Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY™
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, ... finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell ... whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index M > Category: Magnificent

Magnificent Quotes (14 quotes)

At last have made wonderful discovery in valley; a magnificent tomb with seals intact; re-covered same for your arrival; congratulations.
Telegram (6 Nov 1922) sent to Lord Carnarvon. In The Discovery of the Tomb of Tutankhamen (1923, 1977), 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (548)  |  Intact (3)  |  Seal (9)  |  Tomb (6)  |  Valley (15)  |  Wonderful (26)

I would rather be ashes than dust!
I would rather that my spark should burn out in a brilliant blaze than it should be stifled by dry-rot.
I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet.
The proper function of man is to live, not to exist.
I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them.
I shall use my time.
'Jack London Credo' quoted, without citing a source, in Irving Shepard (ed.), Jack London’s Tales of Adventure (1956), Introduction, vii. (Irving Shepard was London's literary executor.) This sentiment, expressed two months before his death, was quoted by journalist Ernest J. Hopkins in the San Francisco Bulletin (2 Dec 1916), Pt. 2, 1. No direct source in London's writings has been found, though he wrote “I would rather be ashes than dust&rdquo. as an inscription in an autograph book. Biographer Clarice Stasz cautions that although Hopkins had visited the ranch just weeks before London's death, the journalist's quote (as was not uncommon in his time) is not necessarily reliable, or may be his own invention. See this comment in 'Apocrypha' appended to Jack London, The Call Of The Wild (eBookEden.com).
Science quotes on:  |  Ash (15)  |  Atom (226)  |  Brilliant (10)  |  Burn (21)  |  Day (38)  |  Death (240)  |  Dust (36)  |  Existence (208)  |  Function (74)  |  Glow (6)  |  Life (742)  |  Man (334)  |  Meteor (12)  |  Permanence (15)  |  Planet (158)  |  Prolong (8)  |  Sleep (33)  |  Spark (16)  |  Time (319)  |  Use (70)  |  Waste (49)

In space there are countless constellations, suns and planets; we see only the suns because they give light; the planets remain invisible, for they are small and dark. There are also numberless earths circling around their suns, no worse and no less than this globe of ours. For no reasonable mind can assume that heavenly bodies that may be far more magnificent than ours would not bear upon them creatures similar or even superior to those upon our human earth.
As quoted in Dave Goldberg, The Universe in the Rearview Mirror: How Hidden Symmetries Shape Reality (2013), 74.
Science quotes on:  |  Assume (10)  |  Bear (8)  |  Body (161)  |  Circling (2)  |  Constellation (6)  |  Countless (10)  |  Creature (103)  |  Dark (36)  |  Earth (414)  |  Globe (33)  |  Heaven (104)  |  Human (312)  |  Invisible (21)  |  Light (209)  |  Mind (437)  |  Numberless (3)  |  Planet (158)  |  Reasonable (14)  |  Similar (15)  |  Small (65)  |  Space (127)  |  Sun (179)  |  Superior (26)

It is obvious that man dwells in a splendid universe, a magnificent expanse of earth and sky and heaven, which manifestly is built on a majestic plan, maintains some mighty design, though man himself cannot grasp it. Yet for him it is not a pleasant or satisfying world. In his few moments of respite from labor or from his enemies, he dreams that this very universe might indeed be perfect, its laws operating just as now they seem to do, and yet he and it somehow be in full accord. The very ease with which he can frame this image to himself makes the reality all the more mocking. ... It is only too clear that man is not at home in this universe, and yet he is not good enough to deserve a better.
In The New England Mind: The Seventeenth Century (1939, 1954), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (8)  |  Better (85)  |  Clear (33)  |  Deserve (11)  |  Dream (71)  |  Dwelling (7)  |  Earth (414)  |  Ease (25)  |  Enemy (37)  |  Expanse (2)  |  Frame (13)  |  Grasp (28)  |  Heaven (104)  |  Himself (10)  |  Home (38)  |  Image (25)  |  Labor (38)  |  Law (370)  |  Majestic (6)  |  Manifestly (3)  |  Mankind (165)  |  Mocking (4)  |  Moment (40)  |  Obvious (44)  |  Operating (4)  |  Perfection (63)  |  Plan (59)  |  Pleasant (13)  |  Satisfying (5)  |  Seem (27)  |  Sky (56)  |  Splendid (7)  |  Universe (446)  |  World (496)

It is suitable to the magnificent harmony of the universe that the species of creatures should, by gentle degrees, ascend upward from us toward His perfection, as we see them gradually descend from us downward.
In An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1849), Book 3, Chap 6, Sec. 12, 326.
Science quotes on:  |  Ascend (6)  |  Creature (103)  |  Descend (5)  |  Downward (4)  |  Evolution (445)  |  Gradual (17)  |  Harmony (42)  |  Perfection (63)  |  Species (145)  |  Universe (446)  |  Upward (5)

Of agitating good roads there is no end, and perhaps this is as it should be, but I think you'll agree that it is high time to agitate less and build more. [Here is] a plan whereby the automobile industry of America can build a magnificent “Appian Way” from New York to San Francisco, having it completed by May 1, 1915 and present it to the people of the United States.
From letter (1912) to Elbert Hubbard. In the Lincoln Highway Association, The Lincoln Highway: the Story of a Crusade That Made Transportation History (1935), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  America (63)  |  Automobile (17)  |  Build (53)  |  Good (154)  |  Industry (81)  |  New York (11)  |  Plan (59)  |  Present (74)  |  Road (37)  |  U.S.A. (6)

On 17th July there came to us at Potsdam the eagerly-awaited news of the trial of the atomic bomb in the [New] Mexican desert. Success beyond all dreams crowded this sombre, magnificent venture of our American allies. The detailed reports ... could leave no doubt in the minds of the very few who were informed, that we were in the presence of a new factor in human affairs, and possessed of powers which were irresistible.
From Churchill's final review of the war and his first major speech as Leader of the Opposition in the House of Commons (16 Aug 1945). In Robert Rhodes James, ed., Winston S. Churchill: His Complete Speeches, 1897-1963 (1974), Vol. 1, 7210.
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (14)  |  Ally (2)  |  American (15)  |  Atomic Bomb (98)  |  Detail (54)  |  Doubt (89)  |  Dream (71)  |  Factor (28)  |  Human (312)  |  Information (86)  |  Irresistible (5)  |  Los Alamos (3)  |  Mind (437)  |  New (258)  |  Possession (31)  |  Power (214)  |  Presence (17)  |  Report (27)  |  Success (176)  |  Test (80)  |  Trial (21)  |  Trinity (7)  |  Venture (11)

So there he is at last. Man on the moon. The poor magnificent bungler! He can't even get to the office without undergoing the agonies of the damned, but give him a little metal, a few chemicals, some wire and twenty or thirty billion dollars and, vroom! there he is, up on a rock a quarter of a million miles up in the sky.
[Written when the first manned mission to the Moon, Apollo 11, landed (20 Jul 1969).]
'Why on Earth Are We There? Because It's Impossible', New York Times (21 Jul 1969), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Agony (3)  |  Apollo 11 (6)  |  Astronaut (22)  |  Bungler (2)  |  Chemical (65)  |  Damned (4)  |  Metal (34)  |  Money (113)  |  Moon (116)  |  Office (11)  |  Rocket (27)  |  Undergo (7)

The contemplation of celestial things will make a man both speak and think more sublimely and magnificently when he descends to human affairs.
In Louis Klopsch, Many Thoughts of Many Minds (1896), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (14)  |  Astronomy (157)  |  Celestial (10)  |  Contemplation (32)  |  Speak (27)  |  Thinking (220)

The discoveries of Darwin, himself a magnificent field naturalist, had the remarkable effect of sending the whole zoological world flocking indoors, where they remained hard at work for fifty years or more, and whence they are now beginning to put forth cautious heads into the open air.
(1960)
Science quotes on:  |  Charles Darwin (260)  |  Discovery (548)  |  Field (103)  |  Field Naturalist (3)  |  Naturalist (48)  |  Zoologist (9)  |  Zoology (25)

The only thing harder to understand than a law of statistical origin would be a law that is not of statistical origin, for then there would be no way for it—or its progenitor principles—to come into being. On the other hand, when we view each of the laws of physics—and no laws are more magnificent in scope or better tested—as at bottom statistical in character, then we are at last able to forego the idea of a law that endures from everlasting to everlasting.
In 'Law without Law' (1979), in John Archibald Wheeler and Wojciech Hubert Zurek (eds.), Quantum Theory and Measurement (1983), 203.
Science quotes on:  |  Idea (390)  |  Law (370)  |  Origin (65)  |  Physics (253)  |  Principle (189)  |  Statistics (119)  |  Test (80)  |  Understanding (315)

We believe one magnificent highway of this kind [the Lincoln Highway], in actual existence, will stimulate as nothing else could the building of enduring highways everywhere that will not only be a credit to the American people but that will also mean much to American agriculture and American commerce.
From Letter (24 Sep 1912) to his friend, the publisher Elbert Hubbard asking for help facilitating fund-raising. In Jane Watts Fisher, Fabulous Hoosier: A Story of American Achievement (1947), 79.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (54)  |  America (63)  |  Belief (293)  |  Building (51)  |  Commerce (13)  |  Credit (13)  |  Enduring (5)  |  Existence (208)  |  Highway (9)  |  Lincoln Highway (4)  |  Stimulate (6)

We shall find everywhere, that the several Species are linked together, and differ but in almost insensible degrees. And when we consider the infinite Power and Wisdom of the Maker, we have reason to think, that it is suitable to the magnificent Harmony of the Universe, and the great Design and infinite Goodness of the Architect, that the Species of Creatures should also, by gentle degrees, ascend upward from us toward his infinite Perfection, as we see they gradually descend from us downwards.
In An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding (1689, 1706, 5th ed.), 381.
Science quotes on:  |  Architect (14)  |  Ascend (6)  |  Creature (103)  |  Degree (30)  |  Descend (5)  |  Design (76)  |  Difference (188)  |  Downward (4)  |  Evolution (445)  |  Goodness (5)  |  Gradually (8)  |  Great (163)  |  Harmony (42)  |  Perfection (63)  |  Similarity (17)  |  Species (145)  |  Universe (446)

When the Heavens were a little blue Arch, stuck with Stars, methought the Universe was too straight and close: I was almost stifled for want of Air: but now it is enlarged in height and breadth, and a thousand Vortex’s taken in. I begin to breathe with more freedom, and I think the Universe to be incomparably more magnificent than it was before.
In A Plurality of Worlds (1688), 126, as translated by Mr. Glanvill.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (133)  |  Arch (6)  |  Blue (24)  |  Breadth (3)  |  Breathe (19)  |  Close (21)  |  Enlarge (14)  |  Freedom (57)  |  Heaven (104)  |  Height (19)  |  Incomparable (6)  |  Star (215)  |  Stifled (2)  |  Straight (9)  |  Stuck (5)  |  Think (82)  |  Thought (290)  |  Thousand (88)  |  Universe (446)  |  Vortex (3)  |  Want (80)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

who invites your feedback

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.