Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Dangerous... to take shelter under a tree, during a thunder-gust. It has been fatal to many, both men and beasts.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index A > Category: Already

Already Quotes (222 quotes)

... I left Caen, where I was living, to go on a geologic excursion under the auspices of the School of Mines. The incidents of the travel made me forget my mathematical work. Having reached Coutances, we entered an omnibus to go to some place or other. At the moment when I put my foot on the step, the idea came to me, without anything in my former thoughts seeming to have paved the way for it, that the transformations I had used to define the Fuchsian functions were identical with those of non-Eudidean geometry. I did not verify the idea; I should not have had time, as upon taking my seat in the omnibus, I went on with a conversation already commenced, but I felt a perfect certainty. On my return to Caen, for convenience sake, I verified the result at my leisure.
Quoted in Sir Roger Penrose, The Emperor's New Mind: Concerning Computers, Minds, and the Laws of Physics (1990), 541. Science and Method (1908) 51-52, 392.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (174)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Enter (141)  |  Excursion (11)  |  Forget (115)  |  Former (137)  |  Function (228)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Idea (843)  |  Identical (53)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Leisure (24)  |  Living (491)  |  Mine (76)  |  Moment (253)  |  Non-Euclidian (2)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Reach (281)  |  Result (677)  |  Return (124)  |  Sake (58)  |  School (219)  |  Step (231)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Travel (114)  |  Verify (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

...to invent is to discover that we know not, and not to recover or resummon that which we already know.
The Second Book of Francis Bacon of the Proficience and Advancement of Learning (1605). In Francis Bacon and Basil Montagu, The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England (1852), 209
Science quotes on:  |  Discover (553)  |  Invention (369)  |  Know (1518)

Air Force Chief of Staff: Doctor, what do you think of our new creation, the … Corporation?
von Kármán: Why, General, I think that corporation has already had an effect on the whole industry.
Air Force Chief of Staff: I’m delighted. What effect is that?
von Kármán: Why, they’ve upset the salary schedule of the whole industry.
As quoted by William R. Sears in 'Some Recollections of Theodore von Kármán', Address to the Symposium in Memory of Theodore von Kármán, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, National Meeting (13-14 May 1964), Washington, D.C. Printed in Journal of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (Mar 1965), 13>, No. 1, 181. These are likely not verbatim words of Karman, but as recollected by Sears, giving an example of von Kármán’s willingness to speak truth to power.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Air Force (2)  |  Chief (97)  |  Corporation (6)  |  Creation (327)  |  Delight (108)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Effect (393)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  Industry (137)  |  New (1216)  |  Salary (7)  |  Think (1086)  |  Upset (18)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)

Alles Gescheite ist schon gedacht worden; man muss nur versuchen, es noch einmal zu denken.
Everything that is worth thinking has already been thought; one must only try to think it again.
As translated in William Francis Henry King (ed.), Classical and Foreign Quotations: A Polyglot Manual of Historical (1904), 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Everything (476)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Try (283)  |  Worth (169)

Ich have auf eine geringe Vermutung eine gefährliche Reise gewagt und erblicke schon die Vorgebirge neuer Länder. Diejenigen, welche die Herzhaftigheit haben die Untersuchung fortzusetzen, werden sie betreten.
Upon a slight conjecture [on the origin of the solar system] I have ventured on a dangerous journey and I already behold the foothills of new lands. Those who have the courage to continue the search will set foot on them.
From Allgemeine Naturgeschichte und Theorie des Himmels (Natural History and Theory of the Heavens (1755). As quoted in D. ter Haar and A.G.W. Cameron, 'Historical Review of Theories of the Origin of the Solar System', collected in Robert Jastrow and A. G. W. Cameron (eds.), Origin of the Solar System: Proceedings of a Conference Held at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, January 23-24, 1962, (1963), 3. 'Cosmogonical Hypotheses' (1913), collected in Harlow Shapley, Source Book in Astronomy, 1900-1950 (1960), 347.
Science quotes on:  |  Behold (18)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Continue (165)  |  Courage (69)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Foot (60)  |  Foothill (3)  |  Journey (42)  |  Land (115)  |  New (1216)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of The Solar System (2)  |  Search (162)  |  Set (394)  |  Solar System (77)  |  System (537)  |  Will (2355)

A drop of old tuberculin, which is an extract of tubercle bacilli, is put on the skin and then a small superficial scarification is made by turning, with some pressure, a vaccination lancet on the surface of the skin. The next day only those individuals show an inflammatory reaction at the point of vaccination who have already been infected with tuberculosis, whereas the healthy individuals show no reaction at all. Every time we find a positive reaction, we can say with certainty that the child is tuberculous.
'The Relation of Tuberculosis to Infant Mortality', read at the third mid-year meeting of the American Academy of Medicine, New Haven, Conn, (4 Nov 1909). In Bulletin of the American Academy of Medicine (1910), 11, 75.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bacillus (9)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Child (307)  |  Drop (76)  |  Extract (40)  |  Find (998)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Individual (404)  |  Infection (27)  |  Inflammation (7)  |  Next (236)  |  Old (481)  |  Point (580)  |  Positive (94)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Say (984)  |  Show (346)  |  Skin (47)  |  Small (477)  |  Superficial (12)  |  Surface (209)  |  Test (211)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tuberculosis (8)  |  Vaccination (6)

A great man, [who] was convinced that the truths of political and moral science are capable of the same certainty as those that form the system of physical science, even in those branches like astronomy that seem to approximate mathematical certainty.
He cherished this belief, for it led to the consoling hope that humanity would inevitably make progress toward a state of happiness and improved character even as it has already done in its knowledge of the truth.
Describing administrator and economist Anne-Robert-Jacques Turgot in Essai sur l’application de l’analyse à la probabilité des décisions rendues à la pluralité des voix (1785), i. Cited epigraph in Charles Coulston Gillispie, Science and Polity in France: The End of the Old Regime (2004), 3
Science quotes on:  |  Approximate (25)  |  Approximation (31)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Belief (578)  |  Capable (168)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Character (243)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Cherishing (2)  |  Consoling (4)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Form (959)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Hope (299)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Moral (195)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Truth (1057)

A physician’s subject of study is necessarily the patient, and his first field for observation is the hospital. But if clinical observation teaches him to know the form and course of diseases, it cannot suffice to make him understand their nature; to this end he must penetrate into the body to find which of the internal parts are injured in their functions. That is why dissection of cadavers and microscopic study of diseases were soon added to clinical observation. But to-day these various methods no longer suffice; we must push investigation further and, in analyzing the elementary phenomena of organic bodies, must compare normal with abnormal states. We showed elsewhere how incapable is anatomy alone to take account of vital phenenoma, and we saw that we must add study of all physico-chemical conditions which contribute necessary elements to normal or pathological manifestations of life. This simple suggestion already makes us feel that the laboratory of a physiologist-physician must be the most complicated of all laboratories, because he has to experiment with phenomena of life which are the most complex of all natural phenomena.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 140-141.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Body (537)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Clinical (15)  |  Compare (69)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Condition (356)  |  Course (409)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Disease (328)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Element (310)  |  Elementary (96)  |  End (590)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Feel (367)  |  Field (364)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Internal (66)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Life (1795)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Observation (555)  |  Organic (158)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Patient (199)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Physician (273)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Push (62)  |  Saw (160)  |  Show (346)  |  Simple (406)  |  Soon (186)  |  State (491)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Understand (606)  |  Various (200)  |  Vital (85)  |  Why (491)

A schism has taken place among the chemists. A particular set of them in France have undertaken to remodel all the terms of the science, and to give every substance a new name, the composition, and especially the termination of which, shall define the relation in which it stands to other substances of the same family, But the science seems too much in its infancy as yet, for this reformation; because in fact, the reformation of this year must be reformed again the next year, and so on, changing the names of substances as often as new experiments develop properties in them undiscovered before. The new nomenclature has, accordingly, been already proved to need numerous and important reformations. ... It is espoused by the minority here, and by the very few, indeed, of the foreign chemists. It is particularly rejected in England.
Letter to Dr. Willard (Paris, 1788). In Thomas Jefferson and John P. Foley (ed.), The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia (1900), 135. From H.A. Washington, The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (1853-54). Vol 3, 15.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Composition (84)  |  Compound (113)  |  Develop (268)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Family (94)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  Minority (21)  |  Must (1526)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reform (22)  |  Reformation (6)  |  Reformed (4)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Stand (274)  |  Substance (248)  |  Term (349)  |  Termination (4)  |  Terms (184)  |  Undiscovered (15)  |  Year (933)

A troubling question for those of us committed to the widest application of intelligence in the study and solution of the problems of men is whether a general understanding of the social sciences will be possible much longer. Many significant areas of these disciplines have already been removed by the advances of the past two decades beyond the reach of anyone who does not know mathematics; and the man of letters is increasingly finding, to his dismay, that the study of mankind proper is passing from his hands to those of technicians and specialists. The aesthetic effect is admittedly bad: we have given up the belletristic “essay on man” for the barbarisms of a technical vocabulary, or at best the forbidding elegance of mathematical syntax.
Opening paragraph of 'The Study of Man: Sociology Learns the Language of Mathematics' in Commentary (1 Sep 1952). Reprinted in James Roy Newman, The World of Mathematics (1956), Vol. 2, 1294.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Application (242)  |  Bad (180)  |  Barbarism (7)  |  Best (459)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Decade (59)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Dismay (5)  |  Effect (393)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Essay (27)  |  General (511)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Know (1518)  |  Letter (109)  |  Man (2251)  |  Man Of Letters (3)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Passing (76)  |  Past (337)  |  Possible (552)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proper (144)  |  Question (621)  |  Reach (281)  |  Remove (45)  |  Science (3879)  |  Significant (74)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Solution (267)  |  Specialist (28)  |  Study (653)  |  Syntax (2)  |  Technical (43)  |  Technician (9)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vocabulary (8)  |  Will (2355)

A weird happening has occurred in the case of a lansquenet named Daniel Burghammer, of the squadron of Captain Burkhard Laymann Zu Liebenau, of the honorable Madrucci Regiment in Piadena, in Italy. When the same was on the point of going to bed one night he complained to his wife, to whom he had been married by the Church seven years ago, that he had great pains in his belly and felt something stirring therein. An hour thereafter he gave birth to a child, a girl. When his wife was made aware of this, she notified the occurrence at once. Thereupon he was examined and questioned. … He confessed on the spot that he was half man and half woman and that for more than seven years he had served as a soldier in Hungary and the Netherlands… . When he was born he was christened as a boy and given in baptism the name of Daniel… . He also stated that while in the Netherlands he only slept once with a Spaniard, and he became pregnant therefrom. This, however, he kept a secret unto himself and also from his wife, with whom he had for seven years lived in wedlock, but he had never been able to get her with child… . The aforesaid soldier is able to suckle the child with his right breast only and not at all on the left side, where he is a man. He has also the natural organs of a man for passing water. Both are well, the child is beautiful, and many towns have already wished to adopt it, which, however, has not as yet been arranged. All this has been set down and described by notaries. It is considered in Italy to be a great miracle, and is to be recorded in the chronicles. The couple, however, are to be divorced by the clergy.
Anonymous
'From Piadena in Italy, the 26th day of May 1601'. As quoted in George Tennyson Matthews (ed.) The Fugger Newsletter (1970), 247-248. A handwritten collection of news reports (1568-1604) by the powerful banking and merchant house of Fugger in Ausburg. This was footnoted in The Story of the Secret Service (1937), 698. https://books.google.com/books?id=YfssAAAAMAAJ Richard Wilmer Rowan - 1937
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Birth (147)  |  Both (493)  |  Boy (94)  |  Captain (14)  |  Child (307)  |  Church (56)  |  Confess (42)  |  Consider (416)  |  Divorce (6)  |  Down (456)  |  Girl (37)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happening (58)  |  Himself (461)  |  Honorable (14)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hungary (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Miracle (83)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Organ (115)  |  Pain (136)  |  Passing (76)  |  Point (580)  |  Question (621)  |  Record (154)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Right (452)  |  Secret (194)  |  Set (394)  |  Side (233)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Something (719)  |  Water (481)  |  Wife (41)  |  Wish (212)  |  Woman (151)  |  Year (933)

Already at the origin of the species man was equal to what he was destined to become.
Can Man Be Modified? (1959), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Destined (42)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Equal (83)  |  Man (2251)  |  Origin (239)  |  Species (401)

Already the steam-engine works our mines, impels our ships, excavates our ports and our rivers, forges iron, fashions wood, grinds grain, spins and weaves our cloths, transports the heaviest burdens, etc. It appears that it must some day serve as a universal motor, and be substituted for animal power, waterfalls, and air currents.
'Réflexions sur la puissance motrice du feu' (1824) translated by R.H. Thurston in Reflections on the Motive Power of Fire, and on Machines Fitted to Develop that Power (1890), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Animal (617)  |  Burden (27)  |  Cloth (6)  |  Current (118)  |  Energy (344)  |  Engine (98)  |  Excavation (8)  |  Fashioning (2)  |  Forge (9)  |  Grain (50)  |  Grind (11)  |  Impelling (2)  |  Iron (96)  |  Mine (76)  |  Motor (23)  |  Must (1526)  |  Port (2)  |  Power (746)  |  River (119)  |  Serving (15)  |  Ship (62)  |  Spin (26)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Substitution (13)  |  Transport (30)  |  Universal (189)  |  Waterfall (4)  |  Weave (19)  |  Weaving (5)  |  Wood (92)  |  Work (1351)

Although a science fair can seem like a big “pain” it can help you understand important scientific principles, such as Newton’s First Law of Inertia, which states: “A body at rest will remain at rest until 8:45 p.m. the night before the science fair project is due, at which point the body will come rushing to the body’s parents, who are already in their pajamas, and shout, “I JUST REMEMBERED THE SCIENCE FAIR IS TOMORROW AND WE GOTTA GO TO THE STORE RIGHT NOW!”
'Science: It’s Just Not Fair', Miami Herald (22 Mar 1998)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Body (537)  |  Due (141)  |  First (1283)  |  Important (209)  |  Inertia (14)  |  Law (894)  |  Pain (136)  |  Parent (76)  |  Point (580)  |  Principle (507)  |  Project (73)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remember (179)  |  Rest (280)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Fair (3)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Shout (25)  |  State (491)  |  Store (48)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Will (2355)

America, so far as her physical history is concerned, has been falsely denominated the New World. Hers was the first dry land lifted out of the waters, hers the first shore washed by the ocean that enveloped all the earth beside; and while Europe was represented only by islands rising here and there above the sea, America already stretched an unbroken line of land from Nova Scotia to the Far West.
Geological Sketches (1866), I.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  America (127)  |  Concern (228)  |  Dry (57)  |  Earth (996)  |  First (1283)  |  History (673)  |  Island (46)  |  Lift (55)  |  New (1216)  |  Nova (6)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Physical (508)  |  Represent (155)  |  Rising (44)  |  Sea (308)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Wash (21)  |  Water (481)  |  World (1774)

Among the memoirs of Kirchhoff are some of uncommon beauty. … Can anything be beautiful, where the author has no time for the slightest external embellishment?—But—; it is this very simplicity, the indispensableness of each word, each letter, each little dash, that among all artists raises the mathematician nearest to the World-creator; it establishes a sublimity which is equalled in no other art, something like it exists at most in symphonic music. The Pythagoreans recognized already the similarity between the most subjective and the most objective of the arts.
In Ceremonial Speech (15 Nov 1887) celebrating the 301st anniversary of the Karl-Franzens-University Graz. Published as Gustav Robert Kirchhoff: Festrede zur Feier des 301. Gründungstages der Karl-Franzens-Universität zu Graz (1888), 28-29, as translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 186. From the original German, “Gerade unter den zuletzt erwähnten Abhandlungen Kirchhoff’s sind einige von ungewöhnlicher Schönheit. … kann etwas schön sein, wo dem Autor auch zur kleinsten äusseren Ausschmückung die Zeit fehlt?–Doch–; gerade durch diese Einfachheit, durch diese Unentbehrlichkeit jedes Wortes, jedes Buchstaben, jedes Strichelchens kömmt der Mathematiker unter allen Künstlern dem Weltenschöpfer am nächsten; sie begründet eine Erhabenheit, die in keiner Kunst ein Gleiches,–Aehnliches höchstens in der symphonischen Musik hat. Erkannten doch schon die Pythagoräer die Aehnlichkeit der subjectivsten und der objectivsten der Künste.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Artist (90)  |  Author (167)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Creator (91)  |  Dash (3)  |  Equal (83)  |  Establish (57)  |  Exist (443)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Gustav Robert Kirchhoff (4)  |  Letter (109)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics And Art (8)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Memoir (13)  |  Most (1731)  |  Music (129)  |  Objective (91)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Raise (35)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Something (719)  |  Subjective (19)  |  Sublimity (5)  |  Symphony (9)  |  Time (1877)  |  Uncommon (14)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

An engineer, a physicist and a mathematician find themselves in an anecdote, indeed an anecdote quite similar to many that you have no doubt already heard.
After some observations and rough calculations the engineer realizes the situation and starts laughing.
A few minutes later the physicist understands too and chuckles to himself happily, as he now has enough experimental evidence to publish a paper.
This leaves the mathematician somewhat perplexed, as he had observed right away that he was the subject of an anecdote, and deduced quite rapidly the presence of humor from similar anecdotes, but considers this anecdote to be too trivial a corollary to be significant, let alone funny.
Anonymous
In 'Zero Gravity: The Lighter Side of Science' APS News (Jun 2003), 12 No. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Anecdote (21)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Consider (416)  |  Corollary (5)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Enough (340)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Find (998)  |  Funny (11)  |  Himself (461)  |  Humor (8)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Joke (83)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Minute (125)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Paper (182)  |  Perplex (6)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Presence (63)  |  Publish (36)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Realize (147)  |  Right (452)  |  Significant (74)  |  Situation (113)  |  Start (221)  |  Subject (521)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Understand (606)

An invention that is quickly accepted will turn out to be a rather trivial alteration of something that has already existed.
Speaking at a shareholders’ meeting (1975). As quoted by Victor K. McElheny, in Insisting On The Impossible: The Life Of Edwin Land (1999), 403.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Acceptance (52)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Invention (369)  |  Something (719)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Turn (447)  |  Will (2355)

An inventor is an opportunist, one who takes occasion by the hand; who, having seen where some want exists, successfully applies the right means to attain the desired end. The means may be largely, or even wholly, something already known, or there may be a certain originality or discovery in the means employed. But in every case the inventor uses the work of others. If I may use a metaphor, I should liken him to the man who essays the conquest of some virgin alp. At the outset he uses the beaten track, and, as he progresses in the ascent, he uses the steps made by those who have preceded him, whenever they lead in the right direction; and it is only after the last footprints have died out that he takes ice-axe in hand and cuts the remaining steps, few or many, that lift him to the crowning height which is his goal.
In Kenneth Raydon Swan, Sir Joseph Swan (1946), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Alp (9)  |  Application (242)  |  Ascent (7)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Beaten Track (4)  |  Certain (550)  |  Conquest (28)  |  Crown (38)  |  Cut (114)  |  Death (388)  |  Desire (204)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Employ (113)  |  End (590)  |  Essay (27)  |  Exist (443)  |  Footprint (15)  |  Goal (145)  |  Height (32)  |  Ice (54)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Lead (384)  |  Leading (17)  |  Lift (55)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Opportunist (3)  |  Originality (19)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outset (7)  |  Preceded (2)  |  Progress (465)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Right (452)  |  Something (719)  |  Step (231)  |  Success (302)  |  Track (38)  |  Use (766)  |  Virgin (9)  |  Want (497)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Work (1351)

Another argument of hope may be drawn from this–that some of the inventions already known are such as before they were discovered it could hardly have entered any man's head to think of; they would have been simply set aside as impossible. For in conjecturing what may be men set before them the example of what has been, and divine of the new with an imagination preoccupied and colored by the old; which way of forming opinions is very fallacious, for streams that are drawn from the springheads of nature do not always run in the old channels.
Translation of Novum Organum, XCII. In Francis Bacon, James Spedding, The Works of Francis Bacon (1864), Vol. 8, 128.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Argument (138)  |  Channel (21)  |  Color (137)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Divine (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enter (141)  |  Fallacious (12)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Forming (42)  |  Hope (299)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Invention (369)  |  Known (454)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Run (174)  |  Set (394)  |  Stream (81)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Way (1217)

Anybody who looks at living organisms knows perfectly well that they can produce other organisms like themselves. This is their normal function, they wouldn’t exist if they didn’t do this, and it’s not plausible that this is the reason why they abound in the world. In other words, living organisms are very complicated aggregations of elementary parts, and by any reasonable theory of probability or thermodynamics highly improbable. That they should occur in the world at all is a miracle of the first magnitude; the only thing which removes, or mitigates, this miracle is that they reproduce themselves. Therefore, if by any peculiar accident there should ever be one of them, from there on the rules of probability do not apply, and there will be many of them, at least if the milieu is reasonable. But a reasonable milieu is already a thermodynamically much less improbable thing. So, the operations of probability somehow leave a loophole at this point, and it is by the process of self-reproduction that they are pierced.
From lecture series on self-replicating machines at the University of Illinois, Lecture 5 (Dec 1949), 'Re-evaluation of the Problems of Complicated Automata—Problems of Hierarchy and Evolution', Theory of Self-Reproducing Automata (1966).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abound (17)  |  Accident (88)  |  Aggregation (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Apply (160)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Do (1908)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Exist (443)  |  First (1283)  |  Function (228)  |  Improbable (13)  |  In Other Words (9)  |  Know (1518)  |  Living (491)  |  Look (582)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Milieu (5)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Mitigate (3)  |  Normal (28)  |  Occur (150)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Pierce (3)  |  Plausible (22)  |  Point (580)  |  Probability (130)  |  Process (423)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remove (45)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Rule (294)  |  Self (267)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

Apart from its healthful mental training as a branch of ordinary education, geology as an open-air pursuit affords an admirable training in habits of observation, furnishes a delightful relief from the cares and routine of everyday life, takes us into the open fields and the free fresh face of nature, leads us into all manner of sequestered nooks, whither hardly any other occupation or interest would be likely to send us, sets before us problems of the highest interest regarding the history of the ground beneath our feet, and thus gives a new charm to scenery which may be already replete with attractions.
Outlines of Field-Geology (1900), 251-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Branch (150)  |  Care (186)  |  Charm (51)  |  Delightful (17)  |  Education (378)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Everyday Life (14)  |  Face (212)  |  Field (364)  |  Free (232)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Geology (220)  |  Ground (217)  |  Habit (168)  |  History (673)  |  Interest (386)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mental (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Open (274)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Relief (30)  |  Routine (25)  |  Sequester (2)  |  Set (394)  |  Training (80)  |  Whither (11)

Armed with all the powers, enjoying all the wealth they owe to science, our societies are still trying to practice and to teach systems of values already destroyed at the roots by that very science. Man knows at last that he is alone in the indifferent immensity of the universe, whence which he has emerged by chance. His duty, like his fate, is written nowhere.
In Jacques Monod and Austryn Wainhouse (trans.), Chance and Necessity: An Essay on the Natural Philosophy of Modern Biology (1971), 171.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Arm (81)  |  Chance (239)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Fate (72)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Man (2251)  |  Owe (71)  |  Power (746)  |  Practice (204)  |  Religion (361)  |  Root (120)  |  Science (3879)  |  Still (613)  |  System (537)  |  Teach (277)  |  Trying (144)  |  Universe (857)  |  Value (365)  |  Wealth (94)

As I have already mentioned, wherever cells are formed, this tough fluid precedes the first solid structures that indicate the presence of future cells. Moreover, we must assume that this substance furnishes the material for the formation of the nucleus and of the primitive sac, not only because these structures are closely apposed to it, but also because,they react to iodine in the same way. We must assume also that the organization of this substance is the process that inaugurates the formation of new cells. It therefore seems justifiable for me to propose a name that refers to its physiological function: I propose the word protoplasma.
H. Mohl, Botanisch Zeitung (1846), 4, col. 73, trans. Henry Harris, The Birth of the Cell (1999), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Cell (138)  |  First (1283)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Function (228)  |  Future (429)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Iodine (7)  |  Material (353)  |  Mention (82)  |  Must (1526)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1216)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Organization (114)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Presence (63)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Process (423)  |  Protoplasm (13)  |  Solid (116)  |  Structure (344)  |  Substance (248)  |  Tough (19)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Word (619)

As the issues are greater than men ever sought to realize before, the recriminations will be fiercer and pride more desperately hurt. It may help to recall that many recognized before the bomb ever feel that the time had already come when we must learn to live in One World.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bomb (18)  |  Feel (367)  |  Fierce (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Help (105)  |  Hurt (12)  |  Issue (42)  |  Learn (629)  |  Live (628)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Pride (78)  |  Realize (147)  |  Recall (10)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Seek (213)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Asian Homo erectus died without issue and does not enter our immediate ancestry (for we evolved from African populations); Neanderthal people were collateral cousins, perhaps already living in Europe while we emerged in Africa... In other words, we are an improbable and fragile entity, fortunately successful after precarious beginnings as a small population in Africa, not the predictable end result of a global tendency. We are a thing, an item of history, not an embodiment of general principles.
Wonderful Life (1989), 319.
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (35)  |  African (10)  |  Ancestry (12)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Cousin (12)  |  Embodiment (9)  |  End (590)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entity (35)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fragile (21)  |  General (511)  |  Global (35)  |  History (673)  |  Homo Sapiens (23)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Living (491)  |  Neanderthal (7)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Population (110)  |  Principle (507)  |  Result (677)  |  Small (477)  |  Successful (123)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Word (619)

Astronomy is a cold, desert science, with all its pompous figures,—depends a little too much on the glass-grinder, too little on the mind. ’Tis of no use to show us more planets and systems. We know already what matter is, and more or less of it does not signify.
In 'Country Life', collected in The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1904), Vol. 12, 166.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Cold (112)  |  Depend (228)  |  Desert (56)  |  Figure (160)  |  Glass (92)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Planet (356)  |  Science (3879)  |  Show (346)  |  Signify (17)  |  System (537)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Use (766)

Authority—the fact, namely, that something has already happened or been said or decided, is of great value; but it is only a pedant who demands authority for everything.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 188.
Science quotes on:  |  Authority (95)  |  Decide (41)  |  Demand (123)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Pedant (5)  |  Something (719)  |  Value (365)

Before any great scientific principle receives distinct enunciation by individuals, it dwells more or less clearly in the general scientific mind. The intellectual plateau is already high, and our discoverers are those who, like peaks above the plateau, rise a little above the general level of thought at the time.
In 'Faraday as a Discoverer', The American Journal of Science (Jul 1868), 2nd series, 46, No. 136, 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Enunciation (7)  |  General (511)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Little (707)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Peak (20)  |  Plateau (6)  |  Principle (507)  |  Receive (114)  |  Rise (166)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Mind (13)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)

Before I flew I was already aware of how small and vulnerable our planet is; but only when I saw it from space, in all its ineffable beauty and fragility, did I realize that humankind’s most urgent task is to cherish and preserve it for future generations.
In Jack Hassard and Julie Weisberg , Environmental Science on the Net: The Global Thinking Project (1999), 40.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Aware (31)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Fly (146)  |  Fragility (2)  |  Future (429)  |  Generation (242)  |  Humankind (11)  |  Ineffable (4)  |  Most (1731)  |  Planet (356)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Realize (147)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Task (147)  |  Urgent (13)  |  Vulnerable (5)

Being also in accord with Goethe that discoveries are made by the age and not by the individual, I should consider the instances to be exceedingly rare of men who can be said to be living before their age, and to be the repository of knowledge quite foreign to the thought of the time. The rule is that a number of persons are employed at a particular piece of work, but one being a few steps in advance of the others is able to crown the edifice with his name, or, having the ability to generalise already known facts, may become in time to be regarded as their originator. Therefore it is that one name is remembered whilst those of coequals have long been buried in obscurity.
In Historical Notes on Bright's Disease, Addison's Disease, and Hodgkin's Disease', Guy's Hospital Reports (1877), 22, 259-260.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Advance (280)  |  Age (499)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Coequal (2)  |  Consider (416)  |  Crown (38)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Edifice (26)  |  Employ (113)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (145)  |  Individual (404)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Name (333)  |  Number (699)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Originator (6)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Rare (89)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remember (179)  |  Repository (5)  |  Rule (294)  |  Step (231)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Work (1351)

But medicine has long had all its means to hand, and has discovered both a principle and a method, through which the discoveries made during a long period are many and excellent, while full discovery will be made, if the inquirer be competent, conduct his researches with knowledge of the discoveries already made, and make them his starting-point. But anyone who, casting aside and rejecting all these means, attempts to conduct research in any other way or after another fashion, and asserts that he has found out anything, is and has been victim of deception.
Ancient Medicine, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1923), Vol. I, 15.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Assert (66)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Both (493)  |  Casting (10)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Deception (8)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Inquirer (9)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Long (790)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Method (505)  |  Other (2236)  |  Period (198)  |  Point (580)  |  Principle (507)  |  Research (664)  |  Through (849)  |  Victim (35)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

By the mid-1950s manatees were already scarce, and monk seals, once common as far north as Galveston, were gone. By the end of the 20th century, up to 90 percent of the sharks, tuna, swordfish, marlins, groupers, turtles, whales, and many other large creatures that prospered in the Gulf for millions of years had been depleted by overfishing.
From 'My Blue Wilderness', National Geographic Magazine (Oct 2010), 77.
Science quotes on:  |  20th Century (36)  |  Century (310)  |  Common (436)  |  Creature (233)  |  Deplete (2)  |  End (590)  |  Gulf (18)  |  Large (394)  |  Marlin (2)  |  Million (114)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Prosper (6)  |  Scarce (10)  |  Seal (18)  |  Shark (10)  |  Swordfish (2)  |  Tuna (4)  |  Turtle (8)  |  Whale (32)  |  Year (933)

Chemical analysis and synthesis go no farther than to the separation of particles one from another, and to their reunion. No new creation or destruction of matter is within the reach of chemical agency. We might as well attempt to introduce a new planet into the solar system, or to annihilate one already in existence, as to create or destroy a particle of hydrogen.
A New System of Chemical Philosophy (1808), Vol. 1, 212.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Annihilate (9)  |  Atomic Theory (15)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Conservation Of Matter (7)  |  Create (235)  |  Creation (327)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Existence (456)  |  Farther (51)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Matter (798)  |  New (1216)  |  Particle (194)  |  Planet (356)  |  Reach (281)  |  Separation (57)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  System (537)

Climate change threatens every corner of our country, every sector of our economy and the health and future of every child. We are already seeing its impacts and we know the poorest and most vulnerable people in the United States and around the world will suffer most of all.
In Hillary Clinton, 'Hillary Clinton: America Must Lead at Paris Climate Talks', Time (29 Nov 2015).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Change (593)  |  Child (307)  |  Climate (97)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Corner (57)  |  Country (251)  |  Economy (55)  |  Future (429)  |  Health (193)  |  Impact (42)  |  Know (1518)  |  Most (1731)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Poorest (2)  |  Sector (6)  |  Seeing (142)  |  State (491)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Threat (30)  |  Threaten (32)  |  United States (31)  |  Vulnerable (5)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Darwin's characteristic perspicacity is nowhere better illustrated than in his prophecy of the reaction of the world of science. He admitted at once that it would be impossible to convince those older men '...whose minds are stocked with a multitude of facts, all viewed ... from a point of view directly opposite to mine ... A few naturalists endowed with much flexibility of mind and who have already begun to doubt the immutability of species, may be influenced by this volume; but I look with confidence to the young and rising naturalists, who will be able to view both sides with equal impartiality.
'The Reaction of American scientists to Darwinism', American Historical Review 1932), 38, 687. Quoted in David L. Hull, Science as Process (), 379.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Better (486)  |  Both (493)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Convince (41)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Impartiality (7)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Look (582)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mine (76)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Prophecy (13)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Rising (44)  |  Science (3879)  |  Side (233)  |  Species (401)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Young (227)

Dear Mr. Bell: … Sir Wm. Thomson … speaks with much enthusiasm of your achievement. What yesterday he would have declared impossible he has today seen realized, and he declares it the most wonderful thing he has seen in America. You speak of it as an embryo invention, but to him it seems already complete, and he declares that, before long, friends will whisper their secrets over the electric wire. Your undulating current he declares a great and happy conception.
Letter to Alexander Graham Bell (25 Jun 1876). Quoted in Alexander Graham Bell, The Bell Telephone: The Deposition of Alexander Graham Bell, in the Suit Brought by the United States to Annul the Bell Patents (1908), 101. Note: William Thomson is better known as Lord Kelvin.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  America (127)  |  Bell (35)  |  Alexander Graham Bell (37)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conception (154)  |  Current (118)  |  Declare (45)  |  Declared (24)  |  Electric (76)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Friend (168)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happy (105)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Invention (369)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (71)  |  Long (790)  |  Most (1731)  |  Realize (147)  |  Secret (194)  |  Speak (232)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Today (314)  |  Whisper (11)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wire (35)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Yesterday (36)

Diamond, for all its great beauty, is not nearly as interesting as the hexagonal plane of graphite. It is not nearly as interesting because we live in a three-dimensional space, and in diamond each atom is surrounded in all three directions in space by a full coordination. Consequently, it is very difficult for an atom inside the diamond lattice to be confronted with anything else in this 3D world because all directions are already taken up.
From Nobel Lecture (7 Dec 1996), 'Discovering the Fullerenes', collected in Ingmar Grenthe (ed.), Nobel Lectures, Chemistry 1996-2000 (2003).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Coordination (9)  |  Diamond (21)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Direction (175)  |  Graphite (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Lattice (2)  |  Live (628)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Plane (20)  |  Space (500)  |  Three-Dimensional (11)  |  World (1774)

Don’t worry about the world coming to an end today. It’s already tomorrow in Australia.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Australia (8)  |  Coming (114)  |  End (590)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  World (1774)  |  Worry (33)

Ecology has not yet explicitly developed the kind of cohesive, simplifying generalizations exemplified by, say, the laws of physics. Nevertheless there are a number of generalizations that are already evident in what we now know about the ecosphere and that can be organized into a kind of informal set of laws of ecology.
In The Closing Circle: Nature, Man, and Technology (2014).
Science quotes on:  |  Cohesive (4)  |  Develop (268)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Evident (91)  |  Exemplify (5)  |  Explicit (3)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Informal (4)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Ecology (5)  |  Law Of Physics (3)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Number (699)  |  Organize (29)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Say (984)  |  Set (394)  |  Simple (406)

Education consists in co-operating with what is already inside a child's mind … The best way to learn geometry is to follow the road which the human race originally followed: Do things, make things, notice things, arrange things, and only then reason about things.
In Mathematician's Delight (1943), 27.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arrange (30)  |  Best (459)  |  Child (307)  |  Consist (223)  |  Cooperate (4)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Follow (378)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Inside (26)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Notice (77)  |  Original (58)  |  Race (268)  |  Reason (744)  |  Road (64)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Way (1217)

ELECTRICITY, n. The power that causes all natural phenomena not known to be caused by something else. It is the same thing as lightning, and its famous attempt to strike Dr. Franklin is one of the most picturesque incidents in that great and good man's career. The memory of Dr. Franklin is justly held in great reverence, particularly in France, where a waxen effigy of him was recently on exhibition, bearing the following touching account of his life and services to science:
Monsieur Franqulin, inventor of electricity. This illustrious savant, after having made several voyages around the world, died on the Sandwich Islands and was devoured by savages, of whom not a single fragment was ever recovered.
Electricity seems destined to play a most important part in the arts and industries. The question of its economical application to some purposes is still unsettled, but experiment has already proved that it will propel a street car better than a gas jet and give more light than a horse.
The Cynic's Word Book (1906), 87. Also published later as The Devil's Dictionary.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Art (657)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Better (486)  |  Car (71)  |  Career (75)  |  Cause (541)  |  Destined (42)  |  Devour (29)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Exhibition (7)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Benjamin Franklin (91)  |  Gas (83)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Horse (74)  |  Humour (116)  |  Illustrious (10)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Island (46)  |  Known (454)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Man (2251)  |  Memory (134)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Power (746)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Service (110)  |  Single (353)  |  Something (719)  |  Still (613)  |  Strike (68)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Touching (16)  |  Unsettled (3)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Endow the already established with money. Endow the woman who shows genius with time.
In Phebe Mitchell Kendall (ed.), Maria Mitchell: Life, Letters, and Journals (1896), 182.
Science quotes on:  |  Endow (14)  |  Established (7)  |  Genius (284)  |  Money (170)  |  Research (664)  |  Show (346)  |  Time (1877)  |  Woman (151)

Every form of life can be produced by physical forces in one of two ways: either by coming into being out of formless matter, or by the modification of an already existing form by a continued process of shaping. In the latter case the cause of this modification may lie either in the influence of a dissimilar male generative matter upon the female germ, or in the influence of other powers which operate only after procreation.
From Gottfried Reinhold Treviranus, The Biology or Philosophy of Animate Nature, as quoted in translation of Ernst Heinrich Philipp August Haeckel's 8th German edition with E. Ray Lankester (ed.), The History of Creation, or, the Development of the Earth and its Inhabitants by the Action of Natural Causes (1892), 95.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Cause (541)  |  Coming (114)  |  Continued (2)  |  Dissimilar (6)  |  Existing (10)  |  Female (50)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Formless (4)  |  Generative (2)  |  Germ (53)  |  Influence (222)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Male (26)  |  Matter (798)  |  Modification (55)  |  Operate (17)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Power (746)  |  Process (423)  |  Procreation (4)  |  Produced (187)  |  Shaping (2)  |  Two (937)  |  Way (1217)

Every new theory as it arises believes in the flush of youth that it has the long sought goal; it sees no limits to its applicability, and believes that at last it is the fortunate theory to achieve the 'right' answer. This was true of electron theory—perhaps some readers will remember a book called The Electrical Theory of the Universe by de Tunzelman. It is true of general relativity theory with its belief that we can formulate a mathematical scheme that will extrapolate to all past and future time and the unfathomed depths of space. It has been true of wave mechanics, with its first enthusiastic claim a brief ten years ago that no problem had successfully resisted its attack provided the attack was properly made, and now the disillusionment of age when confronted by the problems of the proton and the neutron. When will we learn that logic, mathematics, physical theory, are all only inventions for formulating in compact and manageable form what we already know, like all inventions do not achieve complete success in accomplishing what they were designed to do, much less complete success in fields beyond the scope of the original design, and that our only justification for hoping to penetrate at all into the unknown with these inventions is our past experience that sometimes we have been fortunate enough to be able to push on a short distance by acquired momentum.
The Nature of Physical Theory (1936), 136.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arise (158)  |  Attack (84)  |  Belief (578)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Book (392)  |  Brief (36)  |  Call (769)  |  Claim (146)  |  Compact (13)  |  Complete (204)  |  Depth (94)  |  Design (195)  |  Disillusionment (2)  |  Distance (161)  |  Do (1908)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electron (93)  |  Enough (340)  |  Experience (467)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  General Relativity (10)  |  Goal (145)  |  Invention (369)  |  Justification (48)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Learn (629)  |  Limit (280)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Momentum (9)  |  Neutron (17)  |  New (1216)  |  Past (337)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Physical (508)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proton (21)  |  Push (62)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Remember (179)  |  Right (452)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Scope (45)  |  See (1081)  |  Short (197)  |  Space (500)  |  Success (302)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Wave (107)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)  |  Youth (101)

Every so often, you have to unlearn what you thought you already knew, and replace it by something more subtle.
In Terry Pratchett, Ian Stewart and Jack Cohen, The Science of Discworld (2014), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  More (2559)  |  Replace (31)  |  Something (719)  |  Subtle (35)  |  Thought (953)  |  Unlearn (11)

Exercises in being obedient can not begin too early, and I have, during an almost daily observation of six years, discovered no harm from an early, consistent guiding of the germinating will, provided only this guiding be done with the greatest mildness and justice, as if the infant had already an insight into the benefits of obedience.
In W. Preyer and H.W. Brown (trans.), The Mind of the Child: The Senses and the Will: Observations Concerning the Mental Development of the Human Being in the First Years of Life (1888, 1890), Vol. 1, 345.
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (260)  |  Being (1278)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Daily (87)  |  Discover (553)  |  Early (185)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Germinating (2)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Guiding (3)  |  Harm (39)  |  Infant (26)  |  Insight (102)  |  Justice (39)  |  Mildness (2)  |  Obedience (19)  |  Obedient (9)  |  Observation (555)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

EXPERIENCE, n. The wisdom that enables us to recognize as an undesirable old acquaintance the folly that we have already embraced.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  93.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Enable (119)  |  Experience (467)  |  Folly (43)  |  Humour (116)  |  Old (481)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Wisdom (221)

Far from becoming discouraged, the philosopher should applaud nature, even when she appears miserly of herself or overly mysterious, and should feel pleased that as he lifts one part of her veil, she allows him to glimpse an immense number of other objects, all worthy of investigation. For what we already know should allow us to judge of what we will be able to know; the human mind has no frontiers, it extends proportionately as the universe displays itself; man, then, can and must attempt all, and he needs only time in order to know all. By multiplying his observations, he could even see and foresee all phenomena, all of nature's occurrences, with as much truth and certainty as if he were deducing them directly from causes. And what more excusable or even more noble enthusiasm could there be than that of believing man capable of recognizing all the powers, and discovering through his investigations all the secrets, of nature!
'Des Mulets', Oeuvres Philosophiques, ed. Jean Piveteau (1954), 414. Quoted in Jacques Roger, The Life Sciences in Eighteenth-Century French Thought, ed. Keith R. Benson and trans. Robert Ellrich (1997), 458.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Display (56)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Extend (128)  |  Feel (367)  |  Foresee (19)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Immense (86)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Judge (108)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lift (55)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Noble (90)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Power (746)  |  Secret (194)  |  See (1081)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)  |  Veil (26)  |  Will (2355)

For many planet hunters, though, the ultimate goal is still greater (or actually, smaller) prey: terrestrial planets, like Earth, circling a star like the Sun. Astronomers already know that three such planets orbit at least one pulsar. But planet hunters will not rest until they are in sight of a small blue world, warm and wet, in whose azure skies and upon whose wind-whipped oceans shines a bright yellow star like our own.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actually (27)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Blue (56)  |  Bright (79)  |  Circle (110)  |  Earth (996)  |  Goal (145)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hunter (24)  |  Know (1518)  |  Least (75)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Planet (356)  |  Prey (13)  |  Pulsar (3)  |  Rest (280)  |  Shine (45)  |  Sight (132)  |  Sky (161)  |  Small (477)  |  Star (427)  |  Still (613)  |  Sun (385)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Warm (69)  |  Wet (6)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  World (1774)  |  Yellow (30)

For [Richard] Feynman, the essence of the scientific imagination was a powerful and almost painful rule. What scientists create must match reality. It must match what is already known. Scientific creativity is imagination in a straitjacket.
In Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman (1992), 324.
Science quotes on:  |  Create (235)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Essence (82)  |  Richard P. Feynman (122)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Match (29)  |  Must (1526)  |  Painful (11)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Reality (261)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Straitjacket (2)

GEOLOGY, n. The science of the earth's crust —to which, doubtless, will be added that of its interior whenever a man shall come up garrulous out of a well. The geological formations of the globe already noted are catalogued thus: The Primary, or lower one, consists of rocks, bones of mired mules, gas-pipes, miners' tools, antique statues minus the nose, Spanish doubloons and ancestors. The Secondary is largely made up of red worms and moles. The Tertiary comprises railway tracks, patent pavements, grass, snakes, mouldy boots, beer bottles, tomato cans, intoxicated citizens, garbage, anarchists, snap-dogs and fools.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  115.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Beer (10)  |  Bone (95)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Consist (223)  |  Crust (38)  |  Dog (70)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fool (116)  |  Formation (96)  |  Garbage (8)  |  Gas (83)  |  Geology (220)  |  Grass (46)  |  Humour (116)  |  Interior (32)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mole (5)  |  Patent (33)  |  Primary (80)  |  Railway (18)  |  Rock (161)  |  Science (3879)  |  Snake (26)  |  Snap (7)  |  Statue (16)  |  Strata (35)  |  Tool (117)  |  Track (38)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Will (2355)  |  Worm (42)

Geometric writings are not rare in which one would seek in vain for an idea at all novel, for a result which sooner or later might be of service, for anything in fact which might be destined to survive in the science; and one finds instead treatises on trivial problems or investigations on special forms which have absolutely no use, no importance, which have their origin not in the science itself but in the caprice of the author; or one finds applications of known methods which have already been made thousands of times; or generalizations from known results which are so easily made that the knowledge of the latter suffices to give at once the former. Now such work is not merely useless; it is actually harmful because it produces a real incumbrance in the science and an embarrassment for the more serious investigators; and because often it crowds out certain lines of thought which might well have deserved to be studied.
From 'On Some Recent Tendencies in Geometric Investigations', Rivista di Matematica (1891), 43. In Bulletin American Mathematical Society (1904), 443.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Author (167)  |  Caprice (9)  |  Certain (550)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Destined (42)  |  Embarrassment (5)  |  Encumbrance (5)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Former (137)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Harmful (12)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  In Vain (9)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Latter (21)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Novel (32)  |  Origin (239)  |  Problem (676)  |  Rare (89)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Serious (91)  |  Service (110)  |  Sooner Or Later (6)  |  Special (184)  |  Study (653)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Survive (79)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Use (766)  |  Useless (33)  |  Vain (83)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)

Good sense is, of all things among men, the most equally distributed ; for every one thinks himself so abundantly provided with it, that those even who are the most difficult to satisfy in everything else, do not usually desire a larger measure of this quality than they already possess.
In Discours de la Méthode (1637), Part 1. English version as given in John Veitch (trans.), The Method, Meditations, and Selections from the Principles of Descartes (1880), 3. Also seen translated as “Of all things, good sense is the most fairly distributed: everyone thinks he is so well supplied with it that even those who are the hardest to satisfy in every other respect never desire more of it than they already have,” or “Good sense is of all things in the world the most equally distributed, for everybody thinks he is so well supplied with it that even those most difficult to please in all other matters never desire more of it than they already possess.” From the original French, “Le bon sens est la chose du monde la mieux partagée; car chacun pense en être si bien pourvu, que ceux même qui sont les plus difficiles à contenter en toute autre chose n'ont point coutume d'en désirer plus qu'ils en ont.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Desire (204)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Distribute (15)  |  Do (1908)  |  Equally (130)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Everything (476)  |  Good (889)  |  Good Sense (2)  |  Himself (461)  |  Measure (232)  |  Most (1731)  |  Possess (156)  |  Quality (135)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Sense (770)  |  Supply (93)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Usually (176)

He who is only a traveler learns things at second-hand and by the halves, and is poor authority. We are most interested when science reports what those men already know practically or instinctively, for that alone is a true humanity.
In 'Higher Laws', in Walden: Or, Life in the Woods (1854, 1899), 239.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Authority (95)  |  Half (56)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Most (1731)  |  Poor (136)  |  Practical (200)  |  Report (38)  |  Science (3879)  |  Secondhand (6)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Traveler (30)

He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt. He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice. This disgrace to civilisation should be done away with at once. Heroism at command, senseless brutality, deplorable love-of-country stance, how violently I hate all this, how despicable and ignoble war is; I would rather be torn to shreds than be part of so base an action! It is my conviction that killing under the cloak of war is nothing but an act of murder.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Base (117)  |  Brain (270)  |  Brutality (4)  |  Civilisation (20)  |  Cloak (5)  |  Command (58)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Country (251)  |  Deplorable (4)  |  Despicable (3)  |  Disgrace (12)  |  Earn (7)  |  File (6)  |  Fully (21)  |  Give (202)  |  Hate (64)  |  Heroism (7)  |  Ignoble (2)  |  Kill (100)  |  Large (394)  |  Love (309)  |  March (46)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Murder (13)  |  Music (129)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Part (222)  |  Rank (67)  |  Senseless (3)  |  Shred (7)  |  Spinal Cord (5)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Tear (42)  |  Torn (17)  |  Violently (3)  |  War (225)

However much we may enlarge our ideas of the time which has elapsed since the Niagara first began to drain the waters of the upper lakes, we have seen that this period was one only of a series, all belonging to the present zoological epoch; or that in which the living testaceous fauna, whether freshwater or marine, had already come into being. If such events can take place while the zoology of the earth remains almost stationary and unaltered, what ages may not be comprehended in those successive tertiary periods during which the Flora and Fauna of the globe have been almost entirely changed. Yet how subordinate a place in the long calendar of geological chronology do the successive tertiary periods themselves occupy! How much more enormous a duration must we assign to many antecedent revolutions of the earth and its inhabitants! No analogy can be found in the natural world to the immense scale of these divisions of past time, unless we contemplate the celestial spaces which have been measured by the astronomer.
Travels in North America (1845), Vol. 1, 51-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Calendar (9)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Chronology (9)  |  Division (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drain (11)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Event (216)  |  First (1283)  |  Freshwater (3)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Lake (32)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Marine Biology (24)  |  Marine Geology (2)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Niagara (8)  |  Niagara Falls (4)  |  Past (337)  |  Period (198)  |  Present (619)  |  Remain (349)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Scale (121)  |  Series (149)  |  Space (500)  |  Stationary (10)  |  Successive (73)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Water (481)  |  World (1774)  |  Zoology (36)

I am delighted that I have found a new reaction to demonstrate even to the blind the structure of the interstitial stroma of the cerebral cortex. I let the silver nitrate react with pieces of brain hardened in potassium dichromate. I have already obtained magnificent results and hope to do even better in the future.
Letter to Nicolo Manfredi, 16 Feb 1873. Archive source. Quoted in Paolo Mazzarello, The Hidden Structure: A Scientific Biography of Camillo Golgi, trans. and ed. Henry A. Buchtel and Aldo Badiani (1999), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Blind (95)  |  Brain (270)  |  Delight (108)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Do (1908)  |  Future (429)  |  Hope (299)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Neurobiology (4)  |  New (1216)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Potassium (11)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Result (677)  |  Silver (46)  |  Stain (9)  |  Structure (344)

I am told that the wall paintings which we had the happiness of admiring in all their beauty and freshness [in the chapel she discovered at Abu Simbel] are already much injured. Such is the fate of every Egyptian monument, great or small. The tourist carves it over with names and dates, and in some instances with caricatures. The student of Egyptology, by taking wet paper “squeezes” sponges away every vestige of the original colour. The “Collector” buys and carries off everything of value that he can, and the Arab steals it for him. The work of destruction, meanwhile goes on apace. The Museums of Berlin, of Turin, of Florence are rich in spoils which tell their lamentable tale. When science leads the way, is it wonderful that ignorance should follow?
Quoted in Margaret S. Drower, The Early Years, in T.G.H. James, (ed.), Excavating in Egypt: The Egypt Exploration Society, 1882-1982 (1982), 10. As cited in Wendy M.K. Shaw, Possessors and Possessed: Museums, Archaeology, and the Visualization of History in the Late Ottoman Empire (2003), 37. Also quoted in Margaret S. Drower, Flinders Petrie: A Life in Archaeology (1995), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arab (4)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Berlin (10)  |  Buy (20)  |  Caricature (6)  |  Carry (127)  |  Carve (5)  |  Collector (9)  |  Color (137)  |  Date (13)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Discover (553)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Egyptology (3)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fate (72)  |  Follow (378)  |  Freshness (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Injure (3)  |  Instance (33)  |  Lamentable (5)  |  Lead (384)  |  Monument (45)  |  Museum (31)  |  Name (333)  |  Original (58)  |  Painting (44)  |  Paper (182)  |  Science (3879)  |  Small (477)  |  Sponge (9)  |  Steal (13)  |  Student (300)  |  Tale (16)  |  Tell (340)  |  Tourist (6)  |  Turin (3)  |  Value (365)  |  Vestige (11)  |  Wall (67)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Work (1351)

I do not personally want to believe that we already know the equations that determine the evolution and fate of the universe; it would make life too dull for me as a scientist. … I hope, and believe, that the Space Telescope might make the Big Bang cosmology appear incorrect to future generations, perhaps somewhat analogous to the way that Galileo’s telescope showed that the earth-centered, Ptolemaic system was inadequate.
From 'The Space Telescope (the Hubble Space Telescope): Out Where the Stars Do Not Twinkle', in NASA Authorization for Fiscal Year 1978: Hearings before the Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, United States Senate, 95th Congress, first session on S.365 (1977), 124. This was testimony to support of authorization for NASA beginning the construction of the Space Telescope, which later became known as the Hubble Space Telescope.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Analogous (5)  |  Bang (29)  |  Belief (578)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Cosmology (25)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dull (54)  |  Earth (996)  |  Equation (132)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fate (72)  |  Future (429)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Generation (242)  |  Geocentric (6)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hubble Space Telescope (9)  |  Inadequate (19)  |  Incorrect (6)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Show (346)  |  Space (500)  |  System (537)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Universe (857)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)

I do not see how a man can work on the frontiers of physics and write poetry at the same time. They are in opposition. In science you want to say something that nobody knew before, in words which everyone can understand. In poetry you are bound to say ... something that everyone knows already in words that nobody can understand.
Commenting to him about the poetry J. Robert Oppenheimer wrote.
Quoted in Steven George Krantz, Mathematical Apocrypha Redux: More Stories and Anecdotes of Mathematicians (2005), 169
Science quotes on:  |  Bound (119)  |  Do (1908)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nobody (104)  |  J. Robert Oppenheimer (39)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)  |  Want (497)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)

I don’t think many people remember what life was like in those days. This was the era when the Russians were claiming superiority, and they could make a pretty good case—they put up Sputnik in ’57; they had already sent men into space to orbit the earth. There was this fear that perhaps communism was the wave of the future. The astronauts, all of us, really believed we were locked in a battle of democracy versus communism, where the winner would dominate the world.
As reported by Howard Wilkinson in 'John Glenn Had the Stuff U.S. Heroes are Made of', The Cincinnati Enquirer (20 Feb 2002).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Astronaut (32)  |  Battle (34)  |  Belief (578)  |  Claim (146)  |  Claiming (8)  |  Communism (11)  |  Democracy (33)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Earth (996)  |  Era (51)  |  Fear (197)  |  Future (429)  |  Good (889)  |  Life (1795)  |  Orbit (81)  |  People (1005)  |  Remember (179)  |  Russia (13)  |  Space (500)  |  Sputnik (4)  |  Superiority (19)  |  Think (1086)  |  Wave (107)  |  Winner (3)  |  World (1774)

I finally saw that the blood, forced by the action of the left ventricle into the arteries, was distributed to the body at large, and its several parts, in the same manner as it is sent through the lungs, impelled by the right ventricle into the pulmonary artery, and that it then passed through the veins and along the vena cava, and so round to the left ventricle in the manner already indicated. Which motion we may be allowed to call circular, in the same way as Aristotle says that the air and the rain emulate the circular motion of the superior bodies; for the moist earth, warmed by the sun, evaporates; the vapours drawn upwards are condensed, and descending in the form of rain, moisten the earth again; and by this arrangement are generations of living things produced.
From William Harvey and Robert Willis (trans.), The Works of William Harvey, M.D. (1847), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Air (347)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Artery (10)  |  Blood (134)  |  Body (537)  |  Call (769)  |  Circular (19)  |  Circular Motion (6)  |  Earth (996)  |  Emulate (2)  |  Evaporate (5)  |  Form (959)  |  Generation (242)  |  Impelled (2)  |  Large (394)  |  Living (491)  |  Lung (34)  |  Moist (12)  |  Motion (310)  |  Pass (238)  |  Produced (187)  |  Pulmonary (3)  |  Rain (62)  |  Right (452)  |  Saw (160)  |  Say (984)  |  Sun (385)  |  Superior (81)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Upward (43)  |  Upwards (6)  |  Vapour (16)  |  Vein (25)  |  Ventricle (7)  |  Warm (69)  |  Way (1217)

I grew up in Brooklyn, New York … a city neighborhood that included houses, lampposts, walls, and bushes. But with an early bedtime in the winter, I could look out my window and see the stars, and the stars were not like anything else in my neighborhood. [At age 5] I didn’t know what they were.
[At age 9] my mother … said to me, “You have a library card now, and you know how to read. Take the streetcar to the library and get a book on stars.” … I stepped up to the big librarian and asked for a book on stars. … I sat down and found out the answer, which was something really stunning.
I found out that the stars are glowing balls of gas. I also found out that the Sun is a star but really close and that the stars are all suns except really far away I didn’t know any physics or mathematics at that time, but I could imagine how far you’d have to move the Sun away from us till it was only as bright as a star. It was in that library, reading that book, that the scale of the universe opened up to me. There was something beautiful about it.
At that young age, I already knew that I’d be very happy if I could devote my life to finding out more about the stars and the planets that go around them. And it’s been my great good fortune to do just that.
Quoted in interview with Jack Rightmyer, in 'Stars in His Eyes', Highlights For Children (1 Jan 1997). Ages as given in Tom Head (ed.), Conversations with Carl Sagan (2006), x.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Ball (62)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Biography (240)  |  Book (392)  |  Bright (79)  |  Brooklyn (3)  |  Career (75)  |  Child (307)  |  City (78)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Early (185)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Gas (83)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  House (140)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Know (1518)  |  Library (48)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Mother (114)  |  Move (216)  |  Neighborhood (12)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Planet (356)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Scale (121)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wall (67)  |  Window (58)  |  Winter (44)  |  Young (227)

I have learnt that all our theories are not Truth itself, but resting places or stages on the way to the conquest of Truth, and that we must be contented to have obtained for the strivers after Truth such a resting place which, if it is on a mountain, permits us to view the provinces already won and those still to be conquered.
Liebig to Gilbert (25 Dec 1870). Rothamsted Archives. Quotation supplied by W. H. Brock.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Conquest (28)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Must (1526)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Permit (58)  |  Province (35)  |  Stage (143)  |  Still (613)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)

I know a good many men of great learning—that is, men born with an extraordinary eagerness and capacity to acquire knowledge. One and all, they tell me that they can't recall learning anything of any value in school. All that schoolmasters managed to accomplish with them was to test and determine the amount of knowledge that they had already acquired independently—and not infrequently the determination was made clumsily and inaccurately.
In Prejudices: third series (1922), 261.
For a longer excerpt, see H. L. Mencken's Recollections of School Algebra.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Acquisition (45)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Birth (147)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Clumsiness (2)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Eagerness (5)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Inaccuracy (3)  |  Independence (34)  |  Independently (24)  |  Infrequently (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learning (274)  |  School (219)  |  Schoolmaster (4)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Tell (340)  |  Test (211)  |  Value (365)

I learnt very quickly that the only reason that would be accepted for not attending a committee meeting was that one already had a previous commitment to attend a meeting of another organization on the same day. I therefore invented a society, the Orion Society, a highly secret and very exclusive society that spawned a multitude of committees, sub-committees, working parties, evaluation groups and so on that, regrettably, had a prior claim on my attention. Soon people wanted to know more about this club and some even decided that they would like to join it. However, it was always made clear to them that applications were never entertained and that if they were deemed to qualify for membership they would be discreetly approached at the appropriate time.
Loose Ends from Current Biology (1997), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Application (242)  |  Approach (108)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Attend (65)  |  Attention (190)  |  Claim (146)  |  Commitment (27)  |  Committee (15)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Evaluation (10)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Know (1518)  |  Meeting (20)  |  More (2559)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Never (1087)  |  Organization (114)  |  People (1005)  |  Reason (744)  |  Secret (194)  |  Society (326)  |  Soon (186)  |  Time (1877)  |  Want (497)

I must admit that when I chose the name, “vitamine,” I was well aware that these substances might later prove not to be of an amine nature. However, it was necessary for me to choose a name that would sound well and serve as a catchword, since I had already at that time no doubt about the importance and the future popularity of the new field.
The Vitamines translated by Harry Ennis Dubin (1922), 26, footnote.
Science quotes on:  |  Amine (2)  |  Catchword (3)  |  Choose (112)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Field (364)  |  Future (429)  |  Importance (286)  |  Must (1526)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Prove (250)  |  Sound (183)  |  Substance (248)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vitamin (13)

I prefer a God who once and for all impressed his will upon creation, to one who continually busied about modifying what he had already done.
Attributed. As stated in W.F. Bynum and Roy Porter, Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (2005), 575.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Creation (327)  |  Evolution (590)  |  God (757)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Modification (55)  |  Will (2355)

I sometimes ask myself how it came about that I was the one to develop the theory of relativity. The reason, I think, is that a normal adult never stops to think about the problem of space and time. These are things which he has thought of as a child. But my intellectual development was retarded, as a result of which I began to wonder about space and time only when I had already grown up.
In Ronald W. Clark, Einstein: The Life and Times (1971), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Adult (19)  |  Ask (411)  |  Begin (260)  |  Child (307)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reason (744)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Result (677)  |  Retarded (5)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Stop (80)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Relativity (33)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wonder (236)

I think the next [21st] century will be the century of complexity. We have already discovered the basic laws that govern matter and understand all the normal situations. We don’t know how the laws fit together, and what happens under extreme conditions. But I expect we will find a complete unified theory sometime this century. The is no limit to the complexity that we can build using those basic laws.
[Answer to question: Some say that while the twentieth century was the century of physics, we are now entering the century of biology. What do you think of this?]
'"Unified Theory" Is Getting Closer, Hawking Predicts', interview in San Jose Mercury News (23 Jan 2000), 29A. Answer quoted in Ashok Sengupta, Chaos, Nonlinearity, Complexity: The Dynamical Paradigm of Nature (2006), vii. Question included in Hans-Joachim Schellnhuber, Nicholas Stern and Mario Molina , Global Sustainability: a Nobel Cause (2010), 13. Cite from Brent Davis and Dennis J. Sumara, Complexity and Education: Inquiries Into Learning, Teaching, and Research (2006), 171.
Science quotes on:  |  20th Century (36)  |  21st Century (7)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Basic (138)  |  Biology (216)  |  Build (204)  |  Century (310)  |  Complete (204)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Condition (356)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Find (998)  |  Fit (134)  |  Govern (64)  |  Governing (20)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Limit (280)  |  Matter (798)  |  Next (236)  |  Normal (28)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Question (621)  |  Say (984)  |  Situation (113)  |  Sometime (4)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Together (387)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unified Theory (7)  |  Will (2355)

I would like to emphasize strongly my belief that the era of computing chemists, when hundreds if not thousands of chemists will go to the computing machine instead of the laboratory for increasingly many facets of chemical information, is already at hand. There is only one obstacle, namely that someone must pay for the computing time.
'Spectroscopy, Molecular Orbitals, and Chemical Bonding', Nobel Lecture (12 Dec 1966). In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1963-1970 (1972), 159.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Computer (127)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  Emphasize (23)  |  Era (51)  |  Facet (8)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Information (166)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Machine (257)  |  Money (170)  |  Must (1526)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Payment (6)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)

If a man devotes himself to the promotion of science, he is firstly opposed, and then he is informed that his ground is already occupied. At first men will allow no value to what we tell them, and then they behave as if they knew it all themselves.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 199.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Behave (17)  |  Devote (35)  |  First (1283)  |  Ground (217)  |  Himself (461)  |  Inform (47)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Oppose (24)  |  Promotion (7)  |  Science (3879)  |  Tell (340)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)

If I am given a sign [formula], and I am ignorant of its meaning, it cannot teach me anything, but if I already know it what does the formula teach me?
In De Magistro (400s), Book 1, chap 10, 23. As quoted in Ettore Carruccio, Mathematics And Logic in History And in Contemporary Thought (1964), 152.
Science quotes on:  |  Formula (98)  |  Give (202)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Know (1518)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Sign (58)  |  Teach (277)

If the world may be thought of as a certain definite quantity of force and as a certain definite number of centers of force—and every other representation remains indefinite and therefore useless—it follows that, in the great dice game of existence, it must pass through calculable number of combinations. In infinite time, every possible combination would at some time or another be realized; more: it would be realized an infinite number of times. And since between every combination and its next recurrence all other possible combinations would have to take place, and each of these combination conditions of the entire sequence of combinations in the same series, a circular movement of absolutely identical series is thus demonstrated: the world as a circular movement that has already repeated itself infinitely often and plays its game in infinitum. This conception is not simply a mechanistic conception; for if it were that, it would not condition an infinite recurrence of identical cases, but a final state. Because the world has not reached this, mechanistic theory must be considered an imperfect and merely provisional hypothesis.
The Will to Power (Notes written 1883-1888), book 4, no. 1066. Trans. W. Kaufmann and R. J. Hollingdale and ed. W. Kaufmann (1968), 549.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  Circular (19)  |  Combination (144)  |  Conception (154)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consider (416)  |  Definite (110)  |  Dice (21)  |  Existence (456)  |  Final (118)  |  Follow (378)  |  Force (487)  |  Game (101)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Identical (53)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Indefinite (20)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Movement (155)  |  Must (1526)  |  Next (236)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Possible (552)  |  Provisional (7)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Reach (281)  |  Remain (349)  |  Representation (53)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Series (149)  |  State (491)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Useless (33)  |  World (1774)

If we consider what science already has enabled men to know—the immensity of space, the fantastic philosophy of the stars, the infinite smallness of the composition of atoms, the macrocosm whereby we succeed only in creating outlines and translating a measure into numbers without our minds being able to form any concrete idea of it—we remain astounded by the enormous machinery of the universe.
Address (10 Sep 1934) to the International Congress of Electro-Radio Biology, Venice. In Associated Press, 'Life a Closed Book, Declares Marconi', New York Times (11 Sep 1934), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Astound (7)  |  Astounding (9)  |  Atom (355)  |  Being (1278)  |  Composition (84)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Creation (327)  |  Enabled (3)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Fantastic (20)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Know (1518)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Macrocosm (2)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Number (699)  |  Outline (11)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Science (3879)  |  Smallness (7)  |  Space (500)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Translation (21)  |  Universe (857)

If we reflect that a small creature such as this is provided, not only with external members, but also with intestines and other organs, we have no reason to doubt that a like creature, even if a thousand million times smaller, may already be provided with all its external and internal organs... though they may be hidden from our eyes. For, if we consider the external and internal organs of animalcules which are so small that a thousand million of them together would amount to the size of a coarse grain of sand, it may well be, however incomprehensible and unsearchable it may seem to us, that an animalcule from the male seed of whatever members of the animal kingdom, contains within itself... all the limbs and organs which an animal has when it is born.
Letter to the Gentlemen of the Royal Society, 30 Mar 1685. In The Collected Letters of Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (1957), Vol. 5, 185.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Kingdom (20)  |  Animalcule (12)  |  Consider (416)  |  Creature (233)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Eye (419)  |  Grain (50)  |  Incomprehensible (29)  |  Internal (66)  |  Intestine (14)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Microorganism (28)  |  Organ (115)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Sand (62)  |  Seed (93)  |  Small (477)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Whatever (234)

If you are young, then I say: Learn something about statistics as soon as you can. Don’t dismiss it through ignorance or because it calls for thought. … If you are older and already crowned with the laurels of success, see to it that those under your wing who look to you for advice are encouraged to look into this subject. In this way you will show that your arteries are not yet hardened, and you will be able to reap the benefits without doing overmuch work yourself. Whoever you are, if your work calls for the interpretation of data, you may be able to do without statistics, but you won’t do as well.
In Facts from Figures (1951), 463.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  Artery (10)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Call (769)  |  Crown (38)  |  Data (156)  |  Dismiss (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Hardened (2)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Laurel (2)  |  Learn (629)  |  Look (582)  |  Older (7)  |  Reap (17)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Something (719)  |  Soon (186)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whoever (42)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wing (75)  |  Work (1351)  |  Young (227)

In experimenting on the arc, my aim was not so much to add to the large number of isolated facts that had already been discovered, as to form some idea of the bearing of these upon one another, and thus to arrive at a clear conception of what takes place in each part of the arc and carbons at every moment. The attempt to correlate all the known phenomena, and to bind them together into one consistent whole, led to the deduction of new facts, which, when duly tested by experiment, became parts of the growing body, and, themselves, opened up fresh questions, to be answered in their turn by experiment.
In The Electric Arc (1902), Preface, iii. Ayrton described the growth of her published work on the electric arc, from a series of articles in The Electrician in 1895-6, to the full book, which “has attained to its present proportions almost with the growth of an organic body.”
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arc (12)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Body (537)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Form (959)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Growing (98)  |  Idea (843)  |  Known (454)  |  Large (394)  |  Moment (253)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Open (274)  |  Question (621)  |  Test (211)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  Whole (738)

In geology the effects to be explained have almost all occurred already, whereas in these other sciences effects actually taking place have to be explained.
Climate and Time in their Geological Relations: A Theory of Secular Change of the Earth's Climate (1875), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Effect (393)  |  Explain (322)  |  Geology (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Science (3879)

In physics, there are many discoveries already made, too powerful to be safe, too unmanageable to be subservient.
Reflection 328, in Lacon: or Many things in Few Words; Addressed to Those Who Think (1820), 155.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (780)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Safe (54)  |  Subservient (4)

In the benzene nucleus we have been given a soil out of which we can see with surprise the already-known realm of organic chemistry multiply, not once or twice but three, four, five or six times just like an equivalent number of trees. What an amount of work had suddenly become necessary, and how quickly were busy hands found to carry it out! First the eye moves up the six stems opening out from the tremendous benzene trunk. But already the branches of the neighbouring stems have become intertwined, and a canopy of leaves has developed which becomes more spacious as the giant soars upwards into the air. The top of the tree rises into the clouds where the eye cannot yet follow it. And to what an extent is this wonderful benzene tree thronged with blossoms! Everywhere in the sea of leaves one can spy the slender hydroxyl bud: hardly rarer is the forked blossom [Gabelblüte] which we call the amine group, the most frequent is the beautiful cross-shaped blossom we call the methyl group. And inside this embellishment of blossoms, what a richness of fruit, some of them shining in a wonderful blaze of color, others giving off an overwhelming fragrance.
A. W. Hofmann, after-dinner speech at Kekulé Benzolfest (Mar 1890). Trans. in W. H. Brock, O. Theodor Benfrey and Susanne Stark, 'Hofmann's Benzene Tree at the Kekulé Festivities', Journal of Chemical Education (1991), 68, 887-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Amine (2)  |  Amount (151)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Become (815)  |  Benzene (7)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Call (769)  |  Canopy (6)  |  Carry (127)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Color (137)  |  Develop (268)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Extent (139)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Giant (67)  |  Known (454)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Number (699)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Radical (25)  |  Realm (85)  |  Rise (166)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Shining (35)  |  Soar (23)  |  Soil (86)  |  Spy (8)  |  Stem (31)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Time (1877)  |  Top (96)  |  Tree (246)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Upward (43)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Work (1351)

In the case of those solids, whether of earth, or rock, which enclose on all sides and contain crystals, selenites, marcasites, plants and their parts, bones and the shells of animals, and other bodies of this kind which are possessed of a smooth surface, these same bodies had already become hard at the time when the matter of the earth and rock containing them was still fluid. And not only did the earth and rock not produce the bodies contained in them, but they did not even exist as such when those bodies were produced in them.
The Prodromus of Nicolaus Steno's Dissertation Concerning a Solid Body enclosed by Process of Nature within a Solid (1669), trans. J. G. Winter (1916), 218.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Become (815)  |  Bone (95)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enclosure (4)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hardness (3)  |  Kind (557)  |  Matter (798)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Plant (294)  |  Possess (156)  |  Produced (187)  |  Production (183)  |  Rock (161)  |  Shell (63)  |  Side (233)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Solid (116)  |  Still (613)  |  Surface (209)  |  Time (1877)

In the first papers concerning the aetiology of tuberculosis I have already indicated the dangers arising from the spread of the bacilli-containing excretions of consumptives, and have urged moreover that prophylactic measures should be taken against the contagious disease. But my words have been unheeded. It was still too early, and because of this they still could not meet with full understanding. It shared the fate of so many similar cases in medicine, where a long time has also been necessary before old prejudices were overcome and the new facts were acknowledged to be correct by the physicians.
'The current state of the struggle against tuberculosis', Nobel Lecture (12 Dec 1905). In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1901-1921 (1967), 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Agreement (53)  |  Arising (22)  |  Bacillus (9)  |  Contagious (4)  |  Danger (115)  |  Disease (328)  |  Early (185)  |  Excretion (7)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fate (72)  |  First (1283)  |  Long (790)  |  Measure (232)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Paper (182)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Spread (83)  |  Still (613)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tuberculosis (8)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Word (619)

In the future I see open fields for more important researches. Psychology will be securely based on the foundation already laid by Mr. Herbert Spencer, that of the necessary acquirement of each mental power and capacity by graduation.
Origin of Species
Science quotes on:  |  Capacity (100)  |  Field (364)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Future (429)  |  Graduation (6)  |  Mental (177)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Open (274)  |  Power (746)  |  Psychology (154)  |  See (1081)  |  Herbert Spencer (37)  |  Will (2355)

It has been pointed out already that no knowledge of probabilities, less in degree than certainty, helps us to know what conclusions are true, and that there is no direct relation between the truth of a proposition and its probability. Probability begins and ends with probability. That a scientific investigation pursued on account of its probability will generally lead to truth, rather than falsehood, is at the best only probable.
In A Treatise on Probability (1921), 322.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Begin (260)  |  Best (459)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Degree (276)  |  Direct (225)  |  End (590)  |  Falsehood (28)  |  Help (105)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lead (384)  |  Less (103)  |  Point (580)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Relation (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)

It is a wrong business when the younger cultivators of science put out of sight and deprecate what their predecessors have done; but obviously that is the tendency of Huxley and his friends … It is very true that Huxley was bitter against the Bishop of Oxford, but I was not present at the debate. Perhaps the Bishop was not prudent to venture into a field where no eloquence can supersede the need for precise knowledge. The young naturalists declared themselves in favour of Darwin’s views which tendency I saw already at Leeds two years ago. I am sorry for it, for I reckon Darwin’s book to be an utterly unphilosophical one.
Letter to James D, Forbes (24 Jul 1860). Trinity College Cambridge, Whewell Manuscripts.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Bishop (3)  |  Bitter (30)  |  Bitterness (3)  |  Book (392)  |  Business (149)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Debate (38)  |  Declared (24)  |  Deprecate (2)  |  Eloquence (7)  |  Field (364)  |  Friend (168)  |  Thomas Henry Huxley (126)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Oxford (16)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Precise (68)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Present (619)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Saw (160)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sight (132)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Superseding (2)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)  |  Wrong (234)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)  |  Younger (21)

It is not improbable that some of the presentations which come before the mind in sleep may even be causes of the actions cognate to each of them. For as when we are about to act [in waking hours], or are engaged in any course of action, or have already performed certain actions, we often find ourselves concerned with these actions, or performing them, in a vivid dream.
Aristotle
In Mortimer Jerome Adler, Charles Lincoln Van Doren (eds.) Great Treasury of Western Thought: A Compendium of Important Statements on Man and His Institutions by the Great Thinkers in Western History (1977), 352
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Awake (19)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Cognate (2)  |  Concern (228)  |  Course (409)  |  Dream (208)  |  Find (998)  |  Hour (186)  |  Improbable (13)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Perform (121)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Waking (17)

It is not worth a first class man’s time to express a majority opinion. By definition, there are already enough people to do that.
Quoted in the foreward to A Mathematician's Apology (1941, reprint with Foreward by C.P. Snow 1992), 46.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Class (164)  |  Definition (221)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enough (340)  |  Express (186)  |  First (1283)  |  Majority (66)  |  Man (2251)  |  Opinion (281)  |  People (1005)  |  Time (1877)  |  Worth (169)

It might be thought … that evolutionary arguments would play a large part in guiding biological research, but this is far from the case. It is difficult enough to study what is happening now. To figure out exactly what happened in evolution is even more difficult. Thus evolutionary achievements can be used as hints to suggest possible lines of research, but it is highly dangerous to trust them too much. It is all too easy to make mistaken inferences unless the process involved is already very well understood.
In What Mad Pursuit: A Personal View of Scientific Discovery (1988), 138-139.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enough (340)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Figure (160)  |  Guide (97)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Happening (58)  |  Hint (21)  |  Inference (45)  |  Involved (90)  |  Large (394)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Possible (552)  |  Process (423)  |  Research (664)  |  Study (653)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trust (66)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)

It was a profound saying of Wilhelm Humboldt, that 'Man is man only by means of speech, but in order to invent speech he must be already man.'
The Antiquity of Man (1863), 468.
Science quotes on:  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Profound (104)  |  Speech (61)

It was on the 25th November 1740 that I cut the first polyp. I put the two parts in a flat glass, which only contained water to the height of four to five lignes. It was thus easy for me to observe these portions of the polyp with a fairly powerful lens.
I shall indicate farther on the precautions I took in making my experiments on these cut polyps and the technique I adopted to cut them. It will suffice to say here that I cut the polyp concerned transversely, a little nearer the anterior than the posterior end. The first part was thus a little shorter than the second.
The instant that I cut the polyp, the two parts contracted so that at first they only appeared like two little grains of green matter at the bottom of the glass in which I put them—for green, as I have already said, is the colour of the first polyps that I possessed. The two parts expanded on the same day on which I separated them. They were very easy to distinguish from one another. The first had its anterior end adorned with the fine threads that serve the polyp as legs and arms, which the second had none.
The extensions of the first part was not the only sign of life that it gave on the same day that it was separated from the other. I saw it move its arms; and the next day, the first time I came to observe it, I found that it had changed its position; and shortly afterwards I saw it take a step. The second part was extended as on the previous day and in the same place. I shook the glass a little to see if it were still alive. This movement made it contract, from which I judged that it was alive. Shortly afterwards it extended again. On the following days I .’ saw the same thing.
Mémoires, pour servir à l'histoire d'un genre de polyps d'eau douce à bras en forme de cornes (1744), 7-16. Trans. John R. Baker, in Abraham Trembley of Geneva: Scientist and Philosopher 1710-1784 (1952), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Anterior (4)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Concern (228)  |  Cut (114)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Easy (204)  |  End (590)  |  Expand (53)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extension (59)  |  Farther (51)  |  First (1283)  |  Flat (33)  |  Glass (92)  |  Grain (50)  |  Green (63)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Instant (45)  |  Leg (34)  |  Lens (14)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Making (300)  |  Matter (798)  |  Move (216)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Next (236)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Other (2236)  |  Polyp (4)  |  Portion (84)  |  Possess (156)  |  Posterior (7)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Precaution (5)  |  Saw (160)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Step (231)  |  Still (613)  |  Technique (80)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thread (32)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)

Kepler’s discovery would not have been possible without the doctrine of conics. Now contemporaries of Kepler—such penetrating minds as Descartes and Pascal—were abandoning the study of geometry ... because they said it was so UTTERLY USELESS. There was the future of the human race almost trembling in the balance; for had not the geometry of conic sections already been worked out in large measure, and had their opinion that only sciences apparently useful ought to be pursued, the nineteenth century would have had none of those characters which distinguish it from the ancien régime.
From 'Lessons from the History of Science: The Scientific Attitude' (c.1896), in Collected Papers (1931), Vol. 1, 32.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  19th Century (33)  |  Abandon (68)  |  Apparently (20)  |  Balance (77)  |  Century (310)  |  Character (243)  |  Conic Section (8)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Future (429)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Large (394)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Blaise Pascal (80)  |  Penetrating (3)  |  Possible (552)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Race (268)  |  Science (3879)  |  Study (653)  |  Trembling (4)  |  Useful (250)  |  Useless (33)  |  Utterly (15)  |  Work (1351)

Laws of Serendi[ity:
(1) In order to discover anything, you must be looking for something.
(2) If you wish to make an improved product, you must already be engaged in making an inferior one.
In Dr. N Sreedharan, Quotations of Wit and Wisdom (2007), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Law (894)  |  Looking (189)  |  Making (300)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Product (160)  |  Something (719)  |  Wish (212)

Life arose as a living molecule or protogene, the progression from this stage to that of the ameba is at least as great as from ameba to man. All the essential problems of living organisms are already solved in the one-celled (or, as many now prefer to say, noncellular) protozoan and these are only elaborated in man or the other multicellular animals. The step from nonlife to life may not have been so complex, after all, and that from cell to multicellular organism is readily comprehensible. The change from protogene to protozoan was probably the most complex that has occurred in evolution, and it may well have taken as long as the change from protozoan to man.
The Meaning of Evolution: A Study of the History of Life and of its Significance for Man (1949), 16
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amoeba (20)  |  Animal (617)  |  Cell (138)  |  Change (593)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Elaborated (7)  |  Elaboration (11)  |  Essential (199)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Great (1574)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multicellular (4)  |  Nonlife (2)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (676)  |  Progression (23)  |  Protozoan (3)  |  Say (984)  |  Solution (267)  |  Stage (143)  |  Step (231)

Mankind always takes up only such problems as it can solve; since, looking at the matter more closely, we will always find that the problem itself arises only when the material conditions necessary for its solution already exist or are at least in the process of formation.
Karl Marx
In Karl Marx and N.I. Stone (trans.), A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy (1904), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (158)  |  Condition (356)  |  Exist (443)  |  Find (998)  |  Formation (96)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Will (2355)

May not Music be described as the Mathematic of sense, Mathematic as Music of the reason? the soul of each the same! Thus the musician feels Mathematic, the mathematician thinks Music, Music the dream, Mathematic the working life each to receive its consummation from the other when the human intelligence, elevated to its perfect type, shall shine forth glorified in some future Mozart-Dirichlet or Beethoven-Gauss a union already not indistinctly foreshadowed in the genius and labours of a Helmholtz!
In paper read 7 Apr 1864, printed in 'Algebraical Researches Containing a Disquisition On Newton’s Rule for the Discovery of Imaginary Roots', Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London (1865), 154, 613, footnote. Also in Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 2, 419.
Science quotes on:  |  Beethoven (13)  |  Beethoven_Ludwig (8)  |  Consummation (7)  |  Describe (128)  |  Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet (3)  |  Dream (208)  |  Elevate (12)  |  Feel (367)  |  Foreshadow (5)  |  Future (429)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Genius (284)  |  Glorify (6)  |  Human (1468)  |  Indistinct (2)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Labour (98)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Mozart_Amadeus (2)  |  Music (129)  |  Musician (21)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Reason (744)  |  Receive (114)  |  Sense (770)  |  Shine (45)  |  Soul (226)  |  Think (1086)  |  Type (167)  |  Union (51)  |  Work (1351)

More about the selection theory: Jerne meant that the Socratic idea of learning was a fitting analogy for 'the logical basis of the selective theories of antibody formation': Can the truth (the capability to synthesize an antibody) be learned? If so, it must be assumed not to pre-exist; to be learned, it must be acquired. We are thus confronted with the difficulty to which Socrates calls attention in Meno [ ... ] namely, that it makes as little sense to search for what one does not know as to search for what one knows; what one knows, one cannot search for, since one knows it already, and what one does not know, one cannot search for, since one does not even know what to search for. Socrates resolves this difficulty by postulating that learning is nothing but recollection. The truth (the capability to synthesize an antibody) cannot be brought in, but was already inherent.
'The Natural Selection Theory', in John Cairns, Gunther S. Stent, and James D. Watson (eds.) Phage and the Origins of Molecular Biology (1966), 301.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Antibody (6)  |  Attention (190)  |  Basis (173)  |  Call (769)  |  Capability (41)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Exist (443)  |  Formation (96)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Little (707)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Recollection (12)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Search (162)  |  Selection (128)  |  Selective (19)  |  Sense (770)  |  Socrates (16)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)

Moreover, the works already known are due to chance and experiment rather than to sciences; for the sciences we now possess are merely systems for the nice ordering and setting forth of things already invented; not methods of invention or directions for new works.
From Novum Organum (1620), Book 1, Aphorism 8. Translated as The New Organon: Aphorisms Concerning the Interpretation of Nature and the Kingdom of Man), collected in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1857), Vol. 4, 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Chance (239)  |  Direction (175)  |  Due (141)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Invention (369)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  New (1216)  |  Nice (13)  |  Order (632)  |  Possess (156)  |  Possessing (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Setting (44)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Work (1351)

Much of the work we do as scientists involves filling in the details about matters that are basically understood already, or applying standard techniques to new specific cases. But occasionally there is a question that offers an opportunity for a really major discovery.
In Tyrannosaurus Rex and the Crater of Doom (1997), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (138)  |  Detail (146)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Involve (90)  |  Major (84)  |  Matter (798)  |  New (1216)  |  Occasionally (5)  |  Offer (141)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Question (621)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Specific (95)  |  Standard (57)  |  Technique (80)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Understood (156)  |  Work (1351)

My own thinking (and that of many of my colleagues) is based on two general principles, which I shall call the Sequence Hypothesis and the Central Dogma. The direct evidence for both of them is negligible, but I have found them to be of great help in getting to grips with these very complex problems. I present them here in the hope that others can make similar use of them. Their speculative nature is emphasized by their names. It is an instructive exercise to attempt to build a useful theory without using them. One generally ends in the wilderness.
The Sequence Hypothesis
This has already been referred to a number of times. In its simplest form it assumes that the specificity of a piece of nucleic acid is expressed solely by the sequence of its bases, and that this sequence is a (simple) code for the amino acid sequence of a particular protein...
The Central Dogma
This states that once 'information' has passed into protein it cannot get out again. In more detail, the transfer of information from nucleic acid to nucleic acid, or from nucleic acid to protein may be possible, but transfer from protein to protein, or from protein to nucleic acid is impossible. Information means here the precise determination of sequence, either of bases in the nucleic acid or of amino acid residues in the protein. This is by no means universally held—Sir Macfarlane Burnet, for example, does not subscribe to it—but many workers now think along these lines. As far as I know it has not been explicitly stated before.
'On Protein Synthesis', Symposia of the Society for Experimental Biology: The Biological Replication of Macromolecules, 1958, 12, 152-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Base (117)  |  Both (493)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Central (80)  |  Code (31)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Complex (188)  |  Detail (146)  |  Determination (78)  |  Direct (225)  |  DNA (77)  |  Dogma (48)  |  End (590)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Express (186)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Information (166)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Molecular Biology (27)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Negligible (5)  |  Nucleic Acid (23)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Possible (552)  |  Precise (68)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Protein (54)  |  Residue (9)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Simple (406)  |  State (491)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Wilderness (45)

My present and most fixed opinion regarding the nature of alcoholic fermentation is this: The chemical act of fermentation is essentially a phenomenon correlative with a vital act, beginning and ending with the latter. I believe that there is never any alcoholic fermentation without their being simultaneously the organization, development, multiplication of the globules, or the pursued, continued life of globules which are already formed.
In 'Memoire sur la fermentation alcoolique', Annales de Chemie et de Physique (1860), 58:3, 359-360, as translated in Joseph S. Fruton, Proteins, Enzymes, Genes: The Interplay of Chemistry and Biology (1999), 137.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Alcohol (22)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Development (422)  |  Ending (3)  |  Essential (199)  |  Fermentation (15)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Globule (5)  |  Life (1795)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Organization (114)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Present (619)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Simultaneity (3)  |  Vital (85)  |  Vitality (23)

Nevertheless, scientific method is not the same as the scientific spirit. The scientific spirit does not rest content with applying that which is already known, but is a restless spirit, ever pressing forward towards the regions of the unknown, and endeavouring to lay under contribution for the special purpose in hand the knowledge acquired in all portions of the wide field of exact science. Lastly, it acts as a check, as well as a stimulus, sifting the value of the evidence, and rejecting that which is worthless, and restraining too eager flights of the imagination and too hasty conclusions.
'The Scientific Spirit in Medicine: Inaugural Sessional Address to the Abernethian Society', St. Bartholomew's Hospital Journal, 1912, 20, 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Field (364)  |  Flight (98)  |  Forward (102)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Method (505)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Portion (84)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Special (184)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Value (365)  |  Wide (96)

New opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without any other reason but because they are not already common.
In 'The Epistle Dedicatory', Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690), second unnumbered page.
Science quotes on:  |  Common (436)  |  Habit (168)  |  New (1216)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reason (744)  |  Usually (176)

Newton and Laplace need myriads of ages and thick-strewn celestial areas. One may say a gravitating solar system is already prophesied in the nature of Newton’s mind.
In Essay on History.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Area (31)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Gravitate (2)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (62)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Need (290)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Prophesy (10)  |  Say (984)  |  Solar System (77)  |  System (537)

No man can reveal to you aught but that which already lies half asleep in the dawning of your knowledge.
In Kahlil Gibran: The Collected Works (207), 134.
Science quotes on:  |  Asleep (3)  |  Aught (6)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lie (364)  |  Man (2251)  |  Reveal (148)

No science doth make known the first principles whereon it buildeth; but they are always taken as plain and manifest in themselves, or as proved and granted already, some former knowledge having made them evident.
In The of Mr. Richard Hooker in Eight Books Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity (1723), Book 3, 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Build (204)  |  Evident (91)  |  First (1283)  |  Former (137)  |  Grant (73)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Plain (33)  |  Principle (507)  |  Prove (250)  |  Science (3879)  |  Themselves (433)

Nor need you doubt that Pythagoras, a long time before he found the demonstration for the Hecatomb, had been certain that the square of the side subtending the right angle in a rectangular triangle was equal to the square of the other two sides; the certainty of the conclusion helped not a little in the search for a demonstration. But whatever was the method of Aristotle, and whether his arguing a priori preceded sense a posteriori, or the contrary, it is sufficient that the same Aristotle (as has often been said) put sensible experiences before all discourses. As to the arguments a priori, their force has already been examined.
Dialogue on the Great World Systems (1632). Revised and Annotated by Giorgio De Santillana (1953), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  A Posteriori (2)  |  A Priori (26)  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Experience (467)  |  Force (487)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Method (505)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Right (452)  |  Search (162)  |  Sense (770)  |  Side (233)  |  Square (70)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Time (1877)  |  Triangle (18)  |  Two (937)  |  Whatever (234)

Now and then women should do for themselves what men have already done—and occasionally what men have not done—thereby establishing themselves as persons, and perhaps encouraging other women toward greater independence of thought and action. Some such consideration was a contributing reason for my wanting to do what I so much wanted to do.
In Amelia Earhart and George Palmer Putnam (ed.), Last Flight (1937), 74.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Do (1908)  |  Encouraging (12)  |  Establishing (7)  |  Greater (288)  |  Independence (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Reason (744)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Want (497)  |  Women (9)

On Tuesday evening at Museum, at a ball in the gardens. The night was chill, I dropped too suddenly from Differential Calculus into ladies’ society, and could not give myself freely to the change. After an hour’s attempt so to do, I returned, cursing the mode of life I was pursuing; next morning I had already shaken hands, however, with Diff. Calculus, and forgot the ladies….
From his diary for 10 Aug 1851, as quoted in J. Helen Gardner and Robin J. Wilson, 'Thomas Archer Hirst—Mathematician Xtravagant II: Student Days in Germany', The American Mathematical Monthly (Jun-Jul 1993), 6, No. 100, 534.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Ball (62)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Change (593)  |  Chill (9)  |  Differential Calculus (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drop (76)  |  Dropped (17)  |  Forget (115)  |  Garden (60)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hour (186)  |  Lady (11)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mode (41)  |  Morning (94)  |  Museum (31)  |  Myself (212)  |  Next (236)  |  Night (120)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Return (124)  |  Shake (41)  |  Society (326)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Suddenly (88)

Once you go from 10 people to 100, you already don’t know who everyone is. So at that stage you might as well keep growing, to get the advantages of scale.
As quoted, without citation, in Can Akdeniz, Fast MBA (2014), 281.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Keep (101)  |  Know (1518)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Scale (121)  |  Stage (143)

One of the main purposes of scientific inference is to justify beliefs which we entertain already; but as a rule they are justified with a difference. Our pre-scientific general beliefs are hardly ever without exceptions; in science, a law with exceptions can only be tolerated as a makeshift. Scientific laws, when we have reason to think them accurate, are different in form from the common-sense rules which have exceptions: they are always, at least in physics, either differential equations, or statistical averages. It might be thought that a statistical average is not very different from a rule with exceptions, but this would be a mistake. Statistics, ideally, are accurate laws about large groups; they differ from other laws only in being about groups, not about individuals. Statistical laws are inferred by induction from particular statistics, just as other laws are inferred from particular single occurrences.
The Analysis of Matter (1927), 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Average (82)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Differ (85)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Entertainment (18)  |  Equation (132)  |  Exception (73)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Group (78)  |  Individual (404)  |  Induction (77)  |  Inference (45)  |  Justification (48)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Makeshift (2)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Pre-Scientific (5)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sense (770)  |  Single (353)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Toleration (6)

One of the most curious and interesting reptiles which I met with in Borneo was a large tree-frog, which was brought me by one of the Chinese workmen. He assured me that he had seen it come down in a slanting direction from a high tree, as if it flew. On examining it, I found the toes very long and fully webbed to their very extremity, so that when expanded they offered a surface much larger than the body. The forelegs were also bordered by a membrane, and the body was capable of considerable inflation. The back and limbs were of a very deep shining green colour, the undersurface and the inner toes yellow, while the webs were black, rayed with yellow. The body was about four inches long, while the webs of each hind foot, when fully expanded, covered a surface of four square inches, and the webs of all the feet together about twelve square inches. As the extremities of the toes have dilated discs for adhesion, showing the creature to be a true tree frog, it is difficult to imagine that this immense membrane of the toes can be for the purpose of swimming only, and the account of the Chinaman, that it flew down from the tree, becomes more credible. This is, I believe, the first instance known of a “flying frog,” and it is very interesting to Darwinians as showing that the variability of the toes which have been already modified for purposes of swimming and adhesive climbing, have been taken advantage of to enable an allied species to pass through the air like the flying lizard. It would appear to be a new species of the genus Rhacophorus, which consists of several frogs of a much smaller size than this, and having the webs of the toes less developed.
Malay Archipelago
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Adhesion (6)  |  Adhesive (2)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Ally (6)  |  Appear (118)  |  Assure (15)  |  Back (390)  |  Become (815)  |  Belief (578)  |  Black (42)  |  Body (537)  |  Border (9)  |  Borneo (3)  |  Bring (90)  |  Capable (168)  |  Chinese (22)  |  Climb (35)  |  Color (137)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Consist (223)  |  Cover (37)  |  Creature (233)  |  Credible (3)  |  Curious (91)  |  Darwinian (9)  |  Deep (233)  |  Develop (268)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direction (175)  |  Disk (3)  |  Down (456)  |  Enable (119)  |  Examine (78)  |  Expand (53)  |  Extremity (7)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Foot (60)  |  Frog (38)  |  Fully (21)  |  Genus (25)  |  Green (63)  |  High (362)  |  Hind (3)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inch (9)  |  Inflation (5)  |  Inner (71)  |  Instance (33)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Large (394)  |  Less (103)  |  Limb (8)  |  Lizard (7)  |  Long (790)  |  Meet (31)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Modify (15)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Offer (141)  |  Pass (238)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Ray (114)  |  Reptile (29)  |  See (1081)  |  Several (32)  |  Shine (45)  |  Shining (35)  |  Show (346)  |  Size (60)  |  Small (477)  |  Species (401)  |  Square (70)  |  Surface (209)  |  Swim (30)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Through (849)  |  Toe (7)  |  Together (387)  |  Tree (246)  |  Tree Frog (2)  |  True (212)  |  Underside (2)  |  Variability (5)  |  Web (16)  |  Workman (13)  |  Yellow (30)

One of the most disturbing ways that climate change is already playing out is through what ecologists call “mismatch” or “mistiming.” This is the process whereby warming causes animals to fall out of step with a critical food source, particularly at breeding times, when a failure to find enough food can lead to rapid population losses.
In 'The Change Within: The Obstacles We Face Are Not Just External', The Nation (12 May 2014).
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Breeding (21)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Climate (97)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Critical (66)  |  Ecologist (9)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Enough (340)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fall (230)  |  Find (998)  |  Food (199)  |  Lead (384)  |  Loss (110)  |  Most (1731)  |  Playing (42)  |  Population (110)  |  Process (423)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Source (93)  |  Step (231)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Warming (23)  |  Way (1217)

One precept for the scientist-to-be is already obvious. Do not place yourself in an environment where your advisor is already suffering from scientific obsolescence. If one is so unfortunate as to receive his training under a person who is either technically or intellectually obsolescent, one finds himself to be a loser before he starts. It is difficult to move into a position of leadership if one’s launching platform is a scientific generation whose time is already past.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 229.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advisor (3)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Environment (216)  |  Find (998)  |  Generation (242)  |  Himself (461)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Launch (20)  |  Leadership (9)  |  Loser (3)  |  Move (216)  |  Obsolescence (4)  |  Obsolescent (2)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Past (337)  |  Person (363)  |  Place (177)  |  Platform (3)  |  Position (77)  |  Precept (10)  |  Receive (114)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Start (221)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Technically (5)  |  Time (1877)  |  Training (80)  |  Unfortunate (19)

One reason which has led the organic chemist to avert his mind from the problems of Biochemistry is the obsession that the really significant happenings in the animal body are concerned in the main with substances of such high molecular weight and consequent vagueness of molecular structure as to make their reactions impossible of study by his available and accurate methods. There remains, I find, pretty widely spread, the feeling—due to earlier biological teaching—that, apart from substances which are obviously excreta, all the simpler products which can be found in cells or tissues are as a class mere objects, already too remote from the fundamental biochemical events to have much significance. So far from this being the case, recent progress points in the clearest way to the fact that the molecules with which a most important and significant part of the chemical dynamics of living tissues is concerned are of a comparatively simple character.
In 'The Dynamic Side of Biochemistry', Address (11 Sep 1913) in Report on the 83rd Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1914), 657-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Available (78)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Biological (137)  |  Body (537)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Class (164)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consequent (19)  |  Due (141)  |  Event (216)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Find (998)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Happening (58)  |  High (362)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Living (491)  |  Metabolism (14)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Molecular Structure (8)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Object (422)  |  Obsession (13)  |  Organic (158)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Product (160)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Reason (744)  |  Recent (77)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remote (83)  |  Significance (113)  |  Significant (74)  |  Simple (406)  |  Spread (83)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Substance (248)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Vagueness (15)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weight (134)

Our confused wish finds expression in the confused question as to the nature of force and electricity. But the answer which we want is not really an answer to this question. It is not by finding out more and fresh relations and connections that it can be answered; but by removing the contradictions existing between those already known, and thus perhaps by reducing their number. When these painful contradictions are removed, the question as to the nature of force will not have been answered; but our minds, no longer vexed, will cease to ask illegitimate questions.
Principles of Mechanics (1899), 7-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Cease (79)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Connection (162)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Expression (175)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Question (621)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Relation (157)  |  Removal (11)  |  Vex (9)  |  Vexation (2)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

Pauli … asked me to tell him what was happening in America. I told him that Mrs. Wu is trying to measure whether parity is conserved. He answered me: “Mrs. Wu is wasting her time. I would bet you a large sum that parity is conserved.” When this letter came I already knew that parity is violated. I could have sent a telegram to Pauli that the bet was accepted. But I wrote him a letter. He said: “I could never let it out that this is possible. I am glad that we did not actually do the bet because I can risk to lose my reputation, but I cannot risk losing my capital.”
In Discussion after paper presented by Chien-Shiung Wu to the International Conference on the History of Original Ideas and Basic Discoveries, Erice, Sicily (27 Jul-4 Aug 1994), 'Parity Violation' collected in Harvey B. Newman, Thomas Ypsilantis (eds.), History of Original Ideas and Basic Discoveries in Particle Physics (1996), 381.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  America (127)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Bet (12)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Do (1908)  |  Happening (58)  |  Large (394)  |  Letter (109)  |  Lose (159)  |  Measure (232)  |  Money (170)  |  Never (1087)  |  Parity (2)  |  Wolfgang Pauli (16)  |  Possible (552)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Risk (61)  |  Sum (102)  |  Telegram (3)  |  Tell (340)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trying (144)  |  Waste (101)  |  Chien-Shiung Wu (6)

Perhaps a species that has accumulated ... tons of explosive per capita has already demonstrated its biological unfitness beyond any further question.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Biological (137)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Explosive (23)  |  Far (154)  |  Question (621)  |  Species (401)  |  Ton (21)

Perhaps we see equations as simple because they are easily expressed in terms of mathematical notation already invented at an earlier stage of development of the science, and thus what appears to us as elegance of description really reflects the interconnectedness of Nature's laws at different levels.
Nobel Banquet Speech (10 Dec 1969), in Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.),Les Prix Nobel en 1969 (1970).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Description (84)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Early (185)  |  Ease (35)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Equation (132)  |  Express (186)  |  Expression (175)  |  Invention (369)  |  Law (894)  |  Level (67)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Notation (27)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Stage (143)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)

Physics is becoming so unbelievably complex that it is taking longer and longer to train a physicist. It is taking so long, in fact, to train a physicist to the place where he understands the nature of physical problems that he is already too old to solve them.
As quoted by Colin Pittendrigh (1971). In George C. Beakley, Ernest G. Chilton, Introduction to Engineering Design and Graphics (1973), 40
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Education (378)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Long (790)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Old (481)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Problem (676)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Train (114)  |  Understand (606)

Poets need be in no degree jealous of the geologists. The stony science, with buried creations for its domains, and half an eternity charged with its annals, possesses its realms of dim and shadowy fields, in which troops of fancies already walk like disembodied ghosts in the old fields of Elysium, and which bid fair to be quite dark and uncertain enough for all the purposes of poesy for centuries to come.
Lecture Third, collected in Popular Geology: A Series of Lectures Read Before the Philosophical Institution of Edinburgh, with Descriptive Sketches from a Geologist's Portfolio (1859), 127.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Annal (3)  |  Creation (327)  |  Dark (140)  |  Degree (276)  |  Disembodied (6)  |  Domain (69)  |  Enough (340)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Field (364)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Ghost (36)  |  Jealousy (9)  |  Old (481)  |  Poet (83)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Realm (85)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Poetry (14)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Walk (124)

Professor von Pirquet has come to this country exactly at the right time to aid us. He has shown us how to detect tuberculosis before it has become so developed as to be contagious and has so taken hold of the individual as to be recognized by any other means. In thousands of cases I for my part am unable to detect tuberculosis in infancy or early childhood without the aid of the tuberculin test which Prof. von Pirquet has shown to be the best. He has taught us how by tubercular skin tests, to detect it. ... What Dr. von Pirquet has done already will make his name go down to posterity as one of the great reformers in tuberculin tests and as one who has done an immense amount of good to humanity. The skin test in twenty-four hours will show you whether the case is tubercular.
Discussion on 'The Relation of Tuberculosis to Infant Mortality', read at the third mid-year meeting of the American Academy of Medicine, New Haven, Conn, (4 Nov 1909). In Bulletin of the American Academy of Medicine (1910), 11, 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Amount (151)  |  Become (815)  |  Best (459)  |  Childhood (38)  |  Contagion (9)  |  Country (251)  |  Detect (44)  |  Detection (16)  |  Develop (268)  |  Down (456)  |  Early (185)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Hour (186)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Immense (86)  |  Individual (404)  |  Infancy (12)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Name (333)  |  Other (2236)  |  Baron Clemens von Pirquet (3)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Professor (128)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Reformer (5)  |  Right (452)  |  Show (346)  |  Skin (47)  |  Test (211)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tuberculosis (8)  |  Will (2355)

Quantity is that which is operated with according to fixed mutually consistent laws. Both operator and operand must derive their meaning from the laws of operation. In the case of ordinary algebra these are the three laws already indicated [the commutative, associative, and distributive laws], in the algebra of quaternions the same save the law of commutation for multiplication and division, and so on. It may be questioned whether this definition is sufficient, and it may be objected that it is vague; but the reader will do well to reflect that any definition must include the linear algebras of Peirce, the algebra of logic, and others that may be easily imagined, although they have not yet been developed. This general definition of quantity enables us to see how operators may be treated as quantities, and thus to understand the rationale of the so called symbolical methods.
In 'Mathematics', Encyclopedia Britannica (9th ed.).
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Both (493)  |  Call (769)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Definition (221)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Derive (65)  |  Develop (268)  |  Distributive (2)  |  Division (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enable (119)  |  Fix (25)  |  General (511)  |  Include (90)  |  Law (894)  |  Linear (13)  |  Logic (287)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mutually (7)  |  Object (422)  |  Operate (17)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operator (3)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Charles Sanders Peirce (22)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Quaternion (9)  |  Question (621)  |  Rationale (7)  |  Reader (40)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Save (118)  |  See (1081)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Understand (606)  |  Vague (47)  |  Will (2355)

Quite distinct from the theoretical question of the manner in which mathematics will rescue itself from the perils to which it is exposed by its own prolific nature is the practical problem of finding means of rendering available for the student the results which have been already accumulated, and making it possible for the learner to obtain some idea of the present state of the various departments of mathematics. … The great mass of mathematical literature will be always contained in Journals and Transactions, but there is no reason why it should not be rendered far more useful and accessible than at present by means of treatises or higher text-books. The whole science suffers from want of avenues of approach, and many beautiful branches of mathematics are regarded as difficult and technical merely because they are not easily accessible. … I feel very strongly that any introduction to a new subject written by a competent person confers a real benefit on the whole science. The number of excellent text-books of an elementary kind that are published in this country makes it all the more to be regretted that we have so few that are intended for the advanced student. As an example of the higher kind of text-book, the want of which is so badly felt in many subjects, I may mention the second part of Prof. Chrystal’s Algebra published last year, which in a small compass gives a great mass of valuable and fundamental knowledge that has hitherto been beyond the reach of an ordinary student, though in reality lying so close at hand. I may add that in any treatise or higher text-book it is always desirable that references to the original memoirs should be given, and, if possible, short historic notices also. I am sure that no subject loses more than mathematics by any attempt to dissociate it from its history.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A (1890), Nature, 42, 466.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accessible (25)  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Add (40)  |  Advance (280)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Approach (108)  |  At Hand (4)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Available (78)  |  Avenue (14)  |  Badly (32)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Book (392)  |  Branch (150)  |  George Chrystal (8)  |  Close (69)  |  Compass (34)  |  Competent (20)  |  Confer (11)  |  Contain (68)  |  Country (251)  |  Department (92)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Easily (35)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Example (94)  |  Excellent (28)  |  Expose (23)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Far (154)  |  Feel (367)  |  Find (998)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Give (202)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Historic (7)  |  History (673)  |  Hitherto (6)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intend (16)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Journal (30)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Learner (10)  |  Lie (364)  |  Literature (103)  |  Lose (159)  |  Lying (55)  |  Making (300)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Memoir (13)  |  Mention (82)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Notice (77)  |  Number (699)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Original (58)  |  Part (222)  |  Peril (9)  |  Person (363)  |  Possible (552)  |  Practical (200)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Prof (2)  |  Prolific (5)  |  Publish (36)  |  Question (621)  |  Reach (281)  |  Real (149)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reference (33)  |  Regard (305)  |  Regret (30)  |  Render (93)  |  Rescue (13)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Second (62)  |  Short (197)  |  Small (477)  |  State (491)  |  Strongly (9)  |  Student (300)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Technical (43)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Theory (970)  |  Transaction (13)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Useful (250)  |  Value (365)  |  Various (200)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)  |  Year (933)

Reason may be employed in two ways to establish a point: first for the purpose of furnishing sufficient proof of some principle, as in natural science, where sufficient proof can be brought to show that the movement of the heavens is always of uniform velocity. Reason is employed in another way, not as furnishing a sufficient proof of a principle, but as confirming an already established principle, by showing the congruity of its results, as in astrology the theory of eccentrics and epicycles is considered as established because thereby the sensible appearances of the heavenly movements can be explained; not, however, as if this reason were sufficient, since some other theory might explain them.
Summa Theologica [1266-1273], Part I, question 32, article 2 (reply to objection 2), trans. Fathers of the English Dominican Province (i.e. L. Shapeote), revised D. J. Sullivan (1952), Vol. I, 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Astrology (43)  |  Consider (416)  |  Employ (113)  |  Explain (322)  |  First (1283)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Movement (155)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proof (287)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reason (744)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Show (346)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Theory (970)  |  Two (937)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Way (1217)

Returning now to the Malay Archipelago, we find that all the wide expanse of sea which divides Java, Sumatra, and Borneo from each other, and from Malacca and Siam, is so shallow that ships can anchor in any part of it, since it rarely exceeds forty fathoms in depth; and if we go as far as the line of a hundred fathoms, we shall include the Philippine Islands and Bali, east of Java. If, therefore, these islands have been separated from each other and the continent by subsidence of the intervening tracts of land, we should conclude that the separation has been comparatively recent, since the depth to which the land has subsided is so small. It is also to be remarked that the great chain of active volcanoes in Sumatra and Java furnishes us with a sufficient cause for such subsidence, since the enormous masses of matter they have thrown out would take away the foundations of the surrounding district; and this may be the true explanation of the often-noticed fact that volcanoes and volcanic chains are always near the sea. The subsidence they produce around them will, in time, make a sea, if one does not already exist.
Malay Archipelago
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  All (4108)  |  Anchor (10)  |  Archipelago (7)  |  Borneo (3)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chain (50)  |  Comparatively (8)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Continent (76)  |  Depth (94)  |  District (9)  |  Divide (75)  |  East (18)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Exceed (9)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expanse (6)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Far (154)  |  Fathom (15)  |  Find (998)  |  Forty (4)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Include (90)  |  Intervene (8)  |  Island (46)  |  Java (2)  |  Land (115)  |  Line (91)  |  Mass (157)  |  Matter (798)  |  Notable (5)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Philippines (3)  |  Produce (104)  |  Rarely (21)  |  Recent (77)  |  Remark (28)  |  Return (124)  |  Sea (308)  |  Separate (143)  |  Separation (57)  |  Shallow (8)  |  Ship (62)  |  Small (477)  |  Subside (5)  |  Subsidence (2)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Surround (30)  |  Take Away (5)  |  Thrown Out (2)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tract (5)  |  True (212)  |  Volcano (39)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)

Science affects the average man and woman in two ways already. He or she benefits by its application driving a motor-car or omnibus instead of a horse-drawn vehicle, being treated for disease by a doctor or surgeon rather than a witch, and being killed with an automatic pistol or shell in place of a dagger or a battle-axe.
'The Scientific Point of View' In R.C. Prasad (ed.), Modern Essays: Studying Language Through Literature (1987), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Automatic (16)  |  Average (82)  |  Being (1278)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Car (71)  |  Dagger (3)  |  Death (388)  |  Disease (328)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Driving (28)  |  Effect (393)  |  Horse (74)  |  Kill (100)  |  Killing (14)  |  Man (2251)  |  Motor (23)  |  Motor Car (3)  |  Omnibus (2)  |  Pistol (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shell (63)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Two (937)  |  Vehicle (11)  |  Way (1217)  |  Witch (4)  |  Woman (151)

Science can give us only the tools in the box, these mechanical miracles that it has already given us. But of what use to us are miraculous tools until we have mastered the humane, cultural use of them? We do not want to live in a world where the machine has mastered the man; we want to live in a world where man has mastered the machine.
Frank Lloyd Wright on Architecture: Selected Writings 1894-1940 (1941), 258.
Science quotes on:  |  Box (22)  |  Cultural (25)  |  Do (1908)  |  Humane (18)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Science (3879)  |  Tool (117)  |  Use (766)  |  Want (497)  |  World (1774)

Science gains from it [the pendulum] more than one can expect. With its huge dimensions, the apparatus presents qualities that one would try in vain to communicate by constructing it on a small [scale], no matter how carefully. Already the regularity of its motion promises the most conclusive results. One collects numbers that, compared with the predictions of theory, permit one to appreciate how far the true pendulum approximates or differs from the abstract system called 'the simple pendulum'.
In 'Demonstration Experimentale du Movement de Rotation de la Terre' (31 May 1851). In C.M. Gariel (ed.), J. Bertrand (ed.) and Harold Burstyn (trans.), Recueil des Travaux Scientifiques de Lion Foucault (1878), Vol. 2, 527.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Call (769)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Conclusive (11)  |  Differ (85)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Expect (200)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Gain (145)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Number (699)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  Permit (58)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Present (619)  |  Promise (67)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Result (677)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Small (477)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Try (283)  |  Vain (83)

Science is in a literal sense constructive of new facts. It has no fixed body of facts passively awaiting explanation, for successful theories allow the construction of new instruments—electron microscopes and deep space probes—and the exploration of phenomena that were beyond description—the behavior of transistors, recombinant DNA, and elementary particles, for example. This is a key point in the progressive nature of science—not only are there more elegant or accurate analyses of phenomena already known, but there is also extension of the range of phenomena that exist to be described and explained.
Co-author with Michael A. Arbib, English-born professor of computer science and biomedical engineering (1940-)
Michael A. Arbib and Mary B. Hesse, The Construction of Reality (1986), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Author (167)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Body (537)  |  Computer (127)  |  Computer Science (11)  |  Construction (112)  |  Constructive (14)  |  Deep (233)  |  DNA (77)  |  Electron (93)  |  Electron Microscope (2)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Exist (443)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Extension (59)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Known (454)  |  Literal (11)  |  Microscope (80)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Particle (194)  |  Point (580)  |  Probe (12)  |  Professor (128)  |  Range (99)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Space (500)  |  Successful (123)  |  Theory (970)  |  Transistor (5)

Science, testing absolutely all thoughts, all works, has already burst well upon the world—a sun, mounting, most illuminating, most glorious—surely never again to set.
In Specimen Days & Collect (1882), 244.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  All (4108)  |  Burst (39)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Illuminating (12)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mount (42)  |  Never (1087)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Sun (385)  |  Surely (101)  |  Testing (5)  |  Thought (953)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Scientific inquiry would thus he conceived of as analogous to terrestrial exploration, whose product—geography—yields results of continually smaller significance which fill in ever more minute gaps in our information. In such a view, later investigations yield findings of ever smaller importance, with each successive accretion making a relatively smaller contribution to what has already come to hand. The advance of science leads, step by diminished step, toward a fixed and final view of things.
In The Limits Of Science (1984, Rev. 1999), 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Accretion (5)  |  Advance (280)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Fill (61)  |  Final (118)  |  Findings (5)  |  Gap (33)  |  Geography (36)  |  Importance (286)  |  Information (166)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Lead (384)  |  Making (300)  |  Minute (125)  |  More (2559)  |  Product (160)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Significance (113)  |  Small (477)  |  Step (231)  |  Successive (73)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Thing (1915)  |  View (488)  |  Yield (81)

Scientists like myself merely use their gifts to show up that which already exists, and we look small compared to the artists who create works of beauty out of themselves. If a good fairy came and offered me back my youth, asking me which gifts I would rather have, those to make visible a thing which exists but which no man has ever seen before, or the genius needed to create, in a style of architecture never imagined before, the great Town Hall in which we are dining tonight, I might be tempted to choose the latter.
Nobel Banquet Speech (10 Dec 1962).
Science quotes on:  |  Architecture (48)  |  Artist (90)  |  Asking (73)  |  Back (390)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Choice (110)  |  Choose (112)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Create (235)  |  Creation (327)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fairy (9)  |  Genius (284)  |  Gift (104)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Offer (141)  |  Scientist (820)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Small (477)  |  Temptation (11)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tonight (9)  |  Town Hall (2)  |  Use (766)  |  Visibility (6)  |  Visible (84)  |  Work (1351)  |  Youth (101)

Scientists repeatedly return to established theories to test them in new ways, and tend towards testiness with those priests, religious or secular, who know the answers already—whatever the questions are.
In Terry Pratchett, Ian Stewart and Jack Cohen, The Science of Discworld (2014), 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Know (1518)  |  New (1216)  |  Priest (28)  |  Question (621)  |  Religious (126)  |  Return (124)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Secular (11)  |  Tend (124)  |  Test (211)  |  Theory (970)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)

She [Rosalind Franklin] discovered in a series of beautifully executed researches the fundamental distinction between carbons that turned on heating into graphite and those that did not. Further she related this difference to the chemical constitution of the molecules from which carbon was made. She was already a recognized authority in industrial physico-chemistry when she chose to abandon this work in favour of the far more difficult and more exciting fields of biophysics.
Comment in The Times, 19 Apr 1958, shortly after Franklin's death. In Jenifer Glynn, 'Rosalind Franklin', in E. Shils and C. Blacker (eds.), Cambridge Women: Twelve Portraits (1996), 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Authority (95)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Difference (337)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Discover (553)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Field (364)  |  Rosalind Franklin (17)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Molecule (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Series (149)  |  Turn (447)  |  Work (1351)

Since 1849 I have studied incessantly, under all its aspects, a question which was already in my mind [since 1832. I confess that my scheme is still a mere dream, and I do not shut my eyes to the fact that so long as I alone believe it to be possible, it is virtually impossible. ... The scheme in question is the cutting of a canal through the Isthmus of Suez. This has been thought of from the earliest historical times, and for that very reason is looked upon as impracticable. Geographical dictionaries inform us indeed that the project would have been executed long ago but for insurmountable obstacles. [On his inspiration for the Suez Canal.]
Letter to M.S.A. Ruyssenaers, Consul-General for Holland in Egypt, from Paris (8 Jul 1852), seeking support. Collected in Ferdinand de Lesseps, The Suez Canal: Letters and Documents Descriptive of Its Rise and Progress in 1854-1856 (1876), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Belief (578)  |  Canal (17)  |  Confess (42)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dream (208)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Historical (70)  |  Idea (843)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Incessantly (3)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Inform (47)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Insurmountable (3)  |  Isthmus (2)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Project (73)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Shut (41)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Suez Canal (2)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)

So, Fabricius, I already have this: that the most true path of the planet [Mars] is an ellipse, which Dürer also calls an oval, or certainly so close to an ellipse that the difference is insensible.
Letter to David Fabricius (11 Oct 1605). Johannes Kepler Gesammelte Werke (1937- ), Vol. 15, letter 358, l. 390-92, p. 249.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Difference (337)  |  Albrecht Dürer (5)  |  Ellipse (8)  |  Mars (44)  |  Most (1731)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Path (144)  |  Planet (356)

Suddenly there was an enormous explosion, like a violent volcano. The nuclear reactions had led to overheating in the underground burial grounds. The explosion poured radioactive dust and materials high up into the sky. It was just the wrong weather for such a tragedy. Strong winds blew the radioactive clouds hundreds of miles away. It was difficult to gauge the extent of the disaster immediately, and no evacuation plan was put into operation right away. Many villages and towns were only ordered to evacuate when the symptoms of radiation sickness were already quite apparent. Tens of thousands of people were affected, hundreds dying, though the real figures have never been made public. The large area, where the accident happened, is still considered dangerous and is closed to the public.
'Two Decades of Dissidence', New Scientist (4 Nov 1976), 72, No. 72, 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Affected (3)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Area (31)  |  Atomic Energy (24)  |  Burial (7)  |  Closed (38)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Consider (416)  |  Considered (12)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Die (86)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Dust (64)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Extent (139)  |  Figure (160)  |  Gauge (2)  |  Ground (217)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Heat (174)  |  High (362)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Large (394)  |  Material (353)  |  Mile (39)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Operation (213)  |  Order (632)  |  People (1005)  |  Plan (117)  |  Public (96)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Real (149)  |  Right (452)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Sky (161)  |  Still (613)  |  Strong (174)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Total (94)  |  Town (27)  |  Tragedy (29)  |  Underground (11)  |  Village (7)  |  Violent (17)  |  Volcano (39)  |  Weather (44)  |  Wind (128)  |  Wrong (234)

The Analytical Engine has no pretensions whatever to originate anything. It can do whatever we know how to order it to perform. It can follow analysis; but it has no power of anticipating any analytical relations or truths. Its province is to assist us to making available what we are already acquainted with.
[Describing Charles Babbage's machine.]
In her notes as translator, following her translation of I. F. Menabrea, 'Sketch of the Analytical Engine Invented by Charles Babbage, Esq.', (from Bibliothègue Universelle de Génève (Oct 1842), No. 82) in Richard Taylor (ed.), Scientific Memoirs (1843), 3, 722.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Analytical Engine (5)  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Available (78)  |  Charles Babbage (54)  |  Computer (127)  |  Do (1908)  |  Engine (98)  |  Follow (378)  |  Know (1518)  |  Machine (257)  |  Making (300)  |  Order (632)  |  Originate (36)  |  Perform (121)  |  Power (746)  |  Pretension (6)  |  Province (35)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Whatever (234)

The application of botanical and zoological evidence to determine the relative age of rocks—this chronometry of the earth's surface which was already present to the lofty mind of Hooke—indicates one of the most glorious epochs of modern geognosy, which has finally, on the Continent at least, been emancipated from the way of Semitic doctrines. Palaeontological investigations have imparted a vivifying breath of grace and diversity to the science of the solid structure of the earth.
Cosmos: A Sketch of a Physical Description of the Universe (1845-62), trans. E. C. Due (1849), Vol. 1, 272.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Application (242)  |  Botany (57)  |  Breath (59)  |  Continent (76)  |  Determine (144)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Earth (996)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Geognosy (2)  |  Geology (220)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Grace (31)  |  Robert Hooke (20)  |  Impart (23)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  Most (1731)  |  North America (4)  |  Paleontology (31)  |  Present (619)  |  Rock (161)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solid (116)  |  Structure (344)  |  Surface (209)  |  Way (1217)  |  Zoology (36)

The assumption we have made … is that marriages and the union of gametes occur at random. The validity of this assumption may now be examined. “Random mating” obviously does not mean promiscuity; it simply means, as already explained above, that in the choice of mates for marriage there is neither preference for nor aversion to the union of persons similar or dissimilar with respect to a given trait or gene. Not all gentlemen prefer blondes or brunettes. Since so few people know what their blood type is, it is even safer to say that the chances of mates being similar or dissimilar in blood type are determined simply by the incidence of these blood types in a given Mendelian population.
[Co-author with Theodosius Dobzhansky]
In Radiation, Genes and Man (1960), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Author (167)  |  Aversion (8)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Chance (239)  |  Choice (110)  |  Determined (9)  |  Dissimilar (6)  |  Examined (3)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Gamete (5)  |  Gene (98)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Incidence (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Marriage (39)  |  Mate (6)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Occur (150)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Population (110)  |  Preference (28)  |  Promiscuity (3)  |  Random (41)  |  Respect (207)  |  Safety (54)  |  Say (984)  |  Similar (36)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Trait (22)  |  Type (167)  |  Union (51)  |  Validity (47)

The diseases which are hard to cure in neighborhoods… are catarrh, hoarseness, coughs, pleurisy, consumption, spitting of blood, and all others that are cured not by lowering the system but by building it up. They are hard to cure, first, because they are originally due to chills; secondly, because the patient's system being already exhausted by disease, the air there, which is in constant agitation owing to winds and therefore deteriorated, takes all the sap of life out of their diseased bodies and leaves them more meager every day. On the other hand, a mild, thick air, without drafts and not constantly blowing back and forth, builds up their frames by its unwavering steadiness, and so strengthens and restores people who are afflicted with these diseases.
Vitruvius
In De Architectura, Book 1, Chap 6, Sec. 3. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 25.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Agitation (9)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Blowing (22)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Catarrh (2)  |  Chill (9)  |  Constant (144)  |  Consumption (14)  |  Cough (8)  |  Cure (122)  |  Disease (328)  |  Draft (6)  |  Due (141)  |  First (1283)  |  Hard (243)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mild (7)  |  More (2559)  |  Neighborhood (12)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owing (39)  |  Patient (199)  |  People (1005)  |  System (537)  |  Wind (128)

The first man who said “fire burns” was employing scientific method, at any rate if he had allowed himself to be burnt several times. This man had already passed through the two stages of observation and generalization. He had not, however, what scientific technique demands—a careful choice of significant facts on the one hand, and, on the other hand, various means of arriving at laws otherwise than my mere generalization. (1931)
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Burn (87)  |  Choice (110)  |  Demand (123)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Himself (461)  |  Inference (45)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Significant (74)  |  Stage (143)  |  Technique (80)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Various (200)

The future belongs to Science. More and more she will control the destinies of the nations. Already she has them in her crucible and on her balances.
In René Vallery-Radot, The Life of Pasteur (1919), xvi.
Science quotes on:  |  Balance (77)  |  Belong (162)  |  Control (167)  |  Crucible (8)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Future (429)  |  More (2559)  |  Nation (193)  |  Science (3879)  |  Will (2355)

The genotypic constitution of a gamete or a zygote may be parallelized with a complicated chemico-physical structure. This reacts exclusively in consequence of its realized state, but not in consequence of the history of its creation. So it may be with the genotypical constitution of gametes and zygotes: its history is without influence upon its reactions, which are determined exclusively by its actual nature. The genotype-conception is thus an 'ahistoric' view of the reactions of living beings—of course only as far as true heredity is concerned. This view is an analog to the chemical view, as already pointed out; chemical compounds have no compromising ante-act, H2O is always H2O, and reacts always in the same manner, whatsoever may be the 'history' of its formation or the earlier states of its elements. I suggest that it is useful to emphasize this 'radical' ahistoric genotype-conception of heredity in its strict antagonism to the transmission—or phenotype-view.
'The Genotype Conception of Heredity', The American Naturalist (1911), 45, 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Actual (117)  |  Analog (3)  |  Antagonism (6)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Compound (113)  |  Conception (154)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Course (409)  |  Creation (327)  |  Element (310)  |  Emphasize (23)  |  Formation (96)  |  Gamete (5)  |  Genotype (8)  |  Heredity (60)  |  History (673)  |  Influence (222)  |  Living (491)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Phenotype (5)  |  Physical (508)  |  Point (580)  |  Radical (25)  |  Reaction (104)  |  State (491)  |  Structure (344)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Useful (250)  |  View (488)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Zygote (3)

The good Christian should beware of mathematicians, and all those who make empty prophecies. The danger already exists that the mathematicians have made a covenant with the devil to darken the spirit and to confine man in the bonds of Hell.
Mathematician refers to astrologer. From De Genesi ad Litteram (400s), Book 2, xviii, 37. As quoted in Morris Kline, Mathematics in Western Culture (1953, 1964), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Astrologer (10)  |  Beware (16)  |  Bond (45)  |  Christian (43)  |  Confine (26)  |  Covenant (2)  |  Danger (115)  |  Darken (2)  |  Devil (31)  |  Empty (80)  |  Exist (443)  |  Good (889)  |  Hell (32)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Prophecy (13)  |  Spirit (265)

The Himalayas are the crowning achievement of the Indo-Australian plate. India in the Oligocene crashed head on into Tibet, hit so hard that it not only folded and buckled the plate boundaries but also plowed into the newly created Tibetan plateau and drove the Himalayas five and a half miles into the sky. The mountains are in some trouble. India has not stopped pushing them, and they are still going up. Their height and volume are already so great they are beginning to melt in their own self-generated radioactive heat. When the climbers in 1953 planted their flags on the highest mountain, they set them in snow over the skeletons of creatures that had lived in a warm clear ocean that India, moving north, blanked out. Possibly as much as 20,000 feet below the sea floor, the skeletal remains had turned into rock. This one fact is a treatise in itself on the movements of the surface of the earth.
If by some fiat, I had to restrict all this writing to one sentence; this is the one I would choose: the summit of Mount Everest is marine limestone.
Annals of the Former World
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  All (4108)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Below (24)  |  Blank (11)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Buckle (4)  |  Choose (112)  |  Clear (100)  |  Climber (7)  |  Crash (9)  |  Create (235)  |  Creature (233)  |  Crown (38)  |  Drive (55)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fiat (6)  |  Five (16)  |  Flag (11)  |  Floor (20)  |  Fold (8)  |  Foot (60)  |  Great (1574)  |  Half (56)  |  Hard (243)  |  Head (81)  |  Heat (174)  |  Height (32)  |  High (362)  |  Himalayas (2)  |  Hit (20)  |  India (16)  |  Limestone (6)  |  Live (628)  |  Marine (9)  |  Melt (16)  |  Mile (39)  |  Mount (42)  |  Mount Everest (5)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Move (216)  |  Movement (155)  |  Newly (4)  |  North (11)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Plant (294)  |  Plate (6)  |  Plateau (6)  |  Plow (7)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Push (62)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Remain (349)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Rock (161)  |  Sea (308)  |  Self (267)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Set (394)  |  Skeletal (2)  |  Skeleton (22)  |  Sky (161)  |  Snow (37)  |  Still (613)  |  Stop (80)  |  Summit (25)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Tibet (4)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Turn (447)  |  Volume (19)  |  Warm (69)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

The individual feels the futility of human desires and aims and the sublimity and marvelous order which reveal themselves both in nature and in the world of thought. Individual existence impresses him as a sort of prison and he wants to experience the universe as a single significant whole. The beginnings of cosmic religious feeling already appear at an early stage of development, e.g., in many of the Psalms of David and in some of the Prophets. Buddhism, as we have learned especially from the wonderful writings of Schopenhauer, contains a much stronger element of this. The religious geniuses of all ages have been distinguished by this kind of religious feeling, which knows no dogma and no God conceived in man’s image; so that there can be no church whose central teachings are based on it. Hence it is precisely among the heretics of every age that we find men who were filled with this highest kind of religious feeling and were in many cases regarded by their contemporaries as atheists, sometimes also as saints. Looked at in this light, men like Democritus, Francis of Assisi, and Spinoza are closely akin to one another.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Aim (165)  |  Akin (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Atheist (15)  |  Base (117)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Beginnings (5)  |  Both (493)  |  Case (99)  |  Central (80)  |  Church (56)  |  Closely (12)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Contain (68)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  David (6)  |  Democritus of Abdera (17)  |  Desire (204)  |  Development (422)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Early (185)  |  Element (310)  |  Especially (31)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fill (61)  |  Find (998)  |  Francis (2)  |  Futility (7)  |  Genius (284)  |  God (757)  |  Heretic (8)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Image (96)  |  Impress (64)  |  Individual (404)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Light (607)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marvelous (29)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Order (632)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Prison (13)  |  Prophet (21)  |  Psalm (3)  |  Regard (305)  |  Religious (126)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Saint (17)  |  Schopenhauer (6)  |  Significant (74)  |  Single (353)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Sort (49)  |  Spinoza (11)  |  Stage (143)  |  Strong (174)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Sublimity (5)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teachings (11)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universe (857)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  World (1774)  |  Writing (189)  |  Writings (6)

The invention of what we may call primary or fundamental notation has been but little indebted to analogy, evidently owing to the small extent of ideas in which comparison can be made useful. But at the same time analogy should be attended to, even if for no other reason than that, by making the invention of notation an art, the exertion of individual caprice ceases to be allowable. Nothing is more easy than the invention of notation, and nothing of worse example and consequence than the confusion of mathematical expressions by unknown symbols. If new notation be advisable, permanently or temporarily, it should carry with it some mark of distinction from that which is already in use, unless it be a demonstrable extension of the latter.
In 'Calculus of Functions', Encyclopaedia of Pure Mathematics (1847), Addition to Article 26, 388.
Science quotes on:  |  Allowable (2)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Art (657)  |  Attend (65)  |  Call (769)  |  Caprice (9)  |  Carry (127)  |  Cease (79)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Easy (204)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Example (94)  |  Exertion (15)  |  Expression (175)  |  Extension (59)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Invention (369)  |  Little (707)  |  Making (300)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics As A Language (20)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Notation (27)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owing (39)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Primary (80)  |  Reason (744)  |  Same (157)  |  Small (477)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Temporary (23)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Worse (24)

The Javanese Anthropopithecus, which in its skull is more human than any other known anthropoid ape, already had an upright, erect posture, which has always been considered to be the exclusive privilege of humans. Thus this ancient
Report of 1892, quoted in Pat Shipman, The Man Who Found the Missing Link: The Extraordinary Life of Eugene Dubois (2001), 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Anthropoid (9)  |  Ape (53)  |  Consider (416)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Human (1468)  |  Known (454)  |  Jean-Baptiste Lamarck (24)  |  Missing Link (4)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Privilege (39)

The key to understanding overpopulation is not population density but the numbers of people in an area relative to its resources and the capacity of the environment to sustain human activities; that is, to the area’s carrying capacity. When is an area overpopulated? When its population can’t be maintained without rapidly depleting nonrenewable resources…. By this standard, the entire planet and virtually every nation is already vastly overpopulated.
In The Population Explosion (1990), 39.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Activity (210)  |  Area (31)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Carrying capacity (3)  |  Density (25)  |  Deplete (2)  |  Entire (47)  |  Environment (216)  |  Human (1468)  |  Key (50)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nonrenewable Resources (2)  |  Number (699)  |  Overpopulation (5)  |  People (1005)  |  Planet (356)  |  Population (110)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Relative (39)  |  Resource (63)  |  Standard (57)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Virtually (6)

The law of the conservation of energy is already known, viz. that the sum of the actual and potential energies in the universe is unchangeable.
'On the General Law of the Transformation of Energy', Philosophical Magazine (1853), 5, 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Conservation Of Energy (29)  |  Energy (344)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Potential (69)  |  Sum (102)  |  Universe (857)

The mathematical intellectualism is henceforth a positive doctrine, but one that inverts the usual doctrines of positivism: in place of originating progress in order, dynamics in statics, its goal is to make logical order the product of intellectual progress. The science of the future is not enwombed, as Comte would have had it, as Kant had wished it, in the forms of the science already existing; the structure of these forms reveals an original dynamism whose onward sweep is prolonged by the synthetic generation of more and more complicated forms. No speculation on number considered as a category a priori enables one to account for the questions set by modern mathematics … space affirms only the possibility of applying to a multiplicity of any elements whatever, relations whose type the intellect does not undertake to determine in advance, but, on the contrary, it asserts their existence and nourishes their unlimited development.
As translated in James Byrnie Shaw, Lectures on the Philosophy of Mathematics (1918), 193. From Léon Brunschvicg, Les Étapes de La Philosophie Mathématique (1912), 567-568, “L’intellectualisme mathématique est désormais une doctrine positive, mais qui intervertira les formules habituelles du positivisme: au lieu de faire sortir le progrès de l’ordre, ou le dynamique du statique, il tend à faire de l'ordre logique le produit du progrès intellectuel. La science à venir n'est pas enfermée, comme l’aurait voulu Comte, comme le voulait déjà Kant, dans les formes de la science déjà faite; la constitution de ces formes révèle un dynamisme originel dont l’élan se prolonge par la génération synthétique de notions de plus en plus compliquées. Aucune spéculation sur le nombre, considéré comme catégorie a priori, ne permet de rendre compte des questions qui se sont posées pour la mathématique moderne … … l’espace ne fait qu'affirmer la possibilité d'appliquer sur une multiplicité d’éléments quelconques des relations dont l’intelligence ne cherche pas à déterminer d’avance le type, dont elle constate, au contraire, dont elle suscite le développement illimité.”
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (26)  |  Account (192)  |  Advance (280)  |  Assert (66)  |  Category (18)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Auguste Comte (21)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Determine (144)  |  Development (422)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dynamics (9)  |  Element (310)  |  Enable (119)  |  Existence (456)  |  Form (959)  |  Future (429)  |  Generation (242)  |  Goal (145)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Immanuel Kant (49)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Number (699)  |  Order (632)  |  Original (58)  |  Positive (94)  |  Positivism (3)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Product (160)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Question (621)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Space (500)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Statics (6)  |  Structure (344)  |  Sweep (19)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Type (167)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Unlimited (22)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Wish (212)

The mathematical universe is already so large and diversified that it is hardly possible for a single mind to grasp it, or, to put it in another way, so much energy would be needed for grasping it that there would be none left for creative research. A mathematical congress of today reminds one of the Tower of Babel, for few men can follow profitably the discussions of sections other than their own, and even there they are sometimes made to feel like strangers.
In The Study Of The History Of Mathematics (1936), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Congress (19)  |  Creative (137)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Diversified (3)  |  Energy (344)  |  Feel (367)  |  Follow (378)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Large (394)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Remind (13)  |  Research (664)  |  Section (11)  |  Single (353)  |  Stranger (15)  |  Today (314)  |  Tower (42)  |  Tower Of Babel (2)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)

The most direct, and in a sense the most important, problem which our conscious knowledge of Nature should enable us to solve is the anticipation of future events, so that we may arrange our present affairs in accordance with such anticipation. As a basis for the solution of this problem we always make use of our knowledge of events which have already occurred, obtained by chance observation or by prearranged experiment.
In Heinrich Hertz, D.E. Jones (trans.) and J.T. Walley (trans.), 'Introduction', The Principles of Mechanics (1899), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Arrange (30)  |  Basis (173)  |  Chance (239)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Direct (225)  |  Enable (119)  |  Event (216)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Future (429)  |  Important (209)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Sense (770)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Use (766)

The office of science is not to record possibilities; but to ascertain what nature does ... As far as Darwinism deals with mere arguments of possibilities or even probabilities, without a basis of fact, it departs from the true scientific method and injures science, as most of the devotees of the new ism have already done.
'Professor Agassiz on the Darwinian Theory ... Interesting Facsimile Letter from the Great Naturalist', Scientific American, 1874, 30, 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Basis (173)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Deal (188)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Method (505)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Office (71)  |  Record (154)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)

The progress of science has always been the result of a close interplay between our concepts of the universe and our observations on nature. The former can only evolve out of the latter and yet the latter is also conditioned greatly by the former. Thus in our exploration of nature, the interplay between our concepts and our observations may sometimes lead to totally unexpected aspects among already familiar phenomena.
'Weak Interactions and Nonconservation of Parity', Nobel Lecture, 11 Dec 1957. In Nobel Lectures: Physics 1942-1962 (1964), 417.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspect (124)  |  Concept (221)  |  Condition (356)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Former (137)  |  Lead (384)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Obervation (4)  |  Observation (555)  |  Progress (465)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Universe (857)

The researches of many commentators have already thrown much darkness on this subject, and it is probable that, if they continue, we shall soon know nothing at all about it.
In The Sciences, September-October 1989.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Continue (165)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Know (1518)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Soon (186)  |  Subject (521)

The science of medicine is a barbarous jargon and the effects of our medicine on the human system are in the highest degree uncertain, except indeed that they have already destroyed more lives than war, pestilence, and famine combined.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Barbarous (3)  |  Combine (57)  |  Degree (276)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Effect (393)  |  Famine (15)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Jargon (13)  |  Live (628)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Pestilence (14)  |  Science (3879)  |  System (537)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  War (225)

The scientist values research by the size of its contribution to that huge, logically articulated structure of ideas which is already, though not yet half built, the most glorious accomplishment of mankind.
In The Art of the Soluble (1967), 126. Also 'Two Conceptions of Science', collected in The Strange Case of the Spotted Mice and Other Classic Essays on Science (1996), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Articulate (7)  |  Build (204)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Half (56)  |  Huge (25)  |  Idea (843)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Most (1731)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Size (60)  |  Structure (344)  |  Value (365)

The situation with regard to insulin is particularly clear. In many parts of the world diabetic children still die from lack of this hormone. ... [T]hose of us who search for new biological facts and for new and better therapeutic weapons should appreciate that one of the central problems of the world is the more equitable distribution and use of the medical and nutritional advances which have already been established. The observations which I have recently made in parts of Africa and South America have brought this fact very forcible to my attention.
'Studies on Diabetes and Cirrhosis', Proceedings, American Philosophical Society (1952) 96, No. 1, 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Africa (35)  |  America (127)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Attention (190)  |  Better (486)  |  Biological (137)  |  Central (80)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Death (388)  |  Diabetes (5)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Equity (4)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Hormone (10)  |  Insulin (9)  |  Lack (119)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Nutrition (23)  |  Observation (555)  |  Problem (676)  |  Regard (305)  |  Research (664)  |  Search (162)  |  Situation (113)  |  South (38)  |  South America (6)  |  Still (613)  |  Therapy (13)  |  Use (766)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  World (1774)

The study of the serum of immunized animals forms a new chapter in the history of the struggle between the animal and infective agents, under which heading practical results of the highest importance are already inscribed. Any explanation of the phenomena is, however, still far from complete.
In Studies in Immunity (1909), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (70)  |  Animal (617)  |  Chapter (11)  |  Complete (204)  |  Completion (22)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Form (959)  |  History (673)  |  Immunization (2)  |  Importance (286)  |  Infection (27)  |  New (1216)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Practical (200)  |  Result (677)  |  Serum (11)  |  Still (613)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Study (653)

The term element is applied in chemistry to those forms of matter which have hitherto resisted all attempts to decompose them. Nothing is ever meant to be affirmed concerning their real nature; they are simply elements to us at the present time; hereafter, by new methods of research, or by new combinations of those already possessed by science, many of the substances which now figure as elements may possibly be shown to be compounds; this has already happened, and may again take place.
In Elementary Chemistry, Theoretical and Practical (1854), 103. There follows on this page, 62 listed elements, some indicated as “of recent discovery and yet imperfectly known”. Two of the later names were Norium and Pelopium.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Combination (144)  |  Compound (113)  |  Decompose (9)  |  Element (310)  |  Figure (160)  |  Form (959)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Matter (798)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Possess (156)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Present (619)  |  Research (664)  |  Resist (15)  |  Science (3879)  |  Substance (248)  |  Term (349)  |  Time (1877)

The tool which serves as intermediary between theory and practice, between thought and observation, is mathematics; it is mathematics which builds the linking bridges and gives the ever more reliable forms. From this it has come about that our entire contemporary culture, inasmuch as it is based on the intellectual penetration and the exploitation of nature, has its foundations in mathematics. Already Galileo said: one can understand nature only when one has learned the language and the signs in which it speaks to us; but this language is mathematics and these signs are mathematical figures.
Radio broadcast (8 Sep 1930). As quoted in Michael Fitzgerald and Ioan James, The Mind of the Mathematician (2007), 6-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Based (10)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Build (204)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Culture (143)  |  Entire (47)  |  Exploitation (14)  |  Figure (160)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Intermediary (2)  |  Language (293)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Link (43)  |  Linking (8)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Practice (204)  |  Reliable (12)  |  Serve (59)  |  Sign (58)  |  Speak (232)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tool (117)  |  Understand (606)

The truly wise ask what the thing is in itself and in relation to other things, and do not trouble themselves about the use of it,—in other words, about the way in which it may be applied to the necessities of existence and what is already known. This will soon be discovered by minds of a very different order—minds that feel the joy of living, and are keen, adroit, and practical.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 190.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Ask (411)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Existence (456)  |  Feel (367)  |  Joy (107)  |  Keen (10)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Practical (200)  |  Relation (157)  |  Soon (186)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Truly (116)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wise (131)  |  Word (619)

The truth is, the Science of Nature has been already too long made only a work of the Brain and the Fancy: It is now high time that it should return to the plainness and soundness of Observations on material and obvious things.
Micrographia (1665). In Extracts from Micrographia (1906), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Fancy (50)  |  High (362)  |  Long (790)  |  Material (353)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Plainness (2)  |  Return (124)  |  Science (3879)  |  Soundness (4)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Work (1351)

The work I have done has, already, been adequately rewarded and recognized. Imagination reaches out repeatedly trying to achieve some higher level of understanding, until suddenly I find myself momentarily alone before one new corner of nature’s pattern of beauty and true majesty revealed. That was my reward.
Nobel Banquet Speech (10 Dec 1965).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alone (311)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Biography (240)  |  Biology (216)  |  Corner (57)  |  Find (998)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Majesty (21)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Reward (68)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Trying (144)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Work (1351)

The worst thing that will probably happen—in fact is already well underway—is not energy depletion, economic collapse, conventional war, or the expansion of totalitarian governments. As terrible as these catastrophes would be for us, they can be repaired in a few generations. The one process now going on that will take millions of years to correct is loss of genetic and species diversity by the destruction of natural habitats. This is the folly our descendants are least likely to forgive us.
Biophilia (1984), 121.(1990), 182.
Science quotes on:  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Collapse (17)  |  Conventional (30)  |  Depletion (3)  |  Descendant (17)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Energy (344)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Folly (43)  |  Forgive (12)  |  Generation (242)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Government (110)  |  Habitat (16)  |  Happen (274)  |  Loss (110)  |  Natural (796)  |  Process (423)  |  Repair (11)  |  Species (401)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Totalitarian (6)  |  War (225)  |  Will (2355)  |  Worst (57)  |  Year (933)

There are but few saints among scientists, as among other men, but truth itself is a goal comparable to sanctity. As the Pythagoreans had already understood it more than twenty-four centuries ago, there is sanctity in pure knowledge, as there is in pure beauty, and the disinterested quest of truth is perhaps the greatest purification.
In The History of Science and the New Humanism (1987), 46-47.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Goal (145)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pure (291)  |  Purification (7)  |  Quest (39)  |  Saint (17)  |  Sanctity (4)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understood (156)

There cannot always be fresh fields of conquest by the knife; there must be portions of the human frame that will ever remain sacred from its intrusions, at least in the surgeon's hands. That we have already, if not quite, reached these final limits, there can be little question. The abdomen, the chest, and the brain will be forever shut from the intrusion of the wise and humane surgeon.
Quoted in C. Cerf and V. Navasky (eds.), I Wish I hadn't Said That: The Experts Speak and Get it Wrong! (2000), 31.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abdomen (5)  |  Brain (270)  |  Conquest (28)  |  Error (321)  |  Field (364)  |  Final (118)  |  Forever (103)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humane (18)  |  Knife (23)  |  Limit (280)  |  Little (707)  |  Must (1526)  |  Portion (84)  |  Question (621)  |  Reach (281)  |  Remain (349)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Shut (41)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wise (131)

There is a theory which states that if ever anyone discovers exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There is another theory which states that this has already happened.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anyone (35)  |  Bizarre (6)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Discover (553)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Inexplicable (8)  |  Instantly (19)  |  More (2559)  |  Replace (31)  |  Something (719)  |  State (491)  |  Theory (970)  |  Universe (857)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

There is already overwhelming evidence that the visible matter within galaxies may account for less than 10 percent of the galaxies’ actual mass: the rest, not yet directly detectable by observers on the earth, is probably distributed within and around each galaxy.
(1986). As quoted in Isaac Asimov's Book of Science and Nature Quotations.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Actual (117)  |  Around (7)  |  Distribute (15)  |  Earth (996)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Galaxies (29)  |  Galaxy (51)  |  Mass (157)  |  Matter (798)  |  Observer (43)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Rest (280)  |  Visible (84)

There is thus a possibility that the ancient dream of philosophers to connect all Nature with the properties of whole numbers will some day be realized. To do so physics will have to develop a long way to establish the details of how the correspondence is to be made. One hint for this development seems pretty obvious, namely, the study of whole numbers in modern mathematics is inextricably bound up with the theory of functions of a complex variable, which theory we have already seen has a good chance of forming the basis of the physics of the future. The working out of this idea would lead to a connection between atomic theory and cosmology.
From Lecture delivered on presentation of the James Scott prize, (6 Feb 1939), 'The Relation Between Mathematics And Physics', printed in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1938-1939), 59, Part 2, 129.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Atomic Theory (15)  |  Basis (173)  |  Bound (119)  |  Chance (239)  |  Complex (188)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Cosmology (25)  |  Detail (146)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dream (208)  |  Establish (57)  |  Forming (42)  |  Function (228)  |  Future (429)  |  Good (889)  |  Hint (21)  |  Idea (843)  |  Lead (384)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Property (168)  |  Realize (147)  |  Study (653)  |  Theory (970)  |  Variable (34)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

These microscopic organisms form an entire world composed of species, families and varieties whose history, which has barely begun to be written, is already fertile in prospects and findings of the highest importance. The names of these organisms are very numerous and will have to be defined and in part discarded. The word microbe which has the advantage of being shorter and carrying a more general meaning, and of having been approved by my illustrious friend, M. Littré, the most competent linguist in France, is one we will adopt.
In paper read to the Académie de Medecine (Mar 1878). In Charles-Emile Sedillot, 'Influence de M. Pasteur sur les progres de la chirurgie' [Influence of Pasteur on the progress of surgery].
Science quotes on:  |  Adoption (7)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Approval (10)  |  Being (1278)  |  Composition (84)  |  Definition (221)  |  Discard (29)  |  Family (94)  |  Fertile (29)  |  Finding (30)  |  Form (959)  |  France (27)  |  Friend (168)  |  General (511)  |  History (673)  |  Illustrious (10)  |  Importance (286)  |  Linguist (2)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Microbe (28)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Organism (220)  |  Prospect (30)  |  Shortness (2)  |  Species (401)  |  Variety (132)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

Those who have taken upon them to lay down the law of nature as a thing already searched out and understood, whether they have spoken in simple assurance or professional affectation, have therein done philosophy and the sciences great injury. For as they have been successful in inducing belief, so they have been effective in quenching and stopping inquiry; and have done more harm by spoiling and putting an end to other men's efforts than good by their own. Those on the other hand who have taken a contrary course, and asserted that absolutely nothing can be known — whether it were from hatred of the ancient sophists, or from uncertainty and fluctuation of mind, or even from a kind of fullness of learning, that they fell upon this opinion — have certainly advanced reasons for it that are not to be despised; but yet they have neither started from true principles nor rested in the just conclusion, zeal and affectation having carried them much too far...
Now my method, though hard to practice, is easy to explain; and it is this. I propose to establish progressive stages of certainty. The evidence of the sense, helped and guarded by a certain process of correction, I retain. But the mental operation which follows the act of sense I for the most part reject; and instead of it I open and lay out a new and certain path for the mind to proceed in, starting directly from the simple sensuous perception.
Novum Organum (1620)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Assert (66)  |  Assurance (17)  |  Belief (578)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Correction (40)  |  Course (409)  |  Down (456)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effective (59)  |  Effort (227)  |  End (590)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fluctuation (14)  |  Follow (378)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hatred (21)  |  Injury (36)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Kind (557)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Learning (274)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Open (274)  |  Operation (213)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Perception (97)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Practice (204)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Process (423)  |  Professional (70)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rest (280)  |  Retain (56)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Search (162)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Stage (143)  |  Start (221)  |  Successful (123)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Understood (156)

Thought-economy is most highly developed in mathematics, that science which has reached the highest formal development, and on which natural science so frequently calls for assistance. Strange as it may seem, the strength of mathematics lies in the avoidance of all unnecessary thoughts, in the utmost economy of thought-operations. The symbols of order, which we call numbers, form already a system of wonderful simplicity and economy. When in the multiplication of a number with several digits we employ the multiplication table and thus make use of previously accomplished results rather than to repeat them each time, when by the use of tables of logarithms we avoid new numerical calculations by replacing them by others long since performed, when we employ determinants instead of carrying through from the beginning the solution of a system of equations, when we decompose new integral expressions into others that are familiar,—we see in all this but a faint reflection of the intellectual activity of a Lagrange or Cauchy, who with the keen discernment of a military commander marshalls a whole troop of completed operations in the execution of a new one.
In Populär-wissenschafliche Vorlesungen (1903), 224-225.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Assistance (20)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Avoidance (11)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Call (769)  |  Carry (127)  |  Baron Augustin-Louis Cauchy (10)  |  Complete (204)  |  Completed (30)  |  Decompose (9)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Digit (4)  |  Discernment (4)  |  Economy (55)  |  Employ (113)  |  Equation (132)  |  Execution (25)  |  Expression (175)  |  Faint (9)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Form (959)  |  Formal (33)  |  Frequently (21)  |  High (362)  |  Highly (16)  |  Instead (21)  |  Integral (26)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Keen (10)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Lie (364)  |  Logarithm (12)  |  Long (790)  |  Marshal (4)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Military (40)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Multiplication Table (16)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Previously (11)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Replace (31)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Several (32)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solution (267)  |  Strange (157)  |  Strength (126)  |  Symbol (93)  |  System (537)  |  Table (104)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Troop (5)  |  Unnecessary (23)  |  Use (766)  |  Utmost (12)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wonderful (149)

Time ends. That is the lesson of the “big bang”. It is also the lesson of the black hole, closer at hand and more immediate object of study. The black hole is a completely collapsed object. It is mass without matter. The Cheshire cat in Alice in Wonderland faded away leaving behind only its grin. A star that falls into an already existing black hole, or that collapses to make a new black hole, fades away. Of the star, of its matter and of its sunspots and solar prominences, all trace disappears. There remains behind only gravitational attraction, the attraction of disembodied mass.
In 'The Lesson of the Black Hole', Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society (1981), 125, 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Alice In Wonderland (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Bang (29)  |  Behind (137)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Black Hole (17)  |  Cat (47)  |  Cheshire Cat (3)  |  Closer (43)  |  Completely (135)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Disembodied (6)  |  End (590)  |  Fad (10)  |  Fall (230)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Grin (4)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Mass (157)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Object (422)  |  Prominence (5)  |  Remain (349)  |  Star (427)  |  Study (653)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunspot (5)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)

To me education is a leading out of what is already there in the pupil’s soul. To Miss Mackay it is a putting in of something that is not there, and that is not what I call education, I call it intrusion.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Call (769)  |  Education (378)  |  Intrusion (3)  |  Lead (384)  |  Miss (51)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Something (719)  |  Soul (226)

To produce a really good biological theory one must try to see through the clutter produced by evolution to the basic mechanisms lying beneath them, realizing that they are likely to be overlaid by other, secondary mechanisms. What seems to physicists to be a hopelessly complicated process may have been what nature found simplest, because nature could only build on what was already there.
In What Mad Pursuit (1990), 139.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (138)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Build (204)  |  Clutter (5)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Good (889)  |  Lying (55)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Process (423)  |  Produced (187)  |  See (1081)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Try (283)

To seek in the great accumulation of the already-said the text that resembles "in advance" a later text, to ransack history in order to rediscover the play of anticipations or echoes, to go right back to the first seeds or to go forward to the last traces, to reveal in a work its fidelity to tradition or its irreducible uniqueness, to raise or lower its stock of originality, to say that the Port -Royal grammarians invented nothing, or to discover that Cuvier had more predecessors than one thought, these are harmless enough amusements for historians who refuse to grow up.
The Archaeology of Knowledge (1969), trans. M. Sheridan Smith (1972), 144.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Advance (280)  |  Amusement (33)  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Back (390)  |  Baron Georges Cuvier (30)  |  Discover (553)  |  Enough (340)  |  First (1283)  |  Forward (102)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grow (238)  |  Historian (54)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Order (632)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Right (452)  |  Royal (57)  |  Say (984)  |  Seed (93)  |  Seek (213)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trace (103)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Uniqueness (11)  |  Work (1351)

Truth scarce ever yet carried it by Vote any where at its first appearance: New Opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without any other Reason, but because they are not already common.
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690). Edited by Peter Nidditch (1975), The Epistle Dedicatory, 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (52)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Common (436)  |  First (1283)  |  New (1216)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reason (744)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Usually (176)  |  Vote (16)

Understanding … must begin by saturating itself with facts and realities. … Besides, we only understand that which is already within us. To understand is to possess the thing understood, first by sympathy and then by intelligence. Instead of first dismembering and dissecting the object to be conceived, we should begin by laying hold of it in its ensemble. The procedure is the same, whether we study a watch or a plant, a work of art or a character.
(7 Apr 1886). In Mary A. Ward (trans.), Amiel’s Journal: The Journal Intime of Henri-Frédéric Amiel (1889), 119.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Begin (260)  |  Character (243)  |  Dismember (2)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Education (378)  |  Ensemble (7)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Must (1526)  |  Object (422)  |  Plant (294)  |  Possess (156)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Reality (261)  |  Study (653)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Understood (156)  |  Watch (109)  |  Work (1351)  |  Work Of Art (3)

Undeveloped though the science [of chemistry] is, it already has great power to bring benefits. Those accruing to physical welfare are readily recognized, as in providing cures, improving the materials needed for everyday living, moving to ameliorate the harm which mankind by its sheer numbers does to the environment, to say nothing of that which even today attends industrial development. And as we continue to improve our understanding of the basic science on which applications increasingly depend, material benefits of this and other kinds are secured for the future.
Speech at the Nobel Banquet (10 Dec 1983) for his Nobel Prize in Chemistry. In Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel: The Nobel Prizes (1984), 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Attend (65)  |  Basic (138)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Continue (165)  |  Cure (122)  |  Depend (228)  |  Development (422)  |  Environment (216)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Future (429)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harm (39)  |  Improve (58)  |  Industrial (13)  |  Industrial Development (4)  |  Kind (557)  |  Living (491)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Material (353)  |  Need (290)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Power (746)  |  Provision (16)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Secured (18)  |  Today (314)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Undeveloped (6)  |  Welfare (25)

Upon the whole, Chymistry is as yet but an opening science, closely connected with the usefull and ornamental arts, and worthy the attention of the liberal mind. And it must always become more and more so: for though it is only of late, that it has been looked upon in that light, the great progress already made in Chymical knowledge, gives us a pleasant prospect of rich additions to it. The Science is now studied on solid and rational grounds. While our knowledge is imperfect, it is apt to run into error: but Experiment is the thread that will lead us out of the labyrinth.
In Alexander Law, Notes of Black's Lectures, vol. 3, 88. Cited in Charles Coulston Gillispie, Dictionary of Scientific Biography: Volumes 1-2 (1981), 181.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  Art (657)  |  Attention (190)  |  Become (815)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Connect (125)  |  Error (321)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Grounds (2)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labyrinth (10)  |  Late (118)  |  Lead (384)  |  Liberal (8)  |  Light (607)  |  Look (582)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Ornament (20)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prospect (30)  |  Rational (90)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solid (116)  |  Study (653)  |  Thread (32)  |  Useful (250)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Worth (169)

We already have anions and cations and now the biochemists and nutritionists are speaking of rat-ions.
Quoted in Ralph Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Anion (4)  |  Biochemist (9)  |  Cation (3)  |  Ion (21)  |  Joke (83)  |  Rat (37)  |  Speaking (119)

We already know the physical laws that govern everything we experience in everyday life … It is a tribute to how far we have come in theoretical physics that it now takes enormous machines and a great deal of money to perform an experiment whose results we cannot predict.
From Inaugural Lecture (29 Apr 1980) as Lucasian Professor at Cambridge University, 'Is the End in Sight for Theoretical Physics?', collected in Black Holes and Baby Universes and Other Essays (1993), 50 & 64.
Science quotes on:  |  Deal (188)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Everyday Life (14)  |  Everything (476)  |  Expensive (10)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Govern (64)  |  Great (1574)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Machine (257)  |  Money (170)  |  Perform (121)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Law (14)  |  Physics (533)  |  Predict (79)  |  Result (677)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)  |  Tribute (10)

We are consuming our forests three times faster than they are being reproduced. Some of the richest timber lands of this continent have already been destroyed, and not replaced, and other vast areas are on the verge of destruction. Yet forests, unlike mines, can be so handled as to yield the best results of use, without exhaustion, just like grain fields.
Address to the Deep Waterway Convention, Memphis, Tennessee (4 Oct 1907), 'Our National Inland Waterways Policy'. In American Waterways (1908), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Area (31)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Continent (76)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Exhaustion (16)  |  Faster (50)  |  Field (364)  |  Forest (150)  |  Grain (50)  |  Land (115)  |  Management (21)  |  Mine (76)  |  Natural Resource (22)  |  Other (2236)  |  Replacement (12)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Result (677)  |  Richest (2)  |  Timber (7)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Vast (177)  |  Verge (10)  |  Yield (81)

We can see that, the constant in the law of gravitation being fixed, there may be some upper limit to the amount of matter possible; as more and more matter is added in the distant parts, space curves round and ultimately closes; the process of adding more matter must stop, because there is no more space, and we can only return to the region already dealt with. But there seems nothing to prevent a defect of matter, leaving space unclosed. Some mechanism seems to be needed, whereby either gravitation creates matter, or all the matter in the universe conspires to define a law of gravitation.
In Space, Time and Gravitation: An Outline of the General Relativity Theory (1920, 1921), 163.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Being (1278)  |  Constant (144)  |  Create (235)  |  Curve (49)  |  Defect (31)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Gravitation (22)  |  Limit (280)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Process (423)  |  Return (124)  |  See (1081)  |  Space (500)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Universe (857)

We come now to the question: what is a priori certain or necessary, respectively in geometry (doctrine of space) or its foundations? Formerly we thought everything; nowadays we think nothing. Already the distance-concept is logically arbitrary; there need be no things that correspond to it, even approximately.
In article he wrote, 'Space-Time', for Encyclopaedia Britannica (14th ed., 1929), Vol. 21, 106.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (26)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Certain (550)  |  Concept (221)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Distance (161)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Everything (476)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Logic (287)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Question (621)  |  Respectively (13)  |  Space (500)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)

We have already considered with disfavour the possibility of the universe having been planned by a biologist or an engineer; from the intrinsic evidence of his creation, the Great Architect of the Universe now begins to appear as a pure mathematician.
The Mysterious Universe (1930), 134.
Science quotes on:  |  Architect (29)  |  Begin (260)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Consider (416)  |  Creation (327)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Evidence (248)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Intrinsic (18)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Origin Of The Universe (16)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Pure (291)  |  Universe (857)

We have seven or eight geological facts, related by Moses on the one part, and on the other, deduced solely from the most exact and best verified geological observations, and yet agreeing perfectly with each other, not only in substance, but in the order of their succession... That two accounts derived from sources totally distinct from and independent on each other should agree not only in the substance but in the order of succession of two events only, is already highly improbable, if these facts be not true, both substantially and as to the order of their succession. Let this improbability, as to the substance of the facts, be represented only by 1/10. Then the improbability of their agreement as to seven events is 1.7/10.7 that is, as one to ten million, and would be much higher if the order also had entered into the computation.
Geological Essays (1799), 52-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Agreement (53)  |  Best (459)  |  Both (493)  |  Computation (24)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Enter (141)  |  Event (216)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Geology (220)  |  Improbability (11)  |  Moses (6)  |  Most (1731)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Probability (130)  |  Represent (155)  |  Substance (248)  |  Succession (77)  |  Two (937)  |  Verification (31)

We know enough to be sure that the scientific achievements of the next fifty years will be far greater, more rapid, and more surprising, than those we have already experienced. … Wireless telephones and television, following naturally upon the their present path of development, would enable their owner to connect up to any room similarly equipped and hear and take part in the conversation as well as if he put his head in through the window.
From 'Fifty Years Hence', Strand Magazine (Dec 1931). Reprinted in Popular Mechanics (Mar 1932), 57, No. 3, 394-396.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Connect (125)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Development (422)  |  Enable (119)  |  Enough (340)  |  Equipped (17)  |  Experienced (2)  |  Greater (288)  |  Head (81)  |  Hear (139)  |  Know (1518)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Path (144)  |  Present (619)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Room (40)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Surprising (4)  |  Telephone (27)  |  Television (30)  |  Through (849)  |  Will (2355)  |  Window (58)  |  Wireless (5)  |  Year (933)

We live in a capitalist economy, and I have no particular objection to honorable self-interest. We cannot hope to make the needed, drastic improvement in primary and secondary education without a dramatic restructuring of salaries. In my opinion, you cannot pay a good teacher enough money to recompense the value of talent applied to the education of young children. I teach an hour or two a day to tolerably well-behaved near-adults–and I come home exhausted. By what possible argument are my services worth more in salary than those of a secondary-school teacher with six classes a day, little prestige, less support, massive problems of discipline, and a fundamental role in shaping minds. (In comparison, I only tinker with intellects already largely formed.)
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Argument (138)  |  Capitalist (6)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Class (164)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Dramatic (17)  |  Drastic (2)  |  Economy (55)  |  Education (378)  |  Enough (340)  |  Exhaust (22)  |  Form (959)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Good (889)  |  Home (170)  |  Honorable (14)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hour (186)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Interest (386)  |  Largely (13)  |  Less (103)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Massive (9)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Money (170)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  Objection (32)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Particular (76)  |  Pay (43)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prestige (14)  |  Primary (80)  |  Problem (676)  |  Recompense (2)  |  Restructuring (2)  |  Role (86)  |  Salary (7)  |  School (219)  |  Secondary (14)  |  Secondary School (4)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Interest (3)  |  Service (110)  |  Shape (72)  |  Support (147)  |  Talent (94)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Tinker (6)  |  Two (937)  |  Value (365)  |  Worth (169)  |  Young (227)

We may best hope to understand the nature and conditions of real knowledge, by studying the nature and conditions of the most certain and stable portions of knowledge which we already possess: and we are most likely to learn the best methods of discovering truth, by examining how truths, now universally recognised, have really been discovered.
In The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences (1840), Vol. I, 3-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Certain (550)  |  Condition (356)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Examining (2)  |  Hope (299)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Portion (84)  |  Possess (156)  |  Recognized (3)  |  Stability (25)  |  Stable (30)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universal (189)

We seem to think that God speaks by seconding the ideas we’ve already adopted, but God nearly always catches us by surprise...God tends to confound, astonish, and flabbergast.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 154
Science quotes on:  |  Adopt (19)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Catch (31)  |  Confound (21)  |  Flabbergast (2)  |  God (757)  |  Idea (843)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Second (62)  |  Seem (145)  |  Speak (232)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Tend (124)  |  Think (1086)

We shall therefore say that a program has common sense if it automatically deduces for itself a sufficient wide class of immediate consequences of anything it is told and what it already knows. ... Our ultimate objective is to make programs that learn from their experience as effectively as humans do.
'Programs with Common Sense', (probably the first paper on AI), delivered to the Teddington Conference on the Mechanization of Thought Processes (Dec 1958). Printed in National Physical Laboratory, Mechanisation of Thought Processes: Proceedings of a Symposium Held at the National Physical Laboratory on 24th, 25th, 26th and 27th November 1958 (1959), 78. Also Summary in John McCarthy and Vladimir Lifschitz (ed.), Formalizing Common Sense: Papers by John McCarthy (1990), 9-10.
Science quotes on:  |  Artificial Intelligence (8)  |  Automatic (16)  |  Class (164)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Definition (221)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effective (59)  |  Experience (467)  |  Human (1468)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Make (25)  |  Objective (91)  |  Say (984)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Wide (96)

We should admit in theory what is already very largely a case in practice, that the main currency of scientific information is the secondary sources in the forms of abstracts, reports, tables, &c., and that the primary sources are only for detailed reference by very few people. It is possible that the fate of most scientific papers will be not to be read by anyone who uses them, but with luck they will furnish an item, a number, some facts or data to such reports which may, but usually will not, lead to the original paper being consulted. This is very sad but it is the inevitable consequence of the growth of science. The number of papers that can be consulted is absolutely limited, no more time can be spent in looking up papers, by and large, than in the past. As the number of papers increase the chance of any one paper being looked at is correspondingly diminished. This of course is only an average, some papers may be looked at by thousands of people and may become a regular and fixed part of science but most will perish unseen.
'The Supply of Information to the Scientist: Some Problems of the Present Day', The Journal of Documentation, 1957, 13, 195.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Average (82)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chance (239)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Course (409)  |  Data (156)  |  Detail (146)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fate (72)  |  Form (959)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Growth (187)  |  Increase (210)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Information (166)  |  Large (394)  |  Lead (384)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Luck (42)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Number (699)  |  Paper (182)  |  Past (337)  |  People (1005)  |  Perish (50)  |  Possible (552)  |  Practice (204)  |  Primary (80)  |  Publication (101)  |  Read (287)  |  Regular (46)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Spent (85)  |  Table (104)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unseen (22)  |  Use (766)  |  Usually (176)  |  Will (2355)

What is found in the effect was already in the cause.
In Creative Evolution (1907).
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Effect (393)

What is important is the gradual development of a theory, based on a careful analysis of the ... facts. ... Its first applications are necessarily to elementary problems where the result has never been in doubt and no theory is actually required. At this early stage the application serves to corroborate the theory. The next stage develops when the theory is applied to somewhat more complicated situations in which it may already lead to a certain extent beyond the obvious and familiar. Here theory and application corroborate each other mutually. Beyond lies the field of real success: genuine prediction by theory. It is well known that all mathematized sciences have gone through these successive stages of evolution.
'Formulation of the Economic Problem' in Theory of Games and Economic Behavior (1964), 8. Reprinted in John Von Neumann, F. Bródy (ed.) and Tibor Vámos (ed.), The Neumann Compendium (2000), 416.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Certain (550)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Corroborate (2)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Early (185)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Known (454)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lie (364)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Never (1087)  |  Next (236)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Other (2236)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Problem (676)  |  Required (108)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Situation (113)  |  Stage (143)  |  Success (302)  |  Successive (73)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)

What, in fact, is mathematical discovery? It does not consist in making new combinations with mathematical entities that are already known. That can be done by anyone, and the combinations that could be so formed would be infinite in number, and the greater part of them would be absolutely devoid of interest. Discovery consists precisely in not constructing useless combinations, but in constructing those that are useful, which are an infinitely small minority. Discovery is discernment, selection.
In Science et Méthode (1920), 48, as translated by Francis Maitland, in Science and Method (1908, 1952), 50-51. Also seen elsewhere translated with “invention” in place of “discovery”.
Science quotes on:  |  Combination (144)  |  Consist (223)  |  Definition (221)  |  Discernment (4)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Form (959)  |  Greater (288)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Interest (386)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Making (300)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Minority (21)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Selection (128)  |  Small (477)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)

When experimental results are found to be in conflict with those of an earlier investigator, the matter is often taken too easily and disposed of for an instance by pointing out a possible source of error in the experiments of the predessessor, but without enquiring whether the error, if present, would be quantitatively sufficient to explain the discrepancy. I think that disagreement with former results should never be taken easily, but every effort should be made to find a true explanation. This can be done in many more cases than it actually is; and as a result, it can be done more easily by the man “on the spot” who is already familiar with the essential details. But it may require a great deal of imagination, and very often it will require supplementary experiments.
From 'August Krogh' in Festkrift Københavns Universitet 1950 (1950), 18, as cited by E. Snorrason, 'Krogh, Schack August Steenberg', in Charles Coulton Gillispie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1973), Vol 7, 501. The DSB quote is introduced, “All his life Krogh was more interested in physical than in chemiical problems in biology, and he explained his critical attitude thus.”
Science quotes on:  |  Conflict (73)  |  Deal (188)  |  Detail (146)  |  Disagreement (14)  |  Discrepancy (7)  |  Dispose (10)  |  Earlier (9)  |  Ease (35)  |  Effort (227)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Error (321)  |  Essential (199)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Find (998)  |  Former (137)  |  Great (1574)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Present (619)  |  Quantitative (29)  |  Require (219)  |  Result (677)  |  Source Of Error (2)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Supplementary (4)  |  Think (1086)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)

When I began my physical studies [in Munich in 1874] and sought advice from my venerable teacher Philipp von Jolly...he portrayed to me physics as a highly developed, almost fully matured science...Possibly in one or another nook there would perhaps be a dust particle or a small bubble to be examined and classified, but the system as a whole stood there fairly secured, and theoretical physics approached visibly that degree of perfection which, for example, geometry has had already for centuries.

From a lecture (1924). In Damien Broderick (ed.), Year Million: Science at the Far Edge of Knowledge (2008), 104.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  Approach (108)  |  Bubble (22)  |  Degree (276)  |  Develop (268)  |  Dust (64)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Particle (194)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Science (3879)  |  Secured (18)  |  Small (477)  |  System (537)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)  |  Venerable (7)  |  Whole (738)

When I undertake the dissection of a human cadaver I pass a stout rope tied like a noose beneath the lower jaw and through the two zygomas up to the top of the head, either more toward the forehead or more toward the occiput according as I want the cadaver to hang with its head up or down. The longer end of the noose I run through a pulley fixed to a beam in the room so that I may raise or lower the cadaver as it hangs there or may turn it round in any direction to suit my purpose; and should I so wish I can allow it to recline at an angle upon a table, since a table can easily be placed underneath the pulley. This is how the cadaver was suspended for drawing all the muscle tables... though while that one was being drawn the rope was passed around the occiput so as to show the muscles in the neck. If the lower jaw has been removed in the course of dissection, or the zygomas have been broken, the hollows for the temporal muscles will nonetheless hold the noose sufficiently firmly. You must take care not to put the noose around the neck, unless some of the muscles connected to the occipital bone have already been cut away. It is best to suspend the cadaver like this because a human body lying on a table is very difficult to turn over on to its chest or its back.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem (1543), Book II, 268, as translated by William Frank Richardson and John Burd Carman, in 'How the Cadaver Can Be Held Erect While These Muscles are Dissected', On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book II: The Ligaments and Muscles (1998), 234.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Beam (24)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Best (459)  |  Body (537)  |  Bone (95)  |  Broken (56)  |  Cadaver (2)  |  Care (186)  |  Connect (125)  |  Course (409)  |  Cut (114)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direction (175)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Down (456)  |  Drawing (56)  |  End (590)  |  Hang (45)  |  Head (81)  |  Human (1468)  |  Jaw (4)  |  Lying (55)  |  More (2559)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Must (1526)  |  Neck (15)  |  Noose (2)  |  Pass (238)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rope (7)  |  Run (174)  |  Show (346)  |  Suspended (5)  |  Table (104)  |  Through (849)  |  Top (96)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

When the history of our galaxy is written, and for all any of us know it may already have been, if Earth gets mentioned at all it won’t be because its inhabitants visited their own moon. That first step, like a newborn’s cry, would be automatically assumed. What would be worth recording is what kind of civilization we earthlings created and whether or not we ventured out to other parts of the galaxy.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Assume (38)  |  Automatically (5)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Create (235)  |  Cry (29)  |  Earth (996)  |  First (1283)  |  Galaxy (51)  |  History (673)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mention (82)  |  Moon (237)  |  Newborn (5)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Record (154)  |  Recording (13)  |  Step (231)  |  Venture (18)  |  Visit (26)  |  Worth (169)  |  Write (230)

When you say, “The burned child dreads the fire, “ you mean that he is already a master of induction.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 132.
Science quotes on:  |  Burn (87)  |  Child (307)  |  Dread (13)  |  Fire (189)  |  Induction (77)  |  Logic (287)  |  Master (178)  |  Mean (809)  |  Say (984)

Whereas you have a very expensive dept. for destroying human life, would it not be for the honour of the New World to have a little national establishment for the preservation of human life; more especially as the devouring monster, small pox, has already destroyed many millions (some say 40) more lives than there are people now on the face of the earth.
(Conclusion of a letter (14 Dec 1826) to Massachusetts Congressman Edward Everett (1794-1865), in which he outlined his experience with vaccination.)
Science quotes on:  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Earth (996)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Experience (467)  |  Face (212)  |  Honour (56)  |  Human (1468)  |  Letter (109)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Monster (31)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  People (1005)  |  Say (984)  |  Small (477)  |  Vaccination (6)  |  World (1774)

While reading in a textbook of chemistry, … I came across the statement, “nitric acid acts upon copper.” I was getting tired of reading such absurd stuff and I determined to see what this meant. Copper was more or less familiar to me, for copper cents were then in use. I had seen a bottle marked “nitric acid” on a table in the doctor’s office where I was then “doing time.” I did not know its peculiarities, but I was getting on and likely to learn. The spirit of adventure was upon me. Having nitric acid and copper, I had only to learn what the words “act upon” meant … I put one of them [cent] on the table, opened the bottle marked “nitric acid”; poured some of the liquid on the copper; and prepared to make an observation. But what was this wonderful thing which I beheld? The cent was already changed, and it was no small change either. A greenish blue liquid foamed and fumed over the cent and over the table. The air in the neighborhood of the performance became colored dark red. A great colored cloud arose. This was disagreeable and suffocating—how should I stop this? I tried to get rid of the objectionable mess by picking it up and throwing it out of the window, which I had meanwhile opened. I learned another fact—nitric acid not only acts upon copper but it acts upon fingers. The pain led to another unpremeditated experiment. I drew my fingers across my trousers and another fact was discovered. Nitric acid acts upon trousers. Taking everything into consideration, that was the most impressive experiment, and, relatively, probably the most costly experiment I have ever performed.
In F.H. Getman, The Life of Ira Remsen (1940), 9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurd (59)  |  Absurdity (32)  |  Acid (83)  |  Act (272)  |  Adventure (56)  |  Air (347)  |  Biography (240)  |  Bottle (15)  |  Cent (5)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Color (137)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Copper (25)  |  Cost (86)  |  Dark (140)  |  Disagreeable (5)  |  Discover (553)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Doing (280)  |  Everything (476)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Finger (44)  |  Foam (3)  |  Fume (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Impressiveness (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Marked (55)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mess (13)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Most (1731)  |  Neighborhood (12)  |  Nitric Acid (2)  |  Observation (555)  |  Office (71)  |  Open (274)  |  Pain (136)  |  Peculiarity (25)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Reading (133)  |  See (1081)  |  Small (477)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Statement (142)  |  Suffocation (2)  |  Table (104)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Throwing (17)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trousers (5)  |  Use (766)  |  Window (58)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Word (619)

While we keep an open mind on this question of vitalism, or while we lean, as so many of us now do, or even cling with a great yearning, to the belief that something other than the physical forces animates the dust of which we are made, it is rather the business of the philosopher than of the biologist, or of the biologist only when he has served his humble and severe apprenticeship to philosophy, to deal with the ultimate problem. It is the plain bounden duty of the biologist to pursue his course unprejudiced by vitalistic hypotheses, along the road of observation and experiment, according to the accepted discipline of the natural and physical sciences. … It is an elementary scientific duty, it is a rule that Kant himself laid down, that we should explain, just as far as we possibly can, all that is capable of such explanation, in the light of the properties of matter and of the forms of energy with which we are already acquainted.
From Presidential Address to Zoological Section of the British Association for the Advancement of Science. As quoted in H.V. Neal, 'The Basis of Individuality in Organisms: A Defense of Vitalism', Science (21 Jul 1916), 44 N.S., No. 1125, 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Apprenticeship (4)  |  Belief (578)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Business (149)  |  Capable (168)  |  Course (409)  |  Deal (188)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Dust (64)  |  Duty (68)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Energy (344)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  Humble (50)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Immanuel Kant (49)  |  Light (607)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Natural (796)  |  Observation (555)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Problem (676)  |  Properties Of Matter (7)  |  Property (168)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Question (621)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Something (719)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Vitalism (5)  |  Yearning (12)

Why may not the present generation, who have already good turnpikes, make the experiment of using steam carriages upon them? They will assuredly effect the movement of heavy burthens; with a slow motion of two and a half miles an hour, and as their progress need not be interrupted, they may travel fifty or sixty miles in the 24 hours.
From 'On the Origin of Steam Boats and Steam Wagons', Thomas Cooper (ed.), The Emporium of Arts and Sciences (Feb 1814), 2, No. 2, 215.
Science quotes on:  |  Carriage (10)  |  Effect (393)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Generation (242)  |  Good (889)  |  Hour (186)  |  Motion (310)  |  Movement (155)  |  Present (619)  |  Progress (465)  |  Slow (101)  |  Speed (65)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Power (8)  |  Transport (30)  |  Travel (114)  |  Turnpike (2)  |  Two (937)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

Words well up freely from the breast, without necessity or intent, and there may well have been no wandering horde in any desert that did not already have its own songs. For man, as a species, is a singing creature, though the notes, in his case, are also coupled with thought.
On Language (1836), trans. Peter Heath (1988), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Creature (233)  |  Desert (56)  |  Language (293)  |  Man (2251)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Singing (19)  |  Song (37)  |  Species (401)  |  Thought (953)  |  Word (619)

You can only find truth with logic if you have already found truth without it.
In G.K. Chesterton, 'The Maxims of Maxim', Daily News (25 Feb 1905). Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Find (998)  |  Logic (287)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Without (13)

You do not know our culture, our ethics, or the unwritten codes that already provide our society more order than could be obtained by any of your impositions.
In 'A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace' (8 Feb 1996). Published on Electronic Frontier Foundation website. Reproduced in Lawrence Lessig, Code: Version 2.0) (2008), 302.
Science quotes on:  |  Code (31)  |  Culture (143)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ethic (40)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Imposition (5)  |  Know (1518)  |  More (2559)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Order (632)  |  Provide (69)  |  Society (326)

You may perceive something of the distinction which I think necessary to keep in view between art and science, between the artist and the man of knowledge, or the philosopher. The man of knowledge, the philosopher, is he who studies and acquires knowledge in order to improve his own mind; and with a desire of extending the department of knowledge to which he turns his attention, or to render it useful to the world, by discoveries, or by inventions, which may be the foundation of new arts, or of improvements in those already established. Excited by one or more of these motives, the philosopher employs himself in acquiring knowledge and in communicating it. The artist only executes and practises what the philosopher or man of invention has discovered or contrived, while the business of the trader is to retail the productions of the artist, exchange some of them for others, and transport them to distant places for that purpose.
From the first of a series of lectures on chemistry, collected in John Robison (ed.), Lectures on the Elements of Chemistry: Delivered in the University of Edinburgh (1807), Vol. 1, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Art (657)  |  Artist (90)  |  Attention (190)  |  Business (149)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Contrive (10)  |  Definition (221)  |  Department (92)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distant (33)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Employ (113)  |  Establish (57)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Excite (15)  |  Execute (7)  |  Extend (128)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Himself (461)  |  Improve (58)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Invention (369)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Motive (59)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Place (177)  |  Practise (7)  |  Production (183)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Render (93)  |  Retail (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Something (719)  |  Study (653)  |  Think (1086)  |  Transport (30)  |  Turn (447)  |  Useful (250)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

You should call it entropy, for two reasons. In the first place your uncertainty function has been used in statistical mechanics under that name, so it already has a name. In the second place, and more important, no one really knows what entropy really is, so in a debate you will always have the advantage.
From the recollection of Claude Shannon given in discussion with Myron Tribus (Apr 1961) about the reason Shannon chose the word “entropy” for his information function (first used by Shannon in a 1945 memorandum at Bell Labs). The suggestion from Neumann to use “entropy” dates back to a Neumann-Shannon conversation c.1940. Shannon’s recollection of the Neumann’s recommendation was quoted as recollected by Tribus in Myron Tribus and Edward C. McIrving, 'Energy and Information', Scientific American (1971), 225, 179-88.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Call (769)  |  Debate (38)  |  Entropy (44)  |  First (1283)  |  Function (228)  |  Information (166)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Reason (744)  |  Statistical Mechanics (7)  |  Two (937)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Understand (606)  |  Will (2355)

[1665-04-30] ...Great fear of the sicknesses here in the City, it being said that two or three houses are already shut up. God preserve us all.
Diary of Samuel Pepys (30 Apr 1665)
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  City (78)  |  Fear (197)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  House (140)  |  Plague (41)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Shut (41)  |  Two (937)

[About any invention] (1) everything that’s already in the world when you’re born is just normal; (2) anything that gets invented between then and before you turn thirty is incredibly exciting and creative and with any luck you can make a career out of it; (3) anything that gets invented after you’re thirty is against the natural order of things and the beginning of the end of civilisation as we know it until it’s been around for about ten years when it gradually turns out to be alright really.
In News Review section, Sunday Times (29 Aug 1999).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Age (499)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Birth (147)  |  Career (75)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Creative (137)  |  End (590)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Invention (369)  |  Know (1518)  |  Luck (42)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Order (4)  |  Normal (28)  |  Order (632)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thirty (6)  |  Turn (447)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

[Alchemists] finde out men so covetous of so much happiness, whom they easily perswade that they shall finde greater Riches in Hydargyrie [mercury], than Nature affords in Gold. Such, whom although they have twice or thrice already been deluded, yet they have still a new Device wherewith to deceive um again; there being no greater Madness…. So that the smells of Coles, Sulphur, Dung, Poyson, and Piss, are to them a greater pleasure than the taste of Honey; till their Farms, Goods, and Patrimonies being wasted, and converted into Ashes and Smoak, when they expect the rewards of their Labours, births of Gold, Youth, and Immortality, after all their Time and Expences; at length, old, ragged, famisht, with the continual use of Quicksilver [mercury] paralytick, onely rich in misery, … a laughing-stock to the people: … compell’d to live in the lowest degree of poverty, and … at length compell’d thereto by Penury, they fall to Ill Courses, as Counterfeiting of Money.
In The Vanity of the Arts and Sciences (1530), translation (1676), 313.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemist (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Birth (147)  |  Coal (57)  |  Continual (43)  |  Counterfeit (2)  |  Course (409)  |  Covetous (2)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Degree (276)  |  Delude (3)  |  Deluded (7)  |  Device (70)  |  Dung (7)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fall (230)  |  Farm (26)  |  Gold (97)  |  Good (889)  |  Greater (288)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Honey (15)  |  Labour (98)  |  Live (628)  |  Madness (33)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Misery (30)  |  Money (170)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Penury (3)  |  People (1005)  |  Persuade (11)  |  Piss (3)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Poison (40)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Quicksilver (7)  |  Reward (68)  |  Smell (27)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Still (613)  |  Sulphur (18)  |  Taste (90)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Youth (101)

[Experimental Physicist] Phys. I know that it is often a help to represent pressure and volume as height and width on paper; and so geometry may have applications to the theory of gases. But is it not going rather far to say that geometry can deal directly with these things and is not necessarily concerned with lengths in space?
[Mathematician] Math. No. Geometry is nowadays largely analytical, so that in form as well as in effect, it deals with variables of an unknown nature. …It is literally true that I do not want to know the significance of the variables x, y, z, t that I am discussing. …
Phys. Yours is a strange subject. You told us at the beginning that you are not concerned as to whether your propositions are true, and now you tell us you do not even care to know what you are talking about.
Math. That is an excellent description of Pure Mathematics, which has already been given by an eminent mathematician [Bertrand Russell].
In Space, Time and Gravitation: An Outline of the General Relativity Theory (1920, 1921), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Care (186)  |  Concern (228)  |  Deal (188)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effect (393)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Experimental Physicist (10)  |  Form (959)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Know (1518)  |  Literally (30)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Paper (182)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Represent (155)  |  Say (984)  |  Significance (113)  |  Space (500)  |  Strange (157)  |  Subject (521)  |  Talking (76)  |  Tell (340)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Variable (34)  |  Want (497)

[Having already asserted his opposition to communism in every respect by signing the regents' oath, his answer to a question why a non-Communist professor should refuse to take a non-Communist oath as a condition of University employment was that to do so would imply it was] up to an accused person to clear himself. ... That sort of thing is going on in Washington today and is a cause of alarm to thoughtful citizens. It is the method used in totalitarian countries. It sounds un-American to people who don’t like to be pushed around. If someone says I ought to do a certain thing the burden should be on him to show I why I should, not on me to show why I should not.
As quoted in 'Educator Scores Oath For Faculty', New York Times (16 Apr 1950), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Accusation (6)  |  Alarm (18)  |  Answer (366)  |  Assert (66)  |  Burden (27)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Communism (11)  |  Communist (8)  |  Condition (356)  |  Country (251)  |  Do (1908)  |  Employment (32)  |  Himself (461)  |  Method (505)  |  Oath (10)  |  Opposition (48)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Professor (128)  |  Push (62)  |  Question (621)  |  Refusal (22)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Respect (207)  |  Say (984)  |  Show (346)  |  Sound (183)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thoughtful (15)  |  Today (314)  |  Totalitarian (6)  |  Un-American (3)  |  Unamerican (2)  |  University (121)  |  Washington (5)  |  Why (491)

[Scientists] define these [terms] in tight phrases which convey a meaning only to those who already understand it.
In Science is a Sacred Cow (1950), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Definition (221)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

[The compass needle] as the guide of Vasco de Gama to the East Indies, and of Columbus to the West Indies and the New World, it was pre-eminently the precursor and pioneer of the telegraph. Silently, and as with finger on its lips, it led them across the waste of waters to the new homes of the world; but when these were largely filled, and houses divided between the old and new hemispheres longed to exchange affectionate greetings, it removed its finger and broke silence. The quivering magnetic needle which lies in the coil of the galvanometer is the tongue of the electric telegraph, and already engineers talk of it as speaking.
'Progress of the Telegraph.' In Jesse Aitken Wilson, Memoirs of George Wilson. Quoted in Natural History Society of Montreal, 'Reviews and Notices of Books,' The Canadian Naturalist and Geologist (1861) Vol. 6, 392.
Science quotes on:  |  Compass (34)  |  Divided (50)  |  Electric (76)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Exchange (37)