Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I was going to record talking... the foil was put on; I then shouted 'Mary had a little lamb',... and the machine reproduced it perfectly.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index E > Category: Extraordinary

Extraordinary Quotes (32 quotes)

All those who think it paradoxical that so great a weight as the earth should not waver or move anywhere seem to me to go astray by making their judgment with an eye to their own affects and not to the property of the whole. For it would not still appear so extraordinary to them, I believe, if they stopped to think that the earth's magnitude compared to the whole body surrounding it is in the ratio of a point to it. For thus it seems possible for that which is relatively least to be supported and pressed against from all sides equally and at the same angle by that which is absolutely greatest and homogeneous.
Ptolemy
'The Almagest 1', in Ptolemy: the Almagest; Nicolaus Copernicus: On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres; Johannes Kepler: Epitome of Copernican Astronomy: IV - V The Harmonies of the World: V, trans. R. Catesby Taliaferro (1952), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Astray (6)  |  Earth (487)  |  Gravity (89)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Motion (127)  |  Paradox (35)  |  Ratio (15)  |  Support (63)  |  Weight (61)

Borel makes the amusing supposition of a million monkeys allowed to play upon the keys of a million typewriters. What is the chance that this wanton activity should reproduce exactly all of the volumes which are contained in the library of the British Museum? It certainly is not a large chance, but it may be roughly calculated, and proves in fact to be considerably larger than the chance that a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen will separate into the two pure constituents. After we have learned to estimate such minute chances, and after we have overcome our fear of numbers which are very much larger or very much smaller than those ordinarily employed, we might proceed to calculate the chance of still more extraordinary occurrences, and even have the boldness to regard the living cell as a result of random arrangement and rearrangement of its atoms. However, we cannot but feel that this would be carrying extrapolation too far. This feeling is due not merely to a recognition of the enormous complexity of living tissue but to the conviction that the whole trend of life, the whole process of building up more and more diverse and complex structures, which we call evolution, is the very opposite of that which we might expect from the laws of chance.
The Anatomy of Science (1926), 158-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Émile Borel (2)  |  Calculate (15)  |  Cell (125)  |  Chance (122)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Conviction (57)  |  Diversity (46)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Extrapolation (3)  |  Library (37)  |  Life (917)  |  Monkey (37)  |  Nitrogen (18)  |  Number (179)  |  Opposite (39)  |  Oxygen (49)  |  Structure (191)  |  Tissue (24)  |  Typewriter (6)

Curiosity that inborn property of man, daughter of ignorance and mother of knowledge when wonder wakens our minds, has the habit, wherever it sees some extraordinary phenomenon of nature, a comet for example, a sun-dog, or a midday star, of asking straightway what it means.
In The New Science (3rd ed., 1744), Book 1, Para. 189, as translated by Thomas Goddard Bergin and Max Harold Fisch, The New Science of Giambattista Vico (1948), 64.
Science quotes on:  |  Asking (23)  |  Comet (43)  |  Curiosity (89)  |  Daughter (11)  |  Habit (78)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Midday (2)  |  Mother (59)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Star (251)  |  Straightway (2)  |  Wonder (134)

Edison was by far the most successful and, probably, the last exponent of the purely empirical method of investigation. Everything he achieved was the result of persistent trials and experiments often performed at random but always attesting extraordinary vigor and resource. Starting from a few known elements, he would make their combinations and permutations, tabulate them and run through the whole list, completing test after test with incredible rapidity until he obtained a clue. His mind was dominated by one idea, to leave no stone unturned, to exhaust every possibility.
As quoted in 'Tesla Says Edison Was an Empiricist', The New York Times (19 Oct 1931), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  Clue (14)  |  Combination (69)  |  Dominate (13)  |  Thomas Edison (74)  |  Empirical (15)  |  Exhaust (12)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Exponent (3)  |  Idea (440)  |  Incredible (18)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Method (154)  |  Mind (544)  |  Permutation (2)  |  Persistence (16)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Random (21)  |  Rapidity (14)  |  Resource (47)  |  Success (202)  |  Test (96)  |  Trial (23)  |  Vigor (3)

Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Claim (52)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Require (33)

Having always observed that most of them who constantly took in the weekly Bills of Mortality made little other use of them than to look at the foot how the burials increased or decreased, and among the Casualties what had happened, rare and extraordinary, in the week current; so as they might take the same as a Text to talk upon in the next company, and withal in the Plague-time, how the Sickness increased or decreased, that the Rich might judg of the necessity of their removal, and Trades-men might conjecture what doings they were likely to have in their respective dealings.
From Natural and Political Observations Mentioned in a Following Index and Made upon Bills of Mortality (1662), Preface. Reproduced in Cornelius Walford, The Insurance Cyclopaedia (1871), Vol. 1, 286. Italicizations from another source.
Science quotes on:  |  Burial (7)  |  Casualty (3)  |  Conjecture (22)  |  Decrease (11)  |  Increase (107)  |  Mortality (13)  |  Observation (418)  |  Plague (34)  |  Rare (31)  |  Sickness (20)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Talk (61)  |  Use (70)

Hitherto the principle of causality was universally accepted as an indispensable postulate of scientific research, but now we are told by some physicists that it must be thrown overboard. The fact that such an extraordinary opinion should be expressed in responsible scientific quarters is widely taken to be significant of the all-round unreliability of human knowledge. This indeed is a very serious situation.
In Where is Science Going? (1932), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (41)  |  Causality (7)  |  Expression (82)  |  Indispensability (2)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Overboard (2)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Postulate (23)  |  Principle (228)  |  Research (517)  |  Responsibility (47)  |  Seriousness (9)  |  Significance (60)  |  Situation (41)  |  Telling (23)  |  Throw (31)

I am besotted with birds of paradise. Watching them display is the most extraordinary thing I’ve ever seen in my life.
From interview with Alice Roberts, 'Attenborough: My Life on Earth', The Biologist (Aug 2015), 62, No. 4, 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Display (22)  |  See (197)  |  Watch (39)

I had a dislike for [mathematics], and ... was hopelessly short in algebra. ... [One extraordinary teacher of mathematics] got the whole year's course into me in exactly six [after-school] lessons of half an hour each. And how? More accurately, why? Simply because he was an algebra fanatic—because he believed that algebra was not only a science of the utmost importance, but also one of the greatest fascination. ... [H]e convinced me in twenty minutes that ignorance of algebra was as calamitous, socially and intellectually, as ignorance of table manners—That acquiring its elements was as necessary as washing behind the ears. So I fell upon the book and gulped it voraciously. ... To this day I comprehend the binomial theorem.
In Prejudices: third series (1922), 261-262.
For a longer excerpt, see H. L. Mencken's Recollections of School Algebra.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (32)  |  Algebra (36)  |  Binomial (2)  |  Book (181)  |  Calamity (8)  |  Comprehension (51)  |  Convincing (9)  |  Course (57)  |  Ear (21)  |  Fanatic (5)  |  Fascination (26)  |  Greatest (53)  |  Gulp (3)  |  Half (35)  |  Hopelessness (4)  |  Hour (42)  |  How (3)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Importance (183)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Lesson (32)  |  Manners (3)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Minute (25)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Society (188)  |  Table (25)  |  Teacher (90)  |  Theorem (46)  |  Utmost (8)  |  Washing (3)  |  Whole (122)  |  Why (6)  |  Year (214)

I know a good many men of great learning—that is, men born with an extraordinary eagerness and capacity to acquire knowledge. One and all, they tell me that they can't recall learning anything of any value in school. All that schoolmasters managed to accomplish with them was to test and determine the amount of knowledge that they had already acquired independently—and not infrequently the determination was made clumsily and inaccurately.
In Prejudices: third series (1922), 261.
For a longer excerpt, see H. L. Mencken's Recollections of School Algebra.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (57)  |  Acquisition (32)  |  Already (16)  |  Birth (81)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Clumsiness (2)  |  Determination (53)  |  Eagerness (4)  |  Inaccuracy (3)  |  Independence (32)  |  Infrequently (2)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Learning (174)  |  School (87)  |  Schoolmaster (4)  |  Teacher (90)  |  Test (96)  |  Value (180)

I think science has enjoyed an extraordinary success because it has such a limited and narrow realm in which to focus its efforts. Namely, the physical universe.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Effort (94)  |  Enjoy (23)  |  Focus (21)  |  Limit (86)  |  Namely (10)  |  Narrow (33)  |  Physical (94)  |  Realm (40)  |  Science (1699)  |  Success (202)  |  Think (205)  |  Universe (563)

I wish, my dear Kepler, that we could have a good laugh together at the extraordinary stupidity of the mob. What do you think of the foremost philosophers of this University? In spite of my oft-repeated efforts and invitations, they have refused, with the obstinacy of a glutted adder, to look at the planets or the Moon or my glass [telescope].
Opere ed Nas. X, 423. As cited in Alan Mackay, A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (1991), 99. Galileo wished others to use his telescope to see for themselves the moons of Jupiter which he had himself first seen in Jan 1610. If you have a primary source for this letter giving the date it was written, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Adder (2)  |  Effort (94)  |  Foremost (8)  |  Glass (35)  |  Invitation (8)  |  Johannes Kepler (72)  |  Laugh (18)  |  Mob (5)  |  Moon (132)  |  Obstinacy (3)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Planet (199)  |  Refusal (20)  |  Stupidity (27)  |  Telescope (74)  |  University (51)  |  Wish (62)

Macaulay somewhere says, that it is extraordinary that, whereas the laws of the motions of the heavenly bodies, far removed as they are from us, are perfectly well understood, the laws of the human mind, which are under our observation all day and every day, are no better understood than they were two thousand years ago.
In Notes on Nursing: What It Is and What It Is Not (1859), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Heavens (16)  |  Human Mind (51)  |  Law Of Motion (12)  |  Lord Thomas Macaulay (4)  |  Observation (418)  |  Understanding (317)

Man is still the most extraordinary computer of all.
Remarks upon presenting the NASA Distinguished Service Medal to astronaut L. Gordon Cooper, in the Flower Garden, at the White House, Washington, D.C. (21 May 1963). From John T. Woolley and Gerhard Peters, The American Presidency Project [online].
Science quotes on:  |  Computer (84)  |  Man (345)

On May 15, 1957 Linus Pauling made an extraordinary speech to the students of Washington University. ... It was at this time that the idea of the scientists' petition against nuclear weapons tests was born. That evening we discussed it at length after dinner at my house and various ones of those present were scribbling and suggesting paragraphs. But it was Linus Pauling himself who contributed the simple prose of the petition that was much superior to any of the suggestions we were making.
Speech, "The 1962 Nobel Peace Prize," at Unitarian Church, Boulder, Colorado (20 Oct 1963). On Oregon State University Library website.
Science quotes on:  |  Birth (81)  |  Dinner (9)  |  Discussion (37)  |  Evening (12)  |  Idea (440)  |  Paragraph (2)  |  Linus Pauling (54)  |  Petition (3)  |  Prose (6)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Scribble (4)  |  Speech (40)  |  Student (131)  |  Suggestion (24)  |  Superior (30)

On the whole, I cannot help saying that it appears to me not a little extraordinary, that a theory so new, and of such importance, overturning every thing that was thought to be the best established in chemistry, should rest on so very narrow and precarious a foundation, the experiments adduced in support of it being not only ambiguous or explicable on either hypothesis, but exceedingly few. I think I have recited them all, and that on which the greatest stress is laid, viz. That of the formation of water from the decomposition of the two kinds of air, has not been sufficiently repeated. Indeed it required so difficult and expensive an apparatus, and so many precautions in the use of it, that the frequent repetition of the experiment cannot be expected; and in these circumstances the practised experimenter cannot help suspecting the accuracy of the result and consequently the certainty of the conclusion.
Considerations on the Doctrine of Phlogiston (1796), 57-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (52)  |  Air (151)  |  Ambiguity (9)  |  Apparatus (30)  |  Certainty (97)  |  Circumstance (48)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Decomposition (12)  |  Difficulty (113)  |  Establish (30)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Formation (54)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Importance (183)  |  Narrow (33)  |  New (340)  |  Precarious (4)  |  Repeat (27)  |  Result (250)  |  Support (63)  |  Theory (582)  |  Water (244)

Organization is simply the means by which the acts of ordinary men can be made to add up to extraordinary results. To this idea of progress that does not wait on some lucky break, some chance discovery, or some rare stroke of genius, but instead is achieved through systematic, cumulative effort, the engineer has contributed brilliantly.
In A Professional Guide for Young Engineers (1949, 1967), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  Act (80)  |  Add (26)  |  Brilliance (8)  |  Chance (122)  |  Cumulative (8)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Effort (94)  |  Engineer (72)  |  Genius (186)  |  Idea (440)  |  Luck (25)  |  Means (109)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  Organization (79)  |  Progress (317)  |  Rare (31)  |  Result (250)  |  Simply (34)  |  Stroke (5)  |  Systematic (25)  |  Waiting (9)

Plasticity, then, in the wide sense of the word, means the possession of a structure weak enough to yield to an influence, but strong enough not to yield all at once. Each relatively stable phase of equilibrium in such a structure is marked by what we may call a new set of habits. Organic matter, especially nervous tissue, seems endowed with a very extraordinary degree of plasticity of this sort ; so that we may without hesitation lay down as our first proposition the following, that the phenomena of habit in living beings are due to plasticity of the organic materials of which their bodies are composed.
'The Laws of Habit', The Popular Science Monthly (Feb 1887), 434.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (193)  |  Composition (52)  |  Endow (9)  |  Equilibrium (16)  |  Habit (78)  |  Influence (110)  |  Matter (270)  |  Nerve (66)  |  Nomenclature (129)  |  Organic (48)  |  Phase (14)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Plasticity (4)  |  Stable (15)  |  Strong (47)  |  Structure (191)  |  Tissue (24)  |  Weak (36)  |  Word (221)  |  Yield (23)

So-called extraordinary events always split into two extremes naturalists who have not witnessed them: those who believe blindly and those who do not believe at all. The latter have always in mind the story of the golden goose; if the facts lie slightly beyond the limits of their knowledge, they relegate them immediately to fables. The former have a secret taste for marvels because they seem to expand Nature; they use their imagination with pleasure to find explanations. To remain doubtful is given to naturalists who keep a middle path between the two extremes. They calmly examine facts; they refer to logic for help; they discuss probabilities; they do not scoff at anything, not even errors, because they serve at least the history of the human mind; finally, they report rather than judge; they rarely decide unless they have good evidence.
Quoted in Albert V. Carozzi, Histoire des sciences de la terre entre 1790 et 1815 vue à travers les documents inédités de la Societé de Physique et d'Histoire Naturelle de Genève, trans. Albert V. and Marguerite Carozzi. (1990), 175.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Blindness (8)  |  Decision (58)  |  Discussion (37)  |  Doubtful (5)  |  Error (230)  |  Event (97)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Expansion (25)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Extreme (36)  |  Fable (5)  |  Fact (609)  |  Final (33)  |  Find (248)  |  Gold (55)  |  Goose (9)  |  History (302)  |  Human (445)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Immediately (9)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Limit (86)  |  Marvel (24)  |  Mind (544)  |  Naturalist (49)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Probability (83)  |  Rare (31)  |  Relegation (2)  |  Remain (77)  |  Report (31)  |  Scoff (4)  |  Secret (98)  |  Service (54)  |  So-Called (18)  |  Split (11)  |  Story (58)  |  Taste (35)  |  Witness (18)

The big political doings of our time are so disheartening that in our generation one feels quite alone. It is as if people had lost the passion for justice and dignity and no longer treasure what better generations have won by extraordinary sacrifices.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (61)  |  Better (131)  |  Big (33)  |  Dignity (18)  |  Disheartening (2)  |  Doings (2)  |  Feel (93)  |  Generation (111)  |  Justice (24)  |  Long (95)  |  Lose (53)  |  Passion (54)  |  People (269)  |  Political (31)  |  Sacrifice (24)  |  Time (439)  |  Treasure (35)  |  Win (25)

The description of some of the experiments, which are communicated here, was completely worked out at my writing-table, before I had seen anything of the phenomena in question. After making the experiments on the following day, it was found that nothing in the description required to be altered. I do not mention this from feelings of pride, but in order to make clear the extraordinary ease and security with which the relations in question can be considered on the principles of Arrhenius' theory of free ions. Such facts speak more forcibly then any polemics for the value of this theory .
Philosophical Magazine (1891), 32, 156.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (22)  |  Svante Arrhenius (11)  |  Communication (58)  |  Completeness (9)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Description (72)  |  Ease (29)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Fact (609)  |  Feeling (79)  |  Ion (8)  |  Mention (12)  |  Observation (418)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Pride (45)  |  Principle (228)  |  Question (315)  |  Relation (96)  |  Security (27)  |  Theory (582)  |  Value (180)

The earth, formed out of the same debris of which the sun was born, is extraordinarily rich in iron—iron which once may have existed at the center of a star that exploded many billions of years ago.
(1965). In Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 220.
Science quotes on:  |  Billion (52)  |  Birth (81)  |  Center (30)  |  Debris (7)  |  Earth (487)  |  Explode (2)  |  Form (210)  |  Iron (53)  |  Planet (199)  |  Rich (48)  |  Star (251)  |  Sun (211)  |  Year (214)

The entire annals of Observation probably do not elsewhere exhibit so extraordinary a verification of any theoretical conjecture adventured on by the human spirit!
[On the mathematical work by Urbain Le Verrier predicting the planet Neptune.]
In The Planet Neptune: An Exposition and History (1848), 90. The verification of the existence of the planet Neptune was made when Johan Galle found a star in an evening observation at the position predicted in the letter he received from Le Verrier earlier that same day.
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (36)  |  Conjecture (22)  |  Exhibition (2)  |  Human Spirit (8)  |  Neptune (8)  |  Observation (418)  |  Theory (582)  |  Verification (20)  |  Urbain-Jean-Joseph Le Verrier (4)

The extraordinary development of modern science may be her undoing. Specialism, now a necessity, has fragmented the specialities themselves in a way that makes the outlook hazardous. The workers lose all sense of proportion in a maze of minutiae.
'The Old Humanities and the New Science' (1919). In G. L. Keynes (ed.), Selected Writings of Sir William Osler (1951), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Development (228)  |  Fragment (24)  |  Hazard (11)  |  Loss (62)  |  Maze (9)  |  Minutiae (6)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Outlook (12)  |  Proportion (47)  |  Science (1699)  |  Specialty (8)  |  Undoing (2)  |  Worker (23)

The famous balance of nature is the most extraordinary of all cybernetic systems. Left to itself, it is always self-regulated.
Saturday Review (8 Jun 1963).
Science quotes on:  |  Balance (43)  |  Cybernetics (3)  |  Fame (30)  |  Nature (1029)  |  System (141)

The interpretation of messages from the earth’s interior demands all the resources of ordinary physics and of extraordinary mathematics. The geophysicist is of a noble company, all of whom are reading messages from the untouchable reality of things. The inwardness of things—atoms, crystals, mountains, planets, stars, nebulas, universes—is the quarry of these hunters of genius and Promethean boldness.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Boldness (6)  |  Crystal (47)  |  Earth (487)  |  Genius (186)  |  Geology (187)  |  Hunter (11)  |  Interior (13)  |  Interpretation (61)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Message (30)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Nebula (15)  |  Noble (41)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  Physics (301)  |  Planet (199)  |  Prometheus (5)  |  Quarry (10)  |  Reality (140)  |  Star (251)  |  Universe (563)

The oppressive weight of disaster and tragedy in our lives does not arise from a high percentage of evil among the summed total of all acts, but from the extraordinary power of exceedingly rare incidents of depravity to inflict catastrophic damage, especially in our technological age when airplanes can become powerful bombs. (An even more evil man, armed only with a longbow, could not have wreaked such havoc at the Battle of Agincourt in 1415.)
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Act (80)  |  Age (137)  |  Airplane (32)  |  Arise (32)  |  Arm (17)  |  Battle (30)  |  Become (100)  |  Bomb (17)  |  Catastrophic (2)  |  Damage (18)  |  Depravity (3)  |  Disaster (36)  |  Especially (18)  |  Evil (67)  |  Exceedingly (3)  |  Havoc (5)  |  High (78)  |  Incident (3)  |  Inflict (4)  |  Live (186)  |  Percentage (6)  |  Power (273)  |  Powerful (51)  |  Rare (31)  |  Sum (30)  |  Technological (15)  |  Total (29)  |  Tragedy (19)  |  Weight (61)

The problem of modern democracy is not that the people have lost their power, but that they have lost their appreciation for the extraordinary power they wield. Consider one astonishing truth: Famine has never struck a democracy.
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciation (19)  |  Astonishing (7)  |  Democracy (21)  |  Famine (8)  |  Lose (53)  |  Modern (104)  |  People (269)  |  Power (273)  |  Problem (362)  |  Strike (21)  |  Truth (750)

The techniques and criteria of religion and science are so extraordinarily different. Science seeks simplicity publicly and encourages the overthrow of authority; religion accepts complexity privately and encourages deference to authority.
In 'Religion - The Antithesis to Science', Chemistry & Industry (Feb 1997).
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (37)  |  Authority (50)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Criterion (10)  |  Deference (2)  |  Different (110)  |  Encourage (16)  |  Overthrow (4)  |  Publicly (3)  |  Religion (210)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Seek (57)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Technique (41)

The velocity of light occupies an extraordinary place in modern physics. It is lèse-majesté to make any criticism of the velocity of light. It is a sacred cow within a sacred cow, and it is just about the Absolutest Absolute in the history of human thought.
Science is a Sacred Cow (1950), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (65)  |  History (302)  |  Human (445)  |  Modern Physics (12)  |  Sacred Cow (2)  |  Thought (374)

This extraordinary metal [iron], the soul of every manufacture, and the mainspring perhaps of civilised society.
Men of Invention and Industry (1884), 108.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (155)  |  Industry (91)  |  Iron (53)  |  Manufacture (12)  |  Society (188)  |  Soul (139)

[My dream dinner guest is] Charles Darwin. It’s an obvious answer, but it’s the truth. Think of any problem and before you start theorising, just check up whether Charles Darwin mentioned it in one of those green books sitting on your shelf. Whether it’s earthworms, human gestures or the origin of species, the observations that man made are unbelievable. He touched on so many subjects. Then, Alexander von Humboldt, the last polymath. There was no aspect of the natural world that he wasn’t curious about or didn’t write about in Kosmos, an extraordinary book.
From interview with Alice Roberts, 'Attenborough: My Life on Earth', The Biologist (Aug 2015), 62, No. 4, 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (181)  |  Check (16)  |  Curious (24)  |  Charles Darwin (284)  |  Earthworm (5)  |  Gesture (2)  |  Guest (4)  |  Human (445)  |  Baron Alexander von Humboldt (16)  |  Natural World (21)  |  Observation (418)  |  Origin Of Species (39)  |  Problem (362)  |  Unbelievable (2)  |  Write (87)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

who invites your feedback

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.