Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index N > Category: Narrow

Narrow Quotes (48 quotes)

A discovery in science, or a new theory, even when it appears most unitary and most all-embracing, deals with some immediate element of novelty or paradox within the framework of far vaster, unanalysed, unarticulated reserves of knowledge, experience, faith, and presupposition. Our progress is narrow; it takes a vast world unchallenged and for granted. This is one reason why, however great the novelty or scope of new discovery, we neither can, nor need, rebuild the house of the mind very rapidly. This is one reason why science, for all its revolutions, is conservative. This is why we will have to accept the fact that no one of us really will ever know very much. This is why we shall have to find comfort in the fact that, taken together, we know more and more.
Science and the Common Understanding (1954), 53-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (45)  |  Analysis (159)  |  Articulation (2)  |  Challenge (61)  |  Comfort (49)  |  Conservative (11)  |  Discovery (676)  |  Element (162)  |  Experience (338)  |  Fact (725)  |  Faith (157)  |  Framework (20)  |  Granted (5)  |  House (43)  |  Immediate (43)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Mind (743)  |  Need (283)  |  Novelty (23)  |  Paradox (43)  |  Progress (362)  |  Rapidly (13)  |  Reason (454)  |  Rebuild (4)  |  Reserve (15)  |  Revolution (69)  |  Scope (23)  |  Theory (690)  |  Unitary (2)  |  Vastness (11)

A mind exclusively bent upon the idea of utility necessarily narrows the range of the imagination. For it is the imagination which pictures to the inner eye of the investigator the indefinitely extending sphere of the possible,—that region of hypothesis and explanation, of underlying cause and controlling law. The area of suggestion and experiment is thus pushed beyond the actual field of vision.
In 'The Paradox of Research', The North American Review (Sep 1908), 188, No. 634, 425.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (283)  |  Exclusive (16)  |  Experiment (600)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Extend (41)  |  Hypothesis (249)  |  Idea (577)  |  Imagination (268)  |  Indefinite (8)  |  Investigator (35)  |  Law (513)  |  Mind (743)  |  Necessary (147)  |  Possible (155)  |  Push (29)  |  Range (57)  |  Region (35)  |  Research (589)  |  Sphere (58)  |  Suggestion (30)  |  Underlying (18)  |  Utility (33)  |  Vision (94)

A research journal serves that narrow borderland which separates the known from the unknown.
Editorial, Vol. 1, Part 1, in the new statistics journal of the Indian Statistical Institute, Sankhayā (1933), as quoted and cited by MacTutor webpage for Mahalanobis. Also reprinted in Sankhyā: The Indian Journal of Statistics (Feb 2003), 65, No. 1, xii.
Science quotes on:  |  Borderland (4)  |  Journal (19)  |  Known (16)  |  Research (589)  |  Separate (69)  |  Serve (57)  |  Unknown (105)

Alas, your dear friend and servant is totally blind. Henceforth this heaven, this universe, which by wonderful observations I had enlarged by a hundred and a thousand times beyond the conception of former ages, is shrunk for me into the narrow space which I myself fill in it. So it pleases God; it shall therefore please me also.
In Letter, as quoted in Sir Oliver Lodge, Pioneers of Science (1905), 133.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (174)  |  Blind (47)  |  Conception (88)  |  Enlarge (26)  |  Former (25)  |  Heaven (151)  |  Hundred (64)  |  Observation (445)  |  Shrink (15)  |  Space (257)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Universe (683)  |  Wonderful (59)

An expert is a person who has made all the mistakes that can be made in a very narrow field.
As quoted by Edward Teller, in Robert Coughlan, 'Dr. Edward Teller’s Magnificent Obsession', Life (6 Sep 1954), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Expert (50)  |  Field (170)  |  Mistake (131)  |  Person (153)

Every complete set of chromosomes contains the full code; so there are, as a rule, two copies of the latter in the fertilized egg cell, which forms the earliest stage of the future individual. In calling the structure of the chromosome fibres a code-script we mean that the all-penetrating mind, once conceived by Laplace, to which every causal connection lay immediately open, could tell from their structure whether the egg would develop, under suitable conditions, into a black cock or into a speckled hen, into a fly or a maize plant, a rhododendron, a beetle, a mouse or a woman. To which we may add, that the appearances of the egg cells are very often remarkably similar; and even when they are not, as in the case of the comparatively gigantic eggs of birds and reptiles, the difference is not so much in the relevant structures as in the nutritive material which in these cases is added for obvious reasons.
But the term code-script is, of course, too narrow. The chromosome structures are at the same time instrumental in bringing about the development they foreshadow. They are law-code and executive power?or, to use another simile, they are architect's plan and builder’s craft-in one.
In What is Life? : The Physical Aspect of the Living Cell (1944), 20-21.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (85)  |  Architect (20)  |  Beetle (9)  |  Bird (119)  |  Builder (12)  |  Cause (283)  |  Cell (137)  |  Chromosome (19)  |  Cock (4)  |  Code (14)  |  Copy (19)  |  Development (276)  |  Egg (45)  |  Executive (3)  |  Fertilization (15)  |  Fly (99)  |  Foreshadow (4)  |  Hen (7)  |  Individual (215)  |  Instrumental (5)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (61)  |  Maize (2)  |  Mouse (26)  |  Plan (87)  |  Plant (199)  |  Reptile (26)  |  Similarity (20)  |  Simile (4)  |  Speckled (2)  |  Structure (221)  |  Woman (111)

Every progress that a church makes in the construction of its dogmas leads to a further taming of the free spirit; every new dogma … narrows the circle of free thought. … Science, on the other hand, liberates with every step of its development, it opens up new paths to thought … In other words, it allows the individual to be truly free.
Translated from the original German, “Jeder Fortschritt, den eine Kirche in dem Aufbau ihrer Dogmen macht, führt zu einer weiter gehenden Bändigung des freien Geistes; jedes neue Dogma … verengt den Kreis des freien Denkens. … Die Naturwissenschaft umgekehrt befreit mit jedem Schritte ihrer Entwicklung, sie eröffnet dem Gedanken neue Bahnen … Sie gestattet, mit anderen Worten, dem Einzelnen in vollem Masse wahr zu sein.” In Speech to the 24th meeting of the German Naturalists and Physicians at Rostock 'Ueber die Aufgaben der Naturwissenschaften in dem neuen nationalen Leben Deutschlands', (On the tasks of the natural sciences in the new national life of Germany), published in Chemisches Zentralblatt (11 Oct 1871), No. 41, 654-655. English version by Webmaster using Google translate.
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (44)  |  Church (34)  |  Circle (55)  |  Construction (83)  |  Development (276)  |  Dogma (32)  |  Free (90)  |  In Other Words (9)  |  Individual (215)  |  Lead (158)  |  Liberate (10)  |  New (483)  |  On The Other Hand (32)  |  Open (66)  |  Path (84)  |  Progress (362)  |  Science (2043)  |  Step (109)  |  Taming (2)  |  Thought (536)

Every serious scientific worker is painfully conscious of this involuntary relegation to an ever-narrowing sphere of knowledge, which threatens to deprive the investigator of his broad horizon and degrades him to the level of a mechanic.
In Ideas and Opinions (1954), 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Broad (27)  |  Conscious (43)  |  Degrade (8)  |  Deprive (11)  |  Horizon (29)  |  Investigator (35)  |  Involuntary (4)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Level (67)  |  Mechanic (23)  |  Relegation (3)  |  Scientist (519)  |  Serious (52)  |  Sphere (58)  |  Threat (29)

Experimental physicists … walk a narrow path with pitfalls on either side. If we spend all our time developing equipment, we risk the appellation of “plumber,” and if we merely use the tools developed by others, we risk the censure of our peers for being parasitic.
In Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1968), 'Recent Developments in Particle Physics', collected in Nobel Lectures: Physics 1963-1970 (1972), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Censure (3)  |  Develop (103)  |  Equipment (29)  |  Experimental Physicist (8)  |  Parasite (30)  |  Path (84)  |  Pitfall (2)  |  Plumber (7)  |  Risk (36)  |  Tool (87)  |  Walk (67)

Far from being the basis of the good society, the family, with its narrow privacy and tawdry secrets, is the source of all our discontents.
From transcript of BBC radio Reith Lecture (12 Nov 1967), 'A Runaway World', on the bbc.co.uk website.
Science quotes on:  |  Basis (89)  |  Discontent (5)  |  Family (45)  |  Good (345)  |  Privacy (7)  |  Secret (130)  |  Society (227)  |  Source (90)

Faraday, who had no narrow views in regard to education, deplored the future of our youth in the competition of the world, because, as he said with sadness, “ our school-boys, when they come out of school, are ignorant of their ignorance at the end of all that education.”
In Inaugural Presidential Address (9 Sep 1885) to the British Association for the Advancement of Science, Aberdeen, Scotland, 'Relations of Science to the Public Weal', Report to the Fifty-Fifth Meeting of the British Association (1886), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Competition (30)  |  Education (333)  |  Michael Faraday (85)  |  Future (284)  |  Ignorance (213)  |  Sadness (34)  |  School (117)  |  Schoolboy (9)  |  View (171)  |  World (892)  |  Youth (75)

He who lacks a sense of the past is condemned to live in the narrow darkness of his own generation
Quoted, and described as “an old Armenian saying”, in Differential Equations: With Applications and Historical Notes (1972), ix.
Science quotes on:  |  Condemn (13)  |  Darkness (43)  |  Generation (137)  |  Lack (77)  |  Live (269)  |  Past (150)  |  Sense (315)

How narrow is the vision that exalts the busyness of the ant above the singing of the grasshopper.
In Kahlil Gibran: The Collected Works (207), 203.
Science quotes on:  |  Ant (24)  |  Busy (28)  |  Exalt (2)  |  Grasshopper (4)  |  Singing (6)  |  Vision (94)

I am nothing more than a single narrow gasping lung, floating over the mists and summits.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Float (21)  |  Gasp (6)  |  Lung (19)  |  Mist (9)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Single (119)  |  Summit (15)

I think science has enjoyed an extraordinary success because it has such a limited and narrow realm in which to focus its efforts. Namely, the physical universe.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Effort (143)  |  Enjoy (38)  |  Extraordinary (43)  |  Focus (27)  |  Limit (123)  |  Namely (11)  |  Physical (129)  |  Realm (54)  |  Science (2043)  |  Success (248)  |  Think (341)  |  Universe (683)

If we imagine an observer to approach our planet from outer space, and, pushing aside the belts of red-brown clouds which obscure our atmosphere, to gaze for a whole day on the surface of the earth as it rotates beneath him, the feature, beyond all others most likely to arrest his attention would be the wedge-like outlines of the continents as they narrow away to the South.
The Face of the Earth (1904), Vol. 1, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (53)  |  Arrest (6)  |  Atmosphere (79)  |  Attention (115)  |  Belt (2)  |  Cloud (69)  |  Continent (52)  |  Day (41)  |  Earth (635)  |  Feature (43)  |  Gaze (16)  |  Imagination (268)  |  Observer (42)  |  Outer Space (6)  |  Outline (11)  |  Planet (262)  |  Push (29)  |  Rotation (7)  |  South (10)  |  Surface (101)  |  Wedge (3)

In defining an element let us not take an external boundary, Let us say, e.g., the smallest ponderable quantity of yttrium is an assemblage of ultimate atoms almost infinitely more like each other than they are to the atoms of any other approximating element. It does not necessarily follow that the atoms shall all be absolutely alike among themselves. The atomic weight which we ascribe to yttrium, therefore, merely represents a mean value around which the actual weights of the individual atoms of the “element” range within certain limits. But if my conjecture is tenable, could we separate atom from atom, we should find them varying within narrow limits on each side of the mean.
Address to Annual General Meeting of the Chemical Society (28 Mar 1888), printed in Journal of the Chemical Society (1888), 491.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Actual (47)  |  Alike (22)  |  Approximation (22)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Assemblage (7)  |  Atom (280)  |  Boundary (38)  |  Conjecture (32)  |  Definition (191)  |  Element (162)  |  External (55)  |  Find (405)  |  Individual (215)  |  Infinitely (13)  |  Limit (123)  |  Mean (101)  |  Ponderable (3)  |  Quantity (64)  |  Range (57)  |  Separate (69)  |  Smallest (9)  |  Ultimate (84)  |  Value (240)  |  Variation (61)  |  Yttrium (3)

It is with narrow-souled people as with narrow-necked bottles, the less they have in them, the more noise they make in pouring out.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Bottle (15)  |  Less (102)  |  Neck (12)  |  Noise (31)  |  People (388)  |  Pour (10)

It seems plain and self-evident, yet it needs to be said: the isolated knowledge obtained by a group of specialists in a narrow field has in itself no value whatsoever, but only in its synthesis with all the rest of knowledge and only inasmuch as it really contributes in this synthesis toward answering the demand, ‘Who are we?’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Contribute (26)  |  Demand (74)  |  Field (170)  |  Group (72)  |  Inasmuch (5)  |  Isolate (21)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Need (283)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Plain (33)  |  Really (78)  |  Rest (92)  |  Say (228)  |  Seem (143)  |  Self-Evident (12)  |  Specialist (25)  |  Synthesis (43)  |  Toward (45)  |  Value (240)  |  Whatsoever (9)

It was Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., who likened the bigot to the pupil of the human eye: the more light you expose it to the narrower it grows.
Ashley Montagu (ed.), Science and Creationism (1984), Introduction, 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Bigot (4)  |  Expose (16)  |  Eye (218)  |  Grow (98)  |  Oliver Wendell Holmes (31)  |  Human (548)  |  Light (345)  |  Pupil (31)

It [mathematics] is in the inner world of pure thought, where all entia dwell, where is every type of order and manner of correlation and variety of relationship, it is in this infinite ensemble of eternal verities whence, if there be one cosmos or many of them, each derives its character and mode of being,—it is there that the spirit of mathesis has its home and its life.
Is it a restricted home, a narrow life, static and cold and grey with logic, without artistic interest, devoid of emotion and mood and sentiment? That world, it is true, is not a world of solar light, not clad in the colours that liven and glorify the things of sense, but it is an illuminated world, and over it all and everywhere throughout are hues and tints transcending sense, painted there by radiant pencils of psychic light, the light in which it lies. It is a silent world, and, nevertheless, in respect to the highest principle of art—the interpenetration of content and form, the perfect fusion of mode and meaning—it even surpasses music. In a sense, it is a static world, but so, too, are the worlds of the sculptor and the architect. The figures, however, which reason constructs and the mathematic vision beholds, transcend the temple and the statue, alike in simplicity and in intricacy, in delicacy and in grace, in symmetry and in poise. Not only are this home and this life thus rich in aesthetic interests, really controlled and sustained by motives of a sublimed and supersensuous art, but the religious aspiration, too, finds there, especially in the beautiful doctrine of invariants, the most perfect symbols of what it seeks—the changeless in the midst of change, abiding things hi a world of flux, configurations that remain the same despite the swirl and stress of countless hosts of curious transformations.
In 'The Universe and Beyond', Hibbert Journal (1904-1906), 3, 314.
Science quotes on:  |  Abide (12)  |  Aesthetic (34)  |  Alike (22)  |  Architect (20)  |  Art (284)  |  Artistic (15)  |  Aspiration (27)  |  Beautiful (138)  |  Behold (18)  |  Change (363)  |  Character (115)  |  Cold (58)  |  Color (99)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Construct (40)  |  Content (66)  |  Control (111)  |  Correlation (11)  |  Cosmos (52)  |  Countless (21)  |  Curious (41)  |  Delicacy (3)  |  Derive (33)  |  Despite (7)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Emotion (78)  |  Ensemble (4)  |  Especially (30)  |  Eternal (67)  |  Everywhere (24)  |  Figure (68)  |  Find (405)  |  Flux (13)  |  Form (308)  |  Fusion (12)  |  Glorify (5)  |  Grace (17)  |  Grey (10)  |  High (152)  |  Home (83)  |  Host (16)  |  Hue (3)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Infinite (128)  |  Inner (39)  |  Interest (235)  |  Intricacy (7)  |  Invariant (7)  |  Lie (115)  |  Life (1124)  |  Light (345)  |  Logic (247)  |  Manner (57)  |  Mean (101)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mode (40)  |  Mood (12)  |  Motive (33)  |  Music (95)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (77)  |  Order (239)  |  Paint (21)  |  Pencil (17)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Perfect (83)  |  Poise (4)  |  Principle (285)  |  Psychic (6)  |  Pure (98)  |  Radiant (10)  |  Really (78)  |  Reason (454)  |  Relationship (71)  |  Religious (49)  |  Remain (111)  |  Respect (86)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Rich (61)  |  Same (155)  |  Sculptor (9)  |  Seek (104)  |  Sense (315)  |  Sensuous (5)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Silent (28)  |  Simplicity (146)  |  Solar (8)  |  Spirit (152)  |  Static (8)  |  Statue (11)  |  Stress (12)  |  Sublime (27)  |  Surpass (19)  |  Sustain (23)  |  Swirl (10)  |  Symbol (65)  |  Symmetry (37)  |  Temple (25)  |  Thought (536)  |  Tint (2)  |  Transcend (17)  |  Transformation (54)  |  True (201)  |  Type (51)  |  Variety (69)  |  Verity (5)  |  Vision (94)  |  World (892)

Its [science’s] effectiveness is almost inevitable because it narrows the possibility of refutation and failure. Science begins by saying it can only answer this type of question and ends by saying these are the only questions that can be asked. Once the implications and shallowness of this trick are fully realised, science will be humbled and we shall be free to celebrate ourselves once again.
From Understanding the Present: An Alternative History of Science (2004), 249.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Ask (157)  |  Begin (106)  |  Celebrate (14)  |  Effectiveness (11)  |  End (195)  |  Failure (138)  |  Free (90)  |  Humble (31)  |  Implication (22)  |  Inevitable (27)  |  Ourselves (51)  |  Possibility (116)  |  Question (404)  |  Realize (90)  |  Refutation (12)  |  Say (228)  |  Science (2043)  |  Shallowness (2)  |  Trick (24)  |  Type (51)

Man tries to make for himself in the fashion that suits him best a simplified and intelligible picture of the world; he then tries to some extent to substitute this cosmos of his for the world of experience, and thus to overcome it. This is what the painter, the poet, the speculative philosopher, and the natural scientist do, each in his own fashion. Each makes this cosmos and its construction the pivot of his emotional life, in order to find in this way the peace and security which he cannot find in the narrow whirlpool of personal experience.
Address at The Physical Society, Berlin (1918) for Max Planck’s 60th birthday, 'Principles of Research', collected in Essays in Science (1934, 2004) 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (172)  |  Construction (83)  |  Cosmos (52)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Experience (338)  |  Extent (49)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Intelligible (18)  |  Life (1124)  |  Natural Scientist (5)  |  Overcome (13)  |  Painter (20)  |  Peace (84)  |  Personal (66)  |  Philosopher (164)  |  Picture (75)  |  Poet (78)  |  Science And Art (181)  |  Security (33)  |  Speculative (8)  |  Substitute (27)  |  Suit (11)  |  Try (141)  |  World (892)

Mathematics is not a book confined within a cover and bound between brazen clasps, whose contents it needs only patience to ransack; it is not a mine, whose treasures may take long to reduce into possession, but which fill only a limited number of veins and lodes; it is not a soil, whose fertility can be exhausted by the yield of successive harvests; it is not a continent or an ocean, whose area can be mapped out and its contour defined: it is limitless as that space which it finds too narrow for its aspirations; its possibilities are as infinite as the worlds which are forever crowding in and multiplying upon the astronomer’s gaze; it is as incapable of being restricted within assigned boundaries or being reduced to definitions of permanent validity, as the consciousness of life, which seems to slumber in each monad, in every atom of matter, in each leaf and bud cell, and is forever ready to burst forth into new forms of vegetable and animal existence.
From Commemoration Day Address (22 Feb 1877) at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, collected in The Collected Mathematical Papers: (1870-1883) (1909), 77-78.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (356)  |  Area (29)  |  Aspiration (27)  |  Assign (13)  |  Astronomer (68)  |  Atom (280)  |  Bind (25)  |  Book (257)  |  Boundary (38)  |  Brass (5)  |  Bud (6)  |  Burst (24)  |  Cell (137)  |  Confine (24)  |  Consciousness (82)  |  Content (66)  |  Continent (52)  |  Contour (3)  |  Cover (37)  |  Crowd (22)  |  Define (49)  |  Definition (191)  |  Exhaust (22)  |  Existence (296)  |  Fertility (15)  |  Fill (61)  |  Find (405)  |  Forever (59)  |  Form (308)  |  Forth (13)  |  Gaze (16)  |  Harvest (17)  |  Incapable (17)  |  Infinite (128)  |  Leaf (49)  |  Life (1124)  |  Limit (123)  |  Limitless (8)  |  Lode (2)  |  Long (172)  |  Map (30)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Matter (340)  |  Multiply (18)  |  Need (283)  |  New (483)  |  Number (276)  |  Ocean (148)  |  Patience (39)  |  Permanent (28)  |  Possession (45)  |  Possibility (116)  |  Ready (37)  |  Reduce (53)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Seem (143)  |  Slumber (4)  |  Soil (64)  |  Space (257)  |  Successive (23)  |  Treasure (45)  |  Validity (31)  |  Vegetable (22)  |  Vein (13)  |  World (892)  |  Yield (35)

Mathematics is of two kinds, Rigorous and Physical. The former is Narrow: the latter Bold and Broad. To have to stop to formulate rigorous demonstrations would put a stop to most physico-mathematical inquiries. Am I to refuse to eat because I do not fully understand the mechanism of digestion?
As quoted by Charles Melbourne Focken in Dimensional Methods and Their Applications (1953), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Bold (7)  |  Broad (27)  |  Demonstration (81)  |  Digestion (24)  |  Eating (21)  |  Formulation (25)  |  Kind (138)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mechanism (52)  |  Physical (129)  |  Refusal (20)  |  Rigor (21)  |  Stop (75)

On the whole, I cannot help saying that it appears to me not a little extraordinary, that a theory so new, and of such importance, overturning every thing that was thought to be the best established in chemistry, should rest on so very narrow and precarious a foundation, the experiments adduced in support of it being not only ambiguous or explicable on either hypothesis, but exceedingly few. I think I have recited them all, and that on which the greatest stress is laid, viz. That of the formation of water from the decomposition of the two kinds of air, has not been sufficiently repeated. Indeed it required so difficult and expensive an apparatus, and so many precautions in the use of it, that the frequent repetition of the experiment cannot be expected; and in these circumstances the practised experimenter cannot help suspecting the accuracy of the result and consequently the certainty of the conclusion.
Considerations on the Doctrine of Phlogiston (1796), 57-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (60)  |  Air (188)  |  Ambiguity (14)  |  Apparatus (37)  |  Certainty (129)  |  Circumstance (66)  |  Conclusion (157)  |  Decomposition (12)  |  Difficulty (144)  |  Establish (55)  |  Experiment (600)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Extraordinary (43)  |  Formation (58)  |  Foundation (105)  |  Hypothesis (249)  |  Importance (216)  |  New (483)  |  Precarious (5)  |  Repeat (40)  |  Result (376)  |  Support (77)  |  Theory (690)  |  Water (292)

One-story intellects, two-story intellects, three-story intellects with skylights. All fact-collectors, who have no aim beyond their facts, are one-story men. Two-story men compare, reason, generalize, using the labors of the fact-collectors as well as their own. Three-story men idealize, imagine, predict; their best illumination comes from above, through the skylight. There are minds with large ground-floors, that can store an infinite amount of knowledge; some librarians, for instance, who know enough of books to help other people, without being able to make much other use of their knowledge, have intellects of this class. Your great working lawyer has two spacious stories; his mind is clear, because his mental floors are large, and he has room to arrange his thoughts so that lie can get at them,—facts below, principles above, and all in ordered series; poets are often narrow below, incapable of clear statement, and with small power of consecutive reasoning, but full of light, if sometimes rather bare of furniture, in the attics.
The Poet at the Breakfast Table (1883), 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Collector (9)  |  Comparison (61)  |  Fact (725)  |  Furniture (8)  |  Generalization (41)  |  Idealization (3)  |  Illumination (12)  |  Infinite (128)  |  Intellect (188)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Labor (71)  |  Lawyer (21)  |  Librarian (2)  |  Light (345)  |  Mind (743)  |  Order (239)  |  Poet (78)  |  Prediction (71)  |  Principle (285)  |  Reason (454)  |  Store (21)  |  Story (72)  |  Thought (536)

Out of all possible universes, the only one which can exist, in the sense that it can be known, is simply the one which satisfies the narrow conditions necessary for the development of intelligent life.
From In the Centre of Immensities: Creation (1979), as cited in Bill Swainson, The Encarta Book of Quotations (2000), 579.
Science quotes on:  |  Condition (160)  |  Development (276)  |  Exist (147)  |  Intelligent (47)  |  Know (547)  |  Life (1124)  |  Necessary (147)  |  Possible (155)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Sense (315)  |  Simple (172)  |  Universe (683)

Religion and science ... constitute deep-rooted and ancient efforts to find richer experience and deeper meaning than are found in the ordinary biological and social satisfactions. As pointed out by Whitehead, religion and science have similar origins and are evolving toward similar goals. Both started from crude observations and fanciful concepts, meaningful only within a narrow range of conditions for the people who formulated them of their limited tribal experience. But progressively, continuously, and almost simultaneously, religious and scientific concepts are ridding themselves of their coarse and local components, reaching higher and higher levels of abstraction and purity. Both the myths of religion and the laws of science, it is now becoming apparent, are not so much descriptions of facts as symbolic expressions of cosmic truths.
'On Being Human,' A God Within, Scribner (1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (38)  |  Ancient (103)  |  Apparent (39)  |  Become (172)  |  Biological (35)  |  Both (81)  |  Coarse (2)  |  Component (16)  |  Concept (143)  |  Condition (160)  |  Constitute (29)  |  Continuously (7)  |  Cosmic (47)  |  Crude (17)  |  Deep (121)  |  Description (84)  |  Effort (143)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Experience (338)  |  Expression (104)  |  Fact (725)  |  Fanciful (6)  |  Find (405)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Goal (100)  |  High (152)  |  Law (513)  |  Level (67)  |  Limit (123)  |  Local (19)  |  Mean (101)  |  Meaningful (16)  |  Myth (48)  |  Observation (445)  |  Ordinary (71)  |  Origin (86)  |  People (388)  |  Point (122)  |  Progressively (3)  |  Purity (14)  |  Range (57)  |  Reach (119)  |  Religion (239)  |  Religious (49)  |  Rich (61)  |  Rid (13)  |  Satisfaction (56)  |  Science (2043)  |  Science And Religion (302)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Similar (35)  |  Simultaneous (17)  |  Social (108)  |  Start (97)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Themselves (44)  |  Toward (45)  |  Truth (914)  |  Whitehead (2)

Suppose a number of equal waves of water to move upon the surface of a stagnant lake, with a certain constant velocity, and to enter a narrow channel leading out of the lake. Suppose then another similar cause to have excited another equal series of waves, which arrive at the same time, with the first. Neither series of waves will destroy the other, but their effects will be combined: if they enter the channel in such a manner that the elevations of one series coincide with those of the other, they must together produce a series of greater joint elevations; but if the elevations of one series are so situated as to correspond to the depressions of the other, they must exactly fill up those depressions. And the surface of the water must remain smooth; at least I can discover no alternative, either from theory or from experiment.
A Reply to the Animadversions of the Edinburgh Reviewers on Some Papers Published in the Philosophical Transactions (1804), 17-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Alternative (29)  |  Channel (21)  |  Coincidence (12)  |  Combination (91)  |  Constant (56)  |  Depression (19)  |  Destruction (85)  |  Elevation (5)  |  Experiment (600)  |  Greater (42)  |  Interference (12)  |  Lake (18)  |  Smooth (17)  |  Stagnant (4)  |  Supposition (36)  |  Surface (101)  |  Theory (690)  |  Velocity (15)  |  Water (292)  |  Wave (67)

The increasing technicality of the terminology employed is also a serious difficulty. It has become necessary to learn an extensive vocabulary before a book in even a limited department of science can be consulted with much profit. This change, of course, has its advantages for the initiated, in securing precision and concisement of statement; but it tends to narrow the field in which an investigator can labour, and it cannot fail to become, in the future, a serious impediment to wide inductive generalisations.
Year Book of Science (1892), preface, from review in Chemical News and Journal of Physical Science (14 Apr 1892), 65, 190.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (73)  |  Book (257)  |  Conciseness (2)  |  Consultation (4)  |  Department (47)  |  Difficulty (144)  |  Extensive (18)  |  Failure (138)  |  Field (170)  |  Generalization (41)  |  Impediment (8)  |  Induction (59)  |  Investigator (35)  |  Necessity (142)  |  Precision (50)  |  Statement (72)  |  Technicality (5)  |  Terminology (8)  |  Vocabulary (5)

The investigation of causal relations between economic phenomena presents many problems of peculiar difficulty, and offers many opportunities for fallacious conclusions. Since the statistician can seldom or never make experiments for himself, he has to accept the data of daily experience, and discuss as best he can the relations of a whole group of changes; he cannot, like the physicist, narrow down the issue to the effect of one variation at a time. The problems of statistics are in this sense far more complex than the problems of physics.
Udny Yule
In 'On the Theory of Correlation', Journal of the Royal Statistical Society (Dec 1897), 60, 812, as cited in Stephen M. Stigler, The History of Statistics: The Measurement of Uncertainty Before 1900 (1986), 348.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (283)  |  Change (363)  |  Complexity (90)  |  Conclusion (157)  |  Data (120)  |  Difficulty (144)  |  Economics (34)  |  Effect (165)  |  Experience (338)  |  Experiment (600)  |  Fallacious (3)  |  Investigation (175)  |  Opportunity (63)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Physicist (160)  |  Physics (346)  |  Problem (490)  |  Relation (149)  |  Statistician (19)  |  Statistics (147)  |  Time (594)  |  Variation (61)

The last few meters up to the summit no longer seem so hard. On reaching the top, I sit down and let my legs dangle into space. I don’t have to climb anymore. I pull my camera from my rucksack and, in my down mittens, fumble a long time with the batteries before I have it working properly. Then I film Peter. Now, after the hours of torment, which indeed I didn’t recognize as torment, now, when the monotonous motion of plodding upwards is at an end, and I have nothing more to do than breathe, a great peace floods my whole being. I breathe like someone who has run the race of his life and knows that he may now rest forever. I keep looking all around, because the first time I didn’t see anything of the panorama I had expected from Everest, neither indeed did I notice how the wind was continually chasing snow across the summit. In my state of spiritual abstraction, I no longer belong to myself and to my eyesight. I am nothing more than a single, narrow, gasping lung, floating over the mists and the summits.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (38)  |  Across (32)  |  Anymore (5)  |  Battery (8)  |  Belong (53)  |  Breathe (36)  |  Camera (6)  |  Chase (13)  |  Climb (34)  |  Continually (16)  |  Dangle (2)  |  Down (86)  |  End (195)  |  Everest (10)  |  Expect (44)  |  Eyesight (4)  |  Film (10)  |  First Time (10)  |  Float (21)  |  Flood (36)  |  Forever (59)  |  Gasp (6)  |  Great (524)  |  Hard (99)  |  Hour (71)  |  Keep (100)  |  Know (547)  |  Leg (18)  |  Let (61)  |  Life (1124)  |  Long (172)  |  Lung (19)  |  Meter (9)  |  Mist (9)  |  Monotonous (3)  |  Motion (158)  |  Myself (36)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Notice (34)  |  Panorama (4)  |  Peace (84)  |  Plod (2)  |  Properly (20)  |  Pull (22)  |  Race (103)  |  Reach (119)  |  Recognize (66)  |  Rest (92)  |  Rucksack (3)  |  Run (57)  |  See (369)  |  Seem (143)  |  Single (119)  |  Sit (47)  |  Snow (24)  |  Someone (21)  |  Space (257)  |  Spiritual (55)  |  State (136)  |  Summit (15)  |  Time (594)  |  Top (34)  |  Torment (14)  |  Upwards (6)  |  Whole (189)  |  Wind (80)  |  Work (626)

The mathematician requires tact and good taste at every step of his work, and he has to learn to trust to his own instinct to distinguish between what is really worthy of his efforts and what is not; he must take care not to be the slave of his symbols, but always to have before his mind the realities which they merely serve to express. For these and other reasons it seems to me of the highest importance that a mathematician should be trained in no narrow school; a wide course of reading in the first few years of his mathematical study cannot fail to influence for good the character of the whole of his subsequent work.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A, (1890), Nature, 42, 467.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (95)  |  Character (115)  |  Course (83)  |  Distinguish (61)  |  Effort (143)  |  Express (63)  |  Fail (58)  |  First (313)  |  Good (345)  |  High (152)  |  Importance (216)  |  Influence (137)  |  Instinct (65)  |  Learn (281)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Merely (82)  |  Mind (743)  |  Read (144)  |  Reality (188)  |  Really (78)  |  Reason (454)  |  Require (79)  |  School (117)  |  Seem (143)  |  Serve (57)  |  Slave (27)  |  Step (109)  |  Study (461)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (59)  |  Subsequent (19)  |  Symbol (65)  |  Tact (6)  |  Taste (48)  |  Train (45)  |  Trust (49)  |  Whole (189)  |  Wide (27)  |  Work (626)  |  Worthy (34)  |  Year (299)

The mythology of science asserts that with many different scientists all asking their own questions and evaluating the answers independently, whatever personal bias creeps into their individual answers is cancelled out when the large picture is put together. This might conceivably be so if scientists were women and men from all sorts of different cultural and social backgrounds who came to science with very different ideologies and interests. But since, in fact, they have been predominantly university-trained white males from privileged social backgrounds, the bias has been narrow and the product often reveals more about the investigator than about the subject being researched.
'Have Only Men Evolved?' Women Look at Biology Looking At Women, eds. Ruth Hubbard, Mary Sue Henifin, and Barbara Fried (1979).
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Ask (157)  |  Assert (21)  |  Background (30)  |  Bias (16)  |  Cancel (3)  |  Creep (9)  |  Cultural (23)  |  Different (178)  |  Evaluate (5)  |  Fact (725)  |  Ideology (12)  |  Independently (6)  |  Individual (215)  |  Interest (235)  |  Investigator (35)  |  Large (130)  |  Male (26)  |  Mythology (13)  |  Often (106)  |  Personal (66)  |  Picture (75)  |  Predominantly (4)  |  Privilege (24)  |  Product (82)  |  Question (404)  |  Research (589)  |  Reveal (50)  |  Science (2043)  |  Scientist (519)  |  Social (108)  |  Sort (49)  |  Subject (235)  |  Together (77)  |  White (56)  |  Woman (111)

The narrow sectarian cannot read astronomy with impunity. The creeds of his church shrivel like dried leaves at the door of the observatory.
In 'Progress of Culture', an address read to the Phi Beta Kappa Society at Cambridge, 18 July 1867. Collected in Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1883), 474.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (203)  |  Church (34)  |  Creed (11)  |  Door (38)  |  Dried (2)  |  Impunity (4)  |  Leaf (49)  |  Observatory (12)  |  Read (144)  |  Science And Religion (302)  |  Shrivel (2)

The opinion appears to be gaining ground that this very general conception of functionality, born on mathematical ground, is destined to supersede the narrower notion of causation, traditional in connection with the natural sciences. As an abstract formulation of the idea of determination in its most general sense, the notion of functionality includes and transcends the more special notion of causation as a one-sided determination of future phenomena by means of present conditions; it can be used to express the fact of the subsumption under a general law of past, present, and future alike, in a sequence of phenomena. From this point of view the remark of Huxley that Mathematics “knows nothing of causation” could only be taken to express the whole truth, if by the term “causation” is understood “efficient causation.” The latter notion has, however, in recent times been to an increasing extent regarded as just as irrelevant in the natural sciences as it is in Mathematics; the idea of thorough-going determinancy, in accordance with formal law, being thought to be alone significant in either domain.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science (1910), Nature, 84, 290.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (79)  |  Alone (101)  |  Appear (115)  |  Born (30)  |  Causation (10)  |  Conception (88)  |  Condition (160)  |  Connection (107)  |  Destined (11)  |  Determination (57)  |  Determine (72)  |  Domain (40)  |  Efficient (24)  |  Express (63)  |  Extent (49)  |  Fact (725)  |  Formal (29)  |  Formulation (25)  |  Functionality (2)  |  Future (284)  |  Gain (67)  |  General (156)  |  Ground (90)  |  Huxley (2)  |  Idea (577)  |  Include (40)  |  Increase (145)  |  Irrelevant (9)  |  Know (547)  |  Latter (21)  |  Law (513)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Means (171)  |  Natural Science (89)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (77)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Notion (57)  |  One-Sided (2)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Past (150)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Point Of View (41)  |  Present (174)  |  Recent (29)  |  Regard (93)  |  Remark (26)  |  Sense (315)  |  Sequence (41)  |  Significant (35)  |  Special (74)  |  Subsumption (3)  |  Supersede (7)  |  Term (120)  |  Thought (536)  |  Time (594)  |  Traditional (15)  |  Transcend (17)  |  Truth (914)  |  Understand (326)  |  Whole (189)

There are then two kinds of intellect: the one able to penetrate acutely and deeply into the conclusions of given premises, and this is the precise intellect; the other able to comprehend a great number of premises without confusing them, and this is the mathematical intellect. The one has force and exactness, the other comprehension. Now the one quality can exist without the other; the intellect can be strong and narrow, and can also be comprehensive and weak.
In Pascal’s Pensées (1958), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Acutely (2)  |  Comprehend (39)  |  Comprehension (57)  |  Comprehensive (16)  |  Conclusion (157)  |  Confuse (18)  |  Deeply (17)  |  Exactness (21)  |  Intellect (188)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Penetrate (29)  |  Precise (33)  |  Premise (25)  |  Strong (72)  |  Weak (43)

There is one thing against which a scientist will have to guard himself: narrow patriotism.
Quoted in India Today (Apr 2008), 33, No 16, as cited on webpage of Dhirubhai Ambani Institute of Information and Communication Technology.
Science quotes on:  |  Guard (18)  |  Patriotism (6)  |  Scientist (519)

This beast is best felt. Shake, rattle, and roll. We are thrown left and right against our straps in spasmodic little jerks. It is steering like crazy, like a nervous lady driving a wide car down a narrow alley, and I just hope it knows where it’s going, because for the first ten seconds we are perilously close to that umbilical tower.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alley (2)  |  Beast (38)  |  Best (172)  |  Car (27)  |  Close (66)  |  Crazy (17)  |  Down (86)  |  Drive (55)  |  Feel (165)  |  First (313)  |  Hope (174)  |  Know (547)  |  Lady (11)  |  Leave (127)  |  Little (184)  |  Nervous (7)  |  Rattle (2)  |  Right (196)  |  Roll (17)  |  Second (59)  |  Shake (29)  |  Spasmodic (2)  |  Steer (4)  |  Strap (3)  |  Throw (43)  |  Tower (17)  |  Wide (27)

To divide a cube into two other cubes, a fourth power, or in general any power whatever into two powers of the same denomination above the second is impossible, and I have assuredly found an admirable proof of this, but the margin is too narrow to contain it.
His handwritten note in the margin, beside the eighth proposition, in his copy of Diophantus' Arithmetica, Book 2. It is known as Fermat’s Last Theorem. (A proof remained elusive until 1994.) In Précis des Oeuvres Mathématiques de P. Fermat et de l'Arithmetique de Diophante (1853), 53-54. As translated by Vera Sandford in David Eugene Smith, A Source Book in Mathematics (1929), 212.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (19)  |  Contain (67)  |  Cube (11)  |  Denomination (3)  |  Divide (40)  |  Found (11)  |  Fourth (7)  |  Impossible (108)  |  Margin (6)  |  Power (358)  |  Proof (243)  |  Second (59)

We are living in an age of awesome agricultural enterprise that needs to be interpreted. We find our simple faith in science dominated by the Religion of PhDeism under the reign of Data; so narrow in people and often so meaningless in context as to be worthless to the scientific farmer.
Letter to Joshua Lederberg (19 Apr 1970), Joshua Lederberg papers, National Library of Medicine (online). Hildebrand was a response to a Lederberg's letter published in the Washington Post (18 Apr 1970) about 'Ecology Has All Requisites of an Authentic Religion.' Note that Sam Murchid claimed this term PhDeism in another context in his diaries (as seen in diaries of 1964 and others).
Science quotes on:  |  Age (174)  |  Agriculture (66)  |  Awesome (11)  |  Context (22)  |  Data (120)  |  Domination (12)  |  Enterprise (32)  |  Faith (157)  |  Farmer (25)  |  Interpretation (69)  |  Living (56)  |  Meaningless (17)  |  People (388)  |  Reign (11)  |  Religion (239)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Simple (172)  |  Worthless (21)

We receive it as a fact, that some minds are so constituted as absolutely to require for their nurture the severe logic of the abstract sciences; that rigorous sequence of ideas which leads from the premises to the conclusion, by a path, arduous and narrow, it may be, and which the youthful reason may find it hard to mount, but where it cannot stray; and on which, if it move at all, it must move onward and upward… . Even for intellects of a different character, whose natural aptitude is for moral evidence and those relations of ideas which are perceived and appreciated by taste, the study of the exact sciences may be recommended as the best protection against the errors into which they are most likely to fall. Although the study of language is in many respects no mean exercise in logic, yet it must be admitted that an eminently practical mind is hardly to be formed without mathematical training.
In Orations and Speeches (1870), Vol. 8, 510.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Abstract (79)  |  Admit (44)  |  Appreciate (29)  |  Aptitude (17)  |  Arduous (3)  |  Best (172)  |  Character (115)  |  Conclusion (157)  |  Constitute (29)  |  Different (178)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Error (275)  |  Evidence (181)  |  Exact Science (10)  |  Exercise (64)  |  Fact (725)  |  Fall (119)  |  Find (405)  |  Form (308)  |  Hard (99)  |  Hardly (19)  |  Idea (577)  |  Intellect (188)  |  Language (217)  |  Lead (158)  |  Likely (33)  |  Logic (247)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mean (101)  |  Mind (743)  |  Moral (123)  |  Mount (10)  |  Move (94)  |  Natural (167)  |  Nurture (16)  |  Path (84)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Practical (129)  |  Premise (25)  |  Protection (25)  |  Reason (454)  |  Receive (59)  |  Recommend (7)  |  Relation (149)  |  Require (79)  |  Respect (86)  |  Rigorous (21)  |  Science (2043)  |  Sequence (41)  |  Severe (16)  |  Stray (6)  |  Study (461)  |  Taste (48)  |  Training (64)  |  Upward (11)  |  Value Of Mathematics (55)  |  Youthful (2)

When the child outgrows the narrow circle of family life … then comes the period of the school, whose object is to initiate him into the technicalities of intercommunication with his fellow-men, and to familiarize him with the ideas that underlie his civilization, and which he must use as tools of thought if he would observe and understand the phases of human life around him; for these … are invisible to the human being who has not the aid of elementary ideas with which to see them.
In Psychologic Foundations of Education: An Attempt to Show the Genesis of the Higher Faculties of the Mind (1907), 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Child (245)  |  Circle (55)  |  Civilization (174)  |  Education (333)  |  Elementary (45)  |  Familiarize (3)  |  Family (45)  |  Fellow (37)  |  Human (548)  |  Idea (577)  |  Initiate (6)  |  Invisible (38)  |  Life (1124)  |  Object (169)  |  Observe (75)  |  Outgrow (4)  |  Period (64)  |  Phase (16)  |  School (117)  |  See (369)  |  Technicality (5)  |  Thought (536)  |  Tool (87)  |  Underlie (6)  |  Understand (326)

Without theory, practice is but routine born of habit. Theory alone can bring forth and develop the spirit of invention. ... [Do not] share the opinion of those narrow minds who disdain everything in science which has not an immediate application. ... A theoretical discovery has but the merit of its existence: it awakens hope, and that is all. But let it be cultivated, let it grow, and you will see what it will become.
Inaugural Address as newly appointed Professor and Dean (Sep 1854) at the opening of the new Faculté des Sciences at Lille (7 Dec 1854). In René Vallery-Radot, The Life of Pasteur, translated by Mrs. R. L. Devonshire (1919), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (166)  |  Birth (93)  |  Development (276)  |  Disdain (6)  |  Everything (180)  |  Habit (107)  |  Immediacy (2)  |  Invention (318)  |  Mind (743)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Practice (92)  |  Routine (19)  |  Sharing (7)  |  Spirit (152)  |  Spirit Of Invention (2)  |  Theory (690)  |  Without (13)

Years ago I used to worry about the degree to which I specialized. Vision is limited enough, yet I was not really working on vision, for I hardly made contact with visual sensations, except as signals, nor with the nervous pathways, nor the structure of the eye, except the retina. Actually my studies involved only the rods and cones of the retina, and in them only the visual pigments. A sadly limited peripheral business, fit for escapists. But it is as though this were a very narrow window through which at a distance, one can only see a crack of light. As one comes closer the view grows wider and wider, until finally looking through the same narrow window one is looking at the universe. It is like the pupil of the eye, an opening only two to three millimetres across in daylight, but yielding a wide angle of view, and manoeuvrable enough to be turned in all directions. I think this is always the way it goes in science, because science is all one. It hardly matters where one enters, provided one can come closer, and then one does not see less and less, but more and more, because one is not dealing with an opaque object, but with a window.
In Scientific American, 1960s, attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  Angle (19)  |  Cone (6)  |  Contact (34)  |  Crack (15)  |  Daylight (9)  |  Dealing (10)  |  Direction (74)  |  Distance (76)  |  Enter (30)  |  Eye (218)  |  Light (345)  |  Opening (15)  |  Pathway (11)  |  Peripheral (3)  |  Pigment (7)  |  Pupil (31)  |  Really (78)  |  Retina (4)  |  Rod (5)  |  Seeing (47)  |  Sensation (28)  |  Signal (18)  |  Vision (94)  |  Window (40)

[A plant] does not change itself gradually, but remains unaffected during all succeeding generations. It only throws off new forms, which are sharply contrasted with the parent, and which are from the very beginning as perfect and as constant, as narrowly defined, and as pure of type as might be expected of any species.
In Species and Varieties: Their Origin and Mutation (1905), 28-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (122)  |  Change (363)  |  Constant (56)  |  Contrast (28)  |  Defined (4)  |  Expectation (54)  |  Form (308)  |  Generation (137)  |  Gradually (21)  |  New (483)  |  Parent (45)  |  Perfect (83)  |  Plant (199)  |  Pure (98)  |  Remain (111)  |  Sharply (4)  |  Species (220)  |  Succeeding (2)  |  Throw (43)  |  Type (51)  |  Unaffected (4)

…indeed what reason may not go to Schoole to the wisdome of Bees, Aunts, and Spiders? what wise hand teacheth them to doe what reason cannot teach us? Ruder heads stand amazed at those prodigious pieces of nature, Whales, Elephants, Dromidaries and Camels; these I confesse, are the Colossus and Majestick pieces of her hand; but in these narrow Engines there is more curious Mathematicks, and the civilitie of these little Citizens more neatly sets forth the wisedome of their Maker.
In Religio Medici and Other Writings (1909), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Amaze (4)  |  Ant (24)  |  Bee (27)  |  Camel (11)  |  Citizen (30)  |  Curious (41)  |  Elephant (22)  |  Engine (29)  |  Majestic (15)  |  Maker (14)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Prodigious (9)  |  Reason (454)  |  School (117)  |  Spider (11)  |  Teach (179)  |  Whale (24)  |  Wisdom (180)  |  Wise (60)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.