Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Dangerous... to take shelter under a tree, during a thunder-gust. It has been fatal to many, both men and beasts.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Simple

Simple Quotes (406 quotes)


...it would be a simple way of solving the goiter problem. And in addition to that it would be the biggest thing in a medical proposition to be carried out in the state of Michigan, and Michigan is a large place. And as I thought of the thing the more convinced I became that this oughtn't to be a personal thing, This ought to be something done by the Michigan State Medical Society as a body.
Recommending the addition of a trace of iodine to table salt.
Opening address to the Medical Department of the University of Michigan, Sep 1914. Quoted by Howard Markel in 'When it Rains it Pours' : Endemic Goiter, Iodized Salt, and David Murray Cowie, M.D. American Journal of Public Health, Feb 1987, vol.77, No.2, page 222.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  Body (537)  |  Iodine (7)  |  Large (394)  |  More (2559)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Salt (46)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  State (491)  |  Table (104)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trace (103)  |  Way (1217)

1839—The fermentation satire
THE MYSTERY OF ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION RESOLVED
(Preliminary Report by Letter) Schwindler
I am about to develop a new theory of wine fermentation … Depending on the weight, these seeds carry fermentation to completion somewhat less than as in the beginning, which is understandable … I shall develop a new theory of wine fermentation [showing] what simple means Nature employs in creating the most amazing phenomena. I owe it to the use of an excellent microscope designed by Pistorius.
When brewer’s yeast is mixed with water the microscope reveals that the yeast dissolves into endless small balls, which are scarcely 1/800th of a line in diameter … If these small balls are placed in sugar water, it can be seen that they consist of the eggs of animals. As they expand, they burst, and from them develop small creatures that multiply with unbelievable rapidity in a most unheard of way. The form of these animals differs from all of the 600 types described up until now. They possess the shape of a Beinsdorff still (without the cooling apparatus). The head of the tube is a sort of proboscis, the inside of which is filled with fine bristles 1/2000th of a line long. Teeth and eyes are not discernible; however, a stomach, intestinal canal, anus (a rose red dot), and organs for secretion of urine are plainly discernible. From the moment they are released from the egg one can see these animals swallow the sugar from the solution and pass it to the stomach. It is digested immediately, a process recognized easily by the resultant evacuation of excrements. In a word, these infusors eat sugar, evacuate ethyl alcohol from the intestinal canal, and carbon dioxide from the urinary organs. The bladder, in the filled state, has the form of a champagne bottle; when empty, it is a small button … As soon as the animals find no more sugar present, they eat each other up, which occurs through a peculiar manipulation; everything is digested down to the eggs which pass unchanged through the intestinal canal. Finally, one again fermentable yeast, namely the seed of the animals, which remain over.
In 'Das entriithselle Geheimiss der geisligen Giihrung', Annalen der Pharmacie und Chemie (1839), 29, 100-104; adapted from English translalion by Ralph E. Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 203-205.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alcohol (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Amazing (35)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Ball (62)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Burst (39)  |  Canal (17)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Carbon Dioxide (22)  |  Carry (127)  |  Completion (22)  |  Consist (223)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Creature (233)  |  Design (195)  |  Develop (268)  |  Diameter (28)  |  Differ (85)  |  Discernible (9)  |  Dissolve (20)  |  Dot (16)  |  Down (456)  |  Eat (104)  |  Egg (69)  |  Employ (113)  |  Empty (80)  |  Endless (56)  |  Everything (476)  |  Expand (53)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fermentation (15)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Letter (109)  |  Long (790)  |  Manipulation (19)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Occur (150)  |  Organ (115)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Pass (238)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Possess (156)  |  Present (619)  |  Proboscis (2)  |  Process (423)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Remain (349)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Rose (34)  |  Satire (4)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  See (1081)  |  Seed (93)  |  Small (477)  |  Solution (267)  |  Soon (186)  |  State (491)  |  Still (613)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Structure (344)  |  Sugar (23)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Type (167)  |  Unbelievable (7)  |  Understandable (12)  |  Urine (16)  |  Use (766)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wine (38)  |  Word (619)  |  Yeast (7)

Are coral reefs growing from the depths of the oceans? ... [The] reply is a simple negative; and a single fact establishes its truth. The reef-forming coral zoophytes, as has been shown, cannot grow at greater depths than 100 or 120 feet; and therefore in seas deeper than this, the formation or growth of reefs over the bottom is impossible.
On Coral Reefs and Islands (1853), 138.
Science quotes on:  |  Coral Reef (12)  |  Depth (94)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Formation (96)  |  Forming (42)  |  Greater (288)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Growth (187)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Island (46)  |  Negative (63)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Reply (56)  |  Sea (308)  |  Single (353)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Zoophyte (4)

Il ne peut y avoir de langage plus universel et plus simple, plus exempt d’erreurs et d’obscurités, c'est-à-dire plus digne d'exprimer les rapports invariables des êtres naturels.
There cannot be a language more universal and more simple, more free from errors and obscurities, … more worthy to express the invariable relations of all natural things. [About mathematical analysis.]
From Théorie Analytique de la Chaleur (1822), xiv, translated by Alexander Freeman in The Analytical Theory of Heat (1878), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Dire (6)  |  Error (321)  |  Express (186)  |  Free (232)  |  Invariable (4)  |  Language (293)  |  Mathematical Analysis (20)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Plus (43)  |  Relation (157)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Universal (189)  |  Worthy (34)

In primis, hominis est propria VERI inquisitio atque investigato. Itaque cum sumus negotiis necessariis, curisque vacui, tum avemus aliquid videre, audire, ac dicere, cognitionemque rerum, aut occultarum aut admirabilium, ad benè beatéque vivendum necessariam ducimus; —ex quo intelligitur, quod VERUM, simplex, sincerumque sit, id esse naturæ hominis aptissimum. Huic veri videndi cupiditati adjuncta est appetitio quædam principatûs, ut nemini parere animus benè a naturâ informatus velit, nisi præcipienti, aut docenti, aut utilitatis causâ justè et legitimè imperanti: ex quo animi magnitudo existit, et humanarum rerum contemtio.
Before all other things, man is distinguished by his pursuit and investigation of TRUTH. And hence, when free from needful business and cares, we delight to see, to hear, and to communicate, and consider a knowledge of many admirable and abstruse things necessary to the good conduct and happiness of our lives: whence it is clear that whatsoever is TRUE, simple, and direct, the same is most congenial to our nature as men. Closely allied with this earnest longing to see and know the truth, is a kind of dignified and princely sentiment which forbids a mind, naturally well constituted, to submit its faculties to any but those who announce it in precept or in doctrine, or to yield obedience to any orders but such as are at once just, lawful, and founded on utility. From this source spring greatness of mind and contempt of worldly advantages and troubles.
In De Officiis, Book 1. Sect. 13. As given in epigraph to John Frederick William Herschel, A Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy (1830), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstruse (10)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Announce (13)  |  Business (149)  |  Care (186)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Communication (94)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Congenial (3)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Delight (108)  |  Dignified (13)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Direct (225)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Forbid (14)  |  Free (232)  |  Good (889)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Hear (139)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lawful (7)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Longing (19)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Obedience (19)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Precept (10)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  See (1081)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Spring (133)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Utility (49)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Yield (81)

Les causes primordiales ne nous sont point connues; mais elles sont assujetties à des lois simples et constantes, que l’on peut découvrir par l’observation, et dont l’étude est l’objet de la philosophie naturelle.
Primary causes are unknown to us; but are subject to simple and constant laws, which may be discovered by observation, the study of them being the object of natural philosophy.
Opening statement from 'Discours Préliminaire' to Théorie Analytique de la Chaleur (1822), i, translated by Alexander Freeman in The Analytical Theory of Heat (1878), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Cause (541)  |  Constant (144)  |  Discover (553)  |  Law (894)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Point (580)  |  Primary (80)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Unknown (182)

Les mathématiciens parviennent à la solution d’un problême par le simple arrangement des données, & en réduisant le raisonnement à des opérations si simples, à des jugemens si courts, qu’ils ne perdent jamais de vue l’évidence qui leur sert de guide.
Mathematicians come to the solution of a problem by the simple arrangement of the data, and reducing the reasoning to such simple operations, to judgments so brief, that they never lose sight of the evidence that serves as their guide.
From a paper read to the Académie Royales des Sciences (18 Apr 1787), printed in Méthode de Nomenclature Chimique (1787), 12. Translation from the French by Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Brief (36)  |  Court (33)  |  Data (156)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Guide (97)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Lose (159)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Never (1087)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Sight (132)  |  Solution (267)

Neumann, to a physicist seeking help with a difficult problem: Simple. This can be solved by using the method of characteristics.
Physicist: I'm afraid I don’t understand the method of characteristics.
Neumann: In mathematics you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
Attributed, as related by Dr. Felix Smith (Head of Molecular Physics, Stanford Research Institute) to author Gary Zukav, who quoted it in The Dancing Wu Li Masters: An Overview of the New Physics (1979, 2001), 208, footnote. The physicist (a friend of Dr. Smith) worked at Los Alamos after WW II. It should be noted that although the author uses quotation marks around the spoken remarks, that they represent the author's memory of Dr. Smith's recollection, who heard it from the physicist. Therefore the fourth-hand wording is very likely not verbatim. Webmaster finds Zukav's book seems to be the only source for this quote.
Science quotes on:  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Problem (676)  |  Solution (267)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

Newsreader: A huge asteroid could destroy Earth! And by coincidence, that's the subject of tonight's miniseries.
Dogbert: In science, researchers proved that this simple device can keep idiots off your television screen. [TV remote control] Click.
Dilbert cartoon strip (30 Apr 1993).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Asteroid (13)  |  Click (4)  |  Coincidence (19)  |  Control (167)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Device (70)  |  Earth (996)  |  Idiot (22)  |  News (36)  |  Proof (287)  |  Remote (83)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Science (3879)  |  Screen (7)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Subject (521)  |  Television (30)  |  Tonight (9)

Simplicibus itaque verbis gaudet Mathematica Veritas, cum etiam per se simplex sit Veritatis oratio. (So Mathematical Truth prefers simple words since the language of Truth is itself simple.)
Epistolarum astronomicarum liber primus (1596)
Science quotes on:  |  Language (293)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Word (619)

Tout le monde convient maintenant qu’une Physique d’où l'on banniroit tout ce qui peut avoir quelque rapport avec les mathématiques, pour se borner à un simple recueil d’observations & d’experiences, ne seroit qu’un amusement historique, plus propre à récréer un cercle de personnes oisives, qu’à occuper un esprit véritablement philosophique.
Everyone now agrees that a Physics where you banish all relationship with mathematics, to confine itself to a mere collection of experiences and observations, would be but an historical amusement, more fitting to entertain idle people, than to engage the mind of a true philosopher.
In Dictionnaire de Physique (1781), Vol. 8, 209. English version via Google Translate, tweaked by Webmaster. Also seen translated as—“Everyone now agrees that a physics lacking all connection with mathematics…would only be an historical amusement, fitter for entertaining the idle than for occupying the mind of a philosopher”—in John L. Heilbron, Electricity in the 17th and 18th centuries: A Study of Early Modern Physics (1979), 74. In the latter source, the subject quote immediately follows a different one by Franz Karl Achard. An editor misreading that paragraph is the likely reason the subject quote will be found in Oxford Dictionary of Science Quotations attributed to Achard. Webmaster checked the original footnoted source, and corrected the author of this entry to Paulian (16 May 2014).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amusement (33)  |  Banish (11)  |  Collection (64)  |  Engage (39)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Experience (467)  |  Historical (70)  |  Idle (33)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Observation (555)  |  People (1005)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Plus (43)  |  Relationship (104)

Toutes les fois que dans une équation finale on trouve deux quantités inconnues, on a un lieu, l'extrémité de l'une d’elles décrivant une ligne droite ou courbe. La ligne droite est simple et unique dans son genre; les espèces des courbes sont en nombre indéfini, cercle, parabole, hyperbole, ellipse, etc.
Whenever two unknown magnitudes appear in a final equation, we have a locus, the extremity of one of the unknown magnitudes describing a straight line or a curve. The straight line is simple and unique; the classes of curves are indefinitely many,—circle, parabola, hyperbola, ellipse, etc.
Introduction aux Lieux Plans et Solides (1679) collected in OEuvres de Fermat (1896), Vol. 3, 85. Introduction to Plane and Solid Loci, as translated by Joseph Seidlin in David E. Smith(ed.)A Source Book in Mathematics (1959), 389. Alternate translation using Google Translate: “Whenever in a final equation there are two unknown quantities, there is a locus, the end of one of them describing a straight line or curve. The line is simple and unique in its kind, species curves are indefinite in number,—circle, parabola, hyperbola, ellipse, etc.”
Science quotes on:  |  Circle (110)  |  Curve (49)  |  Describe (128)  |  Ellipse (8)  |  Equation (132)  |  Extremity (7)  |  Final (118)  |  Locus (5)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Parabola (2)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  Two (937)  |  Unique (67)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Whenever (81)

[When asked “Dr. Einstein, why is it that when the mind of man has stretched so far as to discover the structure of the atom we have been unable to devise the political means to keep the atom from destroying us?”] That is simple, my friend. It is because politics is more difficult than physics.
Einstein’s answer to a conferee at a meeting at Princeton, N.J. (Jan 1946), as recalled by Greenville Clark in 'Letters to the Times', in New York Times (22 Apr 1955), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Control (167)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discover (553)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Friend (168)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  Science And Politics (15)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Structure (344)  |  Why (491)

… the really fundamental things have a way of appearing to be simple once they have been stated by a genius. ...

In 'Analytical Function and Mathematical Physics,' Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society, October 1931.
Science quotes on:  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Genius (284)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Way (1217)

A casual glance at crystals may lead to the idea that they were pure sports of nature, but this is simply an elegant way of declaring one's ignorance. With a thoughtful examination of them, we discover laws of arrangement. With the help of these, calculation portrays and links up the observed results. How variable and at the same time how precise and regular are these laws! How simple they are ordinarily, without losing anything of their significance! The theory which has served to develop these laws is based entirely on a fact, whose existence has hitherto been vaguely discerned rather than demonstrated. This fact is that in all minerals which belong to the same species, these little solids, which are the crystal elements and which I call their integrant molecules, have an invariable form, in which the faces lie in the direction of the natural fracture surfaces corresponding to the mechanical division of the crystals. Their angles and dimensions are derived from calculations combined with observation.
Traité de mineralogie ... Publié par le conseil des mines (1801), Vol. 1, xiii-iv, trans. Albert V. and Marguerite Carozzi.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Belong (162)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Call (769)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Develop (268)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discern (33)  |  Discover (553)  |  Division (65)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Element (310)  |  Examination (98)  |  Existence (456)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Form (959)  |  Fracture (6)  |  Glance (34)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lie (364)  |  Little (707)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Precise (68)  |  Pure (291)  |  Regular (46)  |  Result (677)  |  Significance (113)  |  Solid (116)  |  Species (401)  |  Sport (22)  |  Surface (209)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thoughtful (15)  |  Time (1877)  |  Variable (34)  |  Way (1217)

A central lesson of science is that to understand complex issues (or even simple ones), we must try to free our minds of dogma and to guarantee the freedom to publish, to contradict, and to experiment. Arguments from authority are unacceptable.
Billions and Billions: Thoughts on Life and Death at the Brink of the Millenium (1998), 190.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Authority (95)  |  Central (80)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Contradict (40)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Guarantee (30)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Problem (676)  |  Publication (101)  |  Science (3879)  |  Try (283)  |  Unacceptable (3)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

A DNA sequence for the genome of bacteriophage ΦX174 of approximately 5,375 nucleotides has been determined using the rapid and simple “plus and minus” method. The sequence identifies many of the features responsible for the production of the proteins of the nine known genes of the organism, including initiation and termination sites for the proteins and RNAs. Two pairs of genes are coded by the same region of DNA using different reading frames.
[Paper co-author]
Frederick Sanger, et al., 'Nucleotide Sequence of Bacteriophage ΦX174 DNA', Nature (1977), 265, 687.
Science quotes on:  |  Author (167)  |  Bacteriophage (2)  |  Code (31)  |  Determination (78)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  DNA (77)  |  Feature (44)  |  Frame (26)  |  Gene (98)  |  Genome (15)  |  Identification (16)  |  Initiation (7)  |  Known (454)  |  Method (505)  |  Nucleotide (6)  |  Organism (220)  |  Paper (182)  |  Plus (43)  |  Production (183)  |  Protein (54)  |  Reading (133)  |  Region (36)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Site (14)  |  Termination (4)  |  Two (937)

A fact is a simple statement that everyone believes. It is innocent, unless found guilty. A hypothesis is a novel suggestion that no one wants to believe. It is guilty until found effective.
Edward Teller, Wendy Teller, Wilson Talley, Conversations on the Dark Secrets of Physics (1991, 2002), Footnote, 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Effective (59)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Guilt (14)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Innocence (13)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Novel (32)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Statement (142)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Want (497)

A great part of its [higher arithmetic] theories derives an additional charm from the peculiarity that important propositions, with the impress of simplicity on them, are often easily discovered by induction, and yet are of so profound a character that we cannot find the demonstrations till after many vain attempts; and even then, when we do succeed, it is often by some tedious and artificial process, while the simple methods may long remain concealed.
Quoted in H. Eves, Mathematical Circles (1977) .
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Character (243)  |  Charm (51)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Derive (65)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Find (998)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impress (64)  |  Induction (77)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Peculiarity (25)  |  Process (423)  |  Profound (104)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Remain (349)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Tedious (14)  |  Vain (83)

A hypothesis may be simply defined as a guess. A scientific hypothesis is an intelligent guess.
In Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 114.
Science quotes on:  |  Definition (221)  |  Guess (61)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Scientific (941)

A lot of prizes have been awarded for showing the universe is not as simple as we might have thought.
In A Brief History of Time, (1988, 1998), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  Award (13)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Lot (151)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universe (857)

A marveilous newtrality have these things mathematicall, and also a strange participation between things supernaturall, immortall, intellectuall, simple and indivisible, and things naturall, mortall, sensible, componded and divisible.
John Dee
In Mathematicall Praeface to the Elements of Geometrie of Euclid of Megara (1570).
Science quotes on:  |  Compound (113)  |  Divisible (4)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Indivisible (21)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Neutrality (5)  |  Participation (15)  |  Sensible (27)  |  Strange (157)  |  Supernatural (25)  |  Thing (1915)

A mathematical proof should resemble a simple and clear-cut constellation, not a scattered cluster in the Milky Way.
In A Mathematician’s Apology (1940, 2012), 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Clear-Cut (10)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Constellation (17)  |  Cut (114)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Milky Way (26)  |  Proof (287)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Scattered (5)  |  Way (1217)

A modern mathematical proof is not very different from a modern machine, or a modern test setup: the simple fundamental principles are hidden and almost invisible under a mass of technical details.
Unterrichtsblätter für Mathematik und Naturwissenschaften (1932), 38, 177-188. As translated by Abe Shenitzer, in 'Part I. Topology and Abstract Algebra as Two Roads of Mathematical Comprehension', The American Mathematical Monthly (May 1995), 102, No. 7, 453.
Science quotes on:  |  Detail (146)  |  Different (577)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern (385)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proof (287)  |  Technical (43)  |  Test (211)

A moment's consideration of this case shows what a really great advance in the theory and practise of breeding has been obtained through the discovery of Mendel's law. What a puzzle this case would have presented to the biologist ten years ago! Agouti crossed with chocolate gives in the second filial generation (not in the first) four varieties, viz., agouti, chocolate, black and cinnamon. We could only have shaken our heads and looked wise (or skeptical).
Then we had no explanation to offer for such occurrences other than the 'instability of color characters under domestication,' the 'effects of inbreeding,' 'maternal impressions.' Serious consideration would have been given to the proximity of cages containing both black and cinnamon-agouti mice.
Now we have a simple, rational explanation, which anyone can put to the test. We are able to predict the production of new varieties, and to produce them.
We must not, of course, in our exuberance, conclude that the powers of the hybridizer know no limits. The result under consideration consists, after all, only in the making of new combinations of unit characters, but it is much to know that these units exist and that all conceivable combinations of them are ordinarily capable of production. This valuable knowledge we owe to the discoverer and to the rediscoverers of Mendel's law.
'New Colour Variety of the Guinea Pig', Science, 1908, 28, 250-252.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Both (493)  |  Breeding (21)  |  Cage (12)  |  Capable (168)  |  Character (243)  |  Chocolate (4)  |  Color (137)  |  Combination (144)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Consist (223)  |  Course (409)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Domestication (5)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exist (443)  |  Explanation (234)  |  First (1283)  |  Generation (242)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Hybrid (14)  |  Impression (114)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Limit (280)  |  Look (582)  |  Making (300)  |  Gregor Mendel (21)  |  Moment (253)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Power (746)  |  Predict (79)  |  Present (619)  |  Production (183)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Rational (90)  |  Result (677)  |  Serious (91)  |  Show (346)  |  Skeptical (20)  |  Test (211)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Wise (131)  |  Year (933)

A neurotic person can be most simply described as someone who, while he was growing up, learned ways of behaving that are self-defeating in his society.
In Margaret Mead and Rhoda Bubendey Métraux (ed.), Margaret Mead, Some Personal Views (1979), 216.
Science quotes on:  |  Behave (17)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Describe (128)  |  Growing (98)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Most (1731)  |  Neurotic (6)  |  Person (363)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Self (267)  |  Society (326)  |  Way (1217)

A physician’s subject of study is necessarily the patient, and his first field for observation is the hospital. But if clinical observation teaches him to know the form and course of diseases, it cannot suffice to make him understand their nature; to this end he must penetrate into the body to find which of the internal parts are injured in their functions. That is why dissection of cadavers and microscopic study of diseases were soon added to clinical observation. But to-day these various methods no longer suffice; we must push investigation further and, in analyzing the elementary phenomena of organic bodies, must compare normal with abnormal states. We showed elsewhere how incapable is anatomy alone to take account of vital phenenoma, and we saw that we must add study of all physico-chemical conditions which contribute necessary elements to normal or pathological manifestations of life. This simple suggestion already makes us feel that the laboratory of a physiologist-physician must be the most complicated of all laboratories, because he has to experiment with phenomena of life which are the most complex of all natural phenomena.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 140-141.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Already (222)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Body (537)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Clinical (15)  |  Compare (69)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Condition (356)  |  Course (409)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Disease (328)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Element (310)  |  Elementary (96)  |  End (590)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Feel (367)  |  Field (364)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Internal (66)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Life (1795)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Observation (555)  |  Organic (158)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Patient (199)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Physician (273)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Push (62)  |  Saw (160)  |  Show (346)  |  Soon (186)  |  State (491)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Understand (606)  |  Various (200)  |  Vital (85)  |  Why (491)

All scientists must focus closely on limited targets. Whether or not one’s findings on a limited subject will have wide applicability depends to some extent on chance, but biologists of superior ability repeatedly focus on questions the answers to which either have wide ramifications or lead to new areas of investigation. One procedure that can be effective is to attempt both reduction and synthesis; that is, direct a question at a phenomenon on one integrative level, identify its mechanism at a simpler level, then extrapolate its consequences to a more complex level of integration.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 230-231,
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Applicability (6)  |  Area (31)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Both (493)  |  Chance (239)  |  Closely (12)  |  Complex (188)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Depend (228)  |  Direct (225)  |  Effective (59)  |  Extent (139)  |  Extrapolate (2)  |  Findings (5)  |  Focus (35)  |  Identify (13)  |  Integration (19)  |  Integrative (2)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Lead (384)  |  Level (67)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Question (621)  |  Ramification (7)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Subject (521)  |  Superior (81)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Target (9)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)

All that can be said upon the number and nature of elements is, in my opinion, confined to discussions entirely of a metaphysical nature. The subject only furnishes us with indefinite problems, which may be solved in a thousand different ways, not one of which, in all probability, is consistent with nature. I shall therefore only add upon this subject, that if, by the term elements, we mean to express those simple and indivisible atoms of which matter is composed, it is extremely probable we know nothing at all about them; but, if we apply the term elements, or principles of bodies, to express our idea of the last point which analysis is capable of reaching, we must admit, as elements, all the substances into which we are capable, by any means, to reduce bodies by decomposition.
Elements of Chemistry (1790), trans. R. Kerr, Preface, xxiv.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Apply (160)  |  Atom (355)  |  Capable (168)  |  Composition (84)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Decomposition (18)  |  Different (577)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Element (310)  |  Express (186)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indefinite (20)  |  Indivisible (21)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Point (580)  |  Principle (507)  |  Probability (130)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Solution (267)  |  Subject (521)  |  Substance (248)  |  Term (349)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Way (1217)

All the inventions and devices ever constructed by the human hand or conceived by the human mind, no matter how delicate, how intricate and complicated, are simple, childish toys compared with that most marvelously wrought mechanism, the human body. Its parts are far more delicate, and their mutual adjustments infinitely more accurate, than are those of the most perfect chronometer ever made.
In Plain Facts For Old and Young: Embracing the Natural History and Hygiene of Organic Life (1879, 1887), Revised Ed., 332.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Adjustment (20)  |  All (4108)  |  Body (537)  |  Childish (20)  |  Chronometer (2)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Construct (124)  |  Construction (112)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Device (70)  |  Hand (143)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Invention (369)  |  Marvelous (29)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Toy (19)

Although the cooking of food presents some unsolved problems, the quick warming of cooked food and the thawing of frozen food both open up some attractive uses. ... There is no important reason why the the housewife of the future should not purchase completely frozen meals at the grocery store just as she buys quick frozen vegetables. With a quick heating, high-frequency unit in her kitchen, food preparation from a pre-cooked, frozen meal becomes a simple matter.
[Predicting home kitchen appliances could be developed from the radionic tube employed to jam enemy radar in World War II.]
In 'Physics of Today Become the Engineering of Tomorrow', Proceedings of the National Electronics Conference (1947), Vols. 1-2, 24-25. Note: by 1947 Ratheon was able to demonstrate a refrigerator-sized commercial microwave oven.
Science quotes on:  |  Appliance (9)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Become (815)  |  Both (493)  |  Completely (135)  |  Cooking (11)  |  Develop (268)  |  Employ (113)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Food (199)  |  Frequency (22)  |  Future (429)  |  High (362)  |  Home (170)  |  Kitchen (13)  |  Matter (798)  |  Meal (18)  |  Microwave (4)  |  Open (274)  |  Oven (5)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Radar (8)  |  Reason (744)  |  Store (48)  |  Unsolved (15)  |  Use (766)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  War (225)  |  Warming (23)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)

Among natural bodies some have, and some have not, life; and by life we mean the faculties of self-nourishment, self-growth and self-decay. Thus every natural body partaking of life may be regarded as an essential existence; … but then it is an existence only in combination. … And since the organism is such a combination, being possessed of life, it cannot be the Vital Principle. Therefore it follows that the Vital Principle most be an essence, as being the form of a natural body, holding life in potentiality; but essence is a reality (entetechie). The Vital Principle is the original reality of a natural body endowed with potential life; this, however, is to be understood only of a body which may be organized. Thus the parts even of plants are organs, but they are organs that are altogether simple; as the leaf which is the covering of the pericarp, the pericarp of the fruit. If, then, there be any general formula for every kind of Vital Principle, it is—tthe primary reality of an organism.
Aristotle
In George Henry Lewes, Aristotle (1864), 231.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Combination (144)  |  Covering (14)  |  Decay (53)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Essence (82)  |  Essential (199)  |  Existence (456)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Formula (98)  |  Fruit (102)  |  General (511)  |  Growth (187)  |  Kind (557)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mean (809)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Organ (115)  |  Organism (220)  |  Plant (294)  |  Possess (156)  |  Potential (69)  |  Potentiality (9)  |  Primary (80)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reality (261)  |  Regard (305)  |  Self (267)  |  Understood (156)  |  Vital (85)

An irrefutable proof that such single-celled primaeval animals really existed as the direct ancestors of Man, is furnished according to the fundamental law of biogeny by the fact that the human egg is nothing more than a simple cell.
Natürlche Schöpfungsgeschichte, trans. E. R. Lankester, The History of Creation (1892), Vol. 2, 381.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Animal (617)  |  Cell (138)  |  Direct (225)  |  Egg (69)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Human (1468)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Proof (287)  |  Single (353)

Anaxagoras of Clazomenae, son of Hegesiboulos, held that the first principles of things were the homoeomeries. For it seemed to him quite impossible that anything should come into being from the non-existent or be dissolved into it. Anyhow we take in nourishment which is simple and homogeneous, such as bread or water, and by this are nourished hair, veins, arteries, flesh, sinews, bones and all the other parts of the body. Which being so, we must agree that everything that exists is in the nourishment we take in, and that everything derives its growth from things that exist. There must be in that nourishment some parts that are productive of blood, some of sinews, some of bones, and so on-parts which reason alone can apprehend. For there is no need to refer the fact that bread and water produce all these things to sense-perception; rather, there are in bread and water parts which only reason can apprehend.
Aetius 1.3.5. In G. S. Kirk, J. E. Raven and M. Schofield (eds), The Presocratic Philosophers: A Critical History with a Selection of Texts (1983), p. 375.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Anaxagoras (10)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Body (537)  |  Bone (95)  |  Bread (39)  |  Derive (65)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Growth (187)  |  Homogeneous (16)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perception (97)  |  Principle (507)  |  Productive (32)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sense (770)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Vein (25)  |  Water (481)

Anaximenes son of Eurystratus, of Miletus, was a pupil of Anaximander; some say he was also a pupil of Parmenides. He said that the material principle was air and the infinite; and that the stars move, not under the earth, but round it. He used simple and economical Ionic speech. He was active, according to what Apollodorus says, around the time of the capture of Sardis, and died in the 63rd Olympiad.
Diogenes Laertius 2.3. In G. S. Kirk, J. E. Raven and M. Schofield (eds), The Presocratic Philosophers: A Critical History with a Selection of Texts(1983), p. 143.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Active (76)  |  Air (347)  |  Anaximenes (5)  |  Earth (996)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Material (353)  |  Move (216)  |  Principle (507)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Say (984)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Speech (61)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Time (1877)

And do you know what “the world” is to me? Shall I,show it to you in my mirror? This world: a monster of energy, without beginning, without end; a firm, iron magnitude of force that does not grow bigger or smaller, that does not expend itself but only transforms itself; as a whole, of unalterable size, a household without expenses or losses, but likewise without increase or income; enclosed by “nothingness”' as by a boundary; not by something blurry or wasted, not something endlessly extended, but set in a definite space as a definite force, and not a space that might be “empty” here or there, but rather as force throughout, as a play of forces and waves of forces, at the same time one and many, increasing here and at the same time decreasing there; a sea of forces flowing and rushing together, eternally changing, eternally flooding back, with tremendous years of recurrence, with an ebb and a flood of its forms; out of the simplest forms striving toward the most complex, out of the stillest, most rigid, coldest forms toward the hottest, most turbulent, most self-contradictory, and then again returning home to the simple out of this abundance, out of the play of contradictions back to the joy of concord, still affirming itself in this uniformity of its courses and its years, blessing itself as that which must return eternally, as a becoming that knows no satiety, no disgust, no weariness: this, my Dionysian world of the eternally self-creating, the eternally self-destroying, this mystery world of the twofold voluptuous delight, my “beyond good and evil,” without goal, unless the joy of the circle itself is a goal; without will, unless a ring feels good will toward itself-do you want a name for this world? A solution for all its riddles? A light for you, too, you best-concealed, strongest, most intrepid, most midnightly men?—This world is the will to power—and nothing besides! And you yourselves are also this will to power—and nothing besides!
The Will to Power (Notes written 1883-1888), book 4, no. 1067. Trans. W. Kaufmann and R. J. Hollingdale and ed. W. Kaufmann (1968), 549-50.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (25)  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Best (459)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Blessing (24)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Circle (110)  |  Complex (188)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Course (409)  |  Definite (110)  |  Delight (108)  |  Disgust (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Empty (80)  |  End (590)  |  Energy (344)  |  Evil (116)  |  Extend (128)  |  Feel (367)  |  Firm (47)  |  Flood (50)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Goal (145)  |  Good (889)  |  Grow (238)  |  Home (170)  |  Income (17)  |  Increase (210)  |  Iron (96)  |  Joy (107)  |  Know (1518)  |  Light (607)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Mirror (41)  |  Monster (31)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Name (333)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Nothingness (12)  |  Power (746)  |  Return (124)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Sea (308)  |  Self (267)  |  Set (394)  |  Show (346)  |  Solution (267)  |  Something (719)  |  Space (500)  |  Still (613)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Transform (73)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Voluptuous (3)  |  Want (497)  |  Wave (107)  |  Weariness (6)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

And thus Nature will be very conformable to her self and very simple, performing all the great Motions of the heavenly Bodies by the Attraction of Gravity which intercedes those Bodies, and almost all the small ones of their Particles by some other attractive and repelling Powers which intercede the Particles. The Vis inertiae is a passive Principle by which Bodies persist in their Motion or Rest, receive Motion in proportion to the Force impressing it, and resist as much as they are resisted. By this Principle alone there never could have been any Motion in the World. Some other Principle was necessary for putting Bodies into Motion; and now they are in Motion, some other Principle is necessary for conserving the Motion.
From Opticks, (1704, 2nd ed. 1718), Book 3, Query 31, 372-3.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Force (487)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Great (1574)  |  Law Of Motion (14)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Receive (114)  |  Rest (280)  |  Self (267)  |  Small (477)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

And, to prevent mistakes, I must advertize you, that I now mean by elements, as those chymists that speak plainest do by their principles, certain primitive or simple, or perfectly unmingled bodies; which not being made of any other bodies, or of one another, are the ingredients of which all those called perfectly mixt bodies are immediately compounded, and into which they are ultimately resolved: now whether there be any such body to be constantly met with in all, and each, of those that are said to be elemented bodies, is the thing I now question.
The Sceptical Chemist (2nd ed., 1661), Appendix, 354. As given in Henry M. Leicester and Herbert S. Klickstein, A Source Book in Chemistry 1400-1900 (1952), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Compound (113)  |  Definition (221)  |  Do (1908)  |  Element (310)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Principle (507)  |  Question (621)  |  Speak (232)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Ultimately (55)

Anybody can make the simple complicated. Creativity is making the complicated simple.
In David Pressman. Patent it Yourself (2008), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Anybody (42)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Making (300)

As is well known the principle of virtual velocities transforms all statics into a mathematical assignment, and by D'Alembert's principle for dynamics, the latter is again reduced to statics. Although it is is very much in order that in gradual training of science and in the instruction of the individual the easier precedes the more difficult, the simple precedes the more complicated, the special precedes the general, yet the min, once it has arrived at the higher standpoint, demands the reverse process whereby all statics appears only as a very special case of mechanics.
Collected Works (1877), Vol. 5, 25-26. Quoted in G. Waldo Dunnington, Carl Friedrich Gauss: Titan of Science (2004), 412.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Assignment (12)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Jean le Rond D’Alembert (11)  |  Demand (123)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Easier (53)  |  General (511)  |  Individual (404)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Known (454)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  More (2559)  |  Order (632)  |  Principle (507)  |  Process (423)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Science (3879)  |  Special (184)  |  Special Case (9)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Statics (6)  |  Theory (970)  |  Training (80)  |  Transform (73)

As man advances in civilisation, and small tribes are united into larger communities, the simplest reason would tell each individual that he ought to extend his social instincts and sympathies to all the members of the same nation, though personally unknown to him. This point being once reached, there is only an artificial barrier to prevent his sympathies extending to the men of all nations and races.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Artificial (33)  |  Barrier (32)  |  Being (1278)  |  Civilisation (20)  |  Community (104)  |  Extend (128)  |  Individual (404)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Large (394)  |  Man (2251)  |  Member (41)  |  Nation (193)  |  Personally (7)  |  Point (580)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Race (268)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reason (744)  |  Same (157)  |  Small (477)  |  Social (252)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Tell (340)  |  Tribe (22)  |  United (14)  |  Unknown (182)

Ask a scientist a very profound question on his science, and he will be silent. Ask a religious person a very simple question on his religion, and he will be frenzied.
Quotations: Superultramodern Science and Philosophy (2005).
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Frenzy (6)  |  Person (363)  |  Profound (104)  |  Question (621)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Silence (56)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Will (2355)

At last gleams of light have come, and I am almost convinced (quite contrary to opinion I started with) that species are not (it is like confessing a murder) immutable. Heaven forfend me from Lamarck nonsense of a “tendency to progression”, “adaptations from the slow willing of animals”, &c! But the conclusions I am led to are not widely different from his; though the means of change are wholly so. I think I have found out (here’s presumption!) the simple way by which species become exquisitely adapted to various ends.
Letter to Sir Joseph Hooker (11 Jan 1844). In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of His Published Letters (1892), 173-174.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Animal (617)  |  Become (815)  |  Change (593)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Different (577)  |  End (590)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Jean-Baptiste Lamarck (24)  |  Last (426)  |  Light (607)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Presumption (15)  |  Progression (23)  |  Slow (101)  |  Species (401)  |  Start (221)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Think (1086)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Willing (44)

At terrestrial temperatures matter has complex properties which are likely to prove most difficult to unravel; but it is reasonable to hope that in the not too distant future we shall be competent to understand so simple a thing as a star.
The Internal Constitution of Stars, Cambridge. (1926, 1988), 393.
Science quotes on:  |  Complex (188)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Future (429)  |  Hope (299)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Prove (250)  |  Star (427)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)  |  Unravel (14)

At the outset do not be worried about this big question—Truth. It is a very simple matter if each one of you starts with the desire to get as much as possible. No human being is constituted to know the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth; and even the best of men must be content with fragments, with partial glimpses, never the full fruition. In this unsatisfied quest the attitude of mind, the desire, the thirst—a thirst that from the soul must arise!—the fervent longing, are the be-all and the end-all.
'The Student Life' (1905). In G. L. Keynes (ed.), Selected Writings of Sir William Osler (1951), 172.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Contentment (11)  |  Desire (204)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Fervent (6)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Fruition (2)  |  Glimpse (13)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Know (1518)  |  Longing (19)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Outset (7)  |  Possible (552)  |  Quest (39)  |  Question (621)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Soul (226)  |  Start (221)  |  Thirst (11)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Whole (738)

Attaching significance to invariants is an effort to recognize what, because of its form or colour or meaning or otherwise, is important or significant in what is only trivial or ephemeral. A simple instance of failing in this is provided by the poll-man at Cambridge, who learned perfectly how to factorize a²-b² but was floored because the examiner unkindly asked for the factors of p²–q².
In 'Recent Developments in Invariant Theory', The Mathematical Gazette (Dec 1926), 13, No. 185, 217. [Note: A poll-man is a student who takes the ordinary university degree, without honours. -Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Color (137)  |  Effort (227)  |  Ephemeral (4)  |  Examiner (5)  |  Factor (46)  |  Fail (185)  |  Form (959)  |  Important (209)  |  Instance (33)  |  Invariant (10)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Provide (69)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Significance (113)  |  Significant (74)  |  Student (300)  |  Trivial (57)

Avoid complexities. Make everything as simple as possible.
As quoted in Joseph Wickham Roe, English and American Tool Builders (1916), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Avoid (116)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Everything (476)  |  Making (300)  |  Possible (552)  |  Simplicity (167)

But how is one to determine what is pleasing to God? ... Whatever is unpleasant to man is pleasant to God. The test is the natural instinct of man. If there arises within one’s dark recesses a hot desire to do this or that, then it is the paramount duty of a Christian to avoid doing this or that. And if, on the contrary, one cherishes an abhorrence of the business, then one must tackle it forthwith, all the time shouting ‘Hallelujah!’ A simple enough religion, surely–simple, satisfying and idiotic.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abhorrence (9)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Business (149)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Christian (43)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Dark (140)  |  Desire (204)  |  Determine (144)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Duty (68)  |  Enough (340)  |  Forthwith (2)  |  God (757)  |  Hot (60)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Paramount (10)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Please (65)  |  Recess (8)  |  Religion (361)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Shout (25)  |  Surely (101)  |  Tackle (6)  |  Test (211)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unpleasant (12)  |  Whatever (234)

But it is just this characteristic of simplicity in the laws of nature hitherto discovered which it would be fallacious to generalize, for it is obvious that simplicity has been a part cause of their discovery, and can, therefore, give no ground for the supposition that other undiscovered laws are equally simple.
From Herbert Spencer lecture delivered at Oxford (1914) 'On Scientific Method in Philosophy', collected in Mysticism and Logic and Other Essays (1919), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Equally (130)  |  Fallacious (12)  |  Generalize (19)  |  Ground (217)  |  Law (894)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Other (2236)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Undiscovered (15)

But shall gravity be therefore called an occult cause, and thrown out of philosophy, because the cause of gravity is occult and not yet discovered? Those who affirm this, should be careful not to fall into an absurdity that may overturn the foundations of all philosophy. For causes usually proceed in a continued chain from those that are more compounded to those that are more simple; when we are arrived at the most simple cause we can go no farther ... These most simple causes will you then call occult and reject them? Then you must reject those that immediately depend on them.
Mathematical Principles (1729), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurdity (32)  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Compound (113)  |  Depend (228)  |  Discover (553)  |  Fall (230)  |  Farther (51)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Immediately (114)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Occult (8)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Reject (63)  |  Usually (176)  |  Will (2355)

By destroying the biological character of phenomena, the use of averages in physiology and medicine usually gives only apparent accuracy to the results. From our point of view, we may distinguish between several kinds of averages: physical averages, chemical averages and physiological and pathological averages. If, for instance, we observe the number of pulsations and the degree of blood pressure by means of the oscillations of a manometer throughout one day, and if we take the average of all our figures to get the true or average blood pressure and to learn the true or average number of pulsations, we shall simply have wrong numbers. In fact, the pulse decreases in number and intensity when we are fasting and increases during digestion or under different influences of movement and rest; all the biological characteristics of the phenomenon disappear in the average. Chemical averages are also often used. If we collect a man's urine during twenty-four hours and mix all this urine to analyze the average, we get an analysis of a urine which simply does not exist; for urine, when fasting, is different from urine during digestion. A startling instance of this kind was invented by a physiologist who took urine from a railroad station urinal where people of all nations passed, and who believed he could thus present an analysis of average European urine! Aside from physical and chemical, there are physiological averages, or what we might call average descriptions of phenomena, which are even more false. Let me assume that a physician collects a great many individual observations of a disease and that he makes an average description of symptoms observed in the individual cases; he will thus have a description that will never be matched in nature. So in physiology, we must never make average descriptions of experiments, because the true relations of phenomena disappear in the average; when dealing with complex and variable experiments, we must study their various circumstances, and then present our most perfect experiment as a type, which, however, still stands for true facts. In the cases just considered, averages must therefore be rejected, because they confuse, while aiming to unify, and distort while aiming to simplify. Averages are applicable only to reducing very slightly varying numerical data about clearly defined and absolutely simple cases.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 134-135.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Average (82)  |  Biological (137)  |  Blood (134)  |  Call (769)  |  Character (243)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Complex (188)  |  Consider (416)  |  Data (156)  |  Degree (276)  |  Different (577)  |  Digestion (28)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disease (328)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distort (22)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fasting (3)  |  Figure (160)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hour (186)  |  Increase (210)  |  Individual (404)  |  Influence (222)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Kind (557)  |  Learn (629)  |  Man (2251)  |  Match (29)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Movement (155)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Oscillation (13)  |  Pass (238)  |  Pathological (21)  |  People (1005)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physician (273)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Present (619)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Pulse (20)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Simplify (13)  |  Stand (274)  |  Startling (15)  |  Station (29)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Type (167)  |  Unify (6)  |  Urine (16)  |  Use (766)  |  Usually (176)  |  Variable (34)  |  Various (200)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wrong (234)

Chemistry as a science is still in its infancy. I hold to my view because there is still so much beyond our understanding even in the simplest systems the chemist has cared to deal with.
Speech at the Nobel Banquet (10 Dec 1983) for his Nobel Prize in Chemistry. In Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel: The Nobel Prizes (1984), 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Car (71)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Deal (188)  |  Infancy (12)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Science (3879)  |  Still (613)  |  System (537)  |  Understanding (513)  |  View (488)

Compounds of gaseous substances with each other are always formed in very simple ratios, so that representing one of the terms by unity, the other is 1, 2, or at most 3 ... The apparent contraction of volume suffered by gas on combination is also very simply related to the volume of one of them.
Mémoires de la Société d' Arcueil, 1809, 2, 233-4. Trans. Foundations of the Molecular Theory, Alembic Club Reprint, no. 4 (1950), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparent (84)  |  Combination (144)  |  Compound (113)  |  Contraction (15)  |  Form (959)  |  Gas (83)  |  Law (894)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Substance (248)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Unity (78)

Computers and rocket ships are examples of invention, not of understanding. … All that is needed to build machines is the knowledge that when one thing happens, another thing happens as a result. It’s an accumulation of simple patterns. A dog can learn patterns. There is no “why” in those examples. We don’t understand why electricity travels. We don’t know why light travels at a constant speed forever. All we can do is observe and record patterns.
In God's Debris: A Thought Experiment (2004), 22.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accumulation (50)  |  All (4108)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Computer (127)  |  Constant (144)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dog (70)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Example (94)  |  Forever (103)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Invention (369)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Light (607)  |  Machine (257)  |  Need (290)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Record (154)  |  Result (677)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Ship (62)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Speed (65)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Travel (114)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Why (491)

Creation science has not entered the curriculum for a reason so simple and so basic that we often forget to mention it: because it is false, and because good teachers understand why it is false. What could be more destructive of that most fragile yet most precious commodity in our entire intellectual heritage—good teaching—than a bill forcing our honorable teachers to sully their sacred trust by granting equal treatment to a doctrine not only known to be false, but calculated to undermine any general understanding of science as an enterprise?.
In 'The Verdict on Creationism' The Sketical Inquirer (Winter 1987/88), 12, 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (138)  |  Bill (14)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Commodity (5)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creation Science (2)  |  Creationism (8)  |  Curriculum (10)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Enter (141)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Equal (83)  |  False (100)  |  Forcing (2)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgetting (13)  |  Fragile (21)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Heritage (20)  |  Honor (54)  |  Honorable (14)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Known (454)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Precious (41)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Trust (66)  |  Undermining (2)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Why (491)

Direct observation of the testimony of the earth … is a matter of the laboratory, of the field naturalist, of indefatigable digging among the ancient archives of the earth’s history. If Mr. Bryan, with an open heart and mind, would drop all his books and all the disputations among the doctors and study first hand the simple archives of Nature, all his doubts would disappear; he would not lose his religion; he would become an evolutionist.
'Evolution and Religion', New York Times (5 Mar 1922), 91. Written in response to an article a few days earlier in which William Jennings Bryan challenged the theory of evolution as lacking proof.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Archive (5)  |  Become (815)  |  Book (392)  |  William Jennings Bryan (20)  |  Digging (11)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Drop (76)  |  Earth (996)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Evolutionist (7)  |  Field (364)  |  Field Naturalist (3)  |  First (1283)  |  First Hand (2)  |  Heart (229)  |  History (673)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Lose (159)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Open (274)  |  Paleontology (31)  |  Proof (287)  |  Religion (361)  |  Research (664)  |  Study (653)  |  Testimony (21)

During a conversation with the writer in the last weeks of his life, Sylvester remarked as curious that notwithstanding he had always considered the bent of his mind to be rather analytical than geometrical, he found in nearly every case that the solution of an analytical problem turned upon some quite simple geometrical notion, and that he was never satisfied until he could present the argument in geometrical language.
In Proceedings London Royal Society, 63, 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Argument (138)  |  Consider (416)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Curious (91)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Language (293)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notion (113)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Remark (28)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Solution (267)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Turn (447)  |  Week (70)  |  Writer (86)

During the time that [Karl] Landsteiner gave me an education in the field of imununology, I discovered that he and I were thinking about the serologic problem in very different ways. He would ask, What do these experiments force us to believe about the nature of the world? I would ask, What is the most. simple and general picture of the world that we can formulate that is not ruled by these experiments? I realized that medical and biological investigators were not attacking their problems the same way that theoretical physicists do, the way I had been in the habit of doing.
‘Molecular Disease’, Pfizer Spectrum (1958), 6:9, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Belief (578)  |  Biological (137)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Education (378)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  Formulation (36)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Habit (168)  |  Immunology (14)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Karl Landsteiner (8)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Picture (143)  |  Problem (676)  |  Realization (43)  |  Research (664)  |  Rule (294)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Theoretical Physicist (19)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

Each of us has read somewhere that in New Guinea pidgin the word for 'piano' is (I use English spelling) 'this fellow you hit teeth belonging to him he squeal all same pig'. I am inclined to doubt whether this expression is authentic; it looks just like the kind of thing a visitor to the Islands would facetiously invent. But I accept 'cut grass belong head belong me' for 'haircut' as genuine... Such phrases seem very funny to us, and make us feel very superior to the ignorant foreigners who use long winded expressions for simple matters. And then it is our turn to name quite a simple thing, a small uncomplicated molecule consisting of nothing more than a measly 11 carbons, seven hydrogens, one nitrogen and six oxygens. We sharpen our pencils, consult our rule books and at last come up with 3-[(1, 3- dihydro-1, 3-dioxo-2H-isoindol-2-yl) oxy]-3-oxopropanoic acid. A name like that could drive any self-respecting Papuan to piano-playing.
The Chemist's English (1990), 3rd Edition, 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Acid (83)  |  All (4108)  |  Authentic (8)  |  Belong (162)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Book (392)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Complication (29)  |  Cut (114)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Expression (175)  |  Feel (367)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Foreigner (3)  |  Funny (11)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Grass (46)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Invention (369)  |  Island (46)  |  Kind (557)  |  Last (426)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Matter (798)  |  Molecule (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1216)  |  New Guinea (3)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Piano (12)  |  Playing (42)  |  Read (287)  |  Rule (294)  |  Self (267)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Small (477)  |  Spelling (8)  |  Superior (81)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Turn (447)  |  Use (766)  |  Wind (128)  |  Word (619)

Ecology has not yet explicitly developed the kind of cohesive, simplifying generalizations exemplified by, say, the laws of physics. Nevertheless there are a number of generalizations that are already evident in what we now know about the ecosphere and that can be organized into a kind of informal set of laws of ecology.
In The Closing Circle: Nature, Man, and Technology (2014).
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Cohesive (4)  |  Develop (268)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Evident (91)  |  Exemplify (5)  |  Explicit (3)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Informal (4)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Ecology (5)  |  Law Of Physics (3)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Number (699)  |  Organize (29)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Say (984)  |  Set (394)

Einstein, twenty-six years old, only three years away from crude privation, still a patent examiner, published in the Annalen der Physik in 1905 five papers on entirely different subjects. Three of them were among the greatest in the history of physics. One, very simple, gave the quantum explanation of the photoelectric effect—it was this work for which, sixteen years later, he was awarded the Nobel prize. Another dealt with the phenomenon of Brownian motion, the apparently erratic movement of tiny particles suspended in a liquid: Einstein showed that these movements satisfied a clear statistical law. This was like a conjuring trick, easy when explained: before it, decent scientists could still doubt the concrete existence of atoms and molecules: this paper was as near to a direct proof of their concreteness as a theoretician could give. The third paper was the special eory of relativity, which quietly amalgamated space, time, and matter into one fundamental unity. This last paper contains no references and quotes no authority. All of them are written in a style unlike any other theoretical physicist's. They contain very little mathematics. There is a good deal of verbal commentary. The conclusions, the bizarre conclusions, emerge as though with the greatest of ease: the reasoning is unbreakable. It looks as though he had reached the conclusions by pure thought, unaided, without listening to the opinions of others. To a surprisingly large extent, that is precisely what he had done.
Variety of Men (1966), 100-1.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Authority (95)  |  Award (13)  |  Bizarre (6)  |  Brownian Motion (2)  |  Commentary (3)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Concreteness (5)  |  Conjuring (3)  |  Crude (31)  |  Deal (188)  |  Decent (10)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Direct (225)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Ease (35)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Erratic (4)  |  Examiner (5)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Good (889)  |  Greatest (328)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Physics (3)  |  Large (394)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Listening (25)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Motion (310)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Old (481)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Particle (194)  |  Patent (33)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Photoelectric Effect (2)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Privation (5)  |  Proof (287)  |  Publication (101)  |  Pure (291)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quote (42)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reference (33)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Show (346)  |  Space (500)  |  Special (184)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Still (613)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suspension (7)  |  Theoretical Physicist (19)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Trick (35)  |  Unbreakable (3)  |  Unity (78)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

Either one or the other [analysis or synthesis] may be direct or indirect. The direct procedure is when the point of departure is known-direct synthesis in the elements of geometry. By combining at random simple truths with each other, more complicated ones are deduced from them. This is the method of discovery, the special method of inventions, contrary to popular opinion.
Ampère gives this example drawn from geometry to illustrate his meaning for “direct synthesis” when deductions following from more simple, already-known theorems leads to a new discovery. In James R. Hofmann, André-Marie Ampère (1996), 159. Cites Académie des Sciences Ampère Archives, box 261.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Combination (144)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Complication (29)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Departure (9)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Element (310)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Indirect (18)  |  Invention (369)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Method (505)  |  More (2559)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Popular (29)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Random (41)  |  Special (184)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Truth (1057)

Endowed with two qualities, which seemed incompatible with each other, a volcanic imagination and a pertinacity of intellect which the most tedious numerical calculations could not daunt, Kepler conjectured that the movements of the celestial bodies must be connected together by simple laws, or, to use his own expression, by harmonic laws. These laws he undertook to discover. A thousand fruitless attempts, errors of calculation inseparable from a colossal undertaking, did not prevent him a single instant from advancing resolutely toward the goal of which he imagined he had obtained a glimpse. Twenty-two years were employed by him in this investigation, and still he was not weary of it! What, in reality, are twenty-two years of labor to him who is about to become the legislator of worlds; who shall inscribe his name in ineffaceable characters upon the frontispiece of an immortal code; who shall be able to exclaim in dithyrambic language, and without incurring the reproach of anyone, “The die is cast; I have written my book; it will be read either in the present age or by posterity, it matters not which; it may well await a reader, since God has waited six thousand years for an interpreter of his words.”
In 'Eulogy on Laplace', in Smithsonian Report for the year 1874 (1875), 131-132.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Age (499)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Await (5)  |  Become (815)  |  Body (537)  |  Book (392)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Cast (66)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Character (243)  |  Code (31)  |  Colossal (15)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Connect (125)  |  Die (86)  |  Discover (553)  |  Employ (113)  |  Endow (14)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Error (321)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Expression (175)  |  Frontispiece (2)  |  Fruitless (8)  |  Glimpse (13)  |  Goal (145)  |  God (757)  |  Harmonic (4)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Incompatible (4)  |  Incur (4)  |  Inscribe (4)  |  Inseparable (16)  |  Instant (45)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Interpreter (8)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Labor (107)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Legislator (4)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Movement (155)  |  Must (1526)  |  Name (333)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pertinacity (2)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Present (619)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Quality (135)  |  Read (287)  |  Reader (40)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reproach (3)  |  Resolutely (3)  |  Single (353)  |  Still (613)  |  Tedious (14)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Together (387)  |  Toward (45)  |  Two (937)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Undertaking (16)  |  Use (766)  |  Volcano (39)  |  Wait (58)  |  Weary (11)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)  |  Write (230)  |  Year (933)

Equations are Expressions of Arithmetical Computation, and properly have no place in Geometry, except as far as Quantities truly Geometrical (that is, Lines, Surfaces, Solids, and Proportions) may be said to be some equal to others. Multiplications, Divisions, and such sort of Computations, are newly received into Geometry, and that unwarily, and contrary to the first Design of this Science. For whosoever considers the Construction of a Problem by a right Line and a Circle, found out by the first Geometricians, will easily perceive that Geometry was invented that we might expeditiously avoid, by drawing Lines, the Tediousness of Computation. Therefore these two Sciences ought not to be confounded. The Ancients did so industriously distinguish them from one another, that they never introduced Arithmetical Terms into Geometry. And the Moderns, by confounding both, have lost the Simplicity in which all the Elegance of Geometry consists. Wherefore that is Arithmetically more simple which is determined by the more simple Equation, but that is Geometrically more simple which is determined by the more simple drawing of Lines; and in Geometry, that ought to be reckoned best which is geometrically most simple.
In 'On the Linear Construction of Equations', Universal Arithmetic (1769), Vol. 2, 470.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Arithmetical (11)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Best (459)  |  Both (493)  |  Circle (110)  |  Computation (24)  |  Confound (21)  |  Confounding (8)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consist (223)  |  Construction (112)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Design (195)  |  Determine (144)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Division (65)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Easily (35)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Equal (83)  |  Equation (132)  |  Expression (175)  |  Far (154)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Geometrician (6)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Industrious (12)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Invent (51)  |  Line (91)  |  Lose (159)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Place (177)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solid (116)  |  Sort (49)  |  Surface (209)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Tedious (14)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Truly (116)  |  Two (937)  |  Wherefore (2)  |  Will (2355)

Ethnologists regard man as the primitive element of tribes, races, and peoples. The anthropologist looks at him as a member of the fauna of the globe, belonging to a zoölogical classification, and subject to the same laws as the rest of the animal kingdom. To study him from the last point of view only would be to lose sight of some of his most interesting and practical relations; but to be confined to the ethnologist’s views is to set aside the scientific rule which requires us to proceed from the simple to the compound, from the known to the unknown, from the material and organic fact to the functional phenomenon.
'Paul Broca and the French School of Anthropology'. Lecture delivered in the National Museum, Washington, D.C., 15 April 1882, by Dr. Robert Fletcher. In The Saturday Lectures (1882), 118.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Kingdom (20)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Classification (97)  |  Compound (113)  |  Element (310)  |  Ethnology (7)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Look (582)  |  Lose (159)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Most (1731)  |  Organic (158)  |  People (1005)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Practical (200)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Race (268)  |  Regard (305)  |  Require (219)  |  Rest (280)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Set (394)  |  Sight (132)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Unknown (182)  |  View (488)

Eventually the process of aging, which is unlikely to be simple, should be understandable. Hopefully some of its processes can be slowed down or avoided. In fact, in the next century, we shall have to tackle the question of the preferred form of death.
(1986).
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Aging (9)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Century (310)  |  Death (388)  |  Down (456)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Form (959)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Next (236)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Process (423)  |  Question (621)  |  Slow (101)  |  Tackle (6)  |  Understandable (12)

Every complex problem has a solution that is simple, neat, and wrong.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Complex (188)  |  Neat (5)  |  Problem (676)  |  Solution (267)  |  Wrong (234)

Every rule has its limits, and every concept its ambiguities. Most of all is this true in the science of life, where nothing quite corresponds to our ideas; similar ends are reached by varied means, and no causes are simple.
In Internal Factors in Evolution (1965), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ambiguity (17)  |  Biology (216)  |  Cause (541)  |  Concept (221)  |  End (590)  |  Idea (843)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)

Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler.
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  Everything (476)  |  Possible (552)  |  Theory (970)

Experiments may be of two kinds: experiments of simple fact, and experiments of quantity. ...[In the latter] the conditions will ... vary, not in quality, but quantity, and the effect will also vary in quantity, so that the result of quantitative induction is also to arrive at some mathematical expression involving the quantity of each condition, and expressing the quantity of the result. In other words, we wish to know what function the effect is of its conditions. We shall find that it is one thing to obtain the numerical results, and quite another thing to detect the law obeyed by those results, the latter being an operation of an inverse and tentative character.
Principles of Science: A Treatise on Logic and Scientific Method (1874, 1892), 439.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Character (243)  |  Condition (356)  |  Detect (44)  |  Effect (393)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Function (228)  |  Induction (77)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Obey (40)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Operation (213)  |  Other (2236)  |  Quality (135)  |  Quantitative (29)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Result (677)  |  Tentative (16)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Variation (90)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Word (619)

Finally, to the theme of the respiratory chain, it is especially noteworthy that David Kellin's chemically simple view of the respiratory chain appears now to have been right all along–and he deserves great credit for having been so reluctant to become involved when the energy-rich chemical intermediates began to be so fashionable. This reminds me of the aphorism: 'The obscure we see eventually, the completely apparent takes longer'.
'David Kellin's Respiratory Chain Concept and Its Chemiosmotic Consequences', Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1978). In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1971-1980 (1993), 325.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Aphorism (21)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Become (815)  |  Chain (50)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Completely (135)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Energy (344)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Fashionable (15)  |  Great (1574)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Involved (90)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Reluctant (4)  |  Respiration (13)  |  Right (452)  |  See (1081)  |  Theme (17)  |  View (488)

Finite systems of deterministic ordinary nonlinear differential equations may be designed to represent forced dissipative hydrodynamic flow. Solutions of these equations can be identified with trajectories in phase space. For those systems with bounded solutions, it is found that nonperiodic solutions are ordinarily unstable with respect to small modifications, so that slightly differing initial states can evolve into considerably different states. Systems with bounded solutions are shown to possess bounded numerical solutions.
A simple system representing cellular convection is solved numerically. All of the solutions are found to be unstable, and almost all of them are nonperiodic.
The feasibility of very-long-range weather prediction is examined in the light of these results
Abstract from his landmark paper introducing Chaos Theory in relation to weather prediction, 'Deterministic Nonperiodic Flow', Journal of the Atmospheric Science (Mar 1963), 20, 130.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bound (119)  |  Chaos Theory (4)  |  Convection (3)  |  Design (195)  |  Different (577)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Equation (132)  |  Feasibility (4)  |  Finite (59)  |  Flow (83)  |  Hydrodynamics (5)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modification (55)  |  Nonlinear (4)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Phase (36)  |  Phase Space (2)  |  Possess (156)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Range (99)  |  Represent (155)  |  Respect (207)  |  Result (677)  |  Small (477)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Space (500)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Unstable (8)  |  Weather (44)  |  Weather Prediction (2)

First you guess. Don’t laugh, this is the most important step. Then you compute the consequences. Compare the consequences to experience. If it disagrees with experience, the guess is wrong. In that simple statement is the key to science. It doesn’t matter how beautiful your guess is or how smart you are or what your name is. If it disagrees with experience, it’s wrong. That’s all there is to it.
Quoted in Florentin Smarandache, V. Christianto, Multi-Valued Logic, Neutrosophy, and Schrodinger Equation? (2006), 73, but without any primary source. If you know it, please contact the Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Compare (69)  |  Compute (18)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Disagree (11)  |  Experience (467)  |  First (1283)  |  Guess (61)  |  Important (209)  |  Key (50)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Science (3879)  |  Smart (26)  |  Statement (142)  |  Step (231)  |  Wrong (234)

First, [Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation] is mathematical in its expression…. Second, it is not exact; Einstein had to modify it…. There is always an edge of mystery, always a place where we have some fiddling around to do yet…. But the most impressive fact is that gravity is simple…. It is simple, and therefore it is beautiful…. Finally, comes the universality of the gravitational law and the fact that it extends over such enormous distances…
In The Character of Physical Law (1965, 2001), 33.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Distance (161)  |  Do (1908)  |  Edge (47)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Expression (175)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Gravitation (22)  |  Law Of Universal Gravitation (3)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modify (15)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universality (22)

Five centuries ago the printing press sparked a radical reshaping of the nature of education. By bringing a master’s words to those who could not hear a master’s voice, the technology of printing dissolved the notion that education must be reserved for those with the means to hire personal tutors. Today we are approaching a new technological revolution, one whose impact on education may be as far-reaching as that of the printing press: the emergence of powerful computers that are sufficiently inexpensive to be used by students for learning, play and exploration. It is our hope that these powerful but simple tools for creating and exploring richly interactive environments will dissolve the barriers to the production of knowledge as the printing press dissolved the barriers to its transmission.
As co-author with A.A. diSessa, from 'Preface', Turtle Geometry: The Computer as a Medium for Exploring Mathematics (1986), xiii.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Approach (108)  |  Barrier (32)  |  Bring (90)  |  Century (310)  |  Computer (127)  |  Create (235)  |  Dissolve (20)  |  Education (378)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Environment (216)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Far-Reaching (8)  |  Hear (139)  |  Hire (7)  |  Hope (299)  |  Impact (42)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Master (178)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Notion (113)  |  Personal (67)  |  Play (112)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Print (17)  |  Printing (22)  |  Printing Press (3)  |  Production (183)  |  Radical (25)  |  Reserve (24)  |  Reshape (4)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Rich (62)  |  Spark (31)  |  Student (300)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Today (314)  |  Tool (117)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Tutor (3)  |  Voice (52)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

For every complex problem, there is a solution that is simple, neat, and wrong.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Complex (188)  |  Neat (5)  |  Problem (676)  |  Solution (267)  |  Wrong (234)

For every complex question there is a simple answer–and it's wrong.
Anonymous
Although often seen attributed to H.L. Mencken, webmaster has not found found a primary source, and no authoritative quote collection containing it. If you have a primary source, please contact webmaster, who meanwhile lists this quote as only being author unknown.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Answer (366)  |  Complex (188)  |  Question (621)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Wrong (234)

Forests … are in fact the world’s air-conditioning system—the very lungs of the planet—and help to store the largest body of freshwater on the planet … essential to produce food for our planet’s growing population. The rainforests of the world also provide the livelihoods of more than a billion of the poorest people on this Earth… In simple terms, the rainforests, which encircle the world, are our very life-support system—and we are on the verge of switching it off.
Presidential Lecture (3 Nov 2008) at the Presidential Palace, Jakarta, Indonesia. On the Prince of Wales website.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Billion (95)  |  Body (537)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Earth (996)  |  Essential (199)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Food (199)  |  Forest (150)  |  Freshwater (3)  |  Growing (98)  |  Largest (39)  |  Life (1795)  |  Livelihood (12)  |  Lung (34)  |  More (2559)  |  People (1005)  |  Planet (356)  |  Population (110)  |  Population Growth (8)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Rain Forest (29)  |  Storage (6)  |  Store (48)  |  Support (147)  |  Switch (10)  |  System (537)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Verge (10)  |  World (1774)

Four college students taking a class together, had done so well through the semester, and each had an “A”. They were so confident, the weekend before finals, they went out partying with friends. Consequently, on Monday, they overslept and missed the final. They explained to the professor that they had gone to a remote mountain cabin for the weekend to study, but, unfortunately, they had a flat tire on the way back, didn’t have a spare, and couldn’t get help for a long time. As a result, they missed the final. The professor kindly agreed they could make up the final the following day. When they arrived the next morning, he placed them each in separate rooms, handed each one a test booklet, and told them to begin. The the first problem was simple, worth 5 points. Turning the page they found the next question, written: “(For 95 points): Which tire?”
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Begin (260)  |  Class (164)  |  College (66)  |  Confident (25)  |  Education (378)  |  Exam (5)  |  Excuse (25)  |  Explain (322)  |  Final (118)  |  First (1283)  |  Flat (33)  |  Friend (168)  |  Joke (83)  |  Long (790)  |  Miss (51)  |  Morning (94)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Next (236)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Professor (128)  |  Question (621)  |  Remote (83)  |  Result (677)  |  Separate (143)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Test (211)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tire (7)  |  Together (387)  |  Unfortunately (38)  |  Way (1217)  |  Worth (169)

Fractal is a word invented by Mandelbrot to bring together under one heading a large class of objects that have [played] … an historical role … in the development of pure mathematics. A great revolution of ideas separates the classical mathematics of the 19th century from the modern mathematics of the 20th. Classical mathematics had its roots in the regular geometric structures of Euclid and the continuously evolving dynamics of Newton. Modern mathematics began with Cantor’s set theory and Peano’s space-filling curve. Historically, the revolution was forced by the discovery of mathematical structures that did not fit the patterns of Euclid and Newton. These new structures were regarded … as “pathological,” .… as a “gallery of monsters,” akin to the cubist paintings and atonal music that were upsetting established standards of taste in the arts at about the same time. The mathematicians who created the monsters regarded them as important in showing that the world of pure mathematics contains a richness of possibilities going far beyond the simple structures that they saw in Nature. Twentieth-century mathematics flowered in the belief that it had transcended completely the limitations imposed by its natural origins.
Now, as Mandelbrot points out, … Nature has played a joke on the mathematicians. The 19th-century mathematicians may not have been lacking in imagination, but Nature was not. The same pathological structures that the mathematicians invented to break loose from 19th-century naturalism turn out to be inherent in familiar objects all around us.
From 'Characterizing Irregularity', Science (12 May 1978), 200, No. 4342, 677-678. Quoted in Benoit Mandelbrot, The Fractal Geometry of Nature (1977, 1983), 3-4.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  19th Century (33)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Belief (578)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Break (99)  |  Century (310)  |  Class (164)  |  Classical (45)  |  Completely (135)  |  Curve (49)  |  Development (422)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Fit (134)  |  Flower (106)  |  Fractal (9)  |  Gallery (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  Historical (70)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Joke (83)  |  Large (394)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Benoit Mandelbrot (13)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Monster (31)  |  Music (129)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Object (422)  |  Origin (239)  |  Painting (44)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Point (580)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Regard (305)  |  Regular (46)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Role (86)  |  Root (120)  |  Saw (160)  |  Separate (143)  |  Set (394)  |  Set Theory (6)  |  Space (500)  |  Structure (344)  |  Taste (90)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Transcend (26)  |  Turn (447)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

Furthermore, it’s equally evident that what goes on is actually one degree better than self-reproduction, for organisms appear to have gotten more elaborate in the course of time. Today's organisms are phylogenetically descended from others which were vastly simpler than they are, so much simpler, in fact, that it’s inconceivable, how any kind of description of the latter, complex organism could have existed in the earlier one. It’s not easy to imagine in what sense a gene, which is probably a low order affair, can contain a description of the human being which will come from it. But in this case you can say that since the gene has its effect only within another human organism, it probably need not contain a complete description of what is to happen, but only a few cues for a few alternatives. However, this is not so in phylogenetic evolution. That starts from simple entities, surrounded by an unliving amorphous milieu, and produce, something more complicated. Evidently, these organisms have the ability to produce something more complicated than themselves.
From lecture series on self-replicating machines at the University of Illinois, Lecture 5 (Dec 1949), 'Re-evaluation of the Problems of Complicated Automata—Problems of Hierarchy and Evolution', Theory of Self-Reproducing Automata (1966).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Alternative (29)  |  Amorphous (5)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Complete (204)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Course (409)  |  Degree (276)  |  Descend (47)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evident (91)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Gene (98)  |  Happen (274)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Kind (557)  |  Low (80)  |  Milieu (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Order (632)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phylogenetic (3)  |  Produce (104)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Say (984)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Something (719)  |  Start (221)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Will (2355)

He who knows not, and knows not he knows not, he is a fool—shun him;
He who knows not, and knows he knows not, he is simple—teach him;
He who knows, and knows not he knows, he is asleep—wake him;
He who knows, and knows he knows, he is wise—follow him.
Anonymous
Hesiod, 'Works and Days,' 293-7. In William White, Notes and Queries (1904), Series 10, Vol. 1, 235, the correspondent H.A. Strong says that the origin of these lines is to be found in Hesiod [Greek, 8th Century B.C.], Works and Days, 293-7; that the passage was very celebrated in antiquity, and is quoted by Aristotle, Nic. Eth., i. 4; and that both Livy (xxii. 29) and Cicero (Pro Cluent., 31) refer to it. Another correspondent (J.H.K.) said it was stated to be an Arab proverb in Lady [Isabel] Burton, Life of [Captain] Sir Richard [F.] Burton (1893), Vol. 1, 548, footnote, with 'Men are four…' added to the beginning of the quote.
Science quotes on:  |  Follow (378)  |  Fool (116)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Shun (4)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Wise (131)

High technology has done us one great service: It has retaught us the delight of performing simple and primordial tasks—chopping wood, building a fire, drawing water from a spring.
In 'Science and Technology', A Voice Crying in the Wilderness (Vox Clamantis in Deserto) (1989), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Chop (7)  |  Delight (108)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Fire (189)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Perform (121)  |  Primordial (10)  |  Service (110)  |  Spring (133)  |  Task (147)  |  Technology (257)  |  Water (481)  |  Wood (92)

How to start on my adventure—how to become a forester—was not so simple. There were no schools of Forestry in America. … Whoever turned his mind toward Forestry in those days thought little about the forest itself and more about its influences, and about its influence on rainfall first of all. So I took a course in meteorology, which has to do with weather and climate. and another in botany, which has to do with the vegetable kingdom—trees are unquestionably vegetable. And another in geology, for forests grow out of the earth. Also I took a course in astronomy, for it is the sun which makes trees grow. All of which is as it should be, because science underlies the forester’s knowledge of the woods. So far I was headed right. But as for Forestry itself, there wasn’t even a suspicion of it at Yale. The time for teaching Forestry as a profession was years away.
In Breaking New Ground (1947, 1998), 3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adventure (56)  |  All (4108)  |  America (127)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Become (815)  |  Biography (240)  |  Botany (57)  |  Climate (97)  |  Course (409)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  First (1283)  |  Forest (150)  |  Forester (4)  |  Forestry (16)  |  Geology (220)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growth (187)  |  Influence (222)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Meteorology (33)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Profession (99)  |  Right (452)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Start (221)  |  Sun (385)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Turn (447)  |  Underlie (18)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Weather (44)  |  Whoever (42)  |  Wood (92)  |  Year (933)

I am a great believer in the simplicity of things and as you probably know I am inclined to hang on to broad & simple ideas like grim death until evidence is too strong for my tenacity.
Letter to Irving Langmuir (10 Jun 1919). Quoted in Nathan Reingold and Ida H. Reingold, Science in America: A Documentary History 1900-1939 (1981), 354.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Believer (25)  |  Broad (27)  |  Death (388)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grim (5)  |  Hang (45)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Know (1518)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Strong (174)  |  Tenacity (10)  |  Thing (1915)

I am a simple man and I want simple answers.
Said to be a favorite line a favorite line of his when challenging his students. As stated, without citation in Robert Slater, Portraits in Silicon (1987), 88.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Man (2251)  |  Want (497)

I am curious in a super-apish way. I like finding out things. That … is all that the “noble self-sacrificing devotion to truth” of 99-44/100% of all scientists amounts to—simple curiosity. That is the spirit in which nearly all productive scientific research is carried on.
Letter from London (20 Apr 1937), No. 81, in George Gaylord Simpson and Léo F. LaPorte (ed.), Simple Curiosity: Letters from George Gaylord Simpson to His Family, 1921-1970 (1987), 34.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Curious (91)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Finding Out (5)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Noble (90)  |  Productive (32)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Sacrifice (5)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Way (1217)

I am much occupied with the investigation of the physical causes [of motions in the Solar System]. My aim in this is to show that the celestial machine is to be likened not to a divine organism but rather to a clockwork … insofar as nearly all the manifold movements are carried out by means of a single, quite simple magnetic force. This physical conception is to be presented through calculation and geometry.
Letter to Ilerwart von Hohenburg (10 Feb 1605) Quoted in Holton, Johannes Kepler's Universe: Its Physics and Metaphysics, 342, as cited by Hylarie Kochiras, Force, Matter, and Metaphysics in Newton's Natural Philosophy (2008), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Cause (541)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Clockwork (7)  |  Conception (154)  |  Divine (112)  |  Force (487)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Machine (257)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Motion (310)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Organism (220)  |  Physical (508)  |  Present (619)  |  Presenting (2)  |  Show (346)  |  Single (353)  |  Solar System (77)  |  System (537)  |  Through (849)

I believe in “intelligence,” and I believe also that there are inherited differences in intellectual ability, but I do not believe that intelligence is a simple scalar endowment that can be quantified by attaching a single figure to it—an I.Q. or the like.
In Advice to a Young Scientist (1979), 25. Footnoted with reference to his own earlier review article of books about IQ, in which he stated “misgivings about whether it is indeed possible to attach a single-number valuation to an endowment as complex and as various as intelligence.” That review was titled 'Unnatural Science', in New York Review of Books (3 Feb 1977), 24, No. 1, 13,
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Belief (578)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  Endowment (16)  |  Figure (160)  |  Inherit (33)  |  Inherited (21)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  IQ (5)  |  Single (353)

I believe that the useful methods of mathematics are easily to be learned by quite young persons, just as languages are easily learned in youth. What a wondrous philosophy and history underlie the use of almost every word in every language—yet the child learns to use the word unconsciously. No doubt when such a word was first invented it was studied over and lectured upon, just as one might lecture now upon the idea of a rate, or the use of Cartesian co-ordinates, and we may depend upon it that children of the future will use the idea of the calculus, and use squared paper as readily as they now cipher. … When Egyptian and Chaldean philosophers spent years in difficult calculations, which would now be thought easy by young children, doubtless they had the same notions of the depth of their knowledge that Sir William Thomson might now have of his. How is it, then, that Thomson gained his immense knowledge in the time taken by a Chaldean philosopher to acquire a simple knowledge of arithmetic? The reason is plain. Thomson, when a child, was taught in a few years more than all that was known three thousand years ago of the properties of numbers. When it is found essential to a boy’s future that machinery should be given to his brain, it is given to him; he is taught to use it, and his bright memory makes the use of it a second nature to him; but it is not till after-life that he makes a close investigation of what there actually is in his brain which has enabled him to do so much. It is taken because the child has much faith. In after years he will accept nothing without careful consideration. The machinery given to the brain of children is getting more and more complicated as time goes on; but there is really no reason why it should not be taken in as early, and used as readily, as were the axioms of childish education in ancient Chaldea.
In Teaching of Mathematics (1902), 14.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Acquire (39)  |  Actually (27)  |  Afterlife (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Belief (578)  |  Boy (94)  |  Brain (270)  |  Bright (79)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Careful (24)  |  Cartesian (3)  |  Chaldea (3)  |  Child (307)  |  Childish (20)  |  Children (200)  |  Cipher (2)  |  Close (69)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Coordinate (5)  |  Depend (228)  |  Depth (94)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Doubtless (8)  |  Early (185)  |  Easily (35)  |  Easy (204)  |  Education (378)  |  Egyptian (5)  |  Enable (119)  |  Essential (199)  |  Faith (203)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  Gain (145)  |  Give (202)  |  History (673)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immense (86)  |  Invent (51)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (71)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Language (293)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Memory (134)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notion (113)  |  Number (699)  |  Paper (182)  |  Person (363)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plain (33)  |  Property (168)  |  Rate (29)  |  Readily (10)  |  Reason (744)  |  Same (157)  |  Second Nature (3)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spent (85)  |  Square (70)  |  Study (653)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unconsciously (7)  |  Underlie (18)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wondrous (21)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)  |  Youth (101)

I believed that, instead of the multiplicity of rules that comprise logic, I would have enough in the following four, as long as I made a firm and steadfast resolution never to fail to observe them.
The first was never to accept anything as true if I did not know clearly that it was so; that is, carefully to avoid prejudice and jumping to conclusions, and to include nothing in my judgments apart from whatever appeared so clearly and distinctly to my mind that I had no opportunity to cast doubt upon it.
The second was to subdivide each on the problems I was about to examine: into as many parts as would be possible and necessary to resolve them better.
The third was to guide my thoughts in an orderly way by beginning, as if by steps, to knowledge of the most complex, and even by assuming an order of the most complex, and even by assuming an order among objects in! cases where there is no natural order among them.
And the final rule was: in all cases, to make such comprehensive enumerations and such general review that I was certain not to omit anything.
The long chains of inferences, all of them simple and easy, that geometers normally use to construct their most difficult demonstrations had given me an opportunity to think that all the things that can fall within the scope of human knowledge follow from each other in a similar way, and as long as one avoids accepting something as true which is not so, and as long as one always observes the order required to deduce them from each other, there cannot be anything so remote that it cannot be reached nor anything so hidden that it cannot be uncovered.
Discourse on Method in Discourse on Method and Related Writings (1637), trans. Desmond M. Clarke, Penguin edition (1999), Part 2, 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Accepting (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Better (486)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Cast (66)  |  Certain (550)  |  Complex (188)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Construct (124)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enough (340)  |  Examine (78)  |  Fail (185)  |  Fall (230)  |  Final (118)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  General (511)  |  Guide (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Include (90)  |  Inference (45)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Observe (168)  |  Omit (11)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reach (281)  |  Remote (83)  |  Required (108)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Review (26)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scope (45)  |  Something (719)  |  Step (231)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)

I claim that relativity and the rest of modern physics is not complicated. It can be explained very simply. It is only unusual or, put another way, it is contrary to common sense.
In Edward Teller, Wendy Teller and Wilson Talley, Conversations on the Dark Secrets of Physics (1991, 2013), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Claim (146)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Physics (23)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Rest (280)  |  Sense (770)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Way (1217)

I consider the study of medicine to have been that training which preached more impressively and more convincingly than any other could have done, the everlasting principles of all scientific work; principles which are so simple and yet are ever forgotten again, so clear and yet always hidden by a deceptive veil.
In Lecture (2 Aug 1877) delivered on the anniversary of the foundation of the Institute for the Education of Army Surgeons, 'On Thought in Medicine', collected in 'Popular Scientific Lectures', The Humboldt Library of Popular Science Literature (1 Jul 1881), 1, No. 24, 18, (renumbered as p.748 in reprint volume of Nos. 1-24).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Clear (100)  |  Consider (416)  |  Convince (41)  |  Deceptive (2)  |  Everlasting (8)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Preach (11)  |  Principle (507)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Study (653)  |  Training (80)  |  Veil (26)  |  Work (1351)

I could not help laughing at the ease with which he explained his process of deduction. “When I hear you give your reasons,” I remarked, “the thing always appears to me to be so ridiculously simple that I could easily do it myself, though at each successive instance of your reasoning I am baffled, until you explain your process. And yet I believe that my eyes are as good as yours.”
“Quite so,” he answered, lighting a cigarette, and throwing himself down into an arm-chair. “You see, but you do not observe. The distinction is clear. For example, you have frequently seen the steps which lead up from the hall to this room.”
“Frequently.”
“How often?”
“'Well, some hundreds of times.”
“Then how many are there?”
“How many! I don't know.”
“Quite so! You have not observed. And yet you have seen. That is just my point. Now, I know that there seventeen steps, because I have both seen and observed.”
From 'Adventure I.—A Scandal in Bohemia', Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, in The Strand Magazine: An Illustrated Monthly (Jul 1891), Vol. 2, 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Arm (81)  |  Both (493)  |  Chair (24)  |  Cigarette (24)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Explain (322)  |  Eye (419)  |  Good (889)  |  Hear (139)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lead (384)  |  Myself (212)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Point (580)  |  Process (423)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  See (1081)  |  Step (231)  |  Successive (73)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Throwing (17)  |  Time (1877)

I had a Meccano set with which I “played” endlessly. Meccano which was invented by Frank Hornby around 1900, is called Erector Set in the US. New toys (mainly Lego) have led to the extinction of Meccano and this has been a major disaster as far as the education of our young engineers and scientists is concerned. Lego is a technically trivial plaything and kids love it partly because it is so simple and partly because it is seductively coloured. However it is only a toy, whereas Meccano is a real engineering kit and it teaches one skill which I consider to be the most important that anyone can acquire: This is the sensitive touch needed to thread a nut on a bolt and tighten them with a screwdriver and spanner just enough that they stay locked, but not so tightly that the thread is stripped or they cannot be unscrewed. On those occasions (usually during a party at your house) when the handbasin tap is closed so tightly that you cannot turn it back on, you know the last person to use the washroom never had a Meccano set.
Nobel laureate autobiography in Les Prix Nobel/Nobel Lectures 1996 (1997), 189.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Back (390)  |  Bolt (9)  |  Call (769)  |  Closed (38)  |  Color (137)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consider (416)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Education (378)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Enough (340)  |  Extinction (74)  |  House (140)  |  Important (209)  |  Invention (369)  |  Kid (15)  |  Kit (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Lock (13)  |  Love (309)  |  Major (84)  |  Meccano (5)  |  Most (1731)  |  Need (290)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Nut (5)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Party (18)  |  Person (363)  |  Play (112)  |  Plaything (3)  |  Real (149)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Screwdriver (2)  |  Seduction (3)  |  Sensitive (14)  |  Set (394)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Skill (109)  |  Spanner (2)  |  Strip (6)  |  Tap (10)  |  Teach (277)  |  Technical (43)  |  Thread (32)  |  Tight (2)  |  Touch (141)  |  Toy (19)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Turn (447)  |  Use (766)  |  Usually (176)  |  Young (227)

I have deep faith that the principle of the universe will be beautiful and simple.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Deep (233)  |  Faith (203)  |  Principle (507)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

I have now reached the point where I may indicate briefly what to me constitutes the essence of the crisis of our time. It concerns the relationship of the individual to society. The individual has become more conscious than ever of his dependence upon society. But he does not experience this dependence as a positive asset, as an organic tie, as a protective force, but rather as a threat to his natural rights, or even to his economic existence. Moreover, his position in society is such that the egotistical drives of his make-up are constantly being accentuated, while his social drives, which are by nature weaker, progressively deteriorate. All human beings, whatever their position in society, are suffering from this process of deterioration. Unknowingly prisoners of their own egotism, they feel insecure, lonely, and deprived of the naive, simple, and unsophisticated enjoyment of life. Man can find meaning in life, short and perilous as it is, only through devoting himself to society.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accentuate (2)  |  All (4108)  |  Asset (6)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Briefly (5)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Crisis (24)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Deprive (12)  |  Deteriorate (3)  |  Deterioration (10)  |  Devote (35)  |  Drive (55)  |  Economic (81)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Essence (82)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feel (367)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Individual (404)  |  Insecure (5)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Moreover (3)  |  Naive (13)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organic (158)  |  Perilous (4)  |  Point (580)  |  Position (77)  |  Positive (94)  |  Prisoner (7)  |  Process (423)  |  Progressively (3)  |  Protective (5)  |  Reach (281)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Right (452)  |  Short (197)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Threat (30)  |  Through (849)  |  Tie (38)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unsophisticated (2)  |  Weak (71)  |  Whatever (234)

I know of no department of natural science more likely to reward a man who goes into it thoroughly than anthropology. There is an immense deal to be done in the science pure and simple, and it is one of those branches of inquiry which brings one into contact with the great problems of humanity in every direction.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Branch (150)  |  Bring (90)  |  Contact (65)  |  Deal (188)  |  Department (92)  |  Direction (175)  |  Great (1574)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Know (1518)  |  Likely (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reward (68)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thoroughly (67)

I know two people who have found it [the secret of success]. … Getting ready. Getting prepared. There were Edison and Lindbergh,—they both got ready before they started. I had to find that out too. I had to stop for ten years after I had started; I had to stop for ten years and get ready. I made my first car in 1893, but it was 1903 before I had it ready to sell. It is these simple things that young men ought to know, and they are hardest to grasp. Before everything else, get ready.
From Henry Ford and Ralph Waldo Trine, The Power that Wins (1929), 147. Often seen paraphrased as “Before everything else, getting ready is the secret of success,” for example, in Connie Robertson (ed.), The Wordsworth Dictionary of Quotations (1998), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Car (71)  |  Thomas Edison (84)  |  Everything (476)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Hard (243)  |  Know (1518)  |  Charles A. Lindbergh (24)  |  People (1005)  |  Prepare (37)  |  Ready (39)  |  Secret (194)  |  Sell (15)  |  Start (221)  |  Stop (80)  |  Success (302)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)

I know with sure and certain knowledge that a man’s work is nothing but this slow trek to rediscover, through the detours of art, those two or three great and simple images in whose presence his heart first opened.
In Lyrical and Critical Essays (1967), 14.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Art (657)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heart (229)  |  Image (96)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Open (274)  |  Opened (2)  |  Presence (63)  |  Slow (101)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  Work (1351)

I now think the answer is very simple: it’s true. God did create the universe about 13.7 billion years ago, and of necessity has involved Himself with His creation ever since. The purpose of this universe is something that only God knows for sure, but it is increasingly clear to modern science that the universe was exquisitely fine-tuned to enable human life.
In Letter (May 2005), sent to the Hope College 2005 Alumni Banquet, read in lieu of accepting an award in person, because of declining health from cancer.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Answer (366)  |  Billion (95)  |  Biography (240)  |  Create (235)  |  Creation (327)  |  Enable (119)  |  God (757)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Involved (90)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Something (719)  |  Think (1086)  |  Universe (857)  |  Year (933)

I realized both the upper and lower body must be held securely in place with one strap across the chest and one across the hips. The belt also needed an immovable anchorage point for the buckle as far down beside the occupant’s hip, so it could hold the body properly during a collision. It was just a matter of finding a solution that was simple, effective and could be put on conveniently with one hand.
as quoted in New York Times obituary, 26 Sep 2002
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Car (71)  |  Collision (15)  |  Down (456)  |  Effective (59)  |  Invention (369)  |  Matter (798)  |  Must (1526)  |  Point (580)  |  Safety (54)  |  Solution (267)

I shall explain a System of the World differing in many particulars from any yet known, answering in all things to the common Rules of Mechanical Motions: This depends upon three Suppositions. First, That all Cœlestial Bodies whatsoever, have an attraction or gravitating power towards their own Centers, whereby they attract not only their own parts, and keep them from flying from them, as we may observe the Earth to do, but that they do also attract all the other Cœlestial bodies that are within the sphere of their activity; and consequently that not only the Sun and Moon have an influence upon the body and motion the Earth, and the Earth upon them, but that Mercury also Venus, Mars, Saturn and Jupiter by their attractive powers, have a considerable influence upon its motion in the same manner the corresponding attractive power of the Earth hath a considerable influence upon every one of their motions also. The second supposition is this, That all bodies whatsoever that are put into a direct and simple motion, will continue to move forward in a streight line, till they are by some other effectual powers deflected and bent into a Motion, describing a Circle, Ellipse, or some other more compounded Curve Line. The third supposition is, That these attractive powers are so much the more powerful in operating, by how much the nearer the body wrought upon is to their own Centers. Now what these several degrees are I have not yet experimentally verified; but it is a notion, which if fully prosecuted as it ought to be, will mightily assist the Astronomer to reduce all the Cœlestial Motions to a certain rule, which I doubt will never be done true without it. He that understands the nature of the Circular Pendulum and Circular Motion, will easily understand the whole ground of this Principle, and will know where to find direction in Nature for the true stating thereof. This I only hint at present to such as have ability and opportunity of prosecuting this Inquiry, and are not wanting of Industry for observing and calculating, wishing heartily such may be found, having myself many other things in hand which I would first compleat and therefore cannot so well attend it. But this I durst promise the Undertaker, that he will find all the Great Motions of the World to be influenced by this Principle, and that the true understanding thereof will be the true perfection of Astronomy.
An Attempt to Prove the Motion of the Earth from Observations (1674), 27-8. Based on a Cutlerian Lecture delivered by Hooke at the Royal Society four years earlier.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Attend (65)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Body (537)  |  Certain (550)  |  Circle (110)  |  Circular (19)  |  Circular Motion (6)  |  Common (436)  |  Compound (113)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Continue (165)  |  Curve (49)  |  Degree (276)  |  Depend (228)  |  Direct (225)  |  Direction (175)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Earth (996)  |  Ellipse (8)  |  Explain (322)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Flying (72)  |  Forward (102)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hint (21)  |  Industry (137)  |  Inertia (14)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Jupiter (26)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Mars (44)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Moon (237)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notion (113)  |  Observe (168)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Planet (356)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Promise (67)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Rule (294)  |  Saturn (13)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Sun (385)  |  Supposition (50)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Venus (20)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

I suppose that I tend to be optimistic about the future of physics. And nothing makes me more optimistic than the discovery of broken symmetries. In the seventh book of the Republic, Plato describes prisoners who are chained in a cave and can see only shadows that things outside cast on the cave wall. When released from the cave at first their eyes hurt, and for a while they think that the shadows they saw in the cave are more real than the objects they now see. But eventually their vision clears, and they can understand how beautiful the real world is. We are in such a cave, imprisoned by the limitations on the sorts of experiments we can do. In particular, we can study matter only at relatively low temperatures, where symmetries are likely to be spontaneously broken, so that nature does not appear very simple or unified. We have not been able to get out of this cave, but by looking long and hard at the shadows on the cave wall, we can at least make out the shapes of symmetries, which though broken, are exact principles governing all phenomena, expressions of the beauty of the world outside.
In Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1989), 'Conceptual Foundations of the Unified Theory of Weak and Electromagnetic Interactions.' Nobel Lectures: Physics 1971-1980 (1992), 556.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Book (392)  |  Broken (56)  |  Cast (66)  |  Cave (15)  |  Describe (128)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Expression (175)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  Governing (20)  |  Hard (243)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Long (790)  |  Looking (189)  |  Low (80)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Outside (141)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Plato (76)  |  Principle (507)  |  Prisoner (7)  |  Reality (261)  |  Republic (15)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Shape (72)  |  Study (653)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Tend (124)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vision (123)  |  Wall (67)  |  World (1774)

I took him [Lawrence Bragg] to a young zoologist working on pattern formation in insect cuticles. The zoologist explained how disturbances introduced into these regular patterns pointed to their formation being governed by some kind of gradient. Bragg listened attentively and then exclaimed: “Your disturbed gradient behaves like a stream of sand running downhill and encountering an obstacle.” “Good heavens,” replied the zoologist, “I had been working on this problem for years before this simple analogy occurred to me and you think of it after twenty minutes.”
As quoted in David Phillips, Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society (Nov 1979), 25, 132, citing: Perutz, M.F. 1971 New Sci. & Sci. J. 8 July 1967.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (71)  |  Being (1278)  |  Sir Lawrence Bragg (13)  |  Disturb (28)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Disturbed (15)  |  Downhill (3)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Formation (96)  |  Good (889)  |  Govern (64)  |  Gradient (2)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Insect (77)  |  Kind (557)  |  Listen (73)  |  Minute (125)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Regular (46)  |  Running (61)  |  Sand (62)  |  Stream (81)  |  Think (1086)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)  |  Zoologist (12)

I was an impostor, the worthy associate of a brigand, &c., &c., and all this for an atom of chlorine put in the place of an atom of hydrogen, for the simple correction of a chemical formula!
Chemical Method (1855), 203.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Associate (25)  |  Atom (355)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chlorine (15)  |  Correction (40)  |  Formula (98)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Impostor (3)  |  Substitution (13)

I was led to the conclusion that at the most extreme dilutions all salts would consist of simple conducting molecules. But the conducting molecules are, according to the hypothesis of Clausius and Williamson, dissociated; hence at extreme dilutions all salt molecules are completely disassociated. The degree of dissociation can be simply found on this assumption by taking the ratio of the molecular conductivity of the solution in question to the molecular conductivity at the most extreme dilution.
Letter to Van’t Hoff, 13 April 1887. In J. R. Partington, A History of Chemistry (1961), Vol. 4, 678.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Completely (135)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conductivity (4)  |  Consist (223)  |  Degree (276)  |  Dilution (4)  |  Electrolyte (4)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Question (621)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Salt (46)  |  Solution (267)

I was sitting in a chair in the patent office at Bern when all of a sudden a thought occurred to me: “If a person falls freely he will not feel his own weight.” I was startled. This simple thought made a deep impression on me. It impelled me toward a theory of gravitation.
Lecture in Japan (1922). The quote is footnoted in Michael White, John Gribbin, Einstein: a Life in Science (1995), 128, saying the talk is known as the 'Kyoto address', reported in J. Ishiwara, Einstein Koen-Roku (1977).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Chair (24)  |  Deep (233)  |  Fall (230)  |  Falling (6)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Free (232)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Impelling (2)  |  Impression (114)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Office (71)  |  Patent (33)  |  Patent Office (3)  |  Person (363)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Startling (15)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Gravitation (6)  |  Thought (953)  |  Weight (134)  |  Will (2355)

I was very impressed that one simple theory could incorporate so much physics
Alan Guth
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Incorporate (9)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Theory (970)

I wasn’t aware of Chargaff’s rules when he said them, but the effect on me was quite electric because I realized immediately that if you had this sort of scheme that John Griffith was proposing, of adenine being paired with thymine, and guanine being paired with cytosine, then you should get Chargaff’s rules.
I was very excited, but I didn’t actually tell Chargaff because it was something I was doing with John Griffith. There was a sort of musical comedy effect where I forgot what the bases were and I had to go to the library to check, and I went back to John Griffith to find out which places he said. Low and behold, it turned out that John Griffith’s ideas fitted in with Chargaff’s rules!
This was very exciting, and we thought “ah ha!” and we realized—I mean what anyone who is familiar with the history of science ought to realize—that when you have one-to-one ratios, it means things go to together. And how on Earth no one pointed out this simple fact in those years, I don’t know.
From Transcript of documentary by VSM Productions, The DNA Story (1973). As excerpted on web page 'Chargaff’s Rules', Linus Pauling and the Race for DNA on website scarc.library.oregonstate.edu
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adenine (5)  |  Back (390)  |  Base (117)  |  Being (1278)  |  Comedy (4)  |  Cytosine (5)  |  Doing (280)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electric (76)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Guanine (4)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Know (1518)  |  Library (48)  |  Low (80)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Pair (9)  |  Point (580)  |  Propose (23)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Realize (147)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Science (3879)  |  Something (719)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thymine (5)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  Year (933)

I … share an excitement and a certain pride in the wonders opened up by scientific investigation …, and also a recognition of the value in scientific method of keeping the hypotheses as simple as possible—my Oxford tutor gave me a great respect for Occam’s razor.
In Letter to periodical, Chemistry and Industry (17 Feb 1997).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Certain (550)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Method (505)  |  Occam’s Razor (3)  |  Open (274)  |  Oxford (16)  |  Possible (552)  |  Pride (78)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Respect (207)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Share (75)  |  Tutor (3)  |  Value (365)  |  Wonder (236)

If a little less time was devoted to the translation of letters by Julius Caesar describing Britain 2000 years ago and a little more time was spent on teaching children how to describe (in simple modern English) the method whereby ethylene was converted into polythene in 1933 in the ICI laboratories at Northwich, and to discussing the enormous social changes which have resulted from this discovery, then I believe that we should be training future leaders in this country to face the world of tomorrow far more effectively than we are at the present time.
Quoted in an Obituary, D. P. Craig, Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society (1972), 18, 461.
Science quotes on:  |  2000 (15)  |  Britain (24)  |  Caesar_Julius (2)  |  Change (593)  |  Children (200)  |  Conversion (17)  |  Country (251)  |  Describe (128)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Education (378)  |  Face (212)  |  Future (429)  |  History (673)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Leader (43)  |  Letter (109)  |  Little (707)  |  Method (505)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Obituary (10)  |  Politician (38)  |  Present (619)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Science And Society (23)  |  Social (252)  |  Spent (85)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Training (80)  |  Translation (21)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

If I go out into nature, into the unknown, to the fringes of knowledge, everything seems mixed up and contradictory, illogical, and incoherent. This is what research does; it smooths out contradictions and makes things simple, logical, and coherent.
In 'Dionysians and Apollonians', Science (2 Jun 1972), 176, 966. Reprinted in Mary Ritchie Key, The Relationship of Verbal and Nonverbal Communication (1980), 318.
Science quotes on:  |  Coherence (13)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fringe (6)  |  Incoherence (2)  |  Incoherent (7)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mix (19)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Research (664)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Smoothness (3)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Unknown (182)

If people do not believe that mathematics is simple, it is only because they do not realize how complicated life is.
In speech to first national meeting of the Association for Computing Machinery (1947), as quoted in Franz L. Alt, 'Archaeology of computers: Reminiscences, 1945-1947', Communications of the ACM (Jul 1972), 15, No. 7, 694.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Do (1908)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  People (1005)  |  Realize (147)

If the brain were simple enough for us to understand it, we would be too simple to understand it.
Ken Hill
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Enough (340)  |  Understand (606)

If the brain were so simple that we could understand it, we would be so simple we couldn't.
Quoted by George E. Pugh, The Biological Origin of Human Values (1978), 154. In a footnote, the author writes that this quote comes from his own father, around 1938. The quote is also widely seen attributed to Lyall Watson (born 1939), for example, by Larry Chang in Wisdom for the Soul: Five Millennia of Prescriptions for Spiritual Healing (2006), 539.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

If the human mind were simple enough to understand, we’d be too simple to understand it.
Pat Bahn
Bahn’s conundrum to cognitive theory
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Enough (340)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

If the matter is one that can be settled by observation, make the observation yourself. Aristotle could have avoided the mistake of thinking that women have fewer teeth than men, by the simple device of asking Mrs. Aristotle to keep her mouth open while he counted.
In An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish (1943), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Asking (73)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Count (105)  |  Device (70)  |  Error (321)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Observation (555)  |  Open (274)  |  Proof (287)  |  Settled (34)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Tooth (29)

If this seems complex, the reason is because Tao is both simple and complex. It is complex when we try to understand it, and simple when we allow ourselves to experience it.
In Gary William Flake, The Computational Beauty of Nature (2000), 327.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Experience (467)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Reason (744)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Tao (2)  |  Try (283)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

If three simple questions and one well chosen laboratory test lead to an unambiguous diagnosis, why harry the patient with more?
Anonymous
Editorial, 'Clinical decision by numbers'. Lancet (1975) 1, 1077.
Science quotes on:  |  Chosen (48)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Lead (384)  |  More (2559)  |  Patient (199)  |  Question (621)  |  Test (211)  |  Why (491)

If we ascribe the ejection of the proton to a Compton recoil from a quantum of 52 x 106 electron volts, then the nitrogen recoil atom arising by a similar process should have an energy not greater than about 400,000 volts, should produce not more than about 10,000 ions, and have a range in the air at N.T.P. of about 1-3mm. Actually, some of the recoil atoms in nitrogen produce at least 30,000 ions. In collaboration with Dr. Feather, I have observed the recoil atoms in an expansion chamber, and their range, estimated visually, was sometimes as much as 3mm. at N.T.P.
These results, and others I have obtained in the course of the work, are very difficult to explain on the assumption that the radiation from beryllium is a quantum radiation, if energy and momentum are to be conserved in the collisions. The difficulties disappear, however, if it be assumed that the radiation consists of particles of mass 1 and charge 0, or neutrons. The capture of the a-particle by the Be9 nucleus may be supposed to result in the formation of a C12 nucleus and the emission of the neutron. From the energy relations of this process the velocity of the neutron emitted in the forward direction may well be about 3 x 109 cm. per sec. The collisions of this neutron with the atoms through which it passes give rise to the recoil atoms, and the observed energies of the recoil atoms are in fair agreement with this view. Moreover, I have observed that the protons ejected from hydrogen by the radiation emitted in the opposite direction to that of the exciting a-particle appear to have a much smaller range than those ejected by the forward radiation.
This again receives a simple explanation on the neutron hypothesis.
'Possible Existence of a Neutron', Letter to the Editor, Nature, 1932, 129, 312.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  Air (347)  |  Arising (22)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Atom (355)  |  Beryllium (3)  |  Charge (59)  |  Collaboration (15)  |  Collision (15)  |  Consist (223)  |  Course (409)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direction (175)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Electron (93)  |  Energy (344)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Formation (96)  |  Forward (102)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Ion (21)  |  Mass (157)  |  Momentum (9)  |  More (2559)  |  Neutron (17)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Observed (149)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Process (423)  |  Proton (21)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Range (99)  |  Receive (114)  |  Result (677)  |  Rise (166)  |  Through (849)  |  Velocity (48)  |  View (488)  |  Work (1351)

If we go back to our chequer game, the fundamental laws are rules by which the chequers move. Mathematics may be applied in the complex situation to figure out what in given circumstances is a good move to make. But very little mathematics is needed for the simple fundamental character of the basic laws. They can be simply stated in English for chequers.
In The Character of Physical Law (1965), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (177)  |  Back (390)  |  Basic (138)  |  Character (243)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Complex (188)  |  English (35)  |  Figure (160)  |  Figure Out (6)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Game (101)  |  Good (889)  |  Law (894)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Move (216)  |  Rule (294)  |  Simply (53)  |  Situation (113)  |  Stated (3)

If we wish to give an account of the atomic constitution of the aromatic compounds, we are bound to explain the following facts:
1) All aromatic compounds, even the most simple, are relatively richer in carbon than the corresponding compounds in the class of fatty bodies.
2) Among the aromatic compounds, as well as among the fatty bodies, a large number of homologous substances exist.
3) The most simple aromatic compounds contain at least six atoms of carbon.
4) All the derivatives of aromatic substances exhibit a certain family likeness; they all belong to the group of 'Aromatic compounds'. In cases where more vigorous reactions take place, a portion of the carbon is often eliminated, but the chief product contains at least six atoms of carbon These facts justify the supposition that all aromatic compounds contain a common group, or, we may say, a common nucleus consisting of six atoms of carbon. Within this nucleus a more intimate combination of the carbon atoms takes place; they are more compactly placed together, and this is the cause of the aromatic bodies being relatively rich in carbon. Other carbon atoms can be joined to this nucleus in the same way, and according to the same law, as in the case of the group of fatty bodies, and in this way the existence of homologous compounds is explained.
Bulletin de la Societé Chimique de France (1865), 1, 98. Trans. W. H. Brock.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Aromatic (3)  |  Atom (355)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belong (162)  |  Bound (119)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chief (97)  |  Class (164)  |  Combination (144)  |  Common (436)  |  Compound (113)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Family (94)  |  Homologous (4)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Likeness (18)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Portion (84)  |  Product (160)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Say (984)  |  Substance (248)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Together (387)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wish (212)

Imagine the chaos that would arise if time machines were as common as automobiles, with tens of millions of them commercially available. Havoc would soon break loose, tearing at the fabric of our universe. Millions of people would go back in time to meddle with their own past and the past of others, rewriting history in the process. … It would thus be impossible to take a simple census to see how many people there were at any given time.
In Hyperspace: A Scientific Odyssey Through Parallel Universes, Time Warps, and The Tenth Dimension (1994, 1995), 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (158)  |  Automobile (22)  |  Available (78)  |  Back (390)  |  Break (99)  |  Census (4)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Common (436)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Havoc (7)  |  History (673)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Machine (257)  |  Meddle (3)  |  Millions (17)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  People (1005)  |  Process (423)  |  Rewriting (2)  |  See (1081)  |  Soon (186)  |  Tear (42)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time Machine (4)  |  Universe (857)

In a sense, of course, probability theory in the form of the simple laws of chance is the key to the analysis of warfare;… My own experience of actual operational research work, has however, shown that its is generally possible to avoid using anything more sophisticated. … In fact the wise operational research worker attempts to concentrate his efforts in finding results which are so obvious as not to need elaborate statistical methods to demonstrate their truth. In this sense advanced probability theory is something one has to know about in order to avoid having to use it.
In 'Operations Research', Physics Today (Nov 1951), 19. As cited by Maurice W. Kirby and Jonathan Rosenhead, 'Patrick Blackett (1897)' in Arjang A. Assad (ed.) and Saul I. Gass (ed.),Profiles in Operations Research: Pioneers and Innovators (2011), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Advanced (11)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Chance (239)  |  Concentrate (26)  |  Course (409)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Finding (30)  |  Form (959)  |  Key (50)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Order (632)  |  Possible (552)  |  Probability (130)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Sense (770)  |  Something (719)  |  Sophisticated (15)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Use (766)  |  Warfare (11)  |  Wise (131)  |  Work (1351)

In a way, cancer is so simple and so natural. The older you get, this is just one of the things that happens as the clock ticks.
As quoted in Eric Berger, Houston Chronicle (28 Oct 2005)
Science quotes on:  |  Cancer (55)  |  Clock (47)  |  Happen (274)  |  Natural (796)  |  Old (481)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tick (9)  |  Way (1217)

In all chemical investigations, it has justly been considered an important object to ascertain the relative weights of the simples which constitute a compound. But unfortunately the enquiry has terminated here; whereas from the relative weights in the mass, the relative weights of the ultimate particles or atoms of the bodies might have been inferred, from which their number and weight in various other compounds would appear, in order to assist and to guide future investigations, and to correct their results. Now it is one great object of this work, to shew the importance and advantage of ascertaining the relative weights of the ultimate particles, both of simple and compound bodies, the number of simple elementary particles which constitute one compound particle, and the number of less compound particles which enter into the formation of one more compound particle.
If there are two bodies, A and B, which are disposed to combine, the following is the order in which the combinations may take place, beginning with the most simple: namely,
1 atom of A + 1 atom of B = 1 atom of C, binary
1 atom of A + 2 atoms of B = 1 atom of D, ternary
2 atoms of A + 1 atom of B = 1 atom of E, ternary
1 atom of A + 3 atoms of B = 1 atom of F, quaternary
3 atoms of A and 1 atom of B = 1 atom of G, quaternary
A New System of Chemical Philosophy (1808), Vol. 1, 212-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Theory (15)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Binary (12)  |  Both (493)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Combination (144)  |  Combine (57)  |  Compound (113)  |  Consider (416)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Enter (141)  |  Formation (96)  |  Future (429)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guide (97)  |  Importance (286)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Mass (157)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Result (677)  |  Two (937)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unfortunately (38)  |  Various (200)  |  Weight (134)  |  Work (1351)

In all likelihood, it is the local conditions of society, which determine the form of the disease, and we can so far think of it as a fairly general result, that the simplest form is the more common, the more paltry and unbalanced the food, and the worse the dwellings are.
From the original German, “Aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach sind es die lokalen Verhältnisse der Gesellschaft, welche die Form der Krankheit bestimmen, und wir können bis jetzt als ein ziemlich allgemeines Resultathinstellen, daß die einfache Form umso häufiger ist, je armseliger und einseitiger die Nahrungsmittel und je schlechter die Wohnungen sind,” in 'Mittheilungen über die in Oberschlesien herrschende Typhus-Epidemie', R. Virchow and B. Reinhardt, Archiv für pathologische Anatomie und Physiologie und für klinische Medicin (1848), 2, No. 2, 248. English version by Webmaster with Google translate.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Common (436)  |  Condition (356)  |  Determine (144)  |  Disease (328)  |  Dwelling (11)  |  Food (199)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Likelihood (10)  |  Local (19)  |  More (2559)  |  Paltry (4)  |  Result (677)  |  Society (326)  |  Think (1086)  |  Unbalanced (2)  |  Worse (24)

In biology, nothing is clear, everything is too complicated, everything is a mess, and just when you think you understand something, you peel off a layer and find deeper complications beneath. Nature is anything but simple.
The Hot Zone
Science quotes on:  |  Beneath (64)  |  Biology (216)  |  Clear (100)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Complication (29)  |  Deep (233)  |  Everything (476)  |  Find (998)  |  Layer (40)  |  Mess (13)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Peel (5)  |  Something (719)  |  Think (1086)  |  Understand (606)

In every living being there exists a capacity for endless diversity of form; each possesses the power of adapting its organization to the variations of the external world, and it is this power, called into activity by cosmic changes, which has enabled the simple zoophytes of the primitive world to climb to higher and higher stages of organization, and has brought endless variety into nature.
From Gottfried Reinold Treviranus, Biologie, oder Philosophie der lebenden Natur [Biology, or Philosophy of Animate Nature], quoted in Lecture 1, August Weismann (1904, 2nd German ed.) as translated in August Weismann, Margaret R. Thomson (trans.), The Evolution Theory, Vol 1., 18-19.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Change (593)  |  Climb (35)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Enable (119)  |  Endless (56)  |  Exist (443)  |  External (57)  |  Form (959)  |  Higher (37)  |  Living (491)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organism (220)  |  Organization (114)  |  Possess (156)  |  Power (746)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Stage (143)  |  Variation (90)  |  Variety (132)  |  World (1774)  |  Zoophyte (4)

In fact, we will have to give up taking things for granted, even the apparently simple things. We have to learn to understand nature and not merely to observe it and endure what it imposes on us. Stupidity, from being an amiable individual defect, has become a social crime.
The Origin of Life (1967), 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Amiable (10)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Crime (38)  |  Defect (31)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Grant (73)  |  Individual (404)  |  Learn (629)  |  Merely (316)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Social (252)  |  Stupidity (39)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)  |  Will (2355)

In inorganic chemistry the radicals are simple; in organic chemistry they are compounds—that is the sole difference.
Joint paper with Liebig, but written by Dumas, Comptes Rendus 1837, 5, 567. Trans. J. R. Partington, A History of Chemistry, Vol. 4, 351.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Compound (113)  |  Difference (337)  |  Inorganic Chemistry (4)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Radical (25)  |  Sole (49)

In its earliest development knowledge is self-sown. Impressions force themselves upon men’s senses whether they will or not, and often against their will. The amount of interest in which these impressions awaken is determined by the coarser pains and pleasures which they carry in their train or by mere curiosity; and reason deals with the materials supplied to it as far as that interest carries it, and no further. Such common knowledge is rather brought than sought; and such ratiocination is little more than the working of a blind intellectual instinct. It is only when the mind passes beyond this condition that it begins to evolve science. When simple curiosity passes into the love of knowledge as such, and the gratification of the æsthetic sense of the beauty of completeness and accuracy seems more desirable that the easy indolence of ignorance; when the finding out of the causes of things becomes a source of joy, and he is accounted happy who is successful in the search, common knowledge passes into what our forefathers called natural history, whence there is but a step to that which used to be termed natural philosophy, and now passes by the name of physical science.
In this final state of knowledge the phenomena of nature are regarded as one continuous series of causes and effects; and the ultimate object of science is to trace out that series, from the term which is nearest to us, to that which is at the farthest limit accessible to our means of investigation.
The course of nature as it is, as it has been, and as it will be, is the object of scientific inquiry; whatever lies beyond, above, or below this is outside science. But the philosopher need not despair at the limitation on his field of labor; in relation to the human mind Nature is boundless; and, though nowhere inaccessible, she is everywhere unfathomable.
The Crayfish: an Introduction to the Study of Zoölogy (1880), 2-3. Excerpted in Popular Science (Apr 1880), 16, 789-790.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accessible (25)  |  Account (192)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Against (332)  |  Amount (151)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Blind (95)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Call (769)  |  Carry (127)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cause And Effect (20)  |  Common (436)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Condition (356)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Course (409)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Deal (188)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Despair (40)  |  Determination (78)  |  Development (422)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Field (364)  |  Final (118)  |  Finding (30)  |  Force (487)  |  Forefather (4)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Impression (114)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Indolence (8)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Joy (107)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labor (107)  |  Labour (98)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Little (707)  |  Love (309)  |  Material (353)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Outside (141)  |  Pain (136)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Ratiocination (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regard (305)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Search (162)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  State (491)  |  Step (231)  |  Successful (123)  |  Term (349)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trace (103)  |  Tracing (3)  |  Train (114)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unfathomable (10)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)

In many cases a dull proof can be supplemented by a geometric analogue so simple and beautiful that the truth of a theorem is almost seen at a glance.
In 'Mathematical Games', Scientific American (Oct 1973), 229, 114.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogue (7)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Dull (54)  |  Geometric (5)  |  Glance (34)  |  Proof (287)  |  Supplement (6)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Truth (1057)

In order to discover Truth in this manner by observation and reason, it is requisite we should fix on some principles whose certainty and effects are demonstrable to our senses, which may serve to explain the phenomena of natural bodies and account for the accidents that arise in them; such only are those which are purely material in the human body with mechanical and physical experiments … a physician may and ought to furnish himself with, and reason from, such things as are demonstrated to be true in anatomy, chemistry, and mechanics, with natural and experimental philosophy, provided he confines his reasoning within the bounds of truth and simple experiment.
As quoted in selection from the writings of Herman Boerhaave, collected in Oliver Joseph Thatcher (ed.), The Ideas that Have Influenced Civilization, in the Original Documents (1800), Vol. 6, 242.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Account (192)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Arise (158)  |  Body (537)  |  Bound (119)  |  Bounds (7)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Confine (26)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Discover (553)  |  Effect (393)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Explain (322)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Material (353)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physician (273)  |  Principle (507)  |  Purely (109)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Sense (770)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)

In science as in life the greatest truths are the simplest.
In 'Mathematical Emancipations', The Monist (Jan 1906), 16, No. 1, 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Greatest (328)  |  Life (1795)  |  Science (3879)  |  Truth (1057)

In scientific thought we adopt the simplest theory which will explain all the facts under consideration and enable us to predict new facts of the same kind. The catch in this criterion lies in the world “simplest.” It is really an aesthetic canon such as we find implicit in our criticisms of poetry or painting. The layman finds such a law as dx/dt = κ(d²x/dy²) much less simple than “it oozes,” of which it is the mathematical statement. The physicist reverses this judgment, and his statement is certainly the more fruitful of the two, so far as prediction is concerned. It is, however, a statement about something very unfamiliar to the plain man, namely the rate of change of a rate of change.
In 'Science and Theology as Art-Forms', Possible Worlds (1927), 227.
Science quotes on:  |  Adopt (19)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Catch (31)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Change (593)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Enable (119)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (998)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Implicit (12)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Kind (557)  |  Law (894)  |  Layman (21)  |  Lie (364)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Ooze (2)  |  Painting (44)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Thought (17)  |  Simplest (10)  |  Something (719)  |  Statement (142)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Two (937)  |  Unfamiliar (16)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

In the case of the Sun, we have a new understanding of the cosmological meaning of sacrifice. The Sun is, with each second, transforming four million tons of itself into light—giving itself over to become energy that we, with every meal, partake of. The Sun converts itself into a flow of energy that photosynthesis changes into plants that are consumed by animals. Humans have been feasting on the Sun’s energy stored in the form of wheat or maize or reindeer as each day the Sun dies as Sun and is reborn as the vitality of Earth. These solar flares are in fact the very power of the vast human enterprise. Every child of ours needs to learn the simple truth: she is the energy of the Sun. And we adults should organize things so her face shines with the same radiant joy.
In The Hidden Heart of the Cosmos: Humanity and the New Story (1996), 40-41.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Animal (617)  |  Become (815)  |  Change (593)  |  Child (307)  |  Consume (9)  |  Cosmological (11)  |  Die (86)  |  Earth (996)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Flow (83)  |  Form (959)  |  Human (1468)  |  Joy (107)  |  Learn (629)  |  Light (607)  |  Maize (4)  |  Meal (18)  |  Meaning (233)  |  New (1216)  |  Organize (29)  |  Photosynthesis (19)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Radiant (15)  |  Reindeer (2)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Same (157)  |  Shine (45)  |  Solar Flare (2)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Ton (21)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vitality (23)  |  Wheat (10)

In the discussion of the. energies involved in the deformation of nuclei, the concept of surface tension of nuclear matter has been used and its value had been estimated from simple considerations regarding nuclear forces. It must be remembered, however, that the surface tension of a charged droplet is diminished by its charge, and a rough estimate shows that the surface tension of nuclei, decreasing with increasing nuclear charge, may become zero for atomic numbers of the order of 100. It seems therefore possible that the uranium nucleus has only small stability of form, and may, after neutron capture, divide itself into two nuclei of roughly equal size (the precise ratio of sizes depending on liner structural features and perhaps partly on chance). These two nuclei will repel each other and should gain a total kinetic energy of c. 200 Mev., as calculated from nuclear radius and charge. This amount of energy may actually be expected to be available from the difference in packing fraction between uranium and the elements in the middle of the periodic system. The whole 'fission' process can thus be described in an essentially classical way, without having to consider quantum-mechanical 'tunnel effects', which would actually be extremely small, on account of the large masses involved.
[Co-author with Otto Robert Frisch]
Lise Meitner and O. R. Frisch, 'Disintegration of Uranium by Neutrons: a New Type of Nuclear Reaction', Nature (1939), 143, 239.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Amount (151)  |  Atomic Number (3)  |  Author (167)  |  Available (78)  |  Become (815)  |  Chance (239)  |  Charge (59)  |  Classical (45)  |  Concept (221)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Deformation (3)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Divide (75)  |  Effect (393)  |  Element (310)  |  Energy (344)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fission (10)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Gain (145)  |  Involved (90)  |  Kinetic (12)  |  Kinetic Energy (3)  |  Large (394)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Must (1526)  |  Neutron (17)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Number (699)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Precise (68)  |  Process (423)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Radius (4)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Remember (179)  |  Repulsion (7)  |  Show (346)  |  Small (477)  |  Stability (25)  |  Structural (29)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Tension (2)  |  System (537)  |  Tension (24)  |  Total (94)  |  Tunnel (13)  |  Two (937)  |  Uranium (20)  |  Value (365)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Zero (37)

In the following pages I offer nothing more than simple facts, plain arguments, and common sense; and have no other preliminaries to settle with the reader, than that he will divest himself of prejudice and repossession, and suffer his reason and feelings to determine for themselves; and that he will put on, or rather that he will not put off, the true character of man, and generously enlarge his view beyond the present day.
In Common Sense: Addressed to the Inhabitants of America (1792), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Character (243)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Determine (144)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Generous (17)  |  Himself (461)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plain (33)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Preliminary (5)  |  Present (619)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sense (770)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Themselves (433)  |  True (212)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

In the modern interpretation of Mendelism, facts are being transformed into factors at a rapid rate. If one factor will not explain the facts, then two are involved; if two prove insufficient, three will sometimes work out. The superior jugglery sometimes necessary to account for the results may blind us, if taken too naively, to the common-place that the results are often so excellently 'explained' because the explanation was invented to explain them. We work backwards from the facts to the factors, and then, presto! explain the facts by the very factors that we invented to account for them. I am not unappreciative of the distinct advantages that this method has in handling the facts. I realize how valuable it has been to us to be able to marshal our results under a few simple assumptions, yet I cannot but fear that we are rapidly developing a sort of Mendelian ritual by which to explain the extraordinary facts of alternative inheritance. So long as we do not lose sight of the purely arbitrary and formal nature of our formulae, little harm will be done; and it is only fair to state that those who are doing the actual work of progress along Mendelian lines are aware of the hypothetical nature of the factor-assumption.
'What are 'Factors' in Mendelian Explanations?', American Breeders Association (1909), 5, 365.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Actual (117)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Backwards (17)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blind (95)  |  Common (436)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Factor (46)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fear (197)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Involved (90)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Lose (159)  |  Gregor Mendel (21)  |  Method (505)  |  Modern (385)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prove (250)  |  Purely (109)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Realize (147)  |  Result (677)  |  Ritual (9)  |  Sight (132)  |  State (491)  |  Superior (81)  |  Transform (73)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

In this lecture I would like to conclude with … some characteristics [of] gravity … The most impressive fact is that gravity is simple. It is simple to state the principles completely and not have left any vagueness for anybody to change the ideas of the law. It is simple, and therefore it is beautiful. It is simple in its pattern. I do not mean it is simple in its action—the motions of the various planets and the perturbations of one on the other can be quite complicated to work out, and to follow how all those stars in a globular cluster move is quite beyond our ability. It is complicated in its actions, but the basic pattern or the system beneath the whole thing is simple. This is common to all our laws; they all turn out to be simple things, although complex in their actual actions.
In 'The Law of Gravitation, as Example of Physical Law', the first of his Messenger Lectures (1964), Cornell University. Collected in The Character of Physical Law (1967), 33-34.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Action (327)  |  Actual (117)  |  All (4108)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Basic (138)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Change (593)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Common (436)  |  Completely (135)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Follow (378)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Idea (843)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Law (894)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Mean (809)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Perturbation (7)  |  Planet (356)  |  Principle (507)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Turn (447)  |  Vagueness (15)  |  Various (200)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

Indeed, the most important part of engineering work—and also of other scientific work—is the determination of the method of attacking the problem, whatever it may be, whether an experimental investigation, or a theoretical calculation. … It is by the choice of a suitable method of attack, that intricate problems are reduced to simple phenomena, and then easily solved.
In Engineering Mathematics: A Series of Lectures Delivered at Union College (1911, 1917), Vol. 2, 275.
Science quotes on:  |  Attack (84)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Choice (110)  |  Determination (78)  |  Ease (35)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Intricacy (8)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Method (505)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Suitability (11)  |  Theory (970)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Work (1351)

It always bothers me that according to the laws as we understand them today, it takes a computing machine an infinite number of logical operations to figure out what goes on in no matter how tiny a region of space and no matter how tiny a region of time … I have often made the hypothesis that ultimately physics will not require a mathematical statement, that in the end the machinery will be revealed and the laws will turn out to be simple, like the chequer board with all its apparent complexities. But this speculation is of the same nature as those other people make—“I like it”,“I don't like it”—and it is not good to be too prejudiced about these things.
In The Character of Physical Law (1965, 2001), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Computer (127)  |  End (590)  |  Figure (160)  |  Good (889)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Law (894)  |  Logic (287)  |  Machine (257)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Require (219)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Space (500)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Statement (142)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Today (314)  |  Turn (447)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Understand (606)  |  Will (2355)

It appears, nevertheless, that all such simple solutions of the problem of vertebrate ancestry are without warrant. They arise from a very common tendency of the mind, against which the naturalist has to guard himself,—a tendency which finds expression in the very widespread notion that the existing anthropoid apes, and more especially the gorilla, must be looked upon as the ancestors of mankind, if once the doctrine of the descent of man from ape-like forefathers is admitted. A little reflexion suffices to show that any given living form, such as the gorilla, cannot possibly be the ancestral form from which man was derived, since ex-hypothesi that ancestral form underwent modification and development, and in so doing, ceased to exist.
'Vertebrata', entry in Encyclopaedia Britannica, 9th edition (1899), Vol. 24, 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Ancestry (12)  |  Anthropoid (9)  |  Ape (53)  |  Arise (158)  |  Common (436)  |  Descent (27)  |  Descent Of Man (6)  |  Development (422)  |  Doing (280)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expression (175)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Gorilla (18)  |  Himself (461)  |  Little (707)  |  Living (491)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modification (55)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Notion (113)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Problem (676)  |  Show (346)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Vertebrate (20)  |  Warrant (8)  |  Widespread (22)

It behooves us always to remember that in physics it has taken great men to discover simple things. They are very great names indeed which we couple with the explanation of the path of a stone, the droop of a chain, the tints of a bubble, the shadows of a cup.
In On Growth and Form (1917).
Science quotes on:  |  Behoove (6)  |  Bubble (22)  |  Discover (553)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Great (1574)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Name (333)  |  Path (144)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Remember (179)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Stone (162)  |  Thing (1915)

It follows from the supreme perfection of God, that in creating the universe has chosen the best possible plan, in which there is the greatest variety together with the greatest order; the best arranged ground, place, time; the most results produced in the most simple ways; the most of power, knowledge, happiness and goodness the creatures that the universe could permit. For since all the possibles in I understanding of God laid claim to existence in proportion to their perfections, the actual world, as the resultant of all these claims, must be the most perfect possible. And without this it would not be possible to give a reason why things have turned out so rather than otherwise.
The Principles of Nature and Grace (1714), The Philosophical Works of Leibnitz (1890), ed. G. M. Duncan, 213-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  All (4108)  |  Best (459)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Claim (146)  |  Creature (233)  |  Existence (456)  |  Follow (378)  |  God (757)  |  Goodness (25)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Ground (217)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Permit (58)  |  Plan (117)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Produced (187)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Reason (744)  |  Result (677)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Variety (132)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)

It has been asserted … that the power of observation is not developed by mathematical studies; while the truth is, that; from the most elementary mathematical notion that arises in the mind of a child to the farthest verge to which mathematical investigation has been pushed and applied, this power is in constant exercise. By observation, as here used, can only be meant the fixing of the attention upon objects (physical or mental) so as to note distinctive peculiarities—to recognize resemblances, differences, and other relations. Now the first mental act of the child recognizing the distinction between one and more than one, between one and two, two and three, etc., is exactly this. So, again, the first geometrical notions are as pure an exercise of this power as can be given. To know a straight line, to distinguish it from a curve; to recognize a triangle and distinguish the several forms—what are these, and all perception of form, but a series of observations? Nor is it alone in securing these fundamental conceptions of number and form that observation plays so important a part. The very genius of the common geometry as a method of reasoning—a system of investigation—is, that it is but a series of observations. The figure being before the eye in actual representation, or before the mind in conception, is so closely scrutinized, that all its distinctive features are perceived; auxiliary lines are drawn (the imagination leading in this), and a new series of inspections is made; and thus, by means of direct, simple observations, the investigation proceeds. So characteristic of common geometry is this method of investigation, that Comte, perhaps the ablest of all writers upon the philosophy of mathematics, is disposed to class geometry, as to its method, with the natural sciences, being based upon observation. Moreover, when we consider applied mathematics, we need only to notice that the exercise of this faculty is so essential, that the basis of all such reasoning, the very material with which we build, have received the name observations. Thus we might proceed to consider the whole range of the human faculties, and find for the most of them ample scope for exercise in mathematical studies. Certainly, the memory will not be found to be neglected. The very first steps in number—counting, the multiplication table, etc., make heavy demands on this power; while the higher branches require the memorizing of formulas which are simply appalling to the uninitiated. So the imagination, the creative faculty of the mind, has constant exercise in all original mathematical investigations, from the solution of the simplest problems to the discovery of the most recondite principle; for it is not by sure, consecutive steps, as many suppose, that we advance from the known to the unknown. The imagination, not the logical faculty, leads in this advance. In fact, practical observation is often in advance of logical exposition. Thus, in the discovery of truth, the imagination habitually presents hypotheses, and observation supplies facts, which it may require ages for the tardy reason to connect logically with the known. Of this truth, mathematics, as well as all other sciences, affords abundant illustrations. So remarkably true is this, that today it is seriously questioned by the majority of thinkers, whether the sublimest branch of mathematics,—the infinitesimal calculus—has anything more than an empirical foundation, mathematicians themselves not being agreed as to its logical basis. That the imagination, and not the logical faculty, leads in all original investigation, no one who has ever succeeded in producing an original demonstration of one of the simpler propositions of geometry, can have any doubt. Nor are induction, analogy, the scrutinization of premises or the search for them, or the balancing of probabilities, spheres of mental operations foreign to mathematics. No one, indeed, can claim preeminence for mathematical studies in all these departments of intellectual culture, but it may, perhaps, be claimed that scarcely any department of science affords discipline to so great a number of faculties, and that none presents so complete a gradation in the exercise of these faculties, from the first principles of the science to the farthest extent of its applications, as mathematics.
In 'Mathematics', in Henry Kiddle and Alexander J. Schem, The Cyclopedia of Education, (1877.) As quoted and cited in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 27-29.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundant (22)  |  Act (272)  |  Actual (117)  |  Advance (280)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Appalling (10)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Mathematics (15)  |  Arise (158)  |  Assert (66)  |  Attention (190)  |  Auxiliary (11)  |  Basis (173)  |  Being (1278)  |  Branch (150)  |  Build (204)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Child (307)  |  Claim (146)  |  Class (164)  |  Common (436)  |  Complete (204)  |  Auguste Comte (21)  |  Conception (154)  |  Connect (125)  |  Consider (416)  |  Constant (144)  |  Count (105)  |  Counting (26)  |  Creative (137)  |  Culture (143)  |  Curve (49)  |  Demand (123)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Department (92)  |  Develop (268)  |  Difference (337)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Essential (199)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Extent (139)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Form (959)  |  Formula (98)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Induction (77)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Infinitesimal Calculus (2)  |  Inspection (7)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Lead (384)  |  Logic (287)  |  Majority (66)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Memorize (4)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Multiplication Table (16)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Neglected (23)  |  New (1216)  |  Notice (77)  |  Notion (113)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perception (97)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Power (746)  |  Practical (200)  |  Preeminence (3)  |  Premise (37)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Pure (291)  |  Push (62)  |  Question (621)  |  Range (99)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Recondite (8)  |  Representation (53)  |  Require (219)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scope (45)  |  Scrutinize (7)  |  Search (162)  |  Series (149)  |  Solution (267)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Step (231)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Suppose (156)  |  System (537)  |  Table (104)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Today (314)  |  Triangle (18)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Verge (10)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Writer (86)

It is because simplicity and vastness are both beautiful that we seek by preference simple facts and vast facts; that we take delight, now in following the giant courses of the stars, now in scrutinizing the microscope that prodigious smallness which is also a vastness, and now in seeking in geological ages the traces of a past that attracts us because of its remoteness.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Attract (23)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Both (493)  |  Course (409)  |  Delight (108)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Follow (378)  |  Geological (11)  |  Giant (67)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Past (337)  |  Preference (28)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Remoteness (9)  |  Scrutinize (7)  |  Seek (213)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Smallness (7)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Trace (103)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vastness (15)

It is contrary to the usual order of things, that events so harmonious as those of the system of the world, should depend on such diversified agents as are supposed to exist in our artificial arrangements; and there is reason to anticipate a great reduction in the number of undecompounded bodies, and to expect that the analogies of nature will be found conformable to the refined operations of art. The more the phenomena of the universe are studied, the more distinct their connection appears, and the more simple their causes, the more magnificent their design, and the more wonderful the wisdom and power of their Author.
Elements of Chemical Philosophy (1812), in J. Davy (ed.), The Collected Works of Sir Humphry Davy(1839-40), Vol. 4, 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (70)  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Art (657)  |  Author (167)  |  Cause (541)  |  Connection (162)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Depend (228)  |  Design (195)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Event (216)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expect (200)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harmonious (18)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Order (632)  |  Power (746)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reduction (51)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  World (1774)

It is easy to create an interstellar radio message which can be recognized as emanating unambiguously from intelligent beings. A modulated signal (‘beep,’ ‘beep-beep,’…) comprising the numbers 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, for example, consists exclusively of the first 12 prime numbers…. A signal of this kind, based on a simple mathematical concept, could only have a biological origin. … But by far the most promising method is to send pictures.
From 'The Quest for Extraterrestrial Intelligence', in the magazine Smithsonian (May 1978), 43-44. Reprinted in Cosmic Search (Mar 1979), 1, No. 2, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Biological (137)  |  Concept (221)  |  Consist (223)  |  Create (235)  |  Easy (204)  |  First (1283)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Interstellar (8)  |  Kind (557)  |  Message (49)  |  Method (505)  |  Most (1731)  |  Number (699)  |  Origin (239)  |  Picture (143)  |  Prime Number (5)  |  Radio (50)  |  SETI (3)  |  Signal (27)

It is India that gave us the ingenious method of expressing all numbers by means of ten symbols, each symbol receiving a value of position as well as an absolute value; a profound and important idea which appears so simple to us now that we ignore its true merit. But its very simplicity and the great ease which it has lent to computations put our arithmetic in the first rank of useful inventions; and we shall appreciate the grandeur of the achievement the more when we remember that it escaped the genius of Archimedes and Apollonius, two of the greatest men produced by antiquity.
Quoted in Return to Mathematical Circles H. Eves (Boston 1988).
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Achievement (179)  |  All (4108)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Apollonius (6)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Computation (24)  |  First (1283)  |  Genius (284)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Invention (369)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Merit (50)  |  Method (505)  |  More (2559)  |  Number (699)  |  Produced (187)  |  Profound (104)  |  Rank (67)  |  Remember (179)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Two (937)  |  Useful (250)  |  Value (365)

It is interesting to contemplate an entangled bank, clothed with many plants of many kinds, with birds singing on the bushes, with various insects flitting about, and with worms crawling through the damp earth, and to reflect that these elaborately constructed forms, so different from each other, and dependent on each other in so complex a manner, have all been produced by laws acting around us. These laws, taken in the largest sense, being Growth with Reproduction; Inheritance which is almost implied by reproduction; Variability from the indirect and direct action of the external conditions of life, and from use and disuse; a Ratio of Increase so high as to lead to a Struggle for Life, and as a consequence to Natural Selection, entailing Divergence of Character and the Extinction of less-improved forms. Thus, from the war of nature, from famine and death, the most exalted object which we are capable of conceiving, namely, the production of the higher animals, directly follows. There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.
Concluding remarks in final chapter, The Origin of Species (1859), 490. In the second edition, Darwin changed “breathed” to “breathed by the Creator”.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Bank (31)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bird (149)  |  Breath (59)  |  Capable (168)  |  Character (243)  |  Complex (188)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Construct (124)  |  Death (388)  |  Different (577)  |  Direct (225)  |  Divergence (6)  |  Earth (996)  |  Endless (56)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Exalted (22)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Famine (15)  |  Follow (378)  |  Food Web (8)  |  Form (959)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Growth (187)  |  High (362)  |  Increase (210)  |  Indirect (18)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Insect (77)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Kind (557)  |  Largest (39)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Gravity (15)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Planet (356)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Produced (187)  |  Production (183)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Selection (128)  |  Sense (770)  |  Singing (19)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Through (849)  |  Use (766)  |  Various (200)  |  View (488)  |  War (225)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Worm (42)

It is natural for man to relate the units of distance by which he travels to the dimensions of the globe that he inhabits. Thus, in moving about the earth, he may know by the simple denomination of distance its proportion to the whole circuit of the earth. This has the further advantage of making nautical and celestial measurements correspond. The navigator often needs to determine, one from the other, the distance he has traversed from the celestial arc lying between the zeniths at his point of departure and at his destination. It is important, therefore, that one of these magnitudes should be the expression of the other, with no difference except in the units. But to that end, the fundamental linear unit must be an aliquot part of the terrestrial meridian. ... Thus, the choice of the metre was reduced to that of the unity of angles.
Lecture at the École Normale to the Year III (Apr 1795), Oeuvres Completes de Laplace (1878-1912), Vol. 14, 141. In Charles Coulston Gillispie, Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1978), Vol. 15, 335.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Angle (20)  |  Arc (12)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Choice (110)  |  Circuit (29)  |  Definition (221)  |  Denomination (6)  |  Destination (14)  |  Determine (144)  |  Difference (337)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Know (1518)  |  Linear (13)  |  Lying (55)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Meridian (4)  |  Meter (9)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Navigator (8)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Travel (114)  |  Unit (33)  |  Unity (78)  |  Whole (738)

It is necessary that a surgeon should have a temperate and moderate disposition. That he should have well-formed hands, long slender fingers, a strong body, not inclined to tremble and with all his members trained to the capable fulfilment of the wishes of his mind. He should be of deep intelligence and of a simple, humble, brave, but not audacious disposition. He should be well grounded in natural science, and should know not only medicine but every part of philosophy; should know logic well, so as to be able to understand what is written, to talk properly, and to support what he has to say by good reasons.
Chirurgia Magna (1296, printed 1479), as translated by James Joseph Walsh in Old-Time Makers of Medicine (1911), 261.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Body (537)  |  Brave (12)  |  Capable (168)  |  Deep (233)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Form (959)  |  Good (889)  |  Ground (217)  |  Humble (50)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Know (1518)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Reason (744)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Strong (174)  |  Support (147)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Train (114)  |  Understand (606)

It is not a simple life to be a single cell, although I have no right to say so, having been a single cell so long ago myself that I have no memory at all of that stage in my life.
In A Long Line of Cells: Collected Essays (1990), 244.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cell (138)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Long Ago (10)  |  Memory (134)  |  Myself (212)  |  Right (452)  |  Say (984)  |  Single (353)  |  Stage (143)

It is not merely as an investigator and discoverer, but as a high-principled and unassuming man, that Scheele merits our warmest admiration. His aim and object was the discovery of truth. The letters of the man reveal to us in the most pleasant way his high scientific ideal, his genuinely philosophic temper, and his simple mode of thought. “It is the truth alone that we desire to know, and what joy there is in discovering it!” With these words he himself characterizes his own efforts.
From History of Chemistry (1899). As quoted in Victor Robinson, Pathfinders in Medicine (1912), 121.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (59)  |  Aim (165)  |  Alone (311)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Effort (227)  |  Genuine (52)  |  High (362)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Joy (107)  |  Know (1518)  |  Letter (109)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Merit (50)  |  Most (1731)  |  Object (422)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Carl Wilhelm Scheele (5)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Temper (9)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

It is not necessary for all men to be great in action. The greatest and sublimest power is often simple patience.
From 'The Efficiency of the Passive Virtues', New Life, Sermons for the New Life (1869), 412.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Patience (56)  |  Power (746)

It is not possible to find in all geometry more difficult and more intricate questions or more simple and lucid explanations [than those given by Archimedes]. Some ascribe this to his natural genius; while others think that incredible effort and toil produced these, to all appearance, easy and unlaboured results. No amount of investigation of yours would succeed in attaining the proof, and yet, once seen, you immediately believe you would have discovered it; by so smooth and so rapid a path he leads you to the conclusion required.
Plutarch
In John Dryden (trans.), Life of Marcellus.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Attain (125)  |  Belief (578)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Discover (553)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effort (227)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Find (998)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Labor (107)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lucid (8)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Possible (552)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Proof (287)  |  Question (621)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Think (1086)  |  Toil (25)

It is the simple hypotheses of which one must be most wary; because these are the ones that have the most chances of passing unnoticed.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Chance (239)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passing (76)  |  Unnoticed (5)  |  Wary (3)

It must ... be admitted that very simple relations ... exist between the volumes of gaseous substances and the numbers of simple or compound molecules which form them. The first hypothesis to present itself in this connection, and apparently even the only admissible one, is the supposition that the number of integral molecules in any gases is always the same for equal volumes, or always proportional to the volumes. Indeed, if we were to suppose that the number of molecules contained in a given volume were different for different gases, it would scarcely be possible to conceive that the law regulating the distance of molecules could give in all cases relations so simple as those which the facts just detailed compel us to acknowledge between the volume and the number of molecules.
'Essay on a Manner of Determining the Relative Masses of the Elementary Molecules of Bodies, and the Proportions in which they enter into these Compounds', Journal de Physique, 1811, 73, 58-76. In Foundations of the Molecular Theory; Alembic Club Reprints, Number 4 (1923), 28-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Admissible (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Compel (30)  |  Compound (113)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Connection (162)  |  Detail (146)  |  Different (577)  |  Distance (161)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Gas (83)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Integral (26)  |  Law (894)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Must (1526)  |  Number (699)  |  Possible (552)  |  Present (619)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Substance (248)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Supposition (50)

It needs scarcely be pointed out that in placing Mathematics at the head of Positive Philosophy, we are only extending the application of the principle which has governed our whole Classification. We are simply carrying back our principle to its first manifestation. Geometrical and Mechanical phenomena are the most general, the most simple, the most abstract of all,— the most irreducible to others, the most independent of them; serving, in fact, as a basis to all others. It follows that the study of them is an indispensable preliminary to that of all others. Therefore must Mathematics hold the first place in the hierarchy of the sciences, and be the point of departure of all Education whether general or special.
In Auguste Comte and Harriet Martineau (trans.), The Positive Philosophy (1858), Introduction, Chap. 2, 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Back (390)  |  Basis (173)  |  Carry (127)  |  Classification (97)  |  Departure (9)  |  Education (378)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  General (511)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Govern (64)  |  Head (81)  |  Hierarchy (17)  |  Hold (95)  |  Independent (67)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Irreducible (7)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Need (290)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Place (177)  |  Point (580)  |  Positive (94)  |  Preliminary (5)  |  Principle (507)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Serve (59)  |  Serving (15)  |  Simply (53)  |  Special (184)  |  Study (653)  |  Whole (738)

It seems to me that the view toward which we are tending is that the specificity in gene action is always a chemical specificity, probably the production of enzymes which guide metabolic processes along particular channels. A given array of genes thus determines the production of a particular kind of protoplasm with particular properties—such, for example, as that of responding to surface forces by the formation of a special sort of semipermeable membrane, and that of responding to trivial asymmetries in the play of external stimuli by polarization, with consequent orderly quantitative gradients in all physiologic processes. Different genes may now be called into play at different points in this simple pattern, either through the local formation of their specific substrates for action, or by activation of a mutational nature. In either case the pattern becomes more complex and qualitatively differentiated. Successive interactions of differentiated regions and the calling into play of additional genes may lead to any degree of complexity of pattern in the organism as a largely self-contained system. The array of genes, assembled in the course of evolution, must of course be one which determines a highly self­regulatory system of reactions. On this view the genes are highly specific chemically, and thus called into play only under very specific conditions; but their morphological effects, if any, rest on quantitative influences of immediate or remote products on growth gradients, which are resultants of all that has gone on before in the organism.
In 'Genetics of Abnormal Growth in the Guinea Pig', Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology (1934), 2, 142.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Activation (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Asymmetry (6)  |  Become (815)  |  Call (769)  |  Channel (21)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consequent (19)  |  Course (409)  |  Degree (276)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enzyme (17)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Force (487)  |  Formation (96)  |  Gene (98)  |  Gradient (2)  |  Growth (187)  |  Guide (97)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Influence (222)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Kind (557)  |  Lead (384)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Metabolism (14)  |  More (2559)  |  Morphological (3)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mutation (37)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Organism (220)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Point (580)  |  Polarization (4)  |  Product (160)  |  Production (183)  |  Protoplasm (13)  |  Qualitative (14)  |  Quantitative (29)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Remote (83)  |  Rest (280)  |  Self (267)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Special (184)  |  Specific (95)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Successive (73)  |  Surface (209)  |  System (537)  |  Through (849)  |  Trivial (57)  |  View (488)

It seems to me that you are solving a problem which goes beyond the limits of physiology in too simple a way. Physiology has realized its problem with fortitude, breaking man down into endless actions and counteractions and reducing him to a crossing, a vortex of reflex acts. Let it now permit sociology to restore him as a whole. Sociology will wrest man from the anatomical theatre and return him to history.
Letter to his son, Alexander, July-Aug 1868. Trans. Roger Smith, Inhibition: History and Meaning in the Sciences of Mind and Brain (1992), 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Down (456)  |  Endless (56)  |  History (673)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Permit (58)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reflex (14)  |  Return (124)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Vortex (9)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

Just as Darwin discovered the law of evolution in organic nature, so Marx discovered the law of evolution in human history; he discovered the simple fact, hitherto concealed by an overgrowth of idealogy [sic], that mankind must first of all eat and drink, have shelter and clothing, before it can pursue politics, science, religion, art etc.
Engels' Speech over the Grave of Karl Marx, delivered at Highgate Cemetery, London, 17 Mar 1883. Quoted in Karl Marx 1818-1883, for the Anniversary of his Death (1942), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Discover (553)  |  Drink (53)  |  Eat (104)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Law (894)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organic (158)  |  Politics (112)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shelter (22)

Knowledge leads us from the simple to the complex; wisdom leads us from the complex to the simple.
Anonymous
In Dianna Daniels Booher, Your Signature Life: Pursuing God's Best Every Day (2003), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Complex (188)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lead (384)  |  Wisdom (221)

Lavoisier was right in the deepest, almost holy, way. His passion harnessed feeling to the service of reason; another kind of passion was the price. Reason cannot save us and can even persecute us in the wrong hands; but we have no hope of salvation without reason. The world is too complex, too intransigent; we cannot bend it to our simple will.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bend (12)  |  Complex (188)  |  Deep (233)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Hand (143)  |  Harness (23)  |  Holy (34)  |  Hope (299)  |  Kind (557)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  Passion (114)  |  Persecute (4)  |  Price (51)  |  Reason (744)  |  Right (452)  |  Salvation (11)  |  Save (118)  |  Service (110)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Wrong (234)

Leaving aside genetic surgery applied humans, I foresee that the coming century will place in our hands two other forms of biological technology which are less dangerous but still revolutionary enough to transform the conditions of our existence. I count these new technologies as powerful allies in the attack on Bernal's three enemies. I give them the names “biological engineering” and “self-reproducing machinery.” Biological engineering means the artificial synthesis of living organisms designed to fulfil human purposes. Self-reproducing machinery means the imitation of the function and reproduction of a living organism with non-living materials, a computer-program imitating the function of DNA and a miniature factory imitating the functions of protein molecules. After we have attained a complete understanding of the principles of organization and development of a simple multicellular organism, both of these avenues of technological exploitation should be open to us.
From 3rd J.D. Bernal Lecture, Birkbeck College London (16 May 1972), The World, the Flesh and the Devil (1972), 6. Collected in The Scientist as Rebel (2006), 292. (The World, the Flesh & the Devil: An Enquiry into the Future of the Three Enemies of the Rational Soul is the title of a book by J. D Bernal, a scientist who pioneered X-ray crystallography.)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Applied (177)  |  Attack (84)  |  Attain (125)  |  Avenue (14)  |  Bioengineering (4)  |  Biological (137)  |  Both (493)  |  Century (310)  |  Coming (114)  |  Complete (204)  |  Computer (127)  |  Condition (356)  |  Count (105)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Design (195)  |  Development (422)  |  DNA (77)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Enough (340)  |  Existence (456)  |  Exploitation (14)  |  Factory (20)  |  Foresee (19)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Human (1468)  |  Living (491)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Material (353)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Miniature (7)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Multicellular (4)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Organism (220)  |  Organization (114)  |  Other (2236)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Principle (507)  |  Protein (54)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Revolutionary (31)  |  Self (267)  |  Still (613)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Transform (73)  |  Two (937)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Will (2355)

Lecturing after a fashion is easy enough ; teaching is a very different affair. ... The transmission of ideas from one mind to another, in a simple unequivocal form, is not always easy ; but in teaching, the object is not merely to convey the idea, but to give a lively and lasting impression; something that should not merely cause the retention of the image, but in such connection as to excite another process, ' thought.'
Memoirs of John Abernethy (1854), 253.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Connection (162)  |  Different (577)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enough (340)  |  Form (959)  |  Idea (843)  |  Image (96)  |  Impression (114)  |  Lively (17)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Object (422)  |  Process (423)  |  Something (719)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thought (953)  |  Transmission (34)

Let any man reflect on the revolution produced in society by two simple and common things, glass and gunpowder.
Reflection 328, in Lacon: or Many things in Few Words; Addressed to Those Who Think (1820), 155.
Science quotes on:  |  Common (436)  |  Glass (92)  |  Gunpowder (16)  |  Man (2251)  |  Produced (187)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Society (326)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)

Let me suggest to you a simple test one can apply to scientific activities to determine whether or not they can constitute the practice of physics. Is what you are doing beautiful? Many beautiful things are created without the use of physical knowledge, but I know of no really worthwhile physics that isn’t beautiful. Indeed, one of the most distressing symptoms of scientific illiteracy is the impression so often given to school children that science is a mechanistic activity subject to algorithmic description.
In 'Physics and the APS in 1979', Physics Today (Apr 1980), 33, No. 4, 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Algorithm (5)  |  Apply (160)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Children (200)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Determine (144)  |  Doing (280)  |  Illiteracy (7)  |  Impression (114)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Practice (204)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Subject (521)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Test (211)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Use (766)  |  Worthwhile (18)

Let NEWTON, pure Intelligence, whom GOD
To Mortals lent, to trace his boundless Works
From Laws sublimely simple, speak thy Fame
In all Philosophy.
The Seasons (1746), 130.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Fame (50)  |  God (757)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Law (894)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Pure (291)  |  Speak (232)  |  Trace (103)  |  Work (1351)

Let us ... consider the ovum [egg] as a physical system. Its potentialities are prodigious and one's first impulse is to expect that such vast potentialities would find expression in complexity of structure. But what do we find? The substance is clouded with particles, but these can be centrifuged away leaving it optically structureless but still capable of development.... On the surface of the egg there is a fine membrane, below it fluid of high viscosity, next fluid of relatively low viscosity, and within this the nucleus, which in the resting stage is simply a bag of fluid enclosed in a delicate membrane.... The egg's simplicity is not that of a machine or a crystal, but that of a nebula. Gathered into it are units relatively simple but capable by their combinations of forming a vast number of dynamical systems...
As guest of honour, closing day address (Jun 1928), Sixth Colloid Symposium, Toronto, Canada, 'Living Matter', printed in Harry Boyer Weiser (ed.), Colloid Symposium Monograph (1928), Vol. 6, 15. Quoted in Joseph Needham, Chemical Embryology (1931), Vol. 1, 612-613.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Combination (144)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Consider (416)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Development (422)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dynamic (14)  |  Dynamical (15)  |  Egg (69)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expression (175)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Forming (42)  |  Gather (72)  |  High (362)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Low (80)  |  Machine (257)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Nebula (16)  |  Next (236)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Number (699)  |  Ovum (4)  |  Particle (194)  |  Physical (508)  |  Potential (69)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Stage (143)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Substance (248)  |  Surface (209)  |  System (537)  |  Vast (177)  |  Viscosity (3)

Let us now declare the means whereby our understanding can rise to knowledge without fear of error. There are two such means: intuition and deduction. By intuition I mean not the varying testimony of the senses, nor the deductive judgment of imagination naturally extravagant, but the conception of an attentive mind so distinct and so clear that no doubt remains to it with regard to that which it comprehends; or, what amounts to the same thing, the self-evidencing conception of a sound and attentive mind, a conception which springs from the light of reason alone, and is more certain, because more simple, than deduction itself. …
It may perhaps be asked why to intuition we add this other mode of knowing, by deduction, that is to say, the process which, from something of which we have certain knowledge, draws consequences which necessarily follow therefrom. But we are obliged to admit this second step; for there are a great many things which, without being evident of themselves, nevertheless bear the marks of certainty if only they are deduced from true and incontestable principles by a continuous and uninterrupted movement of thought, with distinct intuition of each thing; just as we know that the last link of a long chain holds to the first, although we can not take in with one glance of the eye the intermediate links, provided that, after having run over them in succession, we can recall them all, each as being joined to its fellows, from the first up to the last. Thus we distinguish intuition from deduction, inasmuch as in the latter case there is conceived a certain progress or succession, while it is not so in the former; … whence it follows that primary propositions, derived immediately from principles, may be said to be known, according to the way we view them, now by intuition, now by deduction; although the principles themselves can be known only by intuition, the remote consequences only by deduction.
In Rules for the Direction of the Mind, Philosophy of Descartes. [Torrey] (1892), 64-65.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Add (40)  |  Admit (45)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Amount (151)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chain (50)  |  Clear (100)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Declare (45)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Derive (65)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Draw (137)  |  Error (321)  |  Evident (91)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fear (197)  |  Fellow (88)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Former (137)  |  Glance (34)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hold (95)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Inasmuch (5)  |  Incontestable (2)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Join (26)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Latter (21)  |  Let (61)  |  Light (607)  |  Link (43)  |  Long (790)  |  Mark (43)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mode (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Movement (155)  |  Naturally (11)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Obliged (6)  |  Other (2236)  |  Primary (80)  |  Principle (507)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Provide (69)  |  Reason (744)  |  Recall (10)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remote (83)  |  Rise (166)  |  Run (174)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Second (62)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Something (719)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spring (133)  |  Step (231)  |  Succession (77)  |  Testimony (21)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Therefrom (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  True (212)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Uninterrupted (7)  |  Vary (27)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whereby (2)  |  Why (491)

Life and business are rather simple after all—to make a success of either, you've got to hang on to the knack of putting yourself into the other person's place.
c. 1891. On Wrigley Company web site.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Business (149)  |  Hang (45)  |  Knack (2)  |  Life (1795)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Place (177)  |  Putting (2)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Success (302)  |  Yourself (7)

Like almost every subject of human interest, this one [mathematics] is just as easy or as difficult as we choose to make it. A lifetime may be spent by a philosopher in discussing the truth of the simplest axiom. The simplest fact as to our existence may fill us with such wonder that our minds will remain overwhelmed with wonder all the time. A Scotch ploughman makes a working religion out of a system which appalls a mental philosopher. Some boys of ten years of age study the methods of the differential calculus; other much cleverer boys working at mathematics to the age of nineteen have a difficulty in comprehending the fundamental ideas of the calculus.
In Teaching of Mathematics (1902), 19-20.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  All The Time (4)  |  Appall (2)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Boy (94)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Choose (112)  |  Clever (38)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Differential Calculus (10)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Easy (204)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fill (61)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Interest (386)  |  Lifetime (31)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overwhelm (5)  |  Overwhelmed (5)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Ploughman (3)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remain (349)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spent (85)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  System (537)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

Little can be understood of even the simplest phenomena of nature without some knowledge of mathematics, and the attempt to penetrate deeper into the mysteries of nature compels simultaneous development of the mathematical processes.
In Teaching of Mathematics in the Elementary and the Secondary School (1906), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Compel (30)  |  Deep (233)  |  Development (422)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Process (423)  |  Simultaneous (22)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)

Making the simple complicated is commonplace; making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that’s creativity.
As quoted, without citation, in Richard D Pepperman, The Eye is Quicker (2004), xv.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Awesome (14)  |  Commonplace (23)  |  Complicate (3)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Make (25)  |  Making (300)

Man is the Reasoning Animal. Such is the claim. I think it is open to dispute. Indeed, my experiments have proven to me that he is the Unreasoning Animal. Note his history, as sketched above. It seems plain to me that whatever he is he is not a reasoning animal. His record is the fantastic record of a maniac. I consider that the strongest count against his intelligence is the fact that with that record back of him he blandly sets himself up as the head animal of the lot: whereas by his own standards he is the bottom one.
In truth, man is incurably foolish. Simple things which the other animals easily learn, he is incapable of learning. Among my experiments was this. In an hour I taught a cat and a dog to be friends. I put them in a cage. In another hour I taught them to be friends with a rabbit. In the course of two days I was able to add a fox, a goose, a squirrel and some doves. Finally a monkey. They lived together in peace; even affectionately.
Next, in another cage I confined an Irish Catholic from Tipperary, and as soon as he seemed tame I added a Scotch Presbyterian from Aberdeen. Next a Turk from Constantinople; a Greek Christian from Crete; an Armenian; a Methodist from the wilds of Arkansas; a Buddhist from China; a Brahman from Benares. Finally, a Salvation Army Colonel from Wapping. Then I stayed away two whole days. When I came back to note results, the cage of Higher Animals was all right, but in the other there was but a chaos of gory odds and ends of turbans and fezzes and plaids and bones and flesh—not a specimen left alive. These Reasoning Animals had disagreed on a theological detail and carried the matter to a Higher Court.
In Letters from the Earth: Uncensored Writings (),
Science quotes on:  |  Aberdeen (2)  |  Against (332)  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arkansas (2)  |  Army (33)  |  Back (390)  |  Bone (95)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Brahman (2)  |  Buddhist (5)  |  Cage (12)  |  Cat (47)  |  Catholic (15)  |  Chaos (91)  |  China (23)  |  Christian (43)  |  Claim (146)  |  Consider (416)  |  Count (105)  |  Course (409)  |  Court (33)  |  Detail (146)  |  Disagreed (4)  |  Disagreement (14)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Dog (70)  |  Dove (3)  |  End (590)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fantastic (20)  |  Flesh (27)  |  Fool (116)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Fox (9)  |  Friend (168)  |  Goose (12)  |  Greek (107)  |  Himself (461)  |  History (673)  |  Hour (186)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Ireland (8)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Lot (151)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Methodist (2)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Next (236)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peace (108)  |  Proof (287)  |  Rabbit (8)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Record (154)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Salvation (11)  |  Scotland (5)  |  Set (394)  |  Soon (186)  |  Specimen (28)  |  Squirrel (7)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Tame (4)  |  Theology (52)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Together (387)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turban (2)  |  Two (937)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wild (87)

Mankind have been slow to believe that order reigns in the universe—that the world is a cosmos and a chaos.
… The divinities of heathen superstition still linger in one form or another in the faith of the ignorant, and even intelligent men shrink from the contemplation of one supreme will acting regularly, not fortuitously, through laws beautiful and simple rather than through a fitful and capricious system of intervention.
... The scientific spirit has cast out the demons, and presented us with nature clothed in her right mind and living under the reign of law. It has given us, for the sorceries of the alchemist, the beautiful laws of chemistry; for the dreams of the astrologer, the sublime truths of astronomy; for the wild visions of cosmogony, the monumental records of geology; for the anarchy of diabolism, the laws of God.
Speech (16 Dec 1867) given while a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, introducing resolution for the appointment of a committee to examine the necessities for legislation upon the subject of the ninth census to be taken the following year. Quoted in John Clark Ridpath, The Life and Work of James A. Garfield (1881), 216.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemist (22)  |  Alchemy (30)  |  Astrology (43)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Capricious (7)  |  Cast (66)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Cosmogony (3)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Dream (208)  |  Faith (203)  |  Form (959)  |  Geology (220)  |  God (757)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Law (894)  |  Linger (14)  |  Living (491)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Order (632)  |  Present (619)  |  Record (154)  |  Reign (23)  |  Right (452)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Slow (101)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Still (613)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Supreme (71)  |  System (537)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vision (123)  |  Wild (87)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Many inventions are not suitable for the people at large because of their carelessness. Before a thing can be marketed to the masses, it must be made practically fool-proof. Its operation must be made extremely simple. That is one reason, I think, why the phonograph has been so universally adopted. Even a child can operate it. … Another reason is that people are far more willing to pay for being amused than for anything else.
As quoted from an interview by B.C. Forbes in The American Magazine (Jan 1921), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Amusement (33)  |  Being (1278)  |  Carelessness (6)  |  Child (307)  |  Fool (116)  |  Foolproof (4)  |  Invention (369)  |  Large (394)  |  Market (20)  |  Marketing (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Operation (213)  |  Pay (43)  |  People (1005)  |  Phonograph (8)  |  Proof (287)  |  Reason (744)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Success (302)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Why (491)  |  Willing (44)

Math is like love—a simple idea but it can get complicated.
Anonymous
Quoted in Jon Fripp, Michael Fripp, Deborah Fripp Speaking of Science: Notable Quotes on Science, Engineering, and the Environment (2000), 45, and attributed to “R. Drabek” with no further source information. Webmaster wonders if this is a typo for mathematician, Pavel Drábek.
Science quotes on:  |  Complicated (115)  |  Idea (843)  |  Love (309)  |  Mathematics (1328)

Mathematical language is not only the simplest and most easily understood of any, but the shortest also.
In Works of Henry, Lord Brougham: Vol. 7: Rhetorical and literary Dissertions and Addresses (1856), 317, footnote.
Science quotes on:  |  Easy (204)  |  Language (293)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics As A Language (20)  |  Most (1731)  |  Short (197)  |  Shortest (16)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)

Mathematics is a game played according to certain simple rules with meaningless marks on paper.
Given as narrative, without quotation marks, in Eric Temple Bell, Mathematics, Queen and Servant of Science (1951, 1961), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Certain (550)  |  Game (101)  |  Mark (43)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meaningless (17)  |  Paper (182)  |  Play (112)  |  Rule (294)

Mathematics … belongs to every inquiry, moral as well as physical. Even the rules of logic, by which it is rigidly bound, could not be deduced without its aid. The laws of argument admit of simple statement, but they must be curiously transposed before they can be applied to the living speech and verified by observation. In its pure and simple form the syllogism cannot be directly compared with all experience, or it would not have required an Aristotle to discover it. It must be transmuted into all the possible shapes in which reasoning loves to clothe itself. The transmutation is the mathematical process in the establishment of the law.
From Memoir (1870) read before the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, printed in 'Linear Associative Algebra', American Journal of Mathematics (1881), 4, 97-98.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Argument (138)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Belong (162)  |  Bound (119)  |  Compare (69)  |  Curious (91)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discover (553)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Experience (467)  |  Form (959)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Law (894)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Logic (287)  |  Love (309)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics And Logic (12)  |  Moral (195)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possible (552)  |  Process (423)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Rule (294)  |  Shape (72)  |  Speech (61)  |  Statement (142)  |  Syllogism (8)  |  Transmutation (22)  |  Transmute (3)  |  Transpose (2)  |  Verify (23)

Mathematics, the science of the ideal, becomes the means of investigating, understanding and making known the world of the real. The complex is expressed in terms of the simple. From one point of view mathematics may be defined as the science of successive substitutions of simpler concepts for more complex.
In A Scrap-book of Elementary Mathematics (1908), 215.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Complex (188)  |  Concept (221)  |  Define (49)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Express (186)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Making (300)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Real (149)  |  Science (3879)  |  Substitution (13)  |  Successive (73)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

Men go into space to see whether it is the kind of place where other men, and their families and their children, can eventually follow them. A disturbingly high proportion of the intelligent young are discontented because they find the life before them intolerably confining. The moon offers a new frontier. It is as simple and splendid as that.
Magazine
Editorial on the moon landing, The Economist (1969).
Science quotes on:  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Confine (26)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Family (94)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Frontier (38)  |  High (362)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Moon (237)  |  New (1216)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Place (177)  |  Proportion (136)  |  See (1081)  |  Space (500)  |  Splendid (23)  |  Young (227)

Men of science, fit to teach, hardly exist. There is no demand for such men. The sciences make up life; they are important to life. The highly educated man fails to understand the simplest things of science, and has no peculiar aptitude for grasping them. I find the grown-up mind coming back to me with the same questions over and over again.
Giving Evidence (18 Nov 1862) to the Public Schools Commission. As quoted in John L. Lewis, 125 Years: The Physical Society & The Institute of Physics (1999), 168.
Science quotes on:  |  Adult (19)  |  Aptitude (19)  |  Back (390)  |  Coming (114)  |  Demand (123)  |  Educated (12)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fail (185)  |  Find (998)  |  Fit (134)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Important (209)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Teach (277)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)

Mere numbers cannot bring out … the intimate essence of the experiment. This conviction comes naturally when one watches a subject at work. … What things can happen! What reflections, what remarks, what feelings, or, on the other hand, what blind automatism, what absence of ideas! … The experimenter judges what may be going on in [the subject’s] mind, and certainly feels difficulty in expressing all the oscillations of a thought in a simple, brutal number, which can have only a deceptive precision. How, in fact, could it sum up what would need several pages of description!
In La Suggestibilité (1900), 119-20.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Automatism (2)  |  Blind (95)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Essence (82)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Happen (274)  |  Idea (843)  |  Judge (108)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Number (699)  |  Oscillation (13)  |  Other (2236)  |  Precision (68)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sum (102)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Work (1351)

Most of the fundamental ideas of science are essentially simple, and may, as a rule, be expressed in a language comprehensible to everyone.
Co-authored with Leopold Infeld.
The Evolution of Physics: The Growth of Ideas from the Early Concepts to Relativity and Quanta (1938), 29. Infeld was a Polish physicist (1898-1968).
Science quotes on:  |  Author (167)  |  Express (186)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Idea (843)  |  Language (293)  |  Most (1731)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Theory (970)

Most of us have had moments in childhood when we touched the divine presence. We did not think it extraordinary because it wasn’t; it was just a beautiful moment filled with love. In those simple moments our hearts were alive, and we saw the poignant beauty of life vividly with wonder and appreciation.
David McArthur and Bruce McArthur
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Childhood (38)  |  Divine (112)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fill (61)  |  Heart (229)  |  Life (1795)  |  Love (309)  |  Moment (253)  |  Most (1731)  |  Poignant (2)  |  Presence (63)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Think (1086)  |  Touch (141)  |  Vividly (11)  |  Wonder (236)

Mssr. Fermat—what have you done?
Your simple conjecture has everyone
Churning out proofs,
Which are nothing but goofs!
Could it be that your statement’s an erudite spoof?
A marginal hoax
That you’ve played on us folks?
But then you’re really not known for your practical jokes.
Or is it then true
That you knew what to do
When n was an integer greater than two?
Oh then why can’t we find
That same proof…are we blind?
You must be reproved, for I’m losing my mind.
In 'Fermat's Last Theorem', Mathematics Magazine (Apr 1986), 59, No. 2, 76.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Blind (95)  |  Churn (4)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Do (1908)  |  Erudite (2)  |  Fermat’s Last Theorem (3)  |  Pierre de Fermat (15)  |  Find (998)  |  Folk (8)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hoax (5)  |  Integer (10)  |  Joke (83)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Lose (159)  |  Marginal (3)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Parody (4)  |  Play (112)  |  Practical (200)  |  Proof (287)  |  Really (78)  |  Statement (142)  |  True (212)  |  Two (937)  |  Why (491)

My aim is to say that the machinery of the heavens is not like a divine animal but like a clock (and anyone who believes a clock has a soul gives the work the honour due to its maker) and that in it almost all the variety of motions is from one very simple magnetic force acting on bodies, as in the clock all motions are from a very simple weight.
Letter to J. G. Herwart von Hohenburg (16 Feb 1605). Johannes Kepler Gesammelte Werke (1937- ), Vol. 15, letter 325, l. 57-61, p. 146.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Clock (47)  |  Divine (112)  |  Due (141)  |  Force (487)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Honour (56)  |  Machine (257)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Maker (34)  |  Motion (310)  |  Say (984)  |  Soul (226)  |  Variety (132)  |  Weight (134)  |  Work (1351)

My colleagues in elementary particle theory in many lands [and I] are driven by the usual insatiable curiosity of the scientist, and our work is a delightful game. I am frequently astonished that it so often results in correct predictions of experimental results. How can it be that writing down a few simple and elegant formulae, like short poems governed by strict rules such as those of the sonnet or the waka, can predict universal regularities of Nature?
Nobel Banquet Speech (10 Dec 1969), in Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.),Les Prix Nobel en 1969 (1970).
Science quotes on:  |  Astonish (37)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Correctness (12)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Delight (108)  |  Delightful (17)  |  Down (456)  |  Drive (55)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Formula (98)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Game (101)  |  Govern (64)  |  Government (110)  |  Insatiable (7)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Particle (194)  |  Particle Physics (13)  |  Poem (96)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Result (677)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Short (197)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Sonnet (4)  |  Strict (17)  |  Theory (970)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universality (22)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)

My experiments with single traits all lead to the same result: that from the seeds of hybrids, plants are obtained half of which in turn carry the hybrid trait (Aa), the other half, however, receive the parental traits A and a in equal amounts. Thus, on the average, among four plants two have the hybrid trait Aa, one the parental trait A, and the other the parental trait a. Therefore, 2Aa+ A +a or A + 2Aa + a is the empirical simple series for two differing traits.
Letter to Carl Nägeli, 31 Dec 1866. In Curt Stern and Eva R. Sherwood (eds.), The Origin of Genetics: A Mendel Source Book (1966), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Average (82)  |  Carry (127)  |  Difference (337)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Empiricism (21)  |  Equal (83)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Hybrid (14)  |  Lead (384)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Plant (294)  |  Receive (114)  |  Result (677)  |  Seed (93)  |  Series (149)  |  Single (353)  |  Trait (22)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)

My goal is simple. It is a complete understanding of the universe, why it is as it is and why it exists at all.
In the Washington Post, April 15, 1988.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Complete (204)  |  Exist (443)  |  Goal (145)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Why (491)

My main thesis will be that in the study of the intermediate processes of metabolism we have to deal not with complex substances which elude ordinary chemical methods, but with the simple substances undergoing comprehensible reactions... I intend also to emphasise the fact that it is not alone with the separation and identification of products from the animal that our present studies deal; but with their reactions in the body; with the dynamic side of biochemical phenomena.
'The Dynamic Side of Biochemistry', Address (11 Sep 1913) in Report on the 83rd Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1914), 653.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Animal (617)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Body (537)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Complex (188)  |  Deal (188)  |  Elude (10)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Identification (16)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Metabolism (14)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Present (619)  |  Product (160)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Separation (57)  |  Side (233)  |  Study (653)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thesis (15)  |  Will (2355)

My own thinking (and that of many of my colleagues) is based on two general principles, which I shall call the Sequence Hypothesis and the Central Dogma. The direct evidence for both of them is negligible, but I have found them to be of great help in getting to grips with these very complex problems. I present them here in the hope that others can make similar use of them. Their speculative nature is emphasized by their names. It is an instructive exercise to attempt to build a useful theory without using them. One generally ends in the wilderness.
The Sequence Hypothesis
This has already been referred to a number of times. In its simplest form it assumes that the specificity of a piece of nucleic acid is expressed solely by the sequence of its bases, and that this sequence is a (simple) code for the amino acid sequence of a particular protein...
The Central Dogma
This states that once 'information' has passed into protein it cannot get out again. In more detail, the transfer of information from nucleic acid to nucleic acid, or from nucleic acid to protein may be possible, but transfer from protein to protein, or from protein to nucleic acid is impossible. Information means here the precise determination of sequence, either of bases in the nucleic acid or of amino acid residues in the protein. This is by no means universally held—Sir Macfarlane Burnet, for example, does not subscribe to it—but many workers now think along these lines. As far as I know it has not been explicitly stated before.
'On Protein Synthesis', Symposia of the Society for Experimental Biology: The Biological Replication of Macromolecules, 1958, 12, 152-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Already (222)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Base (117)  |  Both (493)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Central (80)  |  Code (31)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Complex (188)  |  Detail (146)  |  Determination (78)  |  Direct (225)  |  DNA (77)  |  Dogma (48)  |  End (590)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Express (186)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Information (166)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Molecular Biology (27)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Negligible (5)  |  Nucleic Acid (23)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Possible (552)  |  Precise (68)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Protein (54)  |  Residue (9)  |  Sequence (68)  |  State (491)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Wilderness (45)

Nature becomes fertile only by virtue of laws that oblige matter to organize itself into one of a number of necessarily very simple primitive forms. Because of their very simplicity, these are capable of constituting the basis for increasingly complex bodies, by the addition of organs calculated according to identical laws of possibility.
'Matiere', Dictionnaire Classique d' Histoire Naturelle (1822-31), Vol. 10, 277, trans. J. Mandelbaum. Quoted in Pietro Corsi, The Age of Lamarck (1988), 225.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Addition (66)  |  Basis (173)  |  Become (815)  |  Capable (168)  |  Complex (188)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fertile (29)  |  Form (959)  |  Identical (53)  |  Law (894)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Number (699)  |  Oblige (6)  |  Organ (115)  |  Organize (29)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Virtue (109)

Nature offers us a thousand simple pleasures—plays of light and color, fragrance in the air, the sun’s warmth on skin and muscle, the audible rhythm of life’s stir and push—for the price of merely paying attention. What joy! But how unwilling or unable many of us are to pay this price in an age when manufactured sources of stimulation and pleasure are everywhere at hand. For me, enjoying nature’s pleasures takes conscious choice, a choice to slow down to seed time or rock time, to still the clamoring ego, to set aside plans and busyness, and to simply to be present in my body, to offer myself up.
In Sisters of the Earth: Women’s Prose and Poetry (1991), 43.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Air (347)  |  Attention (190)  |  Audible (4)  |  Body (537)  |  Busy (28)  |  Choice (110)  |  Clamoring (2)  |  Color (137)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Down (456)  |  Ego (17)  |  Enjoy (40)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Joy (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Merely (316)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Offer (141)  |  Pay (43)  |  Plan (117)  |  Play (112)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Present (619)  |  Price (51)  |  Push (62)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Rock (161)  |  Seed (93)  |  Set (394)  |  Set Aside (4)  |  Simply (53)  |  Skin (47)  |  Slow (101)  |  Source (93)  |  Still (613)  |  Stimulation (16)  |  Stir (21)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unable (24)  |  Unwilling (9)  |  Warmth (21)

Nature seems to take advantage of the simple mathematical representations of the symmetry laws. When one pauses to consider the elegance and the beautiful perfection of the mathematical reasoning involved and contrast it with the complex and far-reaching physical consequences, a deep sense of respect for the power of the symmetry laws never fails to develop.
Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1957). In Nobel Lectures: Physics, 1981-1990) (1998), 394-395.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Complex (188)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Deep (233)  |  Develop (268)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Fail (185)  |  Involved (90)  |  Law (894)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Physical (508)  |  Power (746)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Representation (53)  |  Respect (207)  |  Sense (770)  |  Symmetry (43)

Nature, displayed in its full extent, presents us with an immense tableau, in which all the order of beings are each represented by a chain which sustains a continuous series of objects, so close and so similar that their difference would be difficult to define. This chain is not a simple thread which is only extended in length, it is a large web or rather a network, which, from interval to interval, casts branches to the side in order to unite with the networks of another order.
'Les Oiseaux Qui Ne Peuvent Voler', Histoire Naturelle des Oiseaux (1770), Vol. I, 394. Trans. Phillip R. Sloan.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cast (66)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Difference (337)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Display (56)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extent (139)  |  Immense (86)  |  Large (394)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Network (21)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Present (619)  |  Represent (155)  |  Series (149)  |  Side (233)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Thread (32)  |  Unite (42)  |  Web Of Life (7)

Never believe that the atom is a complex mystery—it is not. The atom is what we find when we look for the underlying architecture in nature, whose bricks are as few, as simple and orderly as possible.
Quoted in Andrew Jon Rotter, Hiroshima (2008), 7, without citation. Also in 'ABC of the Atom'. Reader's Digest (Feb 1952), 40, 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Architecture (48)  |  Atom (355)  |  Belief (578)  |  Brick (18)  |  Complex (188)  |  Find (998)  |  Look (582)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Possible (552)  |  Underlying (30)

No hypothesis concerning the nature of this 'something' shall be advanced thereby or based thereon. Therefore it appears as most simple to use the last syllable 'gen' taken from Darwin's well-known word pangene since it alone is of interest to use, in order thereby to replace the poor, more ambiguous word, 'Anlage'. Thus, we will say for 'das pangene' and 'die pangene' simply 'Das Gen' and 'Die Gene,' The word Gen is fully free from every hypothesis; it expresses only the safely proved fact that in any case many properties of organisms are conditioned by separable and hence independent 'Zustiinde,' 'Grundlagen,' 'Anlagen'—in short what we will call 'just genes'—which occur specifically in the gametes.
Elemente der Exakten Erblichkeitslehre (1909), 124. Trans. G. E. Allen and quoted in G. E. Allen, Thomas Hunt Morgan: The Man and His Science (1978), 209-10 (Footnote 79).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alone (311)  |  Ambiguous (13)  |  Call (769)  |  Condition (356)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Free (232)  |  Gamete (5)  |  Gene (98)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Interest (386)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Occur (150)  |  Order (632)  |  Organism (220)  |  Poor (136)  |  Say (984)  |  Short (197)  |  Something (719)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

No part of Mathematics suffers more from the triviality of its initial presentation to beginners than the great subject of series. Two minor examples of series, namely arithmetic and geometric series, are considered; these examples are important because they are the simplest examples of an important general theory. But the general ideas are never disclosed; and thus the examples, which exemplify nothing, are reduced to silly trivialities.
In An Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Beginner (11)  |  Consider (416)  |  Considered (12)  |  Disclose (18)  |  Example (94)  |  Exemplify (5)  |  General (511)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Important (209)  |  Initial (17)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Minor (10)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Reduced (3)  |  Series (149)  |  Silly (17)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Theory (970)  |  Triviality (2)  |  Two (937)

No problem can be solved until it is reduced to some simple form. The changing of a vague difficulty into a specific, concrete form is a very essential element in thinking.
Seen, for example, in The Grain and Feed Review (1931), 21, 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Changing (7)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Element (310)  |  Essential (199)  |  Form (959)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Solution (267)  |  Specific (95)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Vague (47)

No substantial part of the universe is so simple that it can be grasped and controlled without abstraction. Abstraction consists in replacing the part of the universe under consideration by a model of similar but simpler structure. Models, formal and intellectual on the one hand, or material on the other, are thus a central necessity of scientific procedure.
As coauthor with Norbert Wiener in 'The Role of Models in Science', Philosophy of Science (Oct 1945), 12, No. 4, 316.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Central (80)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Consist (223)  |  Control (167)  |  Formal (33)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Material (353)  |  Model (102)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Replace (31)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Similar (36)  |  Structure (344)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Universe (857)

Now, we propose in the first place to show, that this law of organic progress is the law of all progress. Whether it be in the development of the Earth, in the development in Life upon its surface, in the development of Society, of Government, of Manufactures, of Commerce, of Language, Literature, Science, Art, this same evolution of the simple into the complex, through a process of continuous differentiation, holds throughout. From the earliest traceable cosmical changes down to the latest results of civilization, we shall find that the transformation of the homogeneous into the heterogeneous is that in which Progress essentially consists.
'Progress: Its Law and Cause', Westminster Review (1857), 67, 446-7.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Change (593)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Commerce (21)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Consist (223)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Development (422)  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Government (110)  |  Heterogeneity (4)  |  Homogeneity (8)  |  Homogeneous (16)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Literature (103)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Organic (158)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Show (346)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Society (326)  |  Surface (209)  |  Through (849)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Trace (103)  |  Traceable (5)  |  Transformation (69)

Numbers have neither substance, nor meaning, nor qualities. They are nothing but marks, and all that is in them we have put into them by the simple rule of straight succession.
In 'Mathematics and the Laws of Nature', The Armchair Science Reader (1959), 301.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Mark (43)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Quality (135)  |  Rule (294)  |  Straight (73)  |  Substance (248)  |  Succession (77)

O. Hahn and F. Strassmann have discovered a new type of nuclear reaction, the splitting into two smaller nuclei of the nuclei of uranium and thorium under neutron bombardment. Thus they demonstrated the production of nuclei of barium, lanthanum, strontium, yttrium, and, more recently, of xenon and caesium. It can be shown by simple considerations that this type of nuclear reaction may be described in an essentially classical way like the fission of a liquid drop, and that the fission products must fly apart with kinetic energies of the order of hundred million electron-volts each.
'Products of the Fission of the Urarium Nucleus', Nature (1939), 143, 471.
Science quotes on:  |  Barium (4)  |  Bombardment (3)  |  Classical (45)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Discover (553)  |  Drop (76)  |  Electron (93)  |  Fission (10)  |  Fly (146)  |  Otto Hahn (2)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Kinetic (12)  |  Kinetic Energy (3)  |  Lanthanum (2)  |  Liquid (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Neutron (17)  |  New (1216)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Reaction (2)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Order (632)  |  Product (160)  |  Production (183)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Strontium (2)  |  Thorium (5)  |  Two (937)  |  Type (167)  |  Uranium (20)  |  Way (1217)  |  Xenon (5)  |  Yttrium (3)

Observation is simple, indefatigable, industrious, upright, without any preconceived opinion. Experiment is artificial, impatient, busy, digressive; passionate, unreliable. We see every day one experiment after another, the second outweighing the impression gained from the first, both, often enough, carried out by men who are neither much distinguished for their spirit, nor for carrying with them the truth of personality and self denial. Nothing is easier than to make a series of so-called interesting experiments. Nature can only in some way be forced, and in her distress, she will give her suffering answer. Nothing is more difficult than to explain it, nothing is more difficult than a valid physiological experiment. We consider as the first task of current physiology to point at it and comprehend it.
Inaugural lecture as docent of physiology at the University of Bonn (19 Oct) 1824. Published in Johannes Muller, Zur vergleichenden Physiologie des Gesichtssinnes des Menschen und der Thiere (1826), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Both (493)  |  Call (769)  |  Consider (416)  |  Current (118)  |  Denial (17)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Distress (9)  |  Easier (53)  |  Enough (340)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Explain (322)  |  First (1283)  |  Gain (145)  |  Impression (114)  |  Industrious (12)  |  Interesting (153)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observation (555)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Passionate (22)  |  Personality (62)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Point (580)  |  See (1081)  |  Self (267)  |  Series (149)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Task (147)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Of course, Behaviourism “works.” So does torture. Give me a no-nonsense, down-to-earth behaviourist, a few drugs, and simple electrical appliances, and in six months I will have him reciting the Athanasian Creed in public.
A Certain World: A Commonplace Book (1971),33.
Science quotes on:  |  Appliance (9)  |  Course (409)  |  Creed (27)  |  Down (456)  |  Drug (57)  |  Earth (996)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Month (88)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Torture (29)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

Ohm found that the results could be summed up in such a simple law that he who runs may read it, and a schoolboy now can predict what a Faraday then could only guess at roughly. By Ohm's discovery a large part of the domain of electricity became annexed by Coulomb's discovery of the law of inverse squares, and completely annexed by Green's investigations. Poisson attacked the difficult problem of induced magnetisation, and his results, though differently expressed, are still the theory, as a most important first approximation. Ampere brought a multitude of phenomena into theory by his investigations of the mechanical forces between conductors supporting currents and magnets. Then there were the remarkable researches of Faraday, the prince of experimentalists, on electrostatics and electrodynamics and the induction of currents. These were rather long in being brought from the crude experimental state to a compact system, expressing the real essence. Unfortunately, in my opinion, Faraday was not a mathematician. It can scarely be doubted that had he been one, he would have anticipated much later work. He would, for instance, knowing Ampere's theory, by his own results have readily been led to Neumann’s theory, and the connected work of Helmholtz and Thomson. But it is perhaps too much to expect a man to be both the prince of experimentalists and a competent mathematician.
From article 'Electro-magnetic Theory II', in The Electrician (16 Jan 1891), 26, No. 661, 331.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  André-Marie Ampère (11)  |  Approximation (31)  |  Attack (84)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Compact (13)  |  Completely (135)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Connect (125)  |  Charles-Augustin Coulomb (3)  |  Crude (31)  |  Current (118)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Domain (69)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electrodynamics (10)  |  Electromagnetism (18)  |  Electrostatic (7)  |  Electrostatics (6)  |  Essence (82)  |  Expect (200)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Experimentalist (20)  |  Express (186)  |  Michael Faraday (85)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Green (63)  |  Guess (61)  |  Hermann von Helmholtz (28)  |  Induction (77)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Long (790)  |  Magnet (20)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Ohm (5)  |  Georg Simon Ohm (3)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Siméon-Denis Poisson (7)  |  Predict (79)  |  Problem (676)  |