Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Dangerous... to take shelter under a tree, during a thunder-gust. It has been fatal to many, both men and beasts.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Context

Context Quotes (29 quotes)

γῆς ἔντερα
[Literally] Earth’s entrails
[or, entrails of earth, or earth’s intestine, or earth’s guts: earthworm. Often seen out of context as “Earthworms are the intestines of the soil.”].
Aristotle
Contrary to the widespread quote, Webmaster has not yet found a complete sentence in the original Greek translating as “Earthworms are the intestines of the soil.” Webmaster believes Aristotle did not write such a sentence. As far as Webmaster can figure out, Aristotle had no other word for an earthworm than the descriptive two-word phrase above. The word γῆς translates directly as “earth” and ἔντερα as “intestine.” In the context, Aristotle wrote only this, without any other wording for “earthworm,” in De Generatione Animalium (On the Generation of Animals), Book III, 10, 762b. Identified in Arthur Platt, De Generatione Animalium (1910), unpaginated page 23, end of 762b, footnote 1. The Greek phrase is given in William Keith and Chambers Guthrie, A History of Greek Philosophy: Aristotle, an Encounter (1981), Vol. 4, 290, footnote 3. The context, from the Platt translation is: “For all of these [animals], though they have but little blood by nature, are nevertheless sanguinea, and have a heart with blood in it as the origin of the parts; and the so-called ‘entrails of earth’, in which comes into being the body of the eel, have the nature of a scolex.” The translator footnotes that: “These ‘entrails of earth’ are earthworms almost certainly. A. thinks they are spontaneously generated, and develop into eels.” An alternate interpretation is given by A.L. Peck in Generation of Animals, With an English Translation (1943), 361. “The ‘earth’s-guts’ as they are called have the nature of a larva; the body of the eels forms within them.” Peck footnotes: “The ‘earth’s-guts’ are apparently the round-worm Gordius. Webmaster note: These are hairlike, very long, and very thin, nematoid worms that are parasites—not earthworms. Webmaster concludes that gardeners saying “Earthworms are the intestines of the soil” are quoting something that Aristotle did not say, per se, and he did not specifically talk about earthworms as gardeners’ friends conditioning the soil.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Earth (996)  |  Earthworm (6)  |  Entrail (2)  |  Entrails (4)  |  Gardening (2)  |  Intestine (14)  |  Literally (30)  |  Soil (86)

Albert Einstein called the intuitive or metaphoric mind a sacred gift. He added that the rational mind is a faithful servant. It it paradoxical that in the context of modern life we have begun to worship the servant and defile the divine.
In The Metaphoric Mind: A Celebration of Creative Consciousness (1976), 26. Note that these words are the author’s own free interpretation Einstein’s views. He is not directly quoting Einstein’s words. No verbatim version appears in Einstein writings. A variant of Samples’ words has become misattributed as an Einstein quote: “The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant; we have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift.”
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (260)  |  Call (769)  |  Divine (112)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Faithful (10)  |  Gift (104)  |  Intuitive (14)  |  Life (1795)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Life (3)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Rational (90)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Servant (39)  |  Worship (32)

Always design a thing by considering it in its next larger context—a chair in a room, a room in a house, a house in an environment, an environment in a city plan.
Time, July 2, 1956.
Science quotes on:  |  Chair (24)  |  City (78)  |  Consider (416)  |  Design (195)  |  Environment (216)  |  House (140)  |  Large (394)  |  Next (236)  |  Plan (117)  |  Room (40)  |  Thing (1915)

Art arises in those strange complexities of action that are called human beings. It is a kind of human behavior. As such it is not magic, except as human beings are magical. Nor is it concerned in absolutes, eternities, “forms,” beyond those that may reside in the context of the human being and be subject to his vicissitudes. Art is not an inner state of consciousness, whatever that may mean. Neither is it essentially a supreme form of communication. Art is human behavior, and its values are contained in human behavior.
In Art Is Action: A Discussion of Nine Arts in a Modern World (1939), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Action (327)  |  Arise (158)  |  Art (657)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Call (769)  |  Communication (94)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Essential (199)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Form (959)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Behavior (9)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Inner (71)  |  Kind (557)  |  Magic (86)  |  Mean (809)  |  Reside (25)  |  State (491)  |  Strange (157)  |  Subject (521)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Value (365)  |  Vicissitude (6)  |  Whatever (234)

Gradually, at various points in our childhoods, we discover different forms of conviction. There’s the rock-hard certainty of personal experience (“I put my finger in the fire and it hurt,”), which is probably the earliest kind we learn. Then there’s the logically convincing, which we probably come to first through maths, in the context of Pythagoras’s theorem or something similar, and which, if we first encounter it at exactly the right moment, bursts on our minds like sunrise with the whole universe playing a great chord of C Major.
In short essay, 'Dawkins, Fairy Tales, and Evidence', 2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Burst (39)  |  Bursting (3)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Childhood (38)  |  Chord (4)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Convincing (9)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Experience (467)  |  Finger (44)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hurting (2)  |  Kind (557)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Logic (287)  |  Major (84)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  Music (129)  |  Playing (42)  |  Point (580)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Right (452)  |  Rock (161)  |  Something (719)  |  Sunrise (13)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Through (849)  |  Universe (857)  |  Various (200)  |  Whole (738)

Humans everywhere share the same goals when the context is large enough. And the study of the Cosmos provides the largest possible context … . If a human disagrees with you, let him live. In a hundred billion galaxies, you will not find another … . If we are to survive, our loyalties must be broadened further, to include the whole human community, the entire planet Earth.
Cosmos
Science quotes on:  |  Billion (95)  |  Broaden (3)  |  Community (104)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Disagree (11)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enough (340)  |  Entire (47)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Far (154)  |  Find (998)  |  Galaxies (29)  |  Galaxy (51)  |  Goal (145)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Include (90)  |  Large (394)  |  Largest (39)  |  Let (61)  |  Live (628)  |  Loyalty (9)  |  Must (1526)  |  Planet (356)  |  Possible (552)  |  Provide (69)  |  Same (157)  |  Share (75)  |  Study (653)  |  Survive (79)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

I thank you for your Expt on the Hedge Hog; but why do you ask me such a question, by way of solving it. I think your solution is just; but why think, why not try the Expt.
[Often seen, without context, briefly as: But why think, why not try the experiment?']
Letter to Edward Jenner (2 Aug 1775). In A. J. Harding Rains (ed.), Letters From the Past: From John Hunter to Edward Jenner (1976), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Hedgehog (4)  |  Question (621)  |  Solution (267)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thank You (8)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Try (283)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)

In place of infinity we usually put some really big number, like 15.
Perhaps referring to the programmer’s hexadecimal counting scheme which has 16 digits (0-9 followed by digits A-F), useful in binary context as a power of 2.
Anonymous
Attributed to a Computer Science Professor on various web pages. Webmaster has found no print source for this wording and comments, but its originality makes it worthy of inclusion here. Webmaster comments: perhaps one of those infinite number of monkeys typed it! Please make contact if you know a primary print source.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Binary (12)  |  Computer (127)  |  Counting (26)  |  Follow (378)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Number (699)  |  Power (746)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usually (176)

In the beginning there was an explosion. Not an explosion like those familiar on earth, starting from a definite center and spreading out to engulf more and more of the circumambient air, but an explosion which occurred simultaneously everywhere, filling all space from the beginning, with every particle of matter rushing apart from every other particle. ‘All space’ in this context may mean either all of an infinite universe, or all of a finite universe which curves back on itself like the surface of a sphere. Neither possibility is easy to comprehend, but this will not get in our way; it matters hardly at all in the early universe whether space is finite or infinite. At about one-hundredth of a second, the earliest time about which we can speak with any confidence, the temperature of the universe was about a hundred thousand million (1011) degrees Centigrade. This is much hotter than in the center of even the hottest star, so hot, in fact, that none of the components of ordinary matter, molecules, or atoms, or even the nuclei of atoms, could have held together. Instead, the matter rushing apart in this explosion consisted of various types of the so-called elementary particles, which are the subject of modern high­energy nuclear physics.
The First Three Minutes: A Modern View of the Origin of the Universe (1977), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Back (390)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Call (769)  |  Component (48)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Consist (223)  |  Curve (49)  |  Definite (110)  |  Degree (276)  |  Early (185)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easy (204)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Energy (344)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Finite (59)  |  High (362)  |  Hot (60)  |  Hottest (2)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Million (114)  |  Modern (385)  |  Molecule (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Physics (5)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Particle Physics (13)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possibility (164)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Space (500)  |  Speak (232)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Star (427)  |  Subject (521)  |  Surface (209)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Type (167)  |  Universe (857)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

In the context of biological research one can reasonably identify creativity with the capacity 1 to ask new and incisive questions, 2 to form new hypotheses, 3 to examine old questions in new ways or with new techniques, and 4 to perceive previously unnoticed relationships.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 231.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Biological (137)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Examine (78)  |  Form (959)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Identify (13)  |  Incisive (3)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Previously (11)  |  Question (621)  |  Reasonably (3)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Research (664)  |  Technique (80)  |  Unnoticed (5)  |  Way (1217)

It is of interest to note that while some dolphins are reported to have learned English—up to fifty words used in correct context—no human being has been reported to have learned delphinese.
This wording was quoted, without citation, as from a “news item”, in Vernon Ingraham (ed.), Survival: Readings on Environment (1971), Vol. 2, 69, but without any attribution to Carl Sagan. In The Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective (1973), 136, Carl Sagan describes meeting in Winter 1963 with a researcher, John Lilly, and a dolphin called Elvar. Sagan wrote, “John believed that Elvar had learned some dozens of words of English. To the best of my knowledge, no human has ever learned a single word of delphinese.” Sagan thought he heard Elvar utter “More!”, and that “it was in context,” because he had been scratching the dolphin’s belly. Webmaster speculates the news item referred to a subsequent interview with Sagan during which this subject came up. Can you help identify the primary news source?
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Correct (86)  |  Dolphin (9)  |  English (35)  |  Fifty (15)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Interest (386)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Note (34)  |  Report (38)  |  Word (619)

Mathematics is a public activity. It occurs in a social context and has social consequences. Posing a problem, formulating a definition, proving a theorem are none of them private acts. They are all part of that larger social process we call science.
In 'Mathematics as an Objective Science', The American Mathematical Monthly (Aug-Sep 1979), 86, No. 7, 542. Reprinted in The Mathematical Intelligencer (1983), 5, No. 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Definition (221)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Large (394)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Occur (150)  |  Part (222)  |  Pose (9)  |  Private (23)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Prove (250)  |  Public (96)  |  Science (3879)  |  Social (252)  |  Theorem (112)

Our attention will focus on the institutional context of technological innovation rather than … individual inventors, for the actual course of work that leads to the conception and use of technology always involves a group that has worked for a considerable period of time on the basic idea before success is achieved.
In The Social Context of Innovation: Bureaucrats, Families, and Heroes in the Early Industrial Revolution as Foreseen in Bacon’s New Atlantis (1982, 2003), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Actual (117)  |  Attention (190)  |  Basic (138)  |  Conception (154)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Course (409)  |  Focus (35)  |  Group (78)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Institution (69)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Involve (90)  |  Lead (384)  |  Period (198)  |  Success (302)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

Our world is not an optimal place, fine tuned by omnipotent forces of selection. It is a quirky mass of imperfections, working well enough (often admirably); a jury-rigged set of adaptations built of curious parts made available by past histories in different contexts ... A world optimally adapted to current environments is a world without history, and a world without history might have been created as we find it. History matters; it confounds perfection and proves that current life transformed its own past.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Admirably (3)  |  Available (78)  |  Build (204)  |  Confound (21)  |  Create (235)  |  Curious (91)  |  Current (118)  |  Different (577)  |  Enough (340)  |  Environment (216)  |  Find (998)  |  Fine (33)  |  Force (487)  |  History (673)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mass (157)  |  Matter (798)  |  Often (106)  |  Omnipotent (12)  |  Optimal (4)  |  Optimally (2)  |  Part (222)  |  Past (337)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Place (177)  |  Prove (250)  |  Quirky (3)  |  Selection (128)  |  Set (394)  |  Transform (73)  |  Tune (19)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

The basic thesis of gestalt theory might be formulated thus: there are contexts in which what is happening in the whole cannot be deduced from the characteristics of the separate pieces, but conversely; what happens to a part of the whole is, in clearcut cases, determined by the laws of the inner structure of its whole.
Lecture at the Kantgesellschaft (Kant Society), Berlin (17 Dec 1924), 'Über Gestalttheorie', as taken down in shorthand. Translated by N. Nairn-Allison in Social Research (1944), 11, 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (138)  |  Case (99)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Clear-Cut (10)  |  Conversely (2)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Determine (144)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Gestalt (3)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Inner (71)  |  Law (894)  |  Part (222)  |  Piece (38)  |  Separate (143)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thesis (15)  |  Whole (738)

The great revelation of the quantum theory was that features of discreteness were discovered in the Book of Nature, in a context in which anything other than continuity seemed to be absurd according to the views held until then.
What is Life? (1944), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  According (237)  |  Book (392)  |  Book Of Nature (12)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Feature (44)  |  Great (1574)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Theory (970)  |  View (488)

The more experiences and experiments accumulate in the exploration of nature, the more precarious the theories become. But it is not always good to discard them immediately on this account. For every hypothesis which once was sound was useful for thinking of previous phenomena in the proper interrelations and for keeping them in context. We ought to set down contradictory experiences separately, until enough have accumulated to make building a new structure worthwhile.
Lichtenberg: Aphorisms & Letters (1969), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Become (815)  |  Building (156)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Discard (29)  |  Down (456)  |  Enough (340)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Good (889)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Interrelation (8)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Precarious (5)  |  Proper (144)  |  Set (394)  |  Sound (183)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Worthwhile (18)

The philosopher of science is not much interested in the thought processes which lead to scientific discoveries; he looks for a logical analysis of the completed theory, including the establishing its validity. That is, he is not interested in the context of discovery, but in the context of justification.
'The Philosophical Significance of the Theory of Relativity' (1938). Collected in P.A. Schillp (ed.). Albert Einstein: Philosopher-Scientist (1949, 1970), 292. Cited in G. Holton, Thematic Origins of Scientific Thought (1973), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Completed (30)  |  Completion (22)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Interest (386)  |  Justification (48)  |  Lead (384)  |  Logic (287)  |  Look (582)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Process (423)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Validity (47)

The philosopher of science is not much interested in the thought processes which lead to scientific discoveries; he looks for a logical analysis of the completed theory, including the relationships establishing its validity. That is, he is not interested in the context of discovery, but in the context of justification.
In'The Philosophical Significance of the Theory of Relativity' (1949), collected in P.A. Schilpp (ed), Albert Einstein: Philosopher-Scientist (1969), 292. As quoted and cited in Stanley Goldberg, Understanding Relativity: Origin and Impact of a Scientific Revolution (1984, 2013), 306.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Completed (30)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Interest (386)  |  Justification (48)  |  Lead (384)  |  Logic (287)  |  Look (582)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Process (423)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Philosophy (6)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Validity (47)

The progress of science requires more than new data; it needs novel frameworks and contexts. And where do these fundamentally new views of the world arise? They are not simply discovered by pure observation; they require new modes of thought. And where can we find them, if old modes do not even include the right metaphors? The nature of true genius must lie in the elusive capacity to construct these new modes from apparent darkness. The basic chanciness and unpredictability of science must also reside in the inherent difficulty of such a task.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Apparent (84)  |  Arise (158)  |  Basic (138)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Construct (124)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Data (156)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Elusive (8)  |  Find (998)  |  Framework (31)  |  Fundamentally (3)  |  Genius (284)  |  Include (90)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Lie (364)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Mode (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Novel (32)  |  Observation (555)  |  Old (481)  |  Progress (465)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Pure (291)  |  Require (219)  |  Reside (25)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simply (53)  |  Task (147)  |  Thought (953)  |  True (212)  |  Unpredictability (7)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

The sociological context of the times [affects education]. Some people call it television culture—you’re supposed to be able to get everything in 30 seconds, a sort of quiz-show attitude.
Recognizing in education a declining “dedication to rigorous thinking and the fact that things are really hard to understand.” In interview, Rushworth M. Kidder, 'Grounded in Space Science', Christian Science Monitor (22 Dec 1989).
Science quotes on:  |  Affect (19)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Call (769)  |  Culture (143)  |  Education (378)  |  Everything (476)  |  People (1005)  |  Rigor (27)  |  Show (346)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Supposed (5)  |  Television (30)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)

There is nothing distinctively scientific about the hypothetico-deductive process. It is not even distinctively intellectual. It is merely a scientific context for a much more general stratagem that underlies almost all regulative processes or processes of continuous control, namely feedback, the control of performance by the consequences of the act performed. In the hypothetico-deductive scheme the inferences we draw from a hypothesis are, in a sense, its logical output. If they are true, the hypothesis need not be altered, but correction is obligatory if they are false. The continuous feedback from inference to hypothesis is implicit in Whewell’s account of scientific method; he would not have dissented from the view that scientific behaviour can be classified as appropriately under cybernetics as under logic.
Induction and Intuition in Scientific Thought (1969), 54-5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Alter (62)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Altered (32)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Classification (97)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Control (167)  |  Correction (40)  |  Cybernetic (5)  |  Cybernetics (5)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Dissent (7)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Draw (137)  |  False (100)  |  Feedback (8)  |  General (511)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Implicit (12)  |  Inference (45)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Logic (287)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obligatory (3)  |  Output (10)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Process (423)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Sense (770)  |  Stratagem (2)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Underlie (18)  |  View (488)  |  William Whewell (70)

Very little comes easily to our poor, benighted species (the first creature, after all, to experiment with the novel evolutionary inventions of self-conscious philosophy and art). Even the most ‘obvious,’ ‘accurate,’ and ‘natural’ style of thinking or drawing must be regulated by history and won by struggle. Solutions must therefore arise within a social context and record the complex interactions of mind and environment that define the possibility of human improvement.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Art (657)  |  Benighted (2)  |  Complex (188)  |  Creature (233)  |  Define (49)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Easily (35)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Experiment (695)  |  First (1283)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Invention (369)  |  Little (707)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Novel (32)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Poor (136)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Record (154)  |  Regulate (8)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Conscious (3)  |  Social (252)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Species (401)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Style (23)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Win (52)

Wallace’s error on human intellect arose from the in adequacy of his rigid selectionism, not from a failure to apply it. And his argument repays our study today, since its flaw persists as the weak link in many of the most ‘modern’ evolutionary speculations of our current literature. For Wallace’s rigid selectionism is much closer than Darwin’s pluralism to the attitude embodied in our favored theory today, which, ironically in this context, goes by the name of ‘Neo-Darwinism.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adequacy (9)  |  Apply (160)  |  Argument (138)  |  Arise (158)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Close (69)  |  Closer (43)  |  Current (118)  |  Darwins (5)  |  Embody (16)  |  Error (321)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Failure (161)  |  Favor (63)  |  Favored (5)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Intellect (31)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Ironically (2)  |  Link (43)  |  Literature (103)  |  Modern (385)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Persist (11)  |  Pluralism (3)  |  Repay (3)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Study (653)  |  Theory (970)  |  Today (314)  |  Weak (71)

We are living in an age of awesome agricultural enterprise that needs to be interpreted. We find our simple faith in science dominated by the Religion of PhDeism under the reign of Data; so narrow in people and often so meaningless in context as to be worthless to the scientific farmer.
Letter to Joshua Lederberg (19 Apr 1970), Joshua Lederberg papers, National Library of Medicine (online). Hildebrand was a response to a Lederberg's letter published in the Washington Post (18 Apr 1970) about 'Ecology Has All Requisites of an Authentic Religion.' Note that Sam Murchid claimed this term PhDeism in another context in his diaries (as seen in diaries of 1964 and others).
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Awesome (14)  |  Data (156)  |  Domination (12)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Faith (203)  |  Farmer (32)  |  Find (998)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Living (491)  |  Meaningless (17)  |  Narrow (84)  |  People (1005)  |  Reign (23)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Simple (406)  |  Worthless (21)

We are not very pleased when we are forced to accept a mathematical truth by virtue of a complicated chain of formal conclusions and computations, which we traverse blindly, link by link, feeling our way by touch. We want first an overview of the aim and of the road; we want to understand the idea of the proof, the deeper context.
Unterrichtsblätter für Mathematik und Naturwissenschaften (1932), 38, 177-188. As translated by Abe Shenitzer, in 'Part I. Topology and Abstract Algebra as Two Roads of Mathematical Comprehension', The American Mathematical Monthly (May 1995), 102, No. 7, 453.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Aim (165)  |  Blind (95)  |  Chain (50)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Computation (24)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Deep (233)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Formal (33)  |  Idea (843)  |  Link (43)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Overview (2)  |  Please (65)  |  Proof (287)  |  Road (64)  |  Touch (141)  |  Traverse (5)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)

We must also teach science not as the bare body of fact, but more as human endeavor in its historic context—in the context of the effects of scientific thought on every kind of thought. We must teach it as an intellectual pursuit rather than as a body of tricks.
In Kermit Lansner, Second-Rate Brains: A Factual, Perceptive Report by Top Scientists, Educators, Journalists, and Their Urgent Recommendations (1958), 31. Note: Dr. I.I. Rabi was chairman of President Eisenhower's Science Advisory Committee.
Science quotes on:  |  Bare (33)  |  Body (537)  |  Effect (393)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Fact (1210)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Kind (557)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Thought (17)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trick (35)

What I then got hold of, something frightful and dangerous, a problem with horns but not necessarily a bull, in any case a new problem—today I should say that it was the problem of science itself, science considered for the first time as problematic, as questionable. But the book in which my youthful courage and suspicion found an outlet—what an impossible book had to result from a task so uncongenial to youth! Constructed from a lot of immature, overgreen personal experiences, all of them close to the limits of communication, presented in the context of art—for the problem of science cannot be recognized in the context of science—a book perhaps for artists who also have an analytic and retrospective penchant (in other words, an exceptional type of artist for whom one might have to look far and wide and really would not care to look) …
In The Birth of Tragedy (1872). Collected in Friedrich Nietzsche and Walter Kaufmann (trans.), The Birth of Tragedy and The Case of Wagner (1967), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Art (657)  |  Artist (90)  |  Book (392)  |  Bull (3)  |  Care (186)  |  Communication (94)  |  Consider (416)  |  Construct (124)  |  Courage (69)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Exceptional (18)  |  Experience (467)  |  First (1283)  |  Frightful (3)  |  Horn (18)  |  Immature (4)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Limit (280)  |  Look (582)  |  Lot (151)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outlet (3)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Questionable (3)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Something (719)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Task (147)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Type (167)  |  Uncongenial (2)  |  Wide (96)  |  Word (619)  |  Youth (101)

Wheeler hopes that we can discover, within the context of physics, a principle that will enable the universe to come into existence “of its own accord.” In his search for such a theory, he remarks: “No guiding principle would seem more powerful than the requirement that it should provide the universe with a way to come into being.” Wheeler likened this 'self-causing' universe to a self-excited circuit in electronics.
In God and the New Physics (1984), 39. Wheeler quotation footnoted 'From the Black Hole', in H. Woolf (Ed.),Some Strangeness in the Proportion (1980).
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Circuit (29)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Electronics (11)  |  Enable (119)  |  Existence (456)  |  Hope (299)  |  More (2559)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Principle (507)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Search (162)  |  Self (267)  |  Theory (970)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  John Wheeler (39)  |  Will (2355)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.