Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index N > Category: Neanderthal

Neanderthal Quotes (7 quotes)

Asian Homo erectus died without issue and does not enter our immediate ancestry (for we evolved from African populations); Neanderthal people were collateral cousins, perhaps already living in Europe while we emerged in Africa... In other words, we are an improbable and fragile entity, fortunately successful after precarious beginnings as a small population in Africa, not the predictable end result of a global tendency. We are a thing, an item of history, not an embodiment of general principles.
Wonderful Life (1989), 319.
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (35)  |  African (10)  |  Already (222)  |  Ancestry (12)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Cousin (12)  |  Embodiment (9)  |  End (590)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entity (35)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fragile (21)  |  General (511)  |  Global (35)  |  History (673)  |  Homo Sapiens (23)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Living (491)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Population (110)  |  Principle (507)  |  Result (677)  |  Small (477)  |  Successful (123)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Word (619)

Faced with the challenge of an endless universe, Man will be forced to mature further, just as the Neanderthal—faced with an entire planet—had no choice but to grow away from the tradition of savagery.
That Moon Plaque: Comments by Science Fiction Writers (1969)
Science quotes on:  |  Challenge (85)  |  Choice (110)  |  Endless (56)  |  Grow (238)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mature (16)  |  Planet (356)  |  Progress (465)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

In no sense can the Neanderthal bones be regarded as the remains of a human being intermediate between men and apes.
In Evidence as to Man's Place in Nature (1863), 157.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Ape (53)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bone (95)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Man (2251)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remains (9)  |  Sense (770)

Let no one mistake it for comedy, farcical though it may be in all its details. It serves notice on the country that Neanderthal man is organizing in these forlorn backwaters of the land, led by a fanatic, rid of sense and devoid of conscience.
{Commenting on the Scopes Monkey Trial, while reporting for the Baltimore Sun.]
In Michael Shermer, Why Darwin Matters (2006), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Comedy (4)  |  Conscience (50)  |  Country (251)  |  Detail (146)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Fanatic (7)  |  Farce (5)  |  Forlorn (5)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Notice (77)  |  Organize (29)  |  Reporting (9)  |  Scope (45)  |  Scopes Monkey Trial (7)  |  John T. Scopes (5)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sun (385)  |  Trial (57)

Run the tape again, and let the tiny twig of Homo sapiens expire in Africa. Other hominids may have stood on the threshold of what we know as human possibilities, but many sensible scenarios would never generate our level of mentality. Run the tape again, and this time Neanderthal perishes in Europe and Homo erectus in Asia (as they did in our world). The sole surviving human stock, Homo erectus in Africa, stumbles along for a while, even prospers, but does not speciate and therefore remains stable. A mutated virus then wipes Homo erectus out, or a change in climate reconverts Africa into inhospitable forest. One little twig on the mammalian branch, a lineage with interesting possibilities that were never realized, joins the vast majority of species in extinction. So what? Most possibilities are never realized, and who will ever know the difference? Arguments of this form lead me to the conclusion that biology's most profound insight into human nature, status, and potential lies in the simple phrase, the embodiment of contingency: Homo sapiens is an entity, not a tendency.
Wonderful Life (1989), 320.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Africa (35)  |  Argument (138)  |  Biology (216)  |  Branch (150)  |  Change (593)  |  Climate (97)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Difference (337)  |  Embodiment (9)  |  Entity (35)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Forest (150)  |  Form (959)  |  Hominid (4)  |  Homo Sapiens (23)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Insight (102)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lie (364)  |  Little (707)  |  Majority (66)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Potential (69)  |  Profound (104)  |  Prosper (6)  |  Remain (349)  |  Run (174)  |  Simple (406)  |  Sole (49)  |  Species (401)  |  Stable (30)  |  Status (35)  |  Stumble (19)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Threshold (10)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Twig (14)  |  Vast (177)  |  Virus (27)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

The “control of nature” is a phrase conceived in arrogance, born of the Neanderthal age of biology and the convenience of man.
In Silent Spring (1962), 297.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Arrogance (20)  |  Biology (216)  |  Control (167)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Environment (216)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Phrase (61)

We have only indirect means of knowing the courage and activity of the Neanderthals in the chase, through the bones of animals hunted for food which are found intermingled with the flints around their ancient hearths.
In 'Customs of the Chase and of cave Life', Men of the Old Stone Age: Their Environment, Life and Art (1921), 211.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Animal (617)  |  Anthropolgy (2)  |  Around (7)  |  Bone (95)  |  Chase (14)  |  Courage (69)  |  Flint (6)  |  Food (199)  |  Hearth (2)  |  Hunt (30)  |  Indirect (18)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Paleontology (31)  |  Through (849)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.