy (19)  |  View (488)  |  Visible (84)  |  Wander (35)  |  White (127)  |  Whole (738)  |  Winding (8)  |  World (1774)

Of the Passive Principle, and Material Cause of the Small Pox ... Nature, in the first compounding and forming of us, hath laid into the Substance and Constitution of each something equivalent to Ovula, of various distinct Kinds, productive of all the contagious, venomous Fevers, we can possibly have as long as we live.
Exanthematologia: Or, An Attempt to Give a Rational Account of Eruptive Fevers, Especially of the Measles and SmallPox (1730), Part II, 'Of the Small-Pox', 175. In Ludvig Hektoen, 'Thomas Fuller 1654-1734: Country Physician and Pioneer Exponent of Specificness in Infection and Immunity', read to the Society (8 Nov 1921), published in Bulletin of the Society of Medical History of Chicago (Mar 1922), 2, 329, or in reprint form, p. 11.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cause (541)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Disease (328)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Fever (29)  |  First (1283)  |  Germ (53)  |  Kind (557)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Material (353)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Principle (507)  |  Productive (32)  |  Small (477)  |  Smallpox (14)  |  Something (719)  |  Substance (248)  |  Various (200)

Proposals for forming a Public Institution for diffusing the knowledge of Mechanical Inventions, and for teaching, by Philosophical Lectures and Experiments, the application of Science to the common purposes of life.
Title of the pamphlet (Apr 1799) in which he proposed what is now the Royal Institution. As named in a notice under 'A Correct List of New Publications', The Monthly Magazine: Part 1 for 1799 from January to June, inclusive (Apr 1799), 7, Part 1, 221.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Common (436)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Institution (69)  |  Invention (369)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Proposal (17)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Royal Institution (4)  |  Science (3879)  |  Teaching (188)

Science has taught us to think the unthinkable. Because when nature is the guide—rather than a priori prejudices, hopes, fears or desires—we are forced out of our comfort zone. One by one, pillars of classical logic have fallen by the wayside as science progressed in the 20th century, from Einstein's realization that measurements of space and time were not absolute but observer-dependent, to quantum mechanics, which not only put fundamental limits on what we can empirically know but also demonstrated that elementary particles and the atoms they form are doing a million seemingly impossible things at once.
In op-ed, 'A Universe Without Purpose', Los Angeles Times (1 Apr 2012).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  20th Century (36)  |  A Priori (26)  |  Absolute (145)  |  Atom (355)  |  Century (310)  |  Classical (45)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Desire (204)  |  Doing (280)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Elementary Particle (2)  |  Falling (6)  |  Fear (197)  |  Form (959)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Guide (97)  |  Hope (299)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Know (1518)  |  Limit (280)  |  Logic (287)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observer (43)  |  Particle (194)  |  Pillar (9)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Progress (465)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Realization (43)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seemingly (28)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Unthinkable (8)  |  Wayside (4)

The capital ... shall form a fund, the interest of which shall be distributed annually as prizes to those persons who shall have rendered humanity the best services during the past year. ... One-fifth to the person having made the most important discovery or invention in the science of physics, one-fifth to the person who has made the most eminent discovery or improvement in chemistry, one-fifth to the one having made the most important discovery with regard to physiology or medicine, one-fifth to the person who has produced the most distinguished idealistic work of literature, and one-fifth to the person who has worked the most or best for advancing the fraternization of all nations and for abolishing or diminishing the standing armies as well as for the forming or propagation of committees of peace.
From will (27 Nov 1895), in which he established the Nobel Prizes, as translated in U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Consular Reports, Issues 156-159 (1897), 331.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Annual (5)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Best (459)  |  Capital (15)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Confer (11)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Form (959)  |  Fund (18)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invention (369)  |  Literature (103)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Past (337)  |  Peace (108)  |  Person (363)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Produced (187)  |  Propagation (14)  |  Regard (305)  |  Render (93)  |  Science (3879)  |  Service (110)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

The course of the line we indicated as forming our grandest terrestrial fold [along the shores of Japan] returns upon itself. It is an endless fold, an endless band, the common possession of two sciences. It is geological in origin, geographical in effect. It is the wedding ring of geology and geography, uniting them at once and for ever in indissoluble union.
Presidential Address to the Geology Section, Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1892), 705.
Science quotes on:  |  Common (436)  |  Course (409)  |  Effect (393)  |  Endless (56)  |  Fold (8)  |  Geography (36)  |  Geology (220)  |  Grandest (10)  |  Line (91)  |  Origin (239)  |  Possession (65)  |  Return (124)  |  Science (3879)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Two (937)  |  Union (51)  |  Wedding (7)

The deep study of nature is the most fruitful source of mathematical discoveries. By offering to research a definite end, this study has the advantage of excluding vague questions and useless calculations; besides it is a sure means of forming analysis itself and of discovering the elements which it most concerns us to know, and which natural science ought always to conserve.
Théorie Analytique de la Chaleur, Discours Préliminaire. Translation as in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath's Quotation-book (1914), 89.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Concern (228)  |  Deep (233)  |  Definite (110)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Element (310)  |  End (590)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Question (621)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Study (653)  |  Vague (47)

The elements of the living body have the chemical peculiarity of forming with each other most numerous combinations and very large molecules, consisting of five, six or even seven different elements.
In discourse (10 Dec 1893) to General Meeting, Nassau Association for Natural Science, Wiesbaden, Germany. Printed in 'The Distribution of the Organic Elements', The Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science (1895), 71, No. 1832, 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Body (537)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Combination (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Element (310)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peculiarity (25)

The idea of an atom has been so constantly associated with incredible assumptions of infinite strength, absolute rigidity, mystical actions at a distance, and individuality, that chemists and many other reasonable naturalists of modern times, losing all patience with it, have dismissed it to the realms of metaphysics, and made it smaller than ‘anything we can conceive.’ But if atoms are inconceivably small, why are not all chemical actions infinitely swift? Chemistry is powerless to deal with this question, and many others of paramount importance, if barred by the hardness of its fundamental assumptions, from contemplating the atom as a real portion of matter occupying a finite space, and forming not an immeasurably small constituent of any palpable body.
Sir William Thomson and Peter Guthrie Tait, A Treatise on Natural Philosophy (1883), Vol. I, Part 2, 495.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Atom (355)  |  Body (537)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Contemplating (11)  |  Deal (188)  |  Distance (161)  |  Finite (59)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Individuality (22)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Matter (798)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Modern (385)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Other (2236)  |  Palpable (8)  |  Paramount (10)  |  Patience (56)  |  Portion (84)  |  Question (621)  |  Realm (85)  |  Rigidity (5)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Strength (126)  |  Time (1877)  |  Why (491)

The influence of his [Leibnitz’s] genius in forming that peculiar taste both in pure and in mixed mathematics which has prevailed in France, as well as in Germany, for a century past, will be found, upon examination, to have been incomparably greater than that of any other individual.
In Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind (1827), Vol. 3, Chap. 1, Sec. 3, 187.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Both (493)  |  Century (310)  |  Examination (98)  |  France (27)  |  Genius (284)  |  Germany (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Individual (404)  |  Influence (222)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Pure (291)  |  Taste (90)  |  Will (2355)

The interior parts of the earth and its internal depths are a region totally impervious to the eye of mortal man, and can least of all be approached by those ordinary paths of hypothesis adopted by naturalists and geologists. The region designed for the existence of man, and of every other creature endowed with organic life, as well as the sphere opened to the perception of man's senses, is confined to a limited space between the upper and lower parts of the earth, exceedingly small in proportion to the diameter, or even semi-diameter of the earth, and forming only the exterior surface, or outer skin, of the great body of the earth.
In Friedrich von Schlegel and James Burton Robertson (trans.), The Philosophy of History (1835), 20.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Approach (108)  |  Body (537)  |  Creature (233)  |  Depth (94)  |  Design (195)  |  Diameter (28)  |  Earth (996)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Existence (456)  |  Exterior (6)  |  Eye (419)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Impervious (5)  |  Interior (32)  |  Internal (66)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Open (274)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Organic (158)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Perception (97)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Sense (770)  |  Skin (47)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Surface (209)

The power of the eye could not be extended further in the opened living animal, hence I had believed that this body of the blood breaks into the empty space, and is collected again by a gaping vessel and by the structure of the walls. The tortuous and diffused motion of the blood in divers directions, and its union at a determinate place offered a handle to this. But the dried lung of the frog made my belief dubious. This lung had, by chance, preserved the redness of the blood in (what afterwards proved to be) the smallest vessels, where by means of a more perfect lens, no more there met the eye the points forming the skin called Sagrino, but vessels mingled annularly. And, so great is the divarication of these vessels as they go out, here from a vein, there from an artery, that order is no longer preserved, but a network appears made up of the prolongations of both vessels. This network occupies not only the whole floor, but extends also to the walls, and is attached to the outgoing vessel, as I could see with greater difficulty but more abundantly in the oblong lung of a tortoise, which is similarly membranous and transparent. Here it was clear to sense that the blood flows away through the tortuous vessels, that it is not poured into spaces but always works through tubules, and is dispersed by the multiplex winding of the vessels.
De Pulmonibus (1661), trans. James Young, Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine (1929-30), 23, 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Artery (10)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Belief (578)  |  Blood (134)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Break (99)  |  Call (769)  |  Capillary (4)  |  Chance (239)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Direction (175)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Empty (80)  |  Extend (128)  |  Eye (419)  |  Flow (83)  |  Frog (38)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Handle (28)  |  Lens (14)  |  Living (491)  |  Lung (34)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Microscope (80)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Network (21)  |  Offer (141)  |  Open (274)  |  Order (632)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Skin (47)  |  Space (500)  |  Structure (344)  |  Through (849)  |  Tortoise (10)  |  Transparency (7)  |  Transparent (16)  |  Union (51)  |  Vein (25)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Wall (67)  |  Whole (738)  |  Winding (8)  |  Work (1351)

The traditional boundaries between various fields of science are rapidly disappearing and what is more important science does not know any national borders. The scientists of the world are forming an invisible network with a very free flow of scientific information - a freedom accepted by the countries of the world irrespective of political systems or religions. ... Great care must be taken that the scientific network is utilized only for scientific purposes - if it gets involved in political questions it loses its special status and utility as a nonpolitical force for development.
Banquet speech accepting Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (10 Dec 1982). In Wilhelm Odelberg (editor) Les Prix Nobel. The Nobel Prizes 1982 (1983)
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Border (9)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Care (186)  |  Country (251)  |  Development (422)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Field (364)  |  Flow (83)  |  Force (487)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Great (1574)  |  Information (166)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Involved (90)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lose (159)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Network (21)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Special (184)  |  Status (35)  |  System (537)  |  Utility (49)  |  Various (200)  |  World (1774)

The wintry clouds drop spangles on the mountains. If the thing occurred once in a century historians would chronicle and poets would sing of the event; but Nature, prodigal of beauty, rains down her hexagonal ice-stars year by year, forming layers yards in thickness. The summer sun thaws and partially consolidates the mass. Each winter's fall is covered by that of the ensuing one, and thus the snow layer of each year has to sustain an annually augmented weight. It is more and more compacted by the pressure, and ends by being converted into the ice of a true glacier, which stretches its frozen tongue far down beyond the limits of perpetual snow. The glaciers move, and through valleys they move like rivers.
The Glaciers of the Alps & Mountaineering in 1861 (1911), 247.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Annual (5)  |  Augment (12)  |  Augmentation (4)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Century (310)  |  Chronicle (6)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Compact (13)  |  Consolidation (4)  |  Conversion (17)  |  Cover (37)  |  Down (456)  |  Drop (76)  |  End (590)  |  Ensuing (3)  |  Event (216)  |  Fall (230)  |  Freezing (16)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Hexagon (4)  |  Historian (54)  |  Ice (54)  |  Layer (40)  |  Limit (280)  |  Mass (157)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Partially (8)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Perpetuity (9)  |  Poet (83)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Prodigal (2)  |  Rain (62)  |  River (119)  |  Snow (37)  |  Song (37)  |  Spangle (2)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Summer (54)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Thaw (2)  |  Thickness (5)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Valley (32)  |  Weight (134)  |  Winter (44)  |  Yard (7)  |  Year (933)

There is thus a possibility that the ancient dream of philosophers to connect all Nature with the properties of whole numbers will some day be realized. To do so physics will have to develop a long way to establish the details of how the correspondence is to be made. One hint for this development seems pretty obvious, namely, the study of whole numbers in modern mathematics is inextricably bound up with the theory of functions of a complex variable, which theory we have already seen has a good chance of forming the basis of the physics of the future. The working out of this idea would lead to a connection between atomic theory and cosmology.
From Lecture delivered on presentation of the James Scott prize, (6 Feb 1939), 'The Relation Between Mathematics And Physics', printed in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1938-1939), 59, Part 2, 129.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Atomic Theory (15)  |  Basis (173)  |  Bound (119)  |  Chance (239)  |  Complex (188)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Cosmology (25)  |  Detail (146)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dream (208)  |  Establish (57)  |  Function (228)  |  Future (429)  |  Good (889)  |  Hint (21)  |  Idea (843)  |  Lead (384)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Property (168)  |  Realize (147)  |  Study (653)  |  Theory (970)  |  Variable (34)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

This discovery [of fullerenes] is principally about the way that carbon condenses, it’s genius for forming clusters.
From Nobel Lecture (7 Dec 1996), 'Discovering the Fullerenes', collected in Ingmar Grenthe (ed.), Nobel Lectures, Chemistry 1996-2000 (2003).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Condense (13)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Form (959)  |  Fullerene (3)  |  Genius (284)  |  Way (1217)

We have been forced to admit for the first time in history not only the possibility of the fact of the growth and decay of the elements of matter. With radium and with uranium we do not see anything but the decay. And yet, somewhere, somehow, it is almost certain that these elements must be continuously forming. They are probably being put together now in the laboratory of the stars. ... Can we ever learn to control the process. Why not? Only research can tell.
'The Significance of Radium,' an address delivered (in connection with the presentation of a gram of radium to Madame Curie) at the National Museum, Washington, D.C. (25 May 1921). In Science (1921), 54, No. 1383, 1921. In Rodney P. Carlisle, Scientific American Inventions and Discoveries (2004), 375.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Certain (550)  |  Control (167)  |  Decay (53)  |  Do (1908)  |  Element (310)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Fusion (16)  |  Growth (187)  |  History (673)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Learn (629)  |  Matter (798)  |  Must (1526)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Process (423)  |  Radium (25)  |  Research (664)  |  See (1081)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Tell (340)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Uranium (20)  |  Why (491)

We say that, in very truth the productive cause is a mineralizing power which is active in forming stones… . This power, existing in the particular material of stones, has two instruments according to different natural conditions.
One of these is heat, which is active in drawing out moisture and digesting the material and bringing about its solidification into the form of stone, in Earth that has been acted upon by unctuous moisture… .
The other instrument is in watery moist material that has been acted upon by earthy dryness; and this [instrument] is cold, which … is active in expelling moisture.
From De Mineralibus (c.1261-1263), as translated by Dorothy Wyckoff, Book of Minerals (1967), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Act (272)  |  Active (76)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cold (112)  |  Condition (356)  |  Different (577)  |  Digest (9)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Dryness (5)  |  Earth (996)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expel (4)  |  Form (959)  |  Heat (174)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Material (353)  |  Mineralize (2)  |  Mineralogy (20)  |  Moist (12)  |  Moisture (20)  |  Natural (796)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particular (76)  |  Power (746)  |  Productive (32)  |  Say (984)  |  Solidification (2)  |  Stone (162)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)

We see, then, that the disappearance of the conscious personality, the predominance of the unconscious personality, the turning by means of suggestion and contagion of feelings and ideas in an identical direction, the tendency to immediately transform the suggested ideas into acts; these, we see, are the principal characteristics of the individual forming part of a crowd. He is no longer himself, but has become an automaton who has ceased to be guided by his will.
From Psychologie des Foules (1895), 20. English text in The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind (1897), Book 1, Chap. 1, 12. Original French text: “Donc, évanouissement de la personnalité consciente, prédominance de la personnalité inconsciente, orientation par voie de suggestion et de contagion des sentiments et des idées dans un même sens, tendance a transformer immédiatement en actes les idée suggérées, tels sont les principaux caractères de l’individu en foule. II n’est plus lui-même, il est devenu un automate que sa volonté ne guide plus.”
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Automaton (12)  |  Become (815)  |  Cease (79)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Contagion (9)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Direction (175)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Guided (3)  |  Himself (461)  |  Idea (843)  |  Identical (53)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Individual (404)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Part (222)  |  Personality (62)  |  Predominance (3)  |  Principal (63)  |  See (1081)  |  Suggested (2)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Transform (73)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unconscious (22)  |  Will (2355)

We set out, therefore, with the supposition that an organised body is not produced by a fundamental power which is guided in its operation by a definite idea, but is developed, according to blind laws of necessity, by powers which, like those of inorganic nature, are established by the very existence of matter. As the elementary materials of organic nature are not different from those of the inorganic kingdom, the source of the organic phenomena can only reside in another combination of these materials, whether it be in a peculiar mode of union of the elementary atoms to form atoms of the second order, or in the arrangement of these conglomerate molecules when forming either the separate morphological elementary parts of organisms, or an entire organism.
Mikroskopische Untersuchungen über die Uebereinstimmung in der Struktur und dem Wachsthum der Thiere und Pflanzen (1839). Microscopic Researches into the Accordance in the Structure and Growth of Animals and Plants, trans. Henry Smith (1847), 190-1.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Atom (355)  |  Blind (95)  |  Body (537)  |  Combination (144)  |  Conglomerate (2)  |  Definite (110)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Existence (456)  |  Form (959)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inorganic (13)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Law (894)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Morphology (22)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Operation (213)  |  Order (632)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organism (220)  |  Organization (114)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Power (746)  |  Produced (187)  |  Reside (25)  |  Separate (143)  |  Set (394)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Union (51)

With respect to those who may ask why Nature does not produce new beings? We may enquire of them in turn, upon what foundation they suppose this fact? What it is that authorizes them to believe this sterility in Nature? Know they if, in the various combinations which she is every instant forming, Nature be not occupied in producing new beings, without the cognizance of these observers? Who has informed them that this Nature is not actually assembling, in her immense elaboratory, the elements suitable to bring to light, generations entirely new, that will have nothing in common with those of the species at present existing? What absurdity then, or what want of just inference would there be, to imagine that the man, the horse, the fish, the bird will be no more? Are these animals so indispensably requisite to Nature, that without them she cannot continue her eternal course? Does not all change around us? Do we not ourselves change? ... Nature contains no one constant form.
The System of Nature (1770), trans. Samuel Wilkinson (1820), Vol. 1, 94-95.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurdity (32)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Ask (411)  |  Authorize (5)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bird (149)  |  Change (593)  |  Combination (144)  |  Common (436)  |  Constant (144)  |  Continue (165)  |  Course (409)  |  Do (1908)  |  Element (310)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fish (120)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Generation (242)  |  Horse (74)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inference (45)  |  Inform (47)  |  Instant (45)  |  Know (1518)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Present (619)  |  Respect (207)  |  Species (401)  |  Sterility (10)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Turn (447)  |  Various (200)  |  Want (497)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

[In mathematics] we behold the conscious logical activity of the human mind in its purest and most perfect form. Here we learn to realize the laborious nature of the process, the great care with which it must proceed, the accuracy which is necessary to determine the exact extent of the general propositions arrived at, the difficulty of forming and comprehending abstract concepts; but here we learn also to place confidence in the certainty, scope and fruitfulness of such intellectual activity.
In Ueber das Verhältnis der Naturwissenschaften zur Gesammtheit der Wissenschaft, Vorträge und Reden (1896), Bd. 1, 176. Also seen translated as “In mathematics we see the conscious logical activity of our mind in its purest and most perfect form; here is made manifest to us all the labor and the great care with which it progresses, the precision which is necessary to determine exactly the source of the established general theorems, and the difficulty with which we form and comprehend abstract conceptions; but we also learn here to have confidence in the certainty, breadth, and fruitfulness of such intellectual labor”, in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 20. From the original German, “Hier sehen wir die bewusste logische Thätigkeit unseres Geistes in ihrer reinsten und vollendetsten Form; wir können hier die ganze Mühe derselben kennen lernen, die grosse Vorsicht, mit der sie vorschreiten muss, die Genauigkeit, welche nöthig ist, um den Umfang der gewonnenen allgemeinen Sätze genau zu bestimmen, die Schwierigkeit, abstracte Begriffe zu bilden und zu verstehen; aber ebenso auch Vertrauen fassen lernen in die Sicherheit, Tragweite und Fruchtbarkeit solcher Gedankenarbeit.”
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Activity (210)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Behold (18)  |  Care (186)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Concept (221)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Determine (144)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Exact (68)  |  Extent (139)  |  Form (959)  |  Fruitfulness (2)  |  General (511)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Laborious (14)  |  Learn (629)  |  Logical (55)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics And Logic (12)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Place (177)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Process (423)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Pure (291)  |  Realize (147)  |  Scope (45)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.