Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Cross

Cross Quotes (9 quotes)

Chiodo scaccia chiodo, ma quattro chiodi fanno una croce.
One nail drives out another, but four nails make a cross.
His final comments on 16th August 1950, just a few days before his death, refer to his estimate of his own work. In Il mestiere di vivere (1947), 361. Translated as The Burning Brand: Diaries 1935-1950 (1961), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Drive (38)  |  Four (6)  |  Nail (3)

A small cabin stands in the Glacier Peak Wilderness, about a hundred yards off a trail that crosses the Cascade Range. In midsummer, the cabin looked strange in the forest. It was only twelve feet square, but it rose fully two stories and then had a high and steeply peaked roof. From the ridge of the roof, moreover, a ten-foot pole stuck straight up. Tied to the top of the pole was a shovel. To hikers shedding their backpacks at the door of the cabin on a cold summer evening—as the five of us did—it was somewhat unnerving to look up and think of people walking around in snow perhaps thirty-five feet above, hunting for that shovel, then digging their way down to the threshold. [1971]
Encounters with the Archdruid
Science quotes on:  |  Cabin (3)  |  Cascade (3)  |  Cold (38)  |  Dig (9)  |  Door (25)  |  Down (44)  |  Five (14)  |  Foot (39)  |  Forest (88)  |  Fully (11)  |  Glacier (13)  |  High (78)  |  Hundred (46)  |  Hunt (12)  |  Midsummer (2)  |  Moreover (2)  |  Peak (15)  |  People (269)  |  Pole (14)  |  Range (38)  |  Ridge (4)  |  Rise (51)  |  Roof (10)  |  Shed (5)  |  Small (97)  |  Snow (15)  |  Square (10)  |  Stand (60)  |  Stick (19)  |  Story (58)  |  Straight (15)  |  Strange (61)  |  Summer (26)  |  Think (205)  |  Thirty-Five (2)  |  Threshold (7)  |  Tie (21)  |  Top (20)  |  Trail (8)  |  Walk (56)  |  Wilderness (28)  |  Yard (4)

I am a cross between Steve Jobs and Leonardo da Vinci.
As quoted by Franz Lidz in 'Dr. NakaMats, the Man With 3300 Patents to His Name', Smithsonian Magazine (Dec 2012).
Science quotes on:  |  Leonardo da Vinci (34)  |  Steve Jobs (6)

In crossing a heath, suppose I pitched my foot against a stone, and were asked how the stone came to be there, I might possibly answer, that, for any thing I knew to the contrary, it had lain there for ever: nor would it perhaps be very easy to shew the absurdity of this answer. But suppose I had found a watch upon the ground, and it should be enquired how the watch happened to be in that place, I should hardly think of the answer which I had before given, that, for any thing I knew, the watch might have always been there.
Natural Theology: or, Evidences of the Existence and Attributes of the Deity, Collected from the Appearances of Nature (1802), 1-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Always (7)  |  Answer (201)  |  Enquiry (75)  |  Finding (30)  |  Foot (39)  |  Ground (63)  |  Heath (4)  |  Lie (80)  |  Pitch (7)  |  Place (111)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Stone (57)  |  Supposition (33)  |  Watch (39)

It was through living among these groups and much more I think, through moving regularly from one to the other and back again that I got occupied with the problem of what, long before I put it on paper, I christened to myself as the ‘two cultures’. For constantly I felt I was moving among two groups [scientists and literary intellectuals] comparable in intelligence, identical in race, not grossly different in social origin, earning about the same incomes, who had almost ceased to communicate at all, who in intellectual, moral and psychological climate had so little in common that instead of going from Burlington House or South Kensington to Chelsea, one might have crossed an ocean.
The Two Cultures: The Rede Lecture (1959), 2. The places mentioned are all in London. Burlington House is the home of the Royal Society and South Kensington is the site of the Natural History Museum, whereas Chelsea represents an affluent centre of artistic life.
Science quotes on:  |  Cessation (10)  |  Climate (38)  |  Common (92)  |  Income (8)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Moral (100)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Origin (77)  |  Psychology (125)  |  Race (76)  |  Society (188)

Over very long time scales, when the perturbing influences of both Jupiter and Saturn are taken into account, the seemingly regular orbits of asteroids that stray into the Kirkwood gaps turn chaotic. For millions of years … such an orbit seems predictable. Then the path grows increasingly eccentric until it begins to cross the orbit of Mars and then the Earth. Collisions or close encounters with those planets are inevitable.
In article 'Tales of Chaos: Tumbling Moons and Unstable Asteroids", New York Times (20 Jan 1987), C3.
Science quotes on:  |  Asteroid (11)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Collision (9)  |  Earth (487)  |  Eccentric (10)  |  Inevitable (17)  |  Influence (110)  |  Jupiter (17)  |  Mars (26)  |  Million (89)  |  Orbit (58)  |  Path (59)  |  Perturb (2)  |  Planet (199)  |  Predictable (9)  |  Regular (8)  |  Saturn (10)  |  Stray (4)

So why fret and care that the actual version of the destined deed was done by an upper class English gentleman who had circumnavigated the globe as a vigorous youth, lost his dearest daughter and his waning faith at the same time, wrote the greatest treatise ever composed on the taxonomy of barnacles, and eventually grew a white beard, lived as a country squire just south of London, and never again traveled far enough even to cross the English Channel? We care for the same reason that we love okapis, delight in the fossil evidence of trilobites, and mourn the passage of the dodo. We care because the broad events that had to happen, happened to happen in a certain particular way. And something unspeakably holy –I don’t know how else to say this–underlies our discovery and confirmation of the actual details that made our world and also, in realms of contingency, assured the minutiae of its construction in the manner we know, and not in any one of a trillion other ways, nearly all of which would not have included the evolution of a scribe to record the beauty, the cruelty, the fascination, and the mystery.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (34)  |  Assure (11)  |  Beard (5)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Broad (18)  |  Care (73)  |  Certain (84)  |  Channel (17)  |  Class (64)  |  Compose (7)  |  Confirmation (15)  |  Construction (69)  |  Contingency (11)  |  Country (121)  |  Cruelty (14)  |  Daughter (11)  |  Deed (17)  |  Delight (51)  |  Destined (5)  |  Detail (65)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Dodo (5)  |  English (23)  |  Event (97)  |  Eventually (14)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Faith (131)  |  Far (77)  |  Fascination (26)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Gentleman (17)  |  Globe (39)  |  Great (300)  |  Grow (66)  |  Happen (63)  |  Holy (14)  |  Include (27)  |  Know (321)  |  Live (186)  |  London (12)  |  Lose (53)  |  Love (164)  |  Manner (35)  |  Minutiae (6)  |  Mourn (2)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Nearly (19)  |  Particular (54)  |  Passage (14)  |  Realm (40)  |  Reason (330)  |  Record (56)  |  Same (92)  |  Say (126)  |  Scribe (3)  |  South (8)  |  Taxonomy (16)  |  Time (439)  |  Travel (40)  |  Treatise (19)  |  Trillion (2)  |  Trilobite (4)  |  Unspeakably (2)  |  Upper (3)  |  Version (6)  |  Vigorous (11)  |  White (38)  |  World (667)  |  Write (87)  |  Youth (57)

What now, dear reader, shall we make of our telescope? Shall we make a Mercury’s magic wand to cross the liquid aether with, and like Lucian lead a colony to the uninhabitied evening star, allured by the sweetness of the place?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aether (8)  |  Allure (2)  |  Colony (5)  |  Lead (101)  |  Liquid (25)  |  Lucian of Samosa (4)  |  Magic (67)  |  Place (111)  |  Reader (22)  |  Star (251)  |  Sweetness (8)  |  Telescope (74)  |  Wand (3)

[May Morris (Joan Davis):] You know, I crossed the goldenrod with poison ivy once. What do you think I got? Hay fever and the seven-year itch.
From movie Josette (1938). Writer, James Edward Grant, from play by Paul Frank and Georg Fraser. In Larry Langman and Paul Gold, Comedy Quotes from the Movies (2001), 289. The phrase “seven-year itch” dates back to at least 1845, and was used as a film title in 1955.
Science quotes on:  |  Genetics (98)  |  Hay Fever (2)  |  Joke (39)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.