Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A change in motion is proportional to the motive force impressed and takes place along the straight line in which that force is impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Room

Room Quotes (38 quotes)

Q: Why did the chicken cross the road?
A: Pierre de Fermat: I just don’t have room here to give the full explanation.
Anonymous
[Note: Pierre de Fermat is famous for an enigmatic marginal note in his notebook, “I have discovered a truly remarkable proof which this margin is too small to contain.”]
Science quotes on:  |  Chicken (7)  |  Cross (14)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Pierre de Fermat (15)  |  Full (63)  |  Give (200)  |  Joke (73)  |  Road (63)

Question: Explain how to determine the time of vibration of a given tuning-fork, and state what apparatus you would require for the purpose.
Answer: For this determination I should require an accurate watch beating seconds, and a sensitive ear. I mount the fork on a suitable stand, and then, as the second hand of my watch passes the figure 60 on the dial, I draw the bow neatly across one of its prongs. I wait. I listen intently. The throbbing air particles are receiving the pulsations; the beating prongs are giving up their original force; and slowly yet surely the sound dies away. Still I can hear it, but faintly and with close attention; and now only by pressing the bones of my head against its prongs. Finally the last trace disappears. I look at the time and leave the room, having determined the time of vibration of the common “pitch” fork. This process deteriorates the fork considerably, hence a different operation must be performed on a fork which is only lent.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 176-7, Question 4. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (60)  |  Answer (249)  |  Apparatus (37)  |  Attention (115)  |  Beat (23)  |  Bone (63)  |  Bow (10)  |  Close (66)  |  Deterioration (8)  |  Determination (57)  |  Dial (4)  |  Difference (246)  |  Disappearance (22)  |  Drawing (21)  |  Ear (25)  |  Examination (65)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Faint (7)  |  Force (249)  |  Head (80)  |  Hearing (28)  |  Howler (15)  |  Leaving (10)  |  Looking (26)  |  Mounting (2)  |  Operation (118)  |  Original (57)  |  Performance (33)  |  Question (404)  |  Second (59)  |  Sensitivity (6)  |  Slow (55)  |  Sound (88)  |  Stand (107)  |  State (136)  |  Sure (14)  |  Time (594)  |  Tuning Fork (2)  |  Vibration (15)  |  Watch (64)

A mathematician is a blind man in a dark room looking for a black cat that doesn’t exist. [Misattributed to Charles Darwin.]
Anonymous
Traced by quoteinvestigator.com to Tomlinson Fort, 'Mathematics and the Sciences', The American Mathematical Monthly (Nov 1940), 47, No. 9, 606. The article writer skeptically noted that: “I have heard it said that Charles Darwin gave the following. (He probably never did.)” Quote Investigator cites a number of wide variations of the metaphor, from various authors and sources, going back to at least 1846.
Science quotes on:  |  Black (42)  |  Blind (47)  |  Cat (36)  |  Dark (76)  |  Charles Darwin (301)  |  Exist (147)  |  Mathematician (364)

A nurse is to maintain the air within the room as fresh as the air without, without lowering the temperature.
In Notes on Nursing: What It Is and What It Is Not (1859), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (188)  |  Fresh (30)  |  Maintain (32)  |  Nurse (21)  |  Temperature (46)

All the unhappiness of men arises from one single fact, that they cannot stay quietly in their own chamber.
In Pensées (1670), Section 4, No. 2. As translated in Blaise Pascal and W.F. Trotter (trans.), 'Thoughts', No. 139, collected in Charles W. Eliot (ed.), The Harvard Classics (1910), Vol. 48, 52. Also seen translated as, “The sole cause of man’s unhappiness is that he does not know how to stay quietly in his room.” From the original French, “Tout le malheur des hommes vient d’une seule chose, qui est de ne savoir pas demeurer en repos, dans une chambre,” in Ernest Havet (ed.), Pensées de Pascal (1892), 152.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (283)  |  Fact (725)  |  Know (547)  |  Quietly (5)  |  Single (119)  |  Sole (20)  |  Stay (24)  |  Unhappiness (8)

Always design a thing by considering it in its next larger context—a chair in a room, a room in a house, a house in an environment, an environment in a city plan.
Time, July 2, 1956.
Science quotes on:  |  Chair (11)  |  City (47)  |  Consider (80)  |  Context (22)  |  Design (113)  |  Environment (180)  |  House (43)  |  Large (130)  |  Next (35)  |  Plan (87)

Any problem can be solved using the materials in the room.
In Peter C. Wensberg, Land's Polaroid: A Company and the Man Who Invented It (1987).
Science quotes on:  |  Material (154)  |  Problem (490)  |  Solution (211)

Everything that comes into being seeks room for itself and desires duration: hence it drives something else from its place and shortens its duration.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 199.
Science quotes on:  |  Desire (140)  |  Drive (55)  |  Duration (10)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Natural Selection (90)  |  Place (174)  |  Seek (104)  |  Shorten (5)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (38)

For undemocratic reasons and for motives not of State, they arrive at their conclusions—largely inarticulate. Being void of self-expression they confide their views to none; but sometimes in a smoking room, one learns why things were done.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Arrive (35)  |  Conclusion (157)  |  Confide (2)  |  Inarticulate (2)  |  Largely (13)  |  Learn (281)  |  Motive (33)  |  Reason (454)  |  Self-Expression (2)  |  Smoke (16)  |  Sometimes (43)  |  State (136)  |  View (171)  |  Void (20)

Gentlemen, everyone in this room knows the difference between a live horse and a dead horse. Pray, therefore, let us cease flogging the latter.
(in conversation)
Science quotes on:  |  Cease (37)  |  Dead (57)  |  Difference (246)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Gentleman (18)  |  Horse (49)  |  Know (547)  |  Latter (21)  |  Let (61)  |  Live (269)  |  Pray (16)

How hard to realize that every camp of men or beast has this glorious starry firmament for a roof! In such places standing alone on the mountain-top it is easy to realize that whatever special nests we make - leaves and moss like the marmots and birds, or tents or piled stone - we all dwell in a house of one room - the world with the firmament for its roof - and are sailing the celestial spaces without leaving any track.
John Muir
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (101)  |  Beast (38)  |  Bird (119)  |  Camp (4)  |  Celestial (21)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Easy (98)  |  Firmament (12)  |  Glorious (23)  |  Hard (99)  |  House (43)  |  Leave (127)  |  Moss (10)  |  Mountaintop (2)  |  Nest (17)  |  Pile (12)  |  Place (174)  |  Realize (90)  |  Roof (13)  |  Sail (21)  |  Space (257)  |  Special (74)  |  Stand (107)  |  Star (336)  |  Stone (76)  |  Tent (6)  |  Track (14)  |  World (892)

I had at one time a very bad fever of which I almost died. In my fever I had a long consistent delirium. I dreamt that I was in Hell, and that Hell is a place full of all those happenings that are improbable but not impossible. The effects of this are curious. Some of the damned, when they first arrive below, imagine that they will beguile the tedium of eternity by games of cards. But they find this impossible, because, whenever a pack is shuffled, it comes out in perfect order, beginning with the Ace of Spades and ending with the King of Hearts. There is a special department of Hell for students of probability. In this department there are many typewriters and many monkeys. Every time that a monkey walks on a typewriter, it types by chance one of Shakespeare's sonnets. There is another place of torment for physicists. In this there are kettles and fires, but when the kettles are put on the fires, the water in them freezes. There are also stuffy rooms. But experience has taught the physicists never to open a window because, when they do, all the air rushes out and leaves the room a vacuum.
'The Metaphysician's Nightmare', Nightmares of Eminent Persons and Other Stories (1954), 38-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrival (9)  |  Curiosity (105)  |  Damned (4)  |  Death (302)  |  Delirium (2)  |  Department (47)  |  Dream (165)  |  Effect (165)  |  Eternity (49)  |  Experience (338)  |  Fever (11)  |  Fire (132)  |  Freeze (5)  |  Game (61)  |  Happening (32)  |  Hell (32)  |  Imagination (268)  |  Impossibility (52)  |  Improbable (12)  |  Kettle (2)  |  Monkey (40)  |  Opening (15)  |  Order (239)  |  Perfection (88)  |  Physicist (160)  |  Possibility (116)  |  Rush (18)  |  William Shakespeare (101)  |  Shuffle (5)  |  Sonnet (4)  |  Special (74)  |  Tedium (3)  |  Torment (14)  |  Typewriter (6)  |  Vacuum (34)  |  Walk (67)  |  Water (292)  |  Window (40)

I used to sit in class and listen to the terms come floating down the room like paper airplanes. Geology was called a descriptive science, and with its pitted outwash plains and drowned rivers, its hanging tributaries and starved coastlines, it was nothing if not descriptive. It was a fountain of metaphor…
In Basin and Range (1981), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Airplane (38)  |  Class (83)  |  Down (86)  |  Float (21)  |  Listen (39)  |  Paper (82)  |  Sit (47)  |  Term (120)

It still fascinates me to think that here in this room you have radio signals from stations all over the world going through, and we can stick up an antenna and receive them.
Recalling how his lifelong “natural interest in how things work” began as a youth, which included such activities as building a Tesla coil and assembling crystal radios. In interview, Rushworth M. Kidder, 'Grounded in Space Science', Christian Science Monitor (22 Dec 1989).
Science quotes on:  |  Antenna (4)  |  Fascinate (12)  |  Radio (30)  |  Receive (59)  |  Signal (18)  |  Station (12)  |  Stick (24)  |  Think (341)  |  World (892)

I’m so fast that last night I turned off the light switch in my hotel room and was in bed before the room was dark.
In epigraph, without citation, in The Great American Sports Book: A Casual But Voluminous Look at American Spectator Sports from the Civil War to the Present Time (1978), 282.
Science quotes on:  |  Bed (22)  |  Dark (76)  |  Fast (43)  |  Hotel (2)  |  Light (345)  |  Night (117)  |  Switch (10)  |  Turn (118)

On entering his [John James Audubon] room, I was astonished and delighted to find that it was turned into a museum. The walls were festooned with all kinds of birds’ eggs, carefully blown out and strung on a thread. The chimney-piece was covered with stuffed squirrels, raccoons, and opossums; and the shelves around were likewise crowded with specimens, among which were fishes, frogs, snakes, lizards, and other reptiles. Besides these stuffed varieties, many paintings were arrayed on the walls, chiefly of birds.
In Richard Rhodes, John James Audubon: The Making of an American (2004), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonishment (23)  |  John James Audubon (9)  |  Bird (119)  |  Delight (64)  |  Egg (45)  |  Festoon (3)  |  Fish (95)  |  Frog (33)  |  Lizard (6)  |  Museum (24)  |  Opossum (2)  |  Painting (42)  |  Reptile (26)  |  Shelf (7)  |  Snake (16)  |  Specimen (17)  |  Squirrel (7)  |  Wall (28)

Our eyes are special detectors. They allows us to register information not only from across the room but from across the universe.
In magazine article, 'Coming to our Senses', Natural History Magazine (Mar 2001). Collected in Death by Black Hole: And Other Cosmic Quandaries (2007), 25. This is Tyson’s respectful update of a quote by Edwin P. Hubble in 1954: “Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science.” (See Science Quotations by Edwin Hubble.)
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (44)  |  Detector (4)  |  Eye (218)  |  Information (121)  |  Register (10)  |  Special (74)  |  Universe (683)

Our most distinguished “man of science” was the then veteran John Dalton. He was rarely absent from his seat in a warm corner of the room during the meetings of the Literary and Philosophical Society. Though a sober-minded Quaker, he was not devoid of some sense of fun; and there was a tradition amongst us, not only that he had once been a poet, but that, although a bachelor, two manuscript copies were still extant of his verses on the subject of matrimonial felicity; and it is my belief there was foundation for the tradition. The old man was sensitive on the subject of his age. Dining one day ... he was placed between two ladies ... [who] resolved to extract from him some admission on the tender point, but in vain. Though never other than courteous, Dalton foiled all their feminine arts and retained his secret. ... Dalton's quaint and diminutive figure was a strongly individualized one.
In Reminiscences of a Yorkshire Naturalist (1896), 73-74.
Science quotes on:  |  Absent (3)  |  Admission (12)  |  Age (174)  |  Art (284)  |  Bachelor (3)  |  Biography (232)  |  Corner (29)  |  Courteous (2)  |  John Dalton (21)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Diminutive (3)  |  Distinguished (7)  |  Extract (17)  |  Felicity (2)  |  Feminine (4)  |  Figure (68)  |  Foiled (2)  |  Fun (34)  |  Individual (215)  |  Lady (11)  |  Manuscript (9)  |  Meeting (20)  |  Men Of Science (130)  |  Poet (78)  |  Quaint (5)  |  Quaker (2)  |  Resolve (19)  |  Seat (6)  |  Secret (130)  |  Sensitive (13)  |  Vain (29)  |  Verse (8)  |  Warm (34)

Ours is a golden age of minorities. At no time in the past have dissident minorities felt so much at home and had so much room to throw their weight around. They speak and act as if they were “the people,” and what they abominate most is the dissent of the majority.
In 'The Trend Toward Anarchy', In Our Time (1976), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (115)  |  Dissent (7)  |  Feel (165)  |  Golden Age (7)  |  Home (83)  |  Majority (42)  |  Minority (16)  |  Ours (4)  |  Past (150)  |  People (388)  |  Speak (90)  |  Throw (43)  |  Time (594)  |  Weight (75)

Roger, Tranquility. Be advised there are lots of smiling faces in this room and all over the world. Over.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advise (7)  |  Face (108)  |  Lot (29)  |  Roger (3)  |  Smile (19)  |  Tranquility (8)  |  World (892)

Several times every day I observed the portions of the polyp with a magnifying glass. On the 4th December, that is to say on the ninth day after having cut the polyp, I seemed in the morning to be able to perceive, on the edges of the anterior end of the second part (the part that had neither head nor arms), three little points arising from those edges. They immediately made me think of the horns that serve as the legs and arms of the polyp. Nevertheless I did not want to decide at once that these were actually arms that were beginning to grow. Throughout the next day I continually observed these points: this excited me extremely, and awaited with impatience the moment when I should know with certainty what they were. At last, on the following day, they were so big that there was no longer any room for doubt that they were actually arms growing at the anterior extremity of this second part. The next day two more arms started to grow out, and a few days later three more. The second part thus had eight of them, and they were all in a short time as long as those of the first part, that is to say as long as those the polyp possessed before it was cut. I then no longer found any difference between the second part and a polyp that had never been cut. I had remarked the same thing about the first part since the day after the operation. When I observed them with the magnifying glass with all the attention of which I was capable, each of the two appeared perceptibly to be a complete polyp, and they performed all the functions that were known to me: they extended, contracted, and walked.
Mémoires, pour servir à l'histoire d'un genre de polyps d'eau douce à bras en forme de cornes (1744), 7-16. Trans. John R. Baker, in Abraham Trembley of Geneva: Scientist and Philosopher 1710-1784 (1952), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Anterior (4)  |  Appeared (4)  |  Arm (25)  |  Attention (115)  |  Cut (39)  |  Difference (246)  |  Doubt (159)  |  Edge (23)  |  Extremity (4)  |  Glass (44)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Leg (18)  |  Long (172)  |  Magnifying (2)  |  Observation (445)  |  Operation (118)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Performed (3)  |  Polyp (4)  |  Remark (26)

The attempted synthesis of paleontology and genetics, an essential part of the present study, may be particularly surprising and possibly hazardous. Not long ago, paleontologists felt that a geneticist was a person who shut himself in a room, pulled down the shades, watched small flies disporting themselves in milk bottles, and thought that he was studying nature. A pursuit so removed from the realities of life, they said, had no significance for the true biologist. On the other hand, the geneticists said that paleontology had no further contributions to make to biology, that its only point had been the completed demonstration of the truth of evolution, and that it was a subject too purely descriptive to merit the name 'science'. The paleontologist, they believed, is like a man who undertakes to study the principles of the internal combustion engine by standing on a street corner and watching the motor cars whiz by.
Tempo and Mode in Evolution (1944), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (121)  |  Biology (168)  |  Bottle (15)  |  Cat (36)  |  Completion (17)  |  Contribution (60)  |  Corner (29)  |  Demonstration (81)  |  Description (84)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Fly (99)  |  Geneticist (11)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Internal Combustion Engine (2)  |  Merit (32)  |  Name (165)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Paleontology (29)  |  Person (153)  |  Shade (22)  |  Standing (11)  |  Street (23)  |  Study (461)  |  Subject (235)  |  Synthesis (43)  |  Truth (914)  |  Watch (64)  |  Whiz (2)

The dexterous management of terms and being able to fend and prove with them, I know has and does pass in the world for a great part of learning; but it is learning distinct from knowledge, for knowledge consists only in perceiving the habitudes and relations of ideas one to another, which is done without words; the intervention of sounds helps nothing to it. And hence we see that there is least use of distinction where there is most knowledge: I mean in mathematics, where men have determined ideas with known names to them; and so, there being no room for equivocations, there is no need of distinctions.
In Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Consist (45)  |  Determine (72)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Distinction (44)  |  Great (524)  |  Habit (107)  |  Help (101)  |  Idea (577)  |  Intervention (12)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Learn (281)  |  Least (74)  |  Management (12)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mean (101)  |  Name (165)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (77)  |  Need (283)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Part (220)  |  Pass (91)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Prove (108)  |  Relation (149)  |  See (369)  |  Sound (88)  |  Term (120)  |  Word (299)  |  World (892)

The line separating investment and speculation, which is never bright and clear, becomes blurred still further when most market participants have recently enjoyed triumphs. Nothing sedates rationality like large doses of effortless money. After a heady experience of that kind, normally sensible people drift into behavior akin to that of Cinderella at the ball. They know that overstaying the festivities—that is, continuing to speculate in companies that have gigantic valuations relative to the cash they are likely to generate in the future—will eventually bring on pumpkins and mice. But they nevertheless hate to miss a single minute of what is one helluva party. Therefore, the giddy participants all plan to leave just seconds before midnight. There’s a problem, though: They are dancing in a room in which the clocks have no hands.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Akin (5)  |  Ball (31)  |  Become (172)  |  Behavior (60)  |  Blur (6)  |  Bright (42)  |  Bring (90)  |  Cash (2)  |  Clear (97)  |  Clock (29)  |  Company (30)  |  Continue (63)  |  Dance (26)  |  Dose (13)  |  Drift (13)  |  Effortless (3)  |  Enjoy (38)  |  Eventually (15)  |  Experience (338)  |  Far (154)  |  Future (284)  |  Generate (14)  |  Giddy (3)  |  Gigantic (23)  |  Hand (141)  |  Hate (38)  |  Heady (2)  |  Investment (11)  |  Kind (138)  |  Know (547)  |  Large (130)  |  Leave (127)  |  Likely (33)  |  Line (89)  |  Market (11)  |  Midnight (11)  |  Minute (43)  |  Miss (27)  |  Money (142)  |  Mouse (26)  |  Normally (2)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Overstay (2)  |  Participant (6)  |  Party (18)  |  People (388)  |  Plan (87)  |  Problem (490)  |  Rationality (15)  |  Recently (3)  |  Relative (39)  |  Second (59)  |  Sensible (25)  |  Separate (69)  |  Single (119)  |  Speculation (103)  |  Triumph (46)  |  Valuation (4)

The more a man is imbued with the ordered regularity of all events the firmer becomes his conviction that there is no room left by the side of this ordered regularity for causes of a different nature. For him neither the rule of human nor the rule of divine will exists as an independent cause of natural events. To be sure, the doctrine of a personal God interfering with natural events could never be refuted, in the real sense, by science, for this doctrine can always take refuge in those domains in which scientific knowledge has not yet been able to set foot.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Become (172)  |  Cause (283)  |  Conviction (71)  |  Different (178)  |  Divine (60)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Domain (40)  |  Event (115)  |  Exist (147)  |  Firm (24)  |  Foot (60)  |  God (535)  |  Human (548)  |  Imbue (2)  |  Independent (65)  |  Interfere (11)  |  Leave (127)  |  Natural (167)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Order (239)  |  Personal (66)  |  Real (148)  |  Refuge (13)  |  Refute (5)  |  Regularity (29)  |  Rule (173)  |  Science (2043)  |  Scientific Knowledge (9)  |  Sense (315)  |  Set (97)  |  Side (51)

The only truly secure system is one that is powered off, cast in a block of concrete and sealed in a lead-lined room with armed guards—and even then I have my doubts.
As quoted in epigraph to A.K. Dewdney, 'Computer Recreations: Of Worms, Viruses and Core War' by A. K. Dewdney in Scientific American (Mar 1989), 110. Also on the koth.org website.
Science quotes on:  |  Block (12)  |  Cast (25)  |  Concrete (31)  |  Doubt (159)  |  Guard (18)  |  Lead (158)  |  Power (358)  |  Secure (20)

The orbits of certainties touch one another; but in the interstices there is room enough for error to go forth and prevail.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 187.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (129)  |  Error (275)  |  Orbit (69)  |  Prevail (16)  |  Touch (76)

Thomas Robert Malthus quote The prodigious waste of human life
colorization © todayinsci (Terms of Use) (source)

Please respect the colorization artist’s wishes and do not copy this image for ONLINE use anywhere else.

Thank you.

For offline use, click Terms of Use tab on top menu.

The prodigious waste of human life occasioned by this perpetual struggle for room and food, was more than supplied by the mighty power of population, acting, in some degree, unshackled, from the constant habit of emigration.
An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Constant (56)  |  Food (152)  |  Habit (107)  |  Human (548)  |  Life (1124)  |  Perpetuity (7)  |  Population (78)  |  Prodigious (9)  |  Struggle (77)  |  Supply (46)  |  Waste (64)

There is a story that once, not long after he came to Berlin, Planck forgot which room had been assigned to him for a lecture and stopped at the entrance office of the university to find out. Please tell me, he asked the elderly man in charge, 'In which room does Professor Planck lecture today?' The old man patted him on the shoulder 'Don't go there, young fellow,' he said 'You are much too young to understand the lectures of our learned Professor Planck'.
Anonymous
In Barbara Lovett Cline, Men Who Made a New Physics: Physicists and the Quantum Theory (1987), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Asking (23)  |  Assignment (10)  |  Berlin (10)  |  Entrance (5)  |  Fellow (37)  |  Forgetting (13)  |  Learning (177)  |  Lecture (67)  |  Office (22)  |  Max Planck (64)  |  Professor (54)  |  Shoulder (18)  |  Story (72)  |  Understanding (325)  |  University (80)  |  Young (98)

There is nothing more mysterious than a TV set left on in an empty room. It is even stranger than a man talking to himself or a woman standing dreaming at her stove. It is as if another planet is communicating with you.
In Jean Baudrillard and Chris Turner (trans.), America (1989), 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Communication (75)  |  Dream (165)  |  Empty (40)  |  Mystery (151)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Planet (262)  |  Stove (2)  |  Strange (94)  |  Talk (99)

Thomas Robert Malthus quote Nature has scattered the seeds of life
colorization © todayinsci (Terms of Use) (source)

Please respect the colorization artist’s wishes and do not copy this image for ONLINE use anywhere else.

Thank you.

For offline use, click Terms of Use tab on top menu.

Through the animal and vegetable kingdoms, Nature has scattered the seeds of life abroad with the most profuse and liberal hand; but has been comparatively sparing in the room and the nourishment necessary to rear them. The germs of existence contained in this spot of earth, if they could freely develop themselves, would fill millions of worlds in the course of a few thousand years. Necessity, that imperious all-pervading law of nature, restrains them within the prescribed bounds. The race of plants and the race of animals shrink under this great restrictive law; and man cannot by any efforts of reason escape from it.
In An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798), 14-15.
Science quotes on:  |  Abroad (8)  |  Animal (356)  |  Bound (15)  |  Comparatively (8)  |  Develop (103)  |  Earth (635)  |  Effort (143)  |  Escape (46)  |  Existence (296)  |  Fill (61)  |  Freely (13)  |  Germ (31)  |  Great (524)  |  Hand (141)  |  Kingdom (37)  |  Law (513)  |  Liberal (8)  |  Life (1124)  |  Million (111)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Necessary (147)  |  Necessity (142)  |  Nourishment (18)  |  Plant (199)  |  Prescribed (3)  |  Profuse (2)  |  Race (103)  |  Rear (7)  |  Reason (454)  |  Restrictive (4)  |  Scattered (5)  |  Shrink (15)  |  Sparing (2)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Vegetable (22)  |  World (892)  |  Year (299)

We know enough to be sure that the scientific achievements of the next fifty years will be far greater, more rapid, and more surprising, than those we have already experienced. … Wireless telephones and television, following naturally upon the their present path of development, would enable their owner to connect up to any room similarly equipped and hear and take part in the conversation as well as if he put his head in through the window.
From 'Fifty Years Hence', Strand Magazine (Dec 1931). Reprinted in Popular Mechanics (Mar 1932), 57, No. 3, 394-396.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (150)  |  Connect (30)  |  Conversation (26)  |  Development (276)  |  Enable (44)  |  Equipped (4)  |  Experienced (2)  |  Greater (42)  |  Head (80)  |  Hear (60)  |  Know (547)  |  Path (84)  |  Rapid (30)  |  Surprising (4)  |  Telephone (23)  |  Television (29)  |  Window (40)  |  Wireless (5)  |  Year (299)

We should have positive expectations of what is in the universe, not fears and dreads. We are made with the realization that we’re not Earthbound, and that our acceptance of the universe offers us room to explore and extend outward. It’s like being in a dark room and imagining all sorts of terrors. But when we turn on the light – technology - suddenly it’s just a room where we can stretch out and explore. If the resources here on Earth are limited, they are not limited in the universe. We are not constrained by the limitations of our planet. As children have to leave the security of family and home life to insure growth into mature adults, so also must humankind leave the security and familiarity of Earth to reach maturity and obtain the highest attainment possible for the human race.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (45)  |  Adult (16)  |  Attainment (40)  |  Child (245)  |  Constrain (8)  |  Dark (76)  |  Dread (13)  |  Earth (635)  |  Earthbound (3)  |  Expectation (54)  |  Exploration (122)  |  Extend (41)  |  Familiarity (16)  |  Family (45)  |  Fear (141)  |  Growth (122)  |  High (152)  |  Home (83)  |  Human Race (69)  |  Humankind (11)  |  Imagine (74)  |  Insure (4)  |  Leave (127)  |  Life (1124)  |  Light (345)  |  Limit (123)  |  Limitation (30)  |  Mature (10)  |  Maturity (10)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Offer (43)  |  Outward (7)  |  Planet (262)  |  Positive (43)  |  Possible (155)  |  Reach (119)  |  Realization (37)  |  Resource (61)  |  Security (33)  |  Sort (49)  |  Stretch (18)  |  Suddenly (17)  |  Technology (221)  |  Terror (18)  |  Turn (118)  |  Universe (683)

When you recover or discover something that nourishes your soul and brings joy, care enough about yourself to make room for it in your life.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 253
Science quotes on:  |  Bring (90)  |  Care (95)  |  Discover (196)  |  Joy (88)  |  Life (1124)  |  Nourish (16)  |  Recover (11)  |  Soul (163)

When [Erwin Schrödinger] went to the Solvay conferences in Brussels, he would walk from the station to the hotel where the delegates stayed, carrying all his luggage in a rucksack and looking so like a tramp that it needed a great deal of argument at the reception desk before he could claim a room.
Quoted in Robert L. Weber, Pioneers of Science: Nobel Prize Winners in Physics (1980), 100.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (81)  |  Biography (232)  |  Conference (11)  |  Desk (13)  |  Hotel (2)  |  Luggage (4)  |  Reception (8)  |  Rucksack (3)  |  Erwin Schrödinger (67)  |  Station (12)  |  Walk (67)

While the method of the natural sciences is... analytic, the method of the social sciences is better described as compositive or synthetic. It is the so-called wholes, the groups of elements which are structurally connected, which we learn to single out from the totality of observed phenomena... Insofar as we analyze individual thought in the social sciences the purpose is not to explain that thought, but merely to distinguish the possible types of elements with which we shall have to reckon in the construction of different patterns of social relationships. It is a mistake... to believe that their aim is to explain conscious action ... The problems which they try to answer arise only insofar as the conscious action of many men produce undesigned results... If social phenomena showed no order except insofar as they were consciously designed, there would indeed be no room for theoretical sciences of society and there would be, as is often argued, only problems of psychology. It is only insofar as some sort of order arises as a result of individual action but without being designed by any individual that a problem is raised which demands a theoretical explanation... people dominated by the scientistic prejudice are often inclined to deny the existence of any such order... it can be shown briefly and without any technical apparatus how the independent actions of individuals will produce an order which is no part of their intentions... The way in which footpaths are formed in a wild broken country is such an instance. At first everyone will seek for himself what seems to him the best path. But the fact that such a path has been used once is likely to make it easier to traverse and therefore more likely to be used again; and thus gradually more and more clearly defined tracks arise and come to be used to the exclusion of other possible ways. Human movements through the region come to conform to a definite pattern which, although the result of deliberate decision of many people, has yet not be consciously designed by anyone.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (184)  |  Aim (88)  |  Analytic (10)  |  Analyze (10)  |  Answer (249)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Apparatus (37)  |  Argue (23)  |  Arise (49)  |  Belief (503)  |  Best (172)  |  Better (190)  |  Break (54)  |  Briefly (5)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Conform (11)  |  Connect (30)  |  Conscious (43)  |  Consciously (6)  |  Construction (83)  |  Country (144)  |  Decision (72)  |  Define (49)  |  Definite (42)  |  Deliberate (12)  |  Demand (74)  |  Deny (41)  |  Describe (56)  |  Design (113)  |  Different (178)  |  Distinguish (61)  |  Dominate (19)  |  Easy (98)  |  Element (162)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Exclusion (13)  |  Existence (296)  |  Explain (105)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Fact (725)  |  First (313)  |  Form (308)  |  Gradually (21)  |  Group (72)  |  Human (548)  |  Inclined (12)  |  Independent (65)  |  Individual (215)  |  Instance (32)  |  Intention (28)  |  Learn (281)  |  Likely (33)  |  Merely (82)  |  Method (230)  |  Mistake (131)  |  Movement (82)  |  Natural Science (89)  |  Observe (75)  |  Often (106)  |  Order (239)  |  Part (220)  |  Path (84)  |  Pattern (79)  |  People (388)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Possible (155)  |  Prejudice (66)  |  Problem (490)  |  Produce (100)  |  Psychology (143)  |  Purpose (193)  |  Raise (34)  |  Reckon (14)  |  Region (35)  |  Relationship (71)  |  Result (376)  |  Seek (104)  |  Seem (143)  |  Show (90)  |  Single (119)  |  So-Called (21)  |  Social (108)  |  Social Science (31)  |  Society (227)  |  Sort (49)  |  Structurally (2)  |  Synthetic (16)  |  Technical (40)  |  Theoretical (21)  |  Theoretical Science (4)  |  Thought (536)  |  Totality (10)  |  Track (14)  |  Traverse (5)  |  Try (141)  |  Type (51)  |  Whole (189)  |  Wild (48)

Yet I also appreciate that we cannot win this battle to save species and environments without forging an emotional bond between ourselves and nature as well–for we will not fight to save what we do not love (but only appreciate in some abstract sense). So let them all continue–the films, the books, the television programs, the zoos, the little half acre of ecological preserve in any community, the primary school lessons, the museum demonstrations, even ... the 6:00 A.M. bird walks. Let them continue and expand because we must have visceral contact in order to love. We really must make room for nature in our hearts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (79)  |  Acre (7)  |  Appreciate (29)  |  Battle (34)  |  Bird (119)  |  Bond (26)  |  Book (257)  |  Community (81)  |  Contact (34)  |  Continue (63)  |  Demonstration (81)  |  Ecological (7)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Environment (180)  |  Expand (22)  |  Fight (44)  |  Film (10)  |  Forge (4)  |  Half (56)  |  Heart (139)  |  Lesson (41)  |  Let (61)  |  Little (184)  |  Love (222)  |  Museum (24)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Order (239)  |  Ourselves (51)  |  Preserve (51)  |  Primary (39)  |  Program (51)  |  Really (78)  |  Save (56)  |  School (117)  |  Sense (315)  |  Species (220)  |  Television (29)  |  Visceral (3)  |  Walk (67)  |  Win (38)  |  Zoo (8)

[About the mechanical properties of the molecules of a chemical substance being studied:] They could be measured, but that would have taken several months. So someone said, ‘Let’s get Teller in and make him guess the data.’ We got him into a room and locked the door, so no one else could get at him, and he asked questions and did some figuring at the blackboard. He got the answers in about two hours, not entirely accurately, of course, but—as we found out when we got around to verifying them—close enough for the purpose.
Recalls the first time she was ever really awed by mental abilities of Edward Teller. She had joined the Manhattan Project, and needed data on the physical properties of molecules of a certain substance to get started on her assigned task of calculating its chemical properties. As quoted in Robert Coughlan, 'Dr. Edward Teller’s Magnificent Obsession', Life (6 Sep 1954), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (32)  |  Answer (249)  |  Ask (157)  |  Blackboard (9)  |  Calculation (98)  |  Chemical (79)  |  Data (120)  |  Door (38)  |  Estimate (28)  |  Guess (48)  |  Lock (12)  |  Measure (102)  |  Mechanical (48)  |  Molecule (131)  |  Property (123)  |  Purpose (193)  |  Question (404)  |  Study (461)  |  Substance (85)  |  Edward Teller (44)  |  Useful (98)  |  Verify (16)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.