Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I have no satisfaction in formulas unless I feel their arithmetical magnitude.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index E > Category: Experience

Experience Quotes (467 quotes)

The supreme task of the physicist is to arrive at those universal elementary laws from which the cosmos can be built up by pure deduction. There is no logical path to these laws; only intuition, resting on sympathetic understanding of experience, can reach them. In this methodological uncertainty, one might suppose that there were any number of possible systems of theoretical physics all equally well justified; and this opinion is no doubt correct, theoretically. But the development of physics has shown that at any given moment, out of all conceivable constructions, a single one has always proved itself decidedly superior to all the rest.
Address (1918) for Max Planck's 60th birthday, at Physical Society, Berlin, 'Principles of Research' in Essays in Science (1934), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Construction (112)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Development (422)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Equally (130)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Law (894)  |  Logic (287)  |  Moment (253)  |  Number (699)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Path (144)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possible (552)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rest (280)  |  Single (353)  |  Superior (81)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Sympathetic (10)  |  System (537)  |  Task (147)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universal (189)

'Causation' has been popularly used to express the condition of association, when applied to natural phenomena. There is no philosophical basis for giving it a wider meaning than partial or absolute association. In no case has it been proved that there is an inherent necessity in the laws of nature. Causation is correlation... [P]erfect correlation, when based upon sufficient experience, is causation in the scientific sense.
'Correlation, Causation and Wright's Theory of "Path Coefficients"', Genetics (7 May 1922), 7, 259-61.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Applied (177)  |  Association (46)  |  Basis (173)  |  Causation (14)  |  Condition (356)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Express (186)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sufficient (128)

...reality is a system, completely ordered and fully intelligible, with which thought in its advance is more and more identifying itself. We may look at the growth of knowledge … as an attempt by our mind to return to union with things as they are in their ordered wholeness…. and if we take this view, our notion of truth is marked out for us. Truth is the approximation of thought to reality … Its measure is the distance thought has travelled … toward that intelligible system … The degree of truth of a particular proposition is to be judged in the first instance by its coherence with experience as a whole, ultimately by its coherence with that further whole, all comprehensive and fully articulated, in which thought can come to rest.
The Nature of Thought (1939), Vol II, 264. Quoted in Erhard Scheibe and Brigitte Falkenburg (ed), Between Rationalism and Empiricism: Selected Papers in the Philosophy of Physics (2001), 233
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Approximation (31)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Coherence (13)  |  Completely (135)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Degree (276)  |  Distance (161)  |  First (1283)  |  Growth (187)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Look (582)  |  Marked (55)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Notion (113)  |  Order (632)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reality (261)  |  Rest (280)  |  Return (124)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Union (51)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wholeness (9)

...That day in the account of creation, or those days that are numbers according to its recurrence, are beyond the experience and knowledge of us mortal earthbound men. And if we are able to make any effort towards an understanding of those days, we ought not to rush forward with an ill considered opinion, as if no other reasonable and plausible interpretation could be offered.
iv.44
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Account (192)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Consider (416)  |  Creation (327)  |  Earthbound (4)  |  Effort (227)  |  Forward (102)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Number (699)  |  Offer (141)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plausible (22)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Recurrence (5)  |  Rush (18)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

Ac kynde wit cometh
Of alle kynnes syghtes,
Of briddes and of beestes,
Of tastes of truthe and of deceites.

Mother-Wit comes from all kinds of experiences,
Of birds and beasts and of tests both true and false.
In William Langland and B. Thomas Wright (ed.) The Vision and Creed of Piers Ploughman (1842), 235. Modern translation by Terrence Tiller in Piers Plowman (1981, 1999), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beast (55)  |  Biology (216)  |  Bird (149)  |  Both (493)  |  Experiment (695)  |  False (100)  |  Kind (557)  |  Mother (114)  |  Observation (555)  |  Science (3879)  |  Taste (90)  |  Test (211)  |  True (212)  |  Wit (59)  |  Zoology (36)

Bei solchen chemischen Untersuchungen, die man zersetzende oder zergliedernde nennt, kommt es zunächst darauf an, zu ermitteln, mit welchen Stoffen man es zu thun hat, oder um chemisch zu reden, welche Stoffe in einem bestimmten Gemenge oder Gemisch enthalten sind. Hierzu bedient man sich sogenannter gegenwirkender Mittel, d. h. Stoffe, die bestimmte Eigenschaften und Eigenthümlichkeiten besitzen und die man aus Ueberlieferung oder eigner Erfahrung genau kennt, so daß die Veränderungen, welche sie bewirken oder erleiden, gleichsam die Sprache sind, mit der sie reden und dadurch dem Forscher anzeigen, daß der und der bestimmte Stoff in der fraglichen Mischung enthalten sei.
In the case of chemical investigations known as decompositions or analyses, it is first important to determine exactly what ingredients you are dealing with, or chemically speaking, what substances are contained in a given mixture or composite. For this purpose we use reagents, i.e., substances that possess certain properties and characteristics, which we well know from references or personal experience, such that the changes which they bring about or undergo, so to say the language that they speak thereby inform the researcher that this or that specific substance is present in the mixture in question.
From Zur Farben-Chemie Musterbilder für Freunde des Schönen und zum Gebrauch für Zeichner, Maler, Verzierer und Zeugdrucker [On Colour Chemistry...] (1850), Introduction. Translation tweaked by Webmaster from version in Herbert and W. Roesky and Klaud Möckel, translated from the original German by T.N. Mitchell and W.E. Russey, Chemical Curiosities: Spectacular Experiments and Inspired Quotes (1996), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Composite (4)  |  Contain (68)  |  Decomposition (18)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Exactly (13)  |  First (1283)  |  Inform (47)  |  Ingredient (15)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Language (293)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Personal (67)  |  Possess (156)  |  Present (619)  |  Property (168)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Reagent (8)  |  Reference (33)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Say (984)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Specific (95)  |  Substance (248)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Use (766)

Demonstratio longe optima est experientia.
By far the best proof is experience.
Novum Organum, I., 70. In Thomas Benfield Harbottle, Dictionary of Quotations (Classical) (1906), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Proof (287)

En un mot, pour tirer la loi de l'expérience, if faut généraliser; c'est une nécessité qui s'impose ŕ l'observateur le plus circonspect.
In one word, to draw the rule from experience, one must generalize; this is a necessity that imposes itself on the most circumspect observer.
La valeur de la science. In Anton Bovier, Statistical Mechanics of Disordered Systems (2006), 186.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Draw (137)  |  Generalize (19)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Observation (555)  |  Plus (43)  |  Rule (294)  |  Word (619)

L’oeuvre de Pasteur est admirable; elle montre son génie, mais it faut avoir vécu dans son intimité pour connaître toute la bonté de son coeur.
The work of Pasteur is admirable; it shows his genius, but it must have been experienced intimately to know all the goodness of his heart.
Epigraph in René Vallery-Radot, La Vie de Pasteur (1900), title page. English by Google translation, tweaked by Webmaster. Pierre Paul Émile Roux had indeed known Pasteur well, as one of his closest collaborators.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Genius (284)  |  Goodness (25)  |  Heart (229)  |  Know (1518)  |  Must (1526)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Show (346)  |  Work (1351)

Tout le monde convient maintenant qu’une Physique d’oů l'on banniroit tout ce qui peut avoir quelque rapport avec les mathématiques, pour se borner ŕ un simple recueil d’observations & d’experiences, ne seroit qu’un amusement historique, plus propre ŕ récréer un cercle de personnes oisives, qu’ŕ occuper un esprit véritablement philosophique.
Everyone now agrees that a Physics where you banish all relationship with mathematics, to confine itself to a mere collection of experiences and observations, would be but an historical amusement, more fitting to entertain idle people, than to engage the mind of a true philosopher.
In Dictionnaire de Physique (1781), Vol. 8, 209. English version via Google Translate, tweaked by Webmaster. Also seen translated as—“Everyone now agrees that a physics lacking all connection with mathematics…would only be an historical amusement, fitter for entertaining the idle than for occupying the mind of a philosopher”—in John L. Heilbron, Electricity in the 17th and 18th centuries: A Study of Early Modern Physics (1979), 74. In the latter source, the subject quote immediately follows a different one by Franz Karl Achard. An editor misreading that paragraph is the likely reason the subject quote will be found in Oxford Dictionary of Science Quotations attributed to Achard. Webmaster checked the original footnoted source, and corrected the author of this entry to Paulian (16 May 2014).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amusement (33)  |  Banish (11)  |  Collection (64)  |  Engage (39)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Historical (70)  |  Idle (33)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Observation (555)  |  People (1005)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Plus (43)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Simple (406)

A discovery in science, or a new theory, even when it appears most unitary and most all-embracing, deals with some immediate element of novelty or paradox within the framework of far vaster, unanalysed, unarticulated reserves of knowledge, experience, faith, and presupposition. Our progress is narrow; it takes a vast world unchallenged and for granted. This is one reason why, however great the novelty or scope of new discovery, we neither can, nor need, rebuild the house of the mind very rapidly. This is one reason why science, for all its revolutions, is conservative. This is why we will have to accept the fact that no one of us really will ever know very much. This is why we shall have to find comfort in the fact that, taken together, we know more and more.
Science and the Common Understanding (1954), 53-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Acceptance (52)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Articulation (2)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Conservative (15)  |  Deal (188)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Element (310)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Faith (203)  |  Find (998)  |  Framework (31)  |  Grant (73)  |  Granted (5)  |  Great (1574)  |  House (140)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Presupposition (2)  |  Progress (465)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rebuild (4)  |  Reserve (24)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scope (45)  |  Theory (970)  |  Together (387)  |  Unitary (2)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vastness (15)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

A formal manipulator in mathematics often experiences the discomforting feeling that his pencil surpasses him in intelligence.
In An Introduction to the History of Mathematics (1953, 1976), 354. This same idea was said much earlier by Ernst Mach (1893). See the quote that begins, “The mathematician who pursues his studies,” on the Ernst Mach Quotes page on this website.
Science quotes on:  |  Discomfort (3)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Formal (33)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Manipulator (4)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Surpass (32)

A great discovery solves a great problem, but there is a grain of discovery in the solution of any problem. Your problem may be modest, but if it challenges your curiosity and brings into play your inventive faculties, and if you solve it by your own means, you may experience the tension and enjoy the triumph of discovery.
From Preface to the first printing, reprinted in How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Challenge (85)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Grain (50)  |  Great (1574)  |  Invention (369)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Modest (15)  |  Problem (676)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Tension (24)  |  Triumph (73)

A human being is part of the whole, called by us “Universe”; a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest—a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty. Nobody is able to achieve this completely but the striving for such achievement is, in itself, a part of the liberation and a foundation for inner security.
In Letter (4 Mar 1950), replying to a grieving father over the loss of a young son. In Dear Professor Einstein: Albert Einstein’s Letters to and from Children (2002), 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Affection (43)  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Circle (110)  |  Compassion (11)  |  Completely (135)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Creature (233)  |  Delusion (25)  |  Desire (204)  |  Embrace (46)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Free (232)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Inner (71)  |  Kind (557)  |  Liberation (12)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Optical (11)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Part (222)  |  Person (363)  |  Personal (67)  |  Prison (13)  |  Rest (280)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Security (47)  |  Separate (143)  |  Something (719)  |  Space (500)  |  Strive (46)  |  Task (147)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whole (738)  |  Widen (10)

A little science is something that they must have. I should like my nephews to know what air is, and water; why we breathe, and why wood burns; the nutritive elements essential to plant life, and the constituents of the soil. And it is no vague and imperfect knowledge from hearsay I would have them gain of these fundamental truths, on which depend agriculture and the industrial arts and our health itself; I would have them know these things thoroughly from their own observation and experience. Books here are insufficient, and can serve merely as aids to scientific experiment.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Aid (97)  |  Air (347)  |  Art (657)  |  Book (392)  |  Breathe (45)  |  Burn (87)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Depend (228)  |  Element (310)  |  Essential (199)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Gain (145)  |  Health (193)  |  Hearsay (5)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Industrial (13)  |  Insufficient (9)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Merely (316)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nephew (2)  |  Observation (555)  |  Plant (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Serve (59)  |  Soil (86)  |  Something (719)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vague (47)  |  Water (481)  |  Why (491)  |  Wood (92)

A Miracle is a Violation of the Laws of Nature; and as a firm and unalterable Experience has established these Laws, the Proof against a Miracle, from the very Nature of the Fact, is as entire as any Argument from Experience can possibly be imagined. Why is it more than probable, that all Men must die; that Lead cannot, of itself, remain suspended in the Air; that Fire consumes Wood, and is extinguished by Water; unless it be, that these Events are found agreeable to the Laws of Nature, and there is required a Violation of these Laws, or in other Words, a Miracle to prevent them? Nothing is esteem'd a Miracle, if it ever happen in the common Course of Nature... There must, therefore, be a uniform Experience against every miraculous Event, otherwise the Event would not merit that Appellation. And as a uniform Experience amounts to a Proof, there is here a direct and full Proof, from the Nature of the Fact, against the Existence of any Miracle; nor can such a Proof be destroy'd, or the Miracle render'd credible, but by an opposite Proof, which is superior.
An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748), 180-181.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Agreeable (18)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Argument (138)  |  Common (436)  |  Course (409)  |  Death (388)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Direct (225)  |  Event (216)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fire (189)  |  Firm (47)  |  Happen (274)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Merit (50)  |  Miracle (83)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Probable (20)  |  Proof (287)  |  Remain (349)  |  Render (93)  |  Required (108)  |  Superior (81)  |  Violation (7)  |  Water (481)  |  Why (491)  |  Wood (92)  |  Word (619)

A moment’s insight is sometimes worth a life’s experience.
In 'Iris, Her Book', The Professor at the Breakfast-Table (1860, 1892), 239.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Insight (102)  |  Life (1795)  |  Moment (253)  |  Worth (169)

A scientist works largely by intuition. Given enough experience, a scientist examining a problem can leap to an intuition as to what the solution ‘should look like.’ ... Science is ultimately based on insight, not logic.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Base (117)  |  Enough (340)  |  Examine (78)  |  Give (202)  |  Insight (102)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Largely (13)  |  Leap (53)  |  Logic (287)  |  Look (582)  |  Problem (676)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Solution (267)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Work (1351)

A scientist worthy of the name, above all a mathematician, experiences in his work the same impression as an artist; his pleasure is as great and of the same Nature.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Artist (90)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impression (114)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Same (157)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worthy (34)

A single idea, if it is right, saves us the labor of an infinity of experiences.
Reflections on America (1958), 97.
Science quotes on:  |  Idea (843)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Labor (107)  |  Labour (98)  |  Right (452)  |  Save (118)  |  Single (353)

A strict materialist believes that everything depends on the motion of matter. He knows the form of the laws of motion though he does not know all their consequences when applied to systems of unknown complexity.
Now one thing in which the materialist (fortified with dynamical knowledge) believes is that if every motion great & small were accurately reversed, and the world left to itself again, everything would happen backwards the fresh water would collect out of the sea and run up the rivers and finally fly up to the clouds in drops which would extract heat from the air and evaporate and afterwards in condensing would shoot out rays of light to the sun and so on. Of course all living things would regrede from the grave to the cradle and we should have a memory of the future but not of the past.
The reason why we do not expect anything of this kind to take place at any time is our experience of irreversible processes, all of one kind, and this leads to the doctrine of a beginning & an end instead of cyclical progression for ever.
Letter to Mark Pattison (7 Apr 1868). In P. M. Hannan (ed.), The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1995), Vol. 2, 1862-1873, 360-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Backwards (17)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Course (409)  |  Cradle (19)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Depend (228)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drop (76)  |  Dynamical (15)  |  End (590)  |  Everything (476)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extract (40)  |  Fly (146)  |  Form (959)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Future (429)  |  Grave (52)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happen (274)  |  Heat (174)  |  Irreversible (12)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Laws Of Motion (10)  |  Lead (384)  |  Light (607)  |  Living (491)  |  Materialist (4)  |  Matter (798)  |  Memory (134)  |  Motion (310)  |  Past (337)  |  Process (423)  |  Progression (23)  |  Ray (114)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reverse (33)  |  River (119)  |  Run (174)  |  Sea (308)  |  Small (477)  |  Sun (385)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Water (481)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)

A … difference between most system-building in the social sciences and systems of thought and classification of the natural sciences is to be seen in their evolution. In the natural sciences both theories and descriptive systems grow by adaptation to the increasing knowledge and experience of the scientists. In the social sciences, systems often issue fully formed from the mind of one man. Then they may be much discussed if they attract attention, but progressive adaptive modification as a result of the concerted efforts of great numbers of men is rare.
The Study of Man (1941), 19-20.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Attention (190)  |  Both (493)  |  Building (156)  |  Classification (97)  |  Concert (7)  |  Descriptive (17)  |  Difference (337)  |  Effort (227)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Form (959)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grow (238)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modification (55)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Number (699)  |  Rare (89)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)

About ten months ago [1609] a report reached my ears that a certain Fleming [Hans Lippershey] had constructed a spyglass, by means of which visible objects, though very distant from the eye of the observer, were distinctly seen as if nearby... Of this truly remarkable effect several experiences were related, to which some persons gave credence while others denied them. A few days later the report was confirmed to me in a letter from a noble Frenchman at Paris, Jacques Badovere, which caused me to apply myself wholeheartedly to enquire into the means by which I might arrive at the invention of a similar instrument. This I did shortly afterwards, my basis being the theory of refraction. First I prepared a tube of lead, at the ends of which I fitted two glass lenses, both plane on one side while on the other side one was spherically convex and the other concave.
The Starry Messenger (1610), trans. Stillman Drake, Discoveries and Opinions of Galileo (1957), 28-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (160)  |  Basis (173)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Certain (550)  |  Concave (6)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Construct (124)  |  Convex (6)  |  Ear (68)  |  Effect (393)  |  End (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Glass (92)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Invention (369)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lens (14)  |  Letter (109)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Month (88)  |  Myself (212)  |  Noble (90)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Reach (281)  |  Refraction (11)  |  Side (233)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truly (116)  |  Two (937)  |  Visible (84)

All advances in science consist either in enlarging the range of experience or in expressing the regularities found or to be found in it.
Presidential Address, Royal Astronomical Society, London (13 Feb 1953), 'On Science and Modern Cosmology', Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (1953), 113, No. 3, 393.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Consist (223)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Express (186)  |  Find (998)  |  Range (99)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Science (3879)

All experience is an arch to build upon.
The Education of Henry Adams (1907, 1918), 87.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arch (11)  |  Build (204)

All of our experience indicates that life can manifest itself only in a concrete form, and that it is bound to certain substantial loci. These loci are cells and cell formations. But we are far from seeking the last and highest level of understanding in the morphology of these loci of life. Anatomy does not exclude physiology, but physiology certainly presupposes anatomy. The phenomena that the physiologist investigates occur in special organs with quite characteristic anatomical arrangements; the various morphological parts disclosed by the anatomist are the bearers of properties or, if you will, of forces probed by the physiologist; when the physiologist has established a law, whether through physical or chemical investigation, the anatomist can still proudly state: This is the structure in which the law becomes manifest.
In 'Cellular-Pathologie', Archiv für pathologische Anatomie und Physiologie und fur klinische Medizin (1855), 8, 19, as translated in LellandJ. Rather, 'Cellular Pathology', Disease, Life, and Man: Selected Essays by Rudolf Virchow (1958), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomist (23)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Become (815)  |  Bound (119)  |  Cell (138)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Level (67)  |  Life (1795)  |  Locus (5)  |  Morphology (22)  |  Occur (150)  |  Organ (115)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Presuppose (15)  |  Pride (78)  |  Probe (12)  |  Property (168)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Special (184)  |  State (491)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Through (849)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2355)

All parts of the material universe are in constant motion and though some of the changes may appear to be cyclical, nothing ever exactly returns, so far as human experience extends, to precisely the same condition.
Address (Jul 1874) at the grave of Joseph Priestley, in Joseph Henry and Arthur P. Molella, et al. (eds.), A Scientist in American Life: Essays and Lectures of Joseph Henry (1980), 119.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Change (593)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constant (144)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Extend (128)  |  Human (1468)  |  Material (353)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Return (124)  |  Universe (857)

Almost every major systematic error which has deluded men for thousands of years relied on practical experience. Horoscopes, incantations, oracles, magic, witchcraft, the cures of witch doctors and of medical practitioners before the advent of modern medicine, were all firmly established through the centuries in the eyes of the public by their supposed practical successes. The scientific method was devised precisely for the purpose of elucidating the nature of things under more carefully controlled conditions and by more rigorous criteria than are present in the situations created by practical problems.
Personal Knowledge (1958), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Advent (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Care (186)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Century (310)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Condition (356)  |  Control (167)  |  Criteria (6)  |  Cure (122)  |  Deluded (7)  |  Delusion (25)  |  Devising (7)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Elucidation (7)  |  Error (321)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Eye (419)  |  Horoscope (4)  |  Incantation (5)  |  Magic (86)  |  Major (84)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Method (505)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Things (29)  |  Oracle (4)  |  Practical (200)  |  Practicality (6)  |  Practitioner (20)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Public (96)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reliance (10)  |  Rigor (27)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Situation (113)  |  Success (302)  |  Supposition (50)  |  System (537)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Witch Doctor (2)  |  Witchcraft (6)  |  Year (933)

Although nature commences with reason and ends in experience it is necessary for us to do the opposite, that is to commence as I said before with experience and from this to proceed to investigate the reason.
'Movement and Weight', from The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci, trans. E. MacCurdy (1938), Vol. 1, 546.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Reason (744)

An event experienced is an event perceived, digested, and assimilated into the substance of our being, and the ratio between the number of cases seen and the number of cases assimilated is the measure of experience.
Address, opening of 1932-3 session of U.C.H. Medical School (4 Oct 1932), 'Art and Science in medicine', The Collected Papers of Wilfred Trotter, FRS (1941), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Assimilation (13)  |  Being (1278)  |  Case (99)  |  Digestion (28)  |  Event (216)  |  Measure (232)  |  Number (699)  |  Perception (97)  |  Ratio (39)  |  See (1081)  |  Substance (248)

An experiment is an observation that can be repeated, isolated and varied. The more frequently you can repeat an observation, the more likely are you to see clearly what is there and to describe accurately what you have seen. The more strictly you can isolate an observation, the easier does your task of observation become, and the less danger is there of your being led astray by irrelevant circumstances, or of placing emphasis on the wrong point. The more widely you can vary an observation, the more clearly will the uniformity of experience stand out, and the better is your chance of discovering laws.
In A Text-Book of Psychology (1909), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Astray (11)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Chance (239)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Clear (100)  |  Danger (115)  |  Describe (128)  |  Description (84)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Easier (53)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Irrelevant (9)  |  Isolate (22)  |  Isolated (14)  |  Law (894)  |  Likely (34)  |  More (2559)  |  Observation (555)  |  Point (580)  |  Repeat (42)  |  See (1081)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stand Out (5)  |  Strict (17)  |  Task (147)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Variation (90)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wrong (234)

An informed appraisal of life absolutely require(s) a full understanding of life’s arena–the universe. … By deepening our understanding of the true nature of physical reality, we profoundly reconfigure our sense of ourselves and our experience of the universe.
In The Fabric of the Cosmos: Space, Time, and the Texture of Reality (2007), 5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Appraisal (2)  |  Arena (4)  |  Deepen (6)  |  Full (66)  |  Inform (47)  |  Life (1795)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Physical (508)  |  Profoundly (13)  |  Reality (261)  |  Require (219)  |  Sense (770)  |  True (212)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)

And having thus passed the principles of arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and geography, with a general compact of physics, they may descend in mathematics to the instrumental science of trigonometry, and from thence to fortification, architecture, engineering, or navigation. And in natural philosophy they may proceed leisurely from the history of meteors, minerals, plants, and living creatures, as far as anatomy. Then also in course might be read to them out of some not tedious writer the institution of physic. … To set forward all these proceedings in nature and mathematics, what hinders but that they may procure, as oft as shall be needful, the helpful experiences of hunters, fowlers, fishermen, shepherds, gardeners, apothecaries; and in other sciences, architects, engineers, mariners, anatomists.
In John Milton and Robert Fletcher (ed.), 'On Education', The Prose Works of John Milton: With an Introductory Review (1834), 100.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomist (23)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Apothecary (10)  |  Architect (29)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Compact (13)  |  Course (409)  |  Creature (233)  |  Descend (47)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Fisherman (7)  |  Fortification (6)  |  Forward (102)  |  Gardener (4)  |  General (511)  |  Geography (36)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Helpful (16)  |  Hinder (12)  |  History (673)  |  Hunter (24)  |  Institution (69)  |  Leisure (24)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mariner (11)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Meteor (18)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Navigation (25)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Plant (294)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Read (287)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Education (15)  |  Set (394)  |  Shepherd (6)  |  Tedious (14)  |  Trigonometry (6)  |  Writer (86)

And I do not take my medicines from the apothecaries; their shops are but foul sculleries, from which comes nothing but foul broths. As for you, you defend your kingdom with belly-crawling and flattery. How long do you think this will last? ... let me tell you this: every little hair on my neck knows more than you and all your scribes, and my shoebuckles are more learned than your Galen and Avicenna, and my beard has more experience than all your high colleges.
'Credo', in J. Jacobi (ed.), Paracelsus: Selected Writings (1951), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apothecary (10)  |  Avicenna (19)  |  Beard (7)  |  Broth (2)  |  College (66)  |  Defense (23)  |  Do (1908)  |  Flattery (7)  |  Foul (15)  |  Galen (19)  |  Hair (25)  |  High (362)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Neck (15)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Scribe (3)  |  Shop (11)  |  Tell (340)  |  Think (1086)  |  Will (2355)

Animals generally seem naturally disposed to … intercourse at about the same period of the year, and that is when winter is changing into summer…. In the human species, the male experiences more under sexual excitement in winter, and the female in summer.
Aristotle
In The Works of Aristotle: Historia Animalium (350 BC), (The History of Animals), Book V, Part 8, 542a20 translated in William David Ross and John Alexander Smith (eds.), D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson (trans.), (1910), Vol. 4, 27-28
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Change (593)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Female (50)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intercourse (4)  |  Male (26)  |  More (2559)  |  Period (198)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Sexual (26)  |  Sexuality (11)  |  Species (401)  |  Summer (54)  |  Winter (44)  |  Year (933)

Any living cell carries with it the experience of a billion years of experimentation by its ancestors. (1949)
Epigraph (witout citation) to Chap 6, in Arnold Jay Levine, Viruses: A Scientific American Library Book (1991), 113. If you know the primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Billion (95)  |  Cell (138)  |  Experimentation (7)  |  Living (491)  |  Year (933)

As an empiricist I continue to think of the conceptual scheme of science as a tool, ultimately, for predicting future experience in the light of past experience. Physical objects are conceptually imported into the situation as convenient intermediaries—not by definition in terms of experience, but simply as irreducible posits comparable, epistemologically, to the gods of Homer. For my part I do, qua lay physicist, believe in physical objects and not in Homer's gods; and I consider it a scientific error to believe otherwise. But in point of epistemological footing the physical objects and the gods differ only in degree and not in kind. Both sorts of entities enter our conception only as cultural posits. The myth of physical objects is epistemologically superior to most in that it has proved more efficacious than other myths as a device for working a manageable structure into the flux of experience.
From A Logical Point of View (1953), 44. [Note: “qua” means “in the character or role of,” thus “qua lay physicist” means “in the role of lay physicist,” or perhaps even (?) “putting on my lay physicist hat.” —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Belief (578)  |  Both (493)  |  Concept (221)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consider (416)  |  Continue (165)  |  Culture (143)  |  Definition (221)  |  Degree (276)  |  Device (70)  |  Differ (85)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  Empiricist (3)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entity (35)  |  Epistemology (8)  |  Error (321)  |  Flux (21)  |  Footing (2)  |  Future (429)  |  God (757)  |  Homer (9)  |  Import (5)  |  Intermediary (2)  |  Kind (557)  |  Light (607)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myth (56)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Past (337)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Point (580)  |  Posit (2)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Situation (113)  |  Structure (344)  |  Superior (81)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tool (117)  |  Ultimately (55)

As chemists, we must rename [our] scheme and insert the symbols Ba, La, Ce in place of Ra, Ac, Th. As nuclear chemists closely associated with physics, we cannot yet convince ourselves to make this leap, which contradicts all previous experience in nuclear physics.
Co-author with Fritz Strassmann, German chemist (1902-80)
Otto Hahn
'(Über den nachweis und das Verhalten der bei der Bestrahlung des Urans mittels Neutronen entstehenden Erdalkallmetalle', Die Naturwissenschaften, 1939, 27, 11-15. Trans. J. Heilbron and Robert W. Seidel, Lawrence and his Laboratory: A History of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (1989), Vol. 1, 436-7.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Author (167)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Contradict (40)  |  Convince (41)  |  German (36)  |  Leap (53)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Physics (5)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Symbol (93)

As children we all possess a natural, uninhibited curiosity, a hunger for explanation, which seems to die slowly as we age—suppressed, I suppose, by the high value we place on conformity and by the need not to appear ignorant.
It betokens a conviction that somehow science is innately incomprehensible. It precludes reaching deeper, thereby denying the profound truth that understanding enriches experience, that explanation vastly enhances the beauty of the natural world in the eye of the beholder.
In Toward the Habit of Truth (1990).
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Children (200)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Enhance (16)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Eye (419)  |  High (362)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Incomprehensible (29)  |  Natural (796)  |  Possess (156)  |  Profound (104)  |  Science (3879)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Value (365)  |  World (1774)

As the human fetus develops, its changing form seems to retrace the whole of human evolution from the time we were cosmic dust to the time we were single-celled organisms in the primordial sea to the time we were four-legged, land-dwelling reptiles and beyond, to our current status as large­brained, bipedal mammals. Thus, humans seem to be the sum total of experience since the beginning of the cosmos.
From interview with James Reston, Jr., in Pamela Weintraub (ed.), The Omni Interviews (1984), 99. Previously published in magazine, Omni (May 1982).
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (305)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bipedal (3)  |  Brain (270)  |  Cell (138)  |  Change (593)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Current (118)  |  Develop (268)  |  Dust (64)  |  Dwelling (11)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fetus (2)  |  Form (959)  |  Human (1468)  |  Land (115)  |  Large (394)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Organism (220)  |  Primordial (10)  |  Reptile (29)  |  Retrace (3)  |  Sea (308)  |  Single (353)  |  Status (35)  |  Sum (102)  |  Time (1877)  |  Total (94)  |  Whole (738)

Break the chains of your prejudices and take up the torch of experience, and you will honour nature in the way she deserves, instead of drawing derogatory conclusions from the ignorance in which she has left you. Simply open your eyes and ignore what you cannot understand, and you will see that a labourer whose mind and knowledge extend no further than the edges of his furrow is no different essentially from the greatest genius, as would have been proved by dissecting the brains of Descartes and Newton; you will be convinced that the imbecile or the idiot are animals in human form, in the same way as the clever ape is a little man in another form; and that, since everything depends absolutely on differences in organisation, a well-constructed animal who has learnt astronomy can predict an eclipse, as he can predict recovery or death when his genius and good eyesight have benefited from some time at the school of Hippocrates and at patients' bedsides.
Machine Man (1747), in Ann Thomson (ed.), Machine Man and Other Writings (1996), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Ape (53)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Brain (270)  |  Break (99)  |  Clever (38)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Construct (124)  |  Death (388)  |  Depend (228)  |  Derogatory (3)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Eclipse (23)  |  Edge (47)  |  Everything (476)  |  Extend (128)  |  Eye (419)  |  Eyesight (5)  |  Form (959)  |  Genius (284)  |  Good (889)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Hippocrates (49)  |  Honour (56)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idiot (22)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Imbecile (4)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Open (274)  |  Patient (199)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Recovery (23)  |  School (219)  |  See (1081)  |  Time (1877)  |  Torch (12)  |  Understand (606)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

But how is it that they [astrologers] have never been able to explain why, in the life of twins, in their actions, in their experiences, their professions, their accomplishments, their positions—in all the other circumstances of human life, and even in death itself, there is often found such a diversity that in those respects many strangers show more resemblance to them than they show to one another, even though the smallest possible interval separated their births and though they were conceived at the same moment, by a single act of intercourse.
De Civitate Dei (The City of God) [413-426], Book V, chapter I, trans. H. Bettenson (1972),180-181.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Astrology (43)  |  Birth (147)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Death (388)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Explain (322)  |  Human (1468)  |  Life (1795)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Profession (99)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Respect (207)  |  Show (346)  |  Single (353)  |  Twin (15)  |  Twins (2)  |  Why (491)

But I shall certainly admit a system as empirical or scientific only if it is capable of being tested by experience. These considerations suggest that not the verifiability but the falsifiability of a system is to be taken as a criterion of demarcation. In other words: I shall not require of a scientific system that it shall be capable of being singled out, once and for all, in a positive sense; but I shall require that its logical form shall be such that it can be singled out, by means of empirical tests, in a negative sense: it must be possible for an empirical scientific system to be refuted by experience. (1959)
The Logic of Scientific Discovery: Logik Der Forschung (1959, 2002), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capable (168)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Empirical Science (9)  |  Form (959)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Negative (63)  |  Other (2236)  |  Positive (94)  |  Possible (552)  |  Require (219)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sense (770)  |  System (537)  |  Test (211)  |  Word (619)

But in practical affairs, particularly in politics, men are needed who combine human experience and interest in human relations with a knowledge of science and technology. Moreover, they must be men of action and not contemplation. I have the impression that no method of education can produce people with all the qualities required. I am haunted by the idea that this break in human civilization, caused by the discovery of the scientific method, may be irreparable.
Max Born
My Life & My Views (1968), 57-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Break (99)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Combine (57)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Education (378)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Impression (114)  |  Interest (386)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Method (505)  |  Must (1526)  |  People (1005)  |  Politics (112)  |  Practical (200)  |  Required (108)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Technology (45)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Technology (257)

But the best demonstration by far is experience, if it go not beyond the actual experiment.
From Aphorism 70, Novum Organum, Book I (1620). Collected in James Spedding (ed.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1858), Vol. 4, 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Best (459)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Experiment (695)

But, as Bacon has well pointed out, truth is more likely to come out of error, if this is clear and definite, than out of confusion, and my experience teaches me that it is better to hold a well-understood and intelligible opinion, even if it should turn out to be wrong, than to be content with a muddle-headed mixture of conflicting views, sometimes miscalled impartiality, and often no better than no opinion at all.
Principles of General Physiology (1915), x.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Better (486)  |  Conflicting (13)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Definite (110)  |  Error (321)  |  Impartiality (7)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Mixture (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Point (580)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turn (447)  |  Understood (156)  |  View (488)  |  Wrong (234)

By the year 2070 we cannot say, or it would be imbecile to do so, that any man alive could understand Shakespearean experience better than Shakespeare, whereas any decent eighteen-year-old student of physics will know more physics than Newton.
'The Case of Leavis and the Serious Case’, Times Literary Supplement (9 Jul 1970), 737-740. Collected in Public Affairs (1971), 95.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Better (486)  |  Decent (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Newton (10)  |  Old (481)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Say (984)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  Student (300)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

By three methods we may learn wisdom: first, by reflection, which is noblest; second, by imitation, which is easiest; and third, by experience, which is the most bitter.
Confucius
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 109
Science quotes on:  |  Bitter (30)  |  Easy (204)  |  First (1283)  |  Imitation (24)  |  Learn (629)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nobl (4)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Second (62)  |  Third (15)  |  Wisdom (221)

Character cannot be developed in ease and quiet. Only through experience of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened, ambition inspired, and success achieved.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Ambition (43)  |  Character (243)  |  Develop (268)  |  Ease (35)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Soul (226)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  Success (302)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Through (849)  |  Trial (57)

Charles Babbage proposed to make an automaton chess-player which should register mechanically the number of games lost and gained in consequence of every sort of move. Thus, the longer the automaton went on playing game, the more experienced it would become by the accumulation of experimental results. Such a machine precisely represents the acquirement of experience by our nervous organization.
In ‘Experimental Legislation’, Popular Science (Apr 1880), 16, 754-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Artificial Intelligence (8)  |  Automaton (12)  |  Charles Babbage (54)  |  Become (815)  |  Chess (25)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Gain (145)  |  Game (101)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Loss (110)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  More (2559)  |  Move (216)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Number (699)  |  Organization (114)  |  Player (8)  |  Playing (42)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Proposal (17)  |  Register (21)  |  Registration (2)  |  Represent (155)  |  Representation (53)  |  Result (677)

Chemical engineering is the profession in which a knowledge of mathematics, chemistry and other natural sciences gained by study, experience and practice is applied with judgment to develop economic ways of using materials and energy for the benefit of mankind.
AIChE
In Article III, 'Definition of the Profession', Constitution of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (as amended 17 Jan 2003). The same wording is found in the 1983 Constitution, as quoted in Nicholas A. Peppas (ed.), One Hundred Years of Chemical Engineering: From Lewis M. Norton (M.I.T. 1888) to Present (2012), 334.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (177)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Engineering (4)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Develop (268)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Energy (344)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Gain (145)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Other (2236)  |  Practice (204)  |  Profession (99)  |  Science (3879)  |  Study (653)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)

Chemistry and physics are experimental sciences; and those who are engaged in attempting to enlarge the boundaries of science by experiment are generally unwilling to publish speculations; for they have learned, by long experience, that it is unsafe to anticipate events. It is true, they must make certain theories and hypotheses. They must form some kind of mental picture of the relations between the phenomena which they are trying to investigate, else their experiments would be made at random, and without connection.
From 'Radium and Its Products', Harper’s Magazine (Dec 1904), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Connection (162)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Event (216)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Form (959)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Kind (557)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Long (790)  |  Mental (177)  |  Must (1526)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Picture (143)  |  Publish (36)  |  Random (41)  |  Relation (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Theory (970)  |  Trying (144)  |  Unsafe (5)  |  Unwilling (9)

Chess is a unique cognitive nexus, a place where art and science come together in the human mind and are then refined and improved by experience.
In How Life Imitates Chess: Making the Right Moves, from the Board to the Boardroom (2007), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Chess (25)  |  Cognition (7)  |  Cognitive (7)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nexus (3)  |  Refinement (17)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Together (387)  |  Unique (67)

Common sense is as rare as genius—is the basis of genius and experience is the hands and feet to every enterprise.
In essay, 'Experience', Essays: Second Series (1844), collected in Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson: Essays First and Second Series (1883), 97. A half-century later, Arthur Handly Marks incorporated the quote (without attribution) as “a first-rate article of common sense is as rare as genius”, in his Address (6 Jun 1892), 'Common Sense' at the Commencement of Prior Institute, Jasper, Tennessee, collected in Igerne and Other Writings of Arthur Handly Marks (1897), 348.
Science quotes on:  |  Basis (173)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Foot (60)  |  Genius (284)  |  Hand (143)  |  Rare (89)  |  Sense (770)

Common sense is not wrong in the view that is meaningful, appropriate and necessary to talk about the large objects of our daily experience …. Common sense is wrong only if it insists that what is familiar must reappear in what is unfamiliar.
In 'Uncommon Sense', collected in J. Robert Oppenheimer, Nicholas Metropolis (ed.) and ‎Gian-Carlo Rota (ed.), Uncommon Sense (1984), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Daily (87)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Insist (20)  |  Large (394)  |  Meaningful (17)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Object (422)  |  Reappear (4)  |  Sense (770)  |  Talk (100)  |  Unfamiliar (16)  |  View (488)  |  Wrong (234)

Common sense is only the application of theories which have grown and been formulated unconsciously as result of experience.
From 'For Mans Use of God's Gifts', collected in Robert C. Goodpasture (ed.), Engineers and Ivory Towers (1952), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Grow (238)  |  Result (677)  |  Sense (770)  |  Theory (970)  |  Unconscious (22)

Common sense is the measure of the possible; it is composed of experience and prevision; it is calculation applied to life.
Entry for 26 Dec 1852 in Amiel’s Journal: The Journal Intime of Henri-Frédéric Amiel, trans. Humphry Ward (1893), 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (177)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Measure (232)  |  Possible (552)  |  Sense (770)

Common to all these types is the anthropomorphic character of their conception of God. In general, only individuals of exceptional endowments, and exceptionally high-minded communities, rise to any considerable extent above this level. But there is a third stage of religious experience which belongs to all of them, even though it is rarely found in a pure form: I shall call it cosmic religious feeling. It is very difficult to elucidate this feeling to anyone who is entirely without it, especially as there is no anthropomorphic conception of God corresponding to it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anthropomorphic (3)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Belong (162)  |  Call (769)  |  Character (243)  |  Common (436)  |  Community (104)  |  Conception (154)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Elucidate (4)  |  Endowment (16)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Especially (31)  |  Exceptional (18)  |  Exceptionally (3)  |  Extent (139)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  God (757)  |  High (362)  |  Individual (404)  |  Level (67)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Pure (291)  |  Rarely (21)  |  Religious (126)  |  Rise (166)  |  Stage (143)  |  Third (15)  |  Type (167)

Concerned to reconstruct past ideas, historians must approach the generation that held them as the anthropologist approaches an alien culture. They must, that is, be prepared at the start to find that natives speak a different language and map experience into different categories from those they themselves bring from home. And they must take as their object the discovery of those categories and the assimilation of the corresponding language.
'Revisiting Planck', Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences (1984), 14, 246.
Science quotes on:  |  Alien (34)  |  Anthropologist (6)  |  Approach (108)  |  Assimilation (13)  |  Category (18)  |  Concern (228)  |  Culture (143)  |  Different (577)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Find (998)  |  Generation (242)  |  Historian (54)  |  History (673)  |  Home (170)  |  Idea (843)  |  Language (293)  |  Map (44)  |  Must (1526)  |  Native (38)  |  Object (422)  |  Past (337)  |  Reconstruction (14)  |  Speak (232)  |  Start (221)  |  Themselves (433)

Consciousness is never experienced in the plural, only in the singular. Not only has none of us ever experienced more than one consciousness, but there is also no trace of circumstantial evidence of this ever happening anywhere in the world. If I say that there cannot be more than one consciousness in the same mind, this seems a blunt tautology–we are quite unable to imagine the contrary.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anywhere (13)  |  Blunt (5)  |  Circumstantial (2)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Seem (145)  |  Singular (23)  |  Tautology (4)  |  Trace (103)  |  Unable (24)  |  World (1774)

During the war years I worked on the development of radar and other radio systems for the R.A.F. and, though gaining much in engineering experience and in understanding people, rapidly forgot most of the physics I had learned.
From Autobiography in Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1974/Nobel Lectures (1975)
Science quotes on:  |  Development (422)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Forgetfulness (7)  |  Gain (145)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Radar (8)  |  Radio (50)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  System (537)  |  Understanding (513)  |  War (225)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

Education is a private matter between the person and the world of knowledge and experience, and has little to do with school or college.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  College (66)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Matter (798)  |  Person (363)  |  Private (23)  |  School (219)  |  World (1774)

Engineering is the profession in which a knowledge of the mathematical and natural sciences gained by study, experience, and practice is applied with judgment to develop ways to utilize, economically, the materials and forces of nature for the benefit of mankind.
ABET
In EAC Criteria for 1999-2000 as cited in Charles R. Lord, Guide to Information Sources in Engineering (2000), 5. Found in many sources, and earlier, for example, Otis E. Lancaster, American Society for Engineering Education, Engineers' Council for Professional Development, Achieve Learning Objectives (1962), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (177)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Develop (268)  |  Economical (9)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Force (487)  |  Force Of Nature (7)  |  Gain (145)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Practice (204)  |  Profession (99)  |  Science (3879)  |  Study (653)  |  Utilize (9)  |  Way (1217)

Ere long intelligence—transmitted without wires—will throb through the earth like a pulse through a living organism. The wonder is that, with the present state of knowledge and the experiences gained, no attempt is being made to disturb the electrostatic or magnetic condition of the earth, and transmit, if nothing else, intelligence.
Electrical Engineer (24 Jun 1892), 11, 609.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Being (1278)  |  Condition (356)  |  Disturb (28)  |  Earth (996)  |  Electrical Engineering (11)  |  Electrostatic (7)  |  Gain (145)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Organism (220)  |  Present (619)  |  Pulse (20)  |  Radio (50)  |  State (491)  |  Throb (6)  |  Through (849)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wire (35)  |  Wonder (236)

Ethical axioms are found and tested not very differently from the axioms of science. Truth is what stands the test of experience.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Axiom (63)  |  Differently (4)  |  Ethical (34)  |  Find (998)  |  Science (3879)  |  Stand (274)  |  Test (211)  |  Truth (1057)

Even in populous districts, the practice of medicine is a lonely road which winds up-hill all the way and a man may easily go astray and never reach the Delectable Mountains unless he early finds those shepherd guides of whom Bunyan tells, Knowledge, Experience, Watchful, and Sincere.
In Aequanimitas (1904), 299.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Astray (11)  |  Early (185)  |  Find (998)  |  Guide (97)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Never (1087)  |  Physician (273)  |  Practice (204)  |  Reach (281)  |  Tell (340)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wind (128)

Every mathematician worthy of the name has experienced, if only rarely, the state of lucid exaltation in which one thought succeeds another as if miraculously… this feeling may last for hours at a time, even for days. Once you have experienced it, you are eager to repeat it but unable to do it at will, unless perhaps by dogged work….
In The Apprenticeship of a Mathematician (1992), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Eager (15)  |  Exaltation (5)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Hour (186)  |  Last (426)  |  Lucid (8)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Miraculous (11)  |  Name (333)  |  Repeat (42)  |  State (491)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unable (24)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worthy (34)

Every new theory as it arises believes in the flush of youth that it has the long sought goal; it sees no limits to its applicability, and believes that at last it is the fortunate theory to achieve the 'right' answer. This was true of electron theory—perhaps some readers will remember a book called The Electrical Theory of the Universe by de Tunzelman. It is true of general relativity theory with its belief that we can formulate a mathematical scheme that will extrapolate to all past and future time and the unfathomed depths of space. It has been true of wave mechanics, with its first enthusiastic claim a brief ten years ago that no problem had successfully resisted its attack provided the attack was properly made, and now the disillusionment of age when confronted by the problems of the proton and the neutron. When will we learn that logic, mathematics, physical theory, are all only inventions for formulating in compact and manageable form what we already know, like all inventions do not achieve complete success in accomplishing what they were designed to do, much less complete success in fields beyond the scope of the original design, and that our only justification for hoping to penetrate at all into the unknown with these inventions is our past experience that sometimes we have been fortunate enough to be able to push on a short distance by acquired momentum.
The Nature of Physical Theory (1936), 136.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arise (158)  |  Attack (84)  |  Belief (578)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Book (392)  |  Brief (36)  |  Call (769)  |  Claim (146)  |  Compact (13)  |  Complete (204)  |  Depth (94)  |  Design (195)  |  Disillusionment (2)  |  Distance (161)  |  Do (1908)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electron (93)  |  Enough (340)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  General Relativity (10)  |  Goal (145)  |  Invention (369)  |  Justification (48)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Learn (629)  |  Limit (280)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Momentum (9)  |  Neutron (17)  |  New (1216)  |  Past (337)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Physical (508)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proton (21)  |  Push (62)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Remember (179)  |  Right (452)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Scope (45)  |  See (1081)  |  Short (197)  |  Space (500)  |  Success (302)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Wave (107)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)  |  Youth (101)

Every scientist, through personal study and research, completes himself and his own humanity. ... Scientific research constitutes for you, as it does for many, the way for the personal encounter with truth, and perhaps the privileged place for the encounter itself with God, the Creator of heaven and earth. Science shines forth in all its value as a good capable of motivating our existence, as a great experience of freedom for truth, as a fundamental work of service. Through research each scientist grows as a human being and helps others to do likewise.
Address to the members of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences (13 Nov 2000). In L’Osservatore Romano (29 Nov 2000), translated in English edition, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capable (168)  |  Complete (204)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Creator (91)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Encounter (22)  |  Existence (456)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grow (238)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Other (2236)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Service (110)  |  Study (653)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Value (365)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

Experience hobbles progress and leads to abandonment of difficult problems; it encourages the initiated to walk on the shady side of the street in the direction of experiences that have been pleasant. Youth without experience attacks the unsolved problems which maturer age with experience avoids, and from the labors of youth comes progress. Youth has dreams and visions, and will not be denied.
From speech 'In the Time of Henry Jacob Bigelow', given to the Boston Surgical Society, Medalist Meeting (6 Jun 1921). Printed in Journal of the Medical Association (1921), 77, 599.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Age (499)  |  Attack (84)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Denial (17)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direction (175)  |  Dream (208)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  Initiated (2)  |  Labor (107)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mature (16)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Problem (676)  |  Progress (465)  |  Side (233)  |  Street (23)  |  Unsolved (15)  |  Vision (123)  |  Walk (124)  |  Will (2355)  |  Youth (101)

Experience is a comb that Nature gives man after he has gone bald.
Anonymous
Thai saying. In Dr. N Sreedharan, Quotations of Wit and Wisdom (2007), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  French Saying (67)

Experience is a jewel, and it need be so, for it is often purchased at an infinite rate.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Infinite (231)  |  Jewel (10)  |  Need (290)  |  Often (106)  |  Purchase (7)  |  Rate (29)

Experience is never at fault; it is only your judgment that is in error in promising itself such results from experience as are not caused by our experiments. For having given a beginning, what follows from it must necessarily be a natural development of such a beginning, unless it has been subject to a contrary influence, while, if it is affected by any contrary influence, the result which ought to follow from the aforesaid beginning will be found to partake of this contrary influence in a greater or less degree in proportion as the said influence is more or less powerful than the aforesaid beginning.
'Philosophy', in The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci, trans. E. MacCurdy (1938), Vol. 1, 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (305)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Degree (276)  |  Development (422)  |  Error (321)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fault (54)  |  Follow (378)  |  Greater (288)  |  Influence (222)  |  Judgment (132)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Never (1087)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Result (677)  |  Subject (521)  |  Will (2355)

Experience is the great teacher; unfortunately, experience leaves mental scars, and scar tissue contracts.
From speech 'In the Time of Henry Jacob Bigelow', given to the Boston Surgical Society, Medalist Meeting (6 Jun 1921). Printed in Journal of the Medical Association (1921), 77, 599.
Science quotes on:  |  Contract (11)  |  Great (1574)  |  Mental (177)  |  Scar (7)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Unfortunately (38)

Experience is the mother of science.
Anonymous
Collected in Henery George Bohn, A Handbook of Proverbs: Comprising Ray's Collection of English Proverbs (1855), 352.
Science quotes on:  |  Mother (114)  |  Science (3879)

Experience of actual fact either teaches fools or abolishes them.
The Homiletic Review, Vol. 83-84 (1922), Vol. 84, 380.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Education (378)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fool (116)

Experience teaches nothing without theory.
In On the Management of Statistical Techniques for Quality and Productivity (1981), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Nothing (966)  |  Teach (277)  |  Theory (970)

EXPERIENCE, n. The wisdom that enables us to recognize as an undesirable old acquaintance the folly that we have already embraced.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  93.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Already (222)  |  Enable (119)  |  Folly (43)  |  Humour (116)  |  Old (481)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Wisdom (221)

Experience, the only logic sure to convince a diseased imagination and restore it to rugged health.
Written in 1892. In The American Claimant (1896), 203. In Mark Twain and Brian Collins (ed.), When in Doubt, Tell the Truth: and Other Quotations from Mark Twain (1996), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Convince (41)  |  Disease (328)  |  Health (193)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Logic (287)  |  Restore (8)  |  Rugged (7)

Experimental observations are only experience carefully planned in advance, and designed to form a secure basis of new knowledge.
In The Design of Experiments (1935, 1970), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Basis (173)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Design (195)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Form (959)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Plan (117)  |  Security (47)

First of all, we ought to observe, that mathematical propositions, properly so called, are always judgments a priori, and not empirical, because they carry along with them necessity, which can never be deduced from experience. If people should object to this, I am quite willing to confine my statements to pure mathematics, the very concept of which implies that it does not contain empirical, but only pure knowledge a priori.
In Critique of Pure Reason (1900), 720.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (26)  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Carry (127)  |  Concept (221)  |  Confine (26)  |  Contain (68)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Empirical (54)  |  First (1283)  |  Imply (17)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Never (1087)  |  Object (422)  |  Observe (168)  |  People (1005)  |  Properly (20)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Statement (142)  |  Willing (44)

First you guess. Don’t laugh, this is the most important step. Then you compute the consequences. Compare the consequences to experience. If it disagrees with experience, the guess is wrong. In that simple statement is the key to science. It doesn’t matter how beautiful your guess is or how smart you are or what your name is. If it disagrees with experience, it’s wrong. That’s all there is to it.
Quoted in Florentin Smarandache, V. Christianto, Multi-Valued Logic, Neutrosophy, and Schrodinger Equation? (2006), 73, but without any primary source. If you know it, please contact the Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Compare (69)  |  Compute (18)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Disagree (11)  |  First (1283)  |  Guess (61)  |  Important (209)  |  Key (50)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Smart (26)  |  Statement (142)  |  Step (231)  |  Wrong (234)

For scholars and laymen alike it is not philosophy but active experience in mathematics itself that can alone answer the question: What is mathematics?
As co-author with Herbert Robbins, in What Is Mathematics?: An Elementary Approach to Ideas and Methods (1941, 1996), xiii.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Activity (210)  |  Alike (60)  |  Alone (311)  |  Answer (366)  |  Itself (7)  |  Layman (21)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Question (621)  |  Scholar (48)

For the better part of my last semester at Garden City High, I constructed a physical pendulum and used it to make a “precision” measurement of gravity. The years of experience building things taught me skills that were directly applicable to the construction of the pendulum. Twenty-five years later, I was to develop a refined version of this measurement using laser-cooled atoms in an atomic fountain interferometer.
[Outcome of high school physics teacher, Thomas Miner, encouraging Chu's ambitious laboratory project.]
Autobiography in Gösta Ekspong (ed.), Nobel Lectures: Physics 1996-2000 (2002), 116.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Atom (355)  |  Better (486)  |  Building (156)  |  City (78)  |  Construct (124)  |  Construction (112)  |  Develop (268)  |  Education (378)  |  Encouraging (12)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Garden (60)  |  Gravity (132)  |  High (362)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Laser (5)  |  Last (426)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Precision (68)  |  Project (73)  |  School (219)  |  Skill (109)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Year (933)

For the holy Bible and the phenomena of nature proceed alike from the divine Word, the former as the dictate of the Holy Ghost and the latter as the observant executrix of God's commands. It is necessary for the Bible, in order to be accommodated to the understanding of every man, to speak many things which appear to differ from the absolute truth so far as the bare meaning of the words is concerned. But Nature, on the other hand, is inexorable and immutable; she never transgresses the laws imposed upon her, or cares a whit whether her abstruse reasons and methods of operation are understandable to men. For that reason it appears that nothing physical which sense-experience sets before our eyes, or which necessary demonstrations prove to us, ought to be called in question (much less condemned) upon the testimony of biblical passages which may have some different meaning beneath their words.
Letter to Madame Christina of Lorraine, Grand Duchess of Tuscany: Concerning the Use of Biblical Quotations in Matters of Science (1615), trans. Stillman Drake, Discoveries and Opinions of Galileo (1957), 182-3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absolute (145)  |  Abstruse (10)  |  Alike (60)  |  Bare (33)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Call (769)  |  Care (186)  |  Command (58)  |  Concern (228)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Differ (85)  |  Different (577)  |  Divine (112)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Eye (419)  |  Former (137)  |  Ghost (36)  |  God (757)  |  Holy (34)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Inexorable (10)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observation (555)  |  Operation (213)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passage (50)  |  Physical (508)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Prove (250)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sense (770)  |  Set (394)  |  Speak (232)  |  Testimony (21)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understandable (12)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Word (619)

For the past 10 years I have had the interesting experience of observing the development of Parkinson's syndrome on myself. As a matter of fact, this condition does not come under my special medical interests or I would have had it solved long ago. … The condition has its compensations: one is not yanked from interesting work to go to the jungles of Burma ... one avoids all kinds of deadly committee meetings, etc.
Article for his 25th anniversary class report. In Barry G. Firkin, Judith A. Whitworth, Dictionary of Medical Eponyms (1996), 5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Condition (356)  |  Deadly (21)  |  Development (422)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Jungle (22)  |  Kind (557)  |  Long (790)  |  Matter (798)  |  Myself (212)  |  Past (337)  |  Special (184)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

For there are two modes of acquiring knowledge, namely, by reasoning and experience. Reasoning draws a conclusion and makes us grant the conclusion, but does not make the conclusion certain, nor does it remove doubt so that the mind may rest on the intuition of truth, unless the mind discovers it by the path of experience; since many have the arguments relating to what can be known, but because they lack experience they neglect the arguments, and neither avoid what is harmful nor follow what is good. For if a man who has never seen fire should prove by adequate reasoning that fire burns and injures things and destroys them, his mind would not be satisfied thereby, nor would he avoid fire, until he placed his hand or some combustible substance in the fire, so that he might prove by experience that which reasoning taught. But when he has had actual experience of combustion his mind is made certain and rests in the full light of truth. Therefore reasoning does not suffice, but experience does.
Opus Majus [1266-1268], Part VI, chapter I, trans. R. B. Burke, The Opus Majus of Roger Bacon (1928), Vol. 2, 583.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Adequate (46)  |  Argument (138)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Burn (87)  |  Certain (550)  |  Combustion (18)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Discover (553)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Draw (137)  |  Fire (189)  |  Follow (378)  |  Good (889)  |  Grant (73)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Lack (119)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observation (555)  |  Path (144)  |  Prove (250)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remove (45)  |  Rest (280)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)

For they are, in truth, textbooks of life: they gather outer and inner experiences into a general and connected whole.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 189.
Science quotes on:  |  Connect (125)  |  Connected (8)  |  Gather (72)  |  General (511)  |  Inner (71)  |  Life (1795)  |  Outer (13)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Whole (738)

For those who have seen the Earth from space, and for the hundreds and perhaps thousands more who will, the experience most certainly changes your perspective. The things that we share in our world are far more valuable than those which divide us.
As quoted, without citation, in Jeffrey O. Bennett, The Cosmic Perspective (1999), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainly (185)  |  Change (593)  |  Divide (75)  |  Earth (996)  |  Hundred (229)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Perspective (28)  |  See (1081)  |  Share (75)  |  Space (500)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Gauss was not the son of a mathematician; Handel’s father was a surgeon, of whose musical powers nothing is known; Titian was the son and also the nephew of a lawyer, while he and his brother, Francesco Vecellio, were the first painters in a family which produced a succession of seven other artists with diminishing talents. These facts do not, however, prove that the condition of the nerve-tracts and centres of the brain, which determine the specific talent, appeared for the first time in these men: the appropriate condition surely existed previously in their parents, although it did not achieve expression. They prove, as it seems to me, that a high degree of endowment in a special direction, which we call talent, cannot have arisen from the experience of previous generations, that is, by the exercise of the brain in the same specific direction.
In 'On Heredity', Essays upon Heredity and Kindred Biological Problems (1889), Vol. 1, 96.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achieve (66)  |  Appear (118)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Artist (90)  |  Brain (270)  |  Brother (43)  |  Call (769)  |  Centre (28)  |  Condition (356)  |  Degree (276)  |  Determine (144)  |  Diminish (17)  |  Direction (175)  |  Do (1908)  |  Endowment (16)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Family (94)  |  Father (110)  |  First (1283)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Generation (242)  |  High (362)  |  Known (454)  |  Lawyer (27)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Music (129)  |  Nephew (2)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Painter (29)  |  Parent (76)  |  Power (746)  |  Previous (12)  |  Produced (187)  |  Prove (250)  |  Son (24)  |  Special (184)  |  Specific (95)  |  Succession (77)  |  Surely (101)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Talent (94)  |  Time (1877)

Gentlemen, as we study the universe we see everywhere the most tremendous manifestations of force. In our own experience we know of but one source of force, namely will. How then can we help regarding the forces we see in nature as due to the will of some omnipresent, omnipotent being? Gentlemen, there must be a GOD.
As quoted in W. E. Byerly (writing as a Professor Emeritus at Harvard University, but a former student at a Peirce lecture on celestial mechanics), 'Benjamin Peirce: II. Reminiscences', The American Mathematical Monthly (Jan 1925), 32, No. 1, 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Due (141)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Force (487)  |  Gentlemen (4)  |  God (757)  |  Know (1518)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Omnipotent (12)  |  Omnipresent (3)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  See (1081)  |  Source (93)  |  Study (653)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

Geology, perhaps more than any other department of natural philosophy, is a science of contemplation. It requires no experience or complicated apparatus, no minute processes upon the unknown processes of matter. It demands only an enquiring mind and senses alive to the facts almost everywhere presented in nature. And as it may be acquired without much difficulty, so it may be improved without much painful exertion.
'Lectures on Geology, 1805 Lecture', in R. Siegfried and R. H. Dott (eds.), Humphry Davy on Geology (1980), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Alive (90)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Demand (123)  |  Department (92)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Geology (220)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Present (619)  |  Require (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Unknown (182)

Goethe said that he who cannot draw on 3,000 years of learning is living hand to mouth. It could just as well be said that individuals who do tap deeply into this rich cultural legacy are wealthy indeed. Yet the paradox is that much of this wisdom is buried in a sea of lesser books or like lost treasure beneath an ocean of online ignorance and trivia. That doesn’t mean that with a little bit of diligence you can’t tap into it. Yet many people, perhaps most, never take advantage of all this human experience. They aren’t obtaining knowledge beyond what they need to know for work or to get by. As a result, their view of our amazing world is diminished and their lives greatly circumscribed.
In An Embarrassment of Riches: Tapping Into the World's Greatest Legacy of Wealth (2013), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Amazing (35)  |  Arent (6)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bit (22)  |  Book (392)  |  Bury (16)  |  Circumscribe (2)  |  Cultural (25)  |  Deeply (17)  |  Diligence (20)  |  Diminish (17)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Goethe (3)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Hand (143)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Individual (404)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Legacy (14)  |  Lesser (5)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Lose (159)  |  Mean (809)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Need (290)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Online (4)  |  Paradox (50)  |  People (1005)  |  Result (677)  |  Rich (62)  |  Say (984)  |  Sea (308)  |  Tap (10)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Trivia (2)  |  View (488)  |  Wealthy (5)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Gradually, at various points in our childhoods, we discover different forms of conviction. There’s the rock-hard certainty of personal experience (“I put my finger in the fire and it hurt,”), which is probably the earliest kind we learn. Then there’s the logically convincing, which we probably come to first through maths, in the context of Pythagoras’s theorem or something similar, and which, if we first encounter it at exactly the right moment, bursts on our minds like sunrise with the whole universe playing a great chord of C Major.
In short essay, 'Dawkins, Fairy Tales, and Evidence', 2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Burst (39)  |  Bursting (3)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Childhood (38)  |  Chord (4)  |  Context (29)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Convincing (9)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Finger (44)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hurting (2)  |  Kind (557)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Logic (287)  |  Major (84)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  Music (129)  |  Playing (42)  |  Point (580)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Right (452)  |  Rock (161)  |  Something (719)  |  Sunrise (13)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Through (849)  |  Universe (857)  |  Various (200)  |  Whole (738)

Groups do not have experiences except insofar as all their members do. And there are no experiences... that all the members of a scientific community must share in the course of a [scientific] revolution. Revolutions should be described not in terms of group experience but in terms of the varied experiences of individual group members. Indeed, that variety itself turns out to play an essential role in the evolution of scientific knowledge.
Thomas S. Kuhn's Foreword to Paul Hoyningen-Huene, Reconstructing Scientific Revolutions: Thomas S Kuhn's Philosophy of Science (1993), xiii.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Community (104)  |  Course (409)  |  Do (1908)  |  Essential (199)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Group (78)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Individual (404)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Must (1526)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Role (86)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Revolution (12)  |  Share (75)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Turn (447)  |  Variety (132)

Hands-on experience at the critical time, not systematic knowledge, is what counts in the making of a naturalist. Better to be an untutored savage for a while, not to know the names or anatomical detail. Better to spend long stretches of time just searching and dreaming.
In Naturalist (1994), 11-12.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Better (486)  |  Count (105)  |  Critical (66)  |  Detail (146)  |  Dreaming (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Long (790)  |  Making (300)  |  Name (333)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Savage (29)  |  Searching (5)  |  Spend (95)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Time (1877)

He who does not believe that God is above all is either a fool or has no experience of life.
From the original Latin, “Deum qui non summum putet, Aut stultum aut rerum esse imperitum existumem,” in Incert. Fragment XV. As translated in Thomas Benfield Harbottle, Dictionary of Quotations (Classical) (1897), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Fool (116)  |  God (757)  |  Life (1795)

Here arises a puzzle that has disturbed scientists of all periods. How can it be that mathematics, being after all a product of human thought which is independent of experience, is so admirably appropriate to the objects of reality? Is human reason, then, without experience, merely by taking thought, able to fathom the properties of real things?
From 'Geometry and Experience', an expanded form of an Address by Albert Einstein to the Prussian Academy of Sciences in Berlin (27 Jan 1921). In Albert Einstein, translated by G. B. Jeffery and W. Perrett, Sidelights on Relativity (1923).
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Arise (158)  |  Being (1278)  |  Disturb (28)  |  Disturbed (15)  |  Fathom (15)  |  Human (1468)  |  Independent (67)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merely (316)  |  Object (422)  |  Period (198)  |  Product (160)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reason (744)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)

Historians constantly rewrite history, reinterpreting (reorganizing) the records of the past. So, too, when the brain's coherent responses become part of a memory, they are organized anew as part of the structure of consciousness. What makes them memories is that they become part of that structure and thus form part of the sense of self; my sense of self derives from a certainty that my experiences refer back to me, the individual who is having them. Hence the sense of the past, of history, of memory, is in part the creation of the self.
The Strange, Familiar, and Forgotten: An Anatomy of Consciousness (1995), 87.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anew (18)  |  Back (390)  |  Become (815)  |  Brain (270)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Creation (327)  |  Derive (65)  |  Form (959)  |  Historian (54)  |  History (673)  |  Individual (404)  |  Memory (134)  |  Organization (114)  |  Past (337)  |  Record (154)  |  Response (53)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Structure (344)  |  Write (230)

Human personality resembles a coral reef: a large hard/dead structure built and inhabited by tiny soft/live animals. The hard/dead part of our personality consists of habits, memories, and compulsions and will probably be explained someday by some sort of extended computer metaphor. The soft/live part of personality consists of moment-to-moment direct experience of being. This aspect of personality is familiar but somewhat ineffable and has eluded all attempts at physical explanation.
Quoted in article 'Nick Herbert', in Gale Cengage Learning, Contemporary Authors Online (2002).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Being (1278)  |  Build (204)  |  Compulsion (17)  |  Computer (127)  |  Consist (223)  |  Coral Reef (12)  |  Dead (59)  |  Direct (225)  |  Elude (10)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extend (128)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hard (243)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ineffable (4)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Memory (134)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Moment (253)  |  Personality (62)  |  Physical (508)  |  Probability (130)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Soft (29)  |  Someday (14)  |  Structure (344)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Will (2355)

I am an organic chemist, albeit one who adheres to the definition of organic chemistry given by the great Swedish chemist Berzelius, namely, the chemistry of substances found in living matter, and my science is one of the more abstruse insofar as it rests on concepts and employs a jargon neither of which is a part of everyday experience. Nevertheless, organic chemistry deals with matters of truly vital Importance and in some of its aspects with which I myself have been particularly concerned it may prove to hold the keys to Life itself.
In 'Synthesis in the Study of Nucleotides', Nobel Lecture, 11 December 1957. In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1942-1962 (1964), 522.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstruse (10)  |  Adhere (3)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Jöns Jacob Berzelius (13)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concern (228)  |  Deal (188)  |  Definition (221)  |  Employ (113)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Find (998)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hold (95)  |  Importance (286)  |  Jargon (13)  |  Key (50)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prove (250)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sweden (3)  |  Truly (116)  |  Vital (85)

I am very astonished that the scientific picture of the real world around me is deficient. It gives a lot of factual information, puts all our experience in a magnificently consistent order, but it is ghastly silent about all and sundry that is really near to our heart, that really matters to us. It cannot tell us a word about red and blue, bitter and sweet, physical pain and physical delight; it knows nothing of beautiful and ugly, good or bad, God and eternity. Science sometimes pretends to answer questions in these domains, but the answers are very often so silly that we are not inclined to take them seriously.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Astonished (9)  |  Bad (180)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Bitter (30)  |  Blue (56)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Deficient (3)  |  Delight (108)  |  Domain (69)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Factual (8)  |  Ghastly (5)  |  Give (202)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Heart (229)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Information (166)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lot (151)  |  Magnificently (2)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Often (106)  |  Order (632)  |  Pain (136)  |  Physical (508)  |  Picture (143)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Question (621)  |  Real World (14)  |  Really (78)  |  Red (35)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Seriously (19)  |  Silent (29)  |  Silly (17)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Sundry (4)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Tell (340)  |  Ugly (14)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

I am very sorry, Pyrophilus, that to the many (elsewhere enumerated) difficulties which you may meet with, and must therefore surmount, in the serious and effectual prosecution of experimental philosophy I must add one discouragement more, which will perhaps is much surprise as dishearten you; and it is, that besides that you will find (as we elsewhere mention) many of the experiments published by authors, or related to you by the persons you converse with, false and unsuccessful (besides this, I say), you will meet with several observations and experiments which, though communicated for true by candid authors or undistrusted eye-witnesses, or perhaps recommended by your own experience, may, upon further trial, disappoint your expectation, either not at all succeeding constantly, or at least varying much from what you expected.
Opening paragraph of The First Essay Concerning the Unsuccessfulness of Experiments (1673), collected in The Works of the Honourable Robert Boyle in Six Volumes to Which is Prefixed the Life of the Author (1772), Vol. 1, 318-319.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Author (167)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Disappoint (14)  |  Disappointment (16)  |  Discouragement (8)  |  Disheartening (2)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Eye (419)  |  False (100)  |  Find (998)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Person (363)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Say (984)  |  Serious (91)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Succeeding (14)  |  Success (302)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Trial (57)  |  Unsuccessful (2)  |  Will (2355)

I assert that the cosmic religious experience is the strongest and the noblest driving force behind scientific research.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Assert (66)  |  Behind (137)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Drive (55)  |  Driving (28)  |  Force (487)  |  Nobl (4)  |  Religious (126)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Strong (174)  |  Strongest (38)

I despise people who depend on these things [heroin and cocaine]. If you really want a mind-altering experience, look at a tree.
Quoted in interview by Tim Adams, 'This much I know: A.C. Grayling', The Observer (4 Jul 2009).
Science quotes on:  |  Addiction (5)  |  Depend (228)  |  Dependency (3)  |  Despise (13)  |  Drug (57)  |  Heroin (2)  |  High (362)  |  Look (582)  |  Mind (1338)  |  People (1005)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tree (246)  |  Want (497)

I do not intend to go deeply into the question how far mathematical studies, as the representatives of conscious logical reasoning, should take a more important place in school education. But it is, in reality, one of the questions of the day. In proportion as the range of science extends, its system and organization must be improved, and it must inevitably come about that individual students will find themselves compelled to go through a stricter course of training than grammar is in a position to supply. What strikes me in my own experience with students who pass from our classical schools to scientific and medical studies, is first, a certain laxity in the application of strictly universal laws. The grammatical rules, in which they have been exercised, are for the most part followed by long lists of exceptions; accordingly they are not in the habit of relying implicitly on the certainty of a legitimate deduction from a strictly universal law. Secondly, I find them for the most part too much inclined to trust to authority, even in cases where they might form an independent judgment. In fact, in philological studies, inasmuch as it is seldom possible to take in the whole of the premises at a glance, and inasmuch as the decision of disputed questions often depends on an aesthetic feeling for beauty of expression, or for the genius of the language, attainable only by long training, it must often happen that the student is referred to authorities even by the best teachers. Both faults are traceable to certain indolence and vagueness of thought, the sad effects of which are not confined to subsequent scientific studies. But certainly the best remedy for both is to be found in mathematics, where there is absolute certainty in the reasoning, and no authority is recognized but that of one’s own intelligence.
In 'On the Relation of Natural Science to Science in general', Popular Lectures on Scientific Subjects, translated by E. Atkinson (1900), 25-26.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absolute (145)  |  Accordingly (5)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Application (242)  |  Attainable (3)  |  Authority (95)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Best (459)  |  Both (493)  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Classical (45)  |  Compel (30)  |  Confine (26)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Course (409)  |  Decision (91)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Deeply (17)  |  Depend (228)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exception (73)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Expression (175)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Far (154)  |  Fault (54)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Genius (284)  |  Glance (34)  |  Grammar (14)  |  Grammatical (2)  |  Habit (168)  |  Happen (274)  |  Important (209)  |  Improve (58)  |  Inasmuch (5)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Independent (67)  |  Individual (404)  |  Indolence (8)  |  Inevitably (6)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intend (16)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Laxity (2)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  List (10)  |  Logical (55)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Medical (26)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Often (106)  |  Organization (114)  |  Part (222)  |  Pass (238)  |  Philological (3)  |  Place (177)  |  Position (77)  |  Possible (552)  |  Premise (37)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Question (621)  |  Range (99)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Refer (14)  |  Rely (11)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Representative (14)  |  Rule (294)  |  Sadness (35)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Strict (17)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Strike (68)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Supply (93)  |  System (537)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Traceable (5)  |  Training (80)  |  Trust (66)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universal Law (3)  |  Vagueness (15)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

I do not share in this reverence for knowledge as such. It all depends on who has the knowledge and what he does with it. That knowledge which adds greatly to character is knowledge so handled as to transform every phase of immediate experience.
In 'The Rhythmic Claims of Freedom and Discipline', The Aims of Education and Other Essays (1929), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Character (243)  |  Depend (228)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Phase (36)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Share (75)  |  Transform (73)  |  Transformation (69)

I fancy you give me credit for being a more systematic sort of cove than I really am in the matter of limits of significance. What would actually happen would be that I should make out Pt (normal) and say to myself that would be about 50:1; pretty good but as it may not be normal we'd best not be too certain, or 100:1; even allowing that it may not be normal it seems good enough and whether one would be content with that or would require further work would depend on the importance of the conclusion and the difficulty of obtaining suitable experience.
Letter to E. S. Pearson, 18 May 1929. E. S. Pearson, '"Student" as Statistician', Biometrika, 1939, 30, 244.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Certain (550)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Depend (228)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Good (889)  |  Happen (274)  |  Importance (286)  |  Limit (280)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Myself (212)  |  Require (219)  |  Say (984)  |  Significance (113)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Work (1351)

I feel, sometimes, as the renaissance man must have felt in finding new riches at every point and in the certainty that unexplored areas of knowledge and experience await at every turn.
Address to the University Students (10 Dec 1956 ) in Göran Liljestrand (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1955 (1956).
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (174)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Point (580)  |  Renaissance (14)  |  Riches (12)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unexplored (14)  |  Wait (58)

I grew up to be indifferent to the distinction between literature and science, which in my teens were simply two languages for experience that I learned together.
quoted in World Authors 1950 - 1970, by J. Wakeman (New York: H.W. Wilson, 1975) pp. 221-23
Science quotes on:  |  Distinction (72)  |  Language (293)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Literature (103)  |  Science (3879)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)

I had at one time a very bad fever of which I almost died. In my fever I had a long consistent delirium. I dreamt that I was in Hell, and that Hell is a place full of all those happenings that are improbable but not impossible. The effects of this are curious. Some of the damned, when they first arrive below, imagine that they will beguile the tedium of eternity by games of cards. But they find this impossible, because, whenever a pack is shuffled, it comes out in perfect order, beginning with the Ace of Spades and ending with the King of Hearts. There is a special department of Hell for students of probability. In this department there are many typewriters and many monkeys. Every time that a monkey walks on a typewriter, it types by chance one of Shakespeare's sonnets. There is another place of torment for physicists. In this there are kettles and fires, but when the kettles are put on the fires, the water in them freezes. There are also stuffy rooms. But experience has taught the physicists never to open a window because, when they do, all the air rushes out and leaves the room a vacuum.
'The Metaphysician's Nightmare', Nightmares of Eminent Persons and Other Stories (1954), 38-9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Arrival (15)  |  Bad (180)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Chance (239)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Curious (91)  |  Damned (4)  |  Death (388)  |  Delirium (3)  |  Department (92)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dream (208)  |  Effect (393)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Fever (29)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Freeze (5)  |  Game (101)  |  Happening (58)  |  Heart (229)  |  Hell (32)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Improbable (13)  |  Kettle (3)  |  Long (790)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Never (1087)  |  Open (274)  |  Opening (15)  |  Order (632)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Probability (130)  |  Room (40)  |  Rush (18)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  Shuffle (5)  |  Sonnet (4)  |  Special (184)  |  Student (300)  |  Tedium (3)  |  Time (1877)  |  Torment (18)  |  Type (167)  |  Typewriter (6)  |  Vacuum (39)  |  Walk (124)  |  Water (481)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Will (2355)  |  Window (58)

I had this experience at the age of eight. My parents gave me a microscope. I don’t recall why, but no matter. I then found my own little world, completely wild and unconstrained, no plastic, no teacher, no books, no anything predictable. At first I did not know the names of the water-drop denizens or what they were doing. But neither did the pioneer microscopists. Like them, I graduated to looking at butterfly scales and other miscellaneous objects. I never thought of what I was doing in such a way, but it was pure science. As true as could be of any child so engaged, I was kin to Leeuwenhoek, who said that his work “was not pursued in order to gain the praise I now enjoy, but chiefly from a craving after knowledge, which I notice resides in me more that most other men.”
In The Creation: An Appeal to Save Life on Earth (2010), 143-144.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Book (392)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Child (307)  |  Complete (204)  |  Completely (135)  |  Craving (5)  |  Doing (280)  |  Drop (76)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Gain (145)  |  Graduation (6)  |  Kin (10)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (17)  |  Little (707)  |  Looking (189)  |  Matter (798)  |  Microscope (80)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notice (77)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Plastic (28)  |  Praise (26)  |  Predictability (7)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Reside (25)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thought (953)  |  Unconstrained (2)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Wild (87)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

I had … during many years, followed a golden rule, namely, that whenever a published fact, a new observation or thought came across me, which was opposed by my general results, to make a memorandum of it without fail and at once; for I had found by experience that such facts and thoughts were far more apt to escape from memory than favorable ones.
In The Autobiography of Charles Darwin with original omissions restored, edited by Nora Barlow (1958).
Science quotes on:  |  Escape (80)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fail (185)  |  Favorable (24)  |  Follow (378)  |  General (511)  |  Golden (45)  |  Memory (134)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Result (677)  |  Rule (294)  |  Thought (953)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Year (933)

I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience. I know no way of judging of the future but by the past.
Speech (Mar 1775) at the Virginia Convention. In W. Thomson (ed.), The Chartist Circular (), 244
Science quotes on:  |  Feet (5)  |  Future (429)  |  Guided (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Past (337)  |  Way (1217)

I have now reached the point where I may indicate briefly what to me constitutes the essence of the crisis of our time. It concerns the relationship of the individual to society. The individual has become more conscious than ever of his dependence upon society. But he does not experience this dependence as a positive asset, as an organic tie, as a protective force, but rather as a threat to his natural rights, or even to his economic existence. Moreover, his position in society is such that the egotistical drives of his make-up are constantly being accentuated, while his social drives, which are by nature weaker, progressively deteriorate. All human beings, whatever their position in society, are suffering from this process of deterioration. Unknowingly prisoners of their own egotism, they feel insecure, lonely, and deprived of the naive, simple, and unsophisticated enjoyment of life. Man can find meaning in life, short and perilous as it is, only through devoting himself to society.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accentuate (2)  |  All (4108)  |  Asset (6)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Briefly (5)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Crisis (24)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Deprive (12)  |  Deteriorate (3)  |  Deterioration (10)  |  Devote (35)  |  Drive (55)  |  Economic (81)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Essence (82)  |  Existence (456)  |  Feel (367)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Individual (404)  |  Insecure (5)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Moreover (3)  |  Naive (13)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organic (158)  |  Perilous (4)  |  Point (580)  |  Position (77)  |  Positive (94)  |  Prisoner (7)  |  Process (423)  |  Progressively (3)  |  Protective (5)  |  Reach (281)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Right (452)  |  Short (197)  |  Simple (406)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Threat (30)  |  Through (849)  |  Tie (38)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unsophisticated (2)  |  Weak (71)  |  Whatever (234)

I have often pondered over the roles of knowledge or experience, on the one hand, and imagination or intuition, on the other, in the process of discovery. I believe that there is a certain fundamental conflict between the two, and knowledge, by advocating caution, tends to inhibit the flight of imagination. Therefore, a certain naivete, unburdened by conventional wisdom, can sometimes be a positive asset.
In R. Langlands, 'Harish-Chandra', Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society (1985), Vol. 31, 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Advocate (18)  |  Asset (6)  |  Belief (578)  |  Caution (24)  |  Certain (550)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Conventional (30)  |  Conventional Wisdom (3)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Flight (98)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Hand (143)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inhibit (4)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Naivete (2)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ponder (14)  |  Positive (94)  |  Process (423)  |  Role (86)  |  Tend (124)  |  Two (937)  |  Wisdom (221)

I imagined in the beginning, that a few experiments would determine the problem; but experience soon convinced me, that a very great number indeed were necessary before such an art could be brought to any tolerable degree of perfection.
Upon pursuing the ''
Preface to An Essay on Combustion with a View to a New Art of Dyeing and Painting (1794), iii. In Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie and Joy Dorothy Harvey, The Biographical Dictionary of Women in Science (2000), 478.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Degree (276)  |  Determine (144)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Great (1574)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Number (699)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Perseverance (23)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Soon (186)

I saw a horrible brown heap on the floor in the corner, which, but for previous experience in this dismal wise, I might not have suspected to be “the bed.” There was something thrown upon it and I asked what it was. “’Tis the poor craythur that stays here, sur; and ’tis very bad she is, ’tis very bad she’s been this long time, and ’tis better she’ll never be, and ’tis slape she doos all day, and ’tis wake she doos all night, and ‘tis the lead, Sur.” “The what?” “The lead, Sur. Sure, ’tis the lead-mills, where women gets took on at eighteen pence a day, Sur, when they makes application early enough, and is lucky and wanted, and ’tis lead-pisoned she is, Sur, and some of them gits lead-pisoned soon and some of them gets lead-pisoned later, and some but not many, niver, and ’tis all according to the constitooshun, Sur, and some constitooshuns is strong, and some is weak, and her constitooshun is lead-pisoned, bad as can be, Sur, and her brain is coming out at her ear, and it hurts her dreadful, and that’s what it is and niver no more and niver so less, Sur.”
In 'New Uncommercial Samples: A Small Star in the East', All the Year Round (19 Dec 1868), New Series, No. 3, 62.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Ask (411)  |  Bad (180)  |  Better (486)  |  Brain (270)  |  Brown (23)  |  Coming (114)  |  Corner (57)  |  Disabled (2)  |  Disease (328)  |  Dreadful (14)  |  Ear (68)  |  Early (185)  |  Enough (340)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lead Poisoning (4)  |  Long (790)  |  Mill (16)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Poor (136)  |  Saw (160)  |  Something (719)  |  Soon (186)  |  Strong (174)  |  Time (1877)  |  Want (497)  |  Weak (71)  |  Wise (131)

I stand before you as somebody who is both physicist and a priest, and I want to hold together my scientific and my religious insights and experiences . I want to hold them together, as far as I am able, without dishonesty and without compartmentalism. I don’t want to be a priest on Sunday and a physicist on Monday; I want to be both on both days.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Dishonesty (9)  |  Far (154)  |  Hold (95)  |  Insight (102)  |  Monday (3)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Priest (28)  |  Religious (126)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Somebody (8)  |  Stand (274)  |  Sunday (7)  |  Together (387)  |  Want (497)

I think it perfectly just, that he who, from the love of experiment, quits an approved for an uncertain practice, should suffer the full penalty of Egyptian law against medical innovation; as I would consign to the pillory, the wretch, who out of regard to his character, that is, to his fees, should follow the routine, when, from constant experience he is sure that his patient will die under it, provided any, not inhuman, deviation would give his patient a chance.
From his researches in Fever, 196. In John Edmonds Stock, Memoirs of the life of Thomas Beddoes (1810), 400.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Chance (239)  |  Character (243)  |  Consign (2)  |  Constant (144)  |  Death (388)  |  Deviation (17)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fee (9)  |  Follow (378)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Justice (39)  |  Law (894)  |  Love (309)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Practice (204)  |  Regard (305)  |  Routine (25)  |  Think (1086)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wretch (5)

I think it would be just to say the most essential characteristic of mind is memory, using this word in its broadest sense to include every influence of past experience on present reactions.
In Portraits from Memory: and Other Essays (1956), 143.
Science quotes on:  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Essential (199)  |  Include (90)  |  Influence (222)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Past (337)  |  Present (619)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Say (984)  |  Sense (770)  |  Think (1086)  |  Word (619)

I think I’ve had more failures than successes, but I don’t see the failures as mistakes because I always learned something from those experiences. I see them as having not achieved the initial goal, nothing more than that.
Quoted in Timothy L. O’Brien, 'Not Invented here: Are U.S. Innovators Losing Their Competitive Edge?', New York Times (13 Nov 2005), B6.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Failure (161)  |  Goal (145)  |  Initial (17)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Success (302)  |  Think (1086)

Thomas Edison quote “Afraid of things that worked”, record track background+colorized photo of Edison & tinfoil phonograph
derivative art and colorization © todayinsci.com (Terms of Use) (source)

Please respect the colorization artist’s wishes and do not copy this image for ONLINE use anywhere else.

Thank you.

For offline use, click Terms of Use tab on top menu.

I was always afraid of things that worked the first time. Long experience proved that there were great drawbacks found generally before they could be got commercial; but here was something there was no doubt of.
[Recalling astonishment when his tin-foil cylinder phonograph first played back his voice recording of “Mary had a little lamb.”]
Quoted in Frank Lewis Dyer, Thomas Commerford Martin, Edison: His Life and Inventions (1910), 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Afraid (21)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Back (390)  |  Commercial (26)  |  Cylinder (10)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Drawback (3)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  Invention (369)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Phonograph (8)  |  Recording (13)  |  Something (719)  |  Success (302)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tin (18)  |  Work (1351)

I was fascinated by fractional distillation as a method while still a school-boy, and built in the cellar of my home, which was my combined workshop and laboratory, distillation columns, packed with coke of graded size, some five feet in height. They were made from coffee tins (obtained from the kitchen), with the bottoms removed and soldered together! Experience with them served me in good stead and by the time I graduated I had a good understanding of the problems of fractional distillation.
Nobel Lectures in Chemistry (1999), Vol. 3, 359-360.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Boy (94)  |  Coffee (19)  |  Coke (3)  |  Distillation (10)  |  Good (889)  |  Home (170)  |  Kitchen (13)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Method (505)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Problem (676)  |  School (219)  |  Still (613)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tin (18)  |  Together (387)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Workshop (14)

I will frankly tell you that my experience in prolonged scientific investigations convinces me that a belief in God—a God who is behind and within the chaos of vanishing points of human knowledge—adds a wonderful stimulus to the man who attempts to penetrate into the regions of the unknown.
As quoted in E.P. Whipple, 'Recollections of Agassiz', in Henry Mills Alden (ed.), Harper's New Monthly Magazine (June 1879), 59, 103.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Behind (137)  |  Belief (578)  |  Biography (240)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Convince (41)  |  God (757)  |  Human (1468)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Point (580)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Tell (340)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Vanishing (11)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonderful (149)

I will now direct the attention of scientists to a previously unnoticed cause which brings about the metamorphosis and decomposition phenomena which are usually called decay, putrefaction, rotting, fermentation and moldering. This cause is the ability possessed by a body engaged in decomposition or combination, i.e. in chemical action, to give rise in a body in contact with it the same ability to undergo the same change which it experiences itself.
Annalen der Pharmacie 1839, 30, 262. Trans. W. H. Brock.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Action (327)  |  Attention (190)  |  Body (537)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Combination (144)  |  Contact (65)  |  Decay (53)  |  Decomposition (18)  |  Direct (225)  |  Fermentation (15)  |  Metamorphosis (5)  |  Mold (33)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possess (156)  |  Putrefaction (4)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rotting (2)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Usually (176)  |  Will (2355)

I wished to show that Pythagoras, the first founder of the vegetable regimen, was at once a very great physicist and a very great physician; that there has been no one of a more cultured and discriminating humanity; that he was a man of wisdom and of experience; that his motive in commending and introducing the new mode of living was derived not from any extravagant superstition, but from the desire to improve the health and the manners of men.
From Dell Vitto Pitagorico (1743), (The Pythagorean Diet: for the Use of the Medical Faculty), as translated quotes in Howard Williams, The Ethics of Diet: A Catena of Authorities Deprecatory of the Practice of Flesh-Eating (1883), 158.
Science quotes on:  |  Commend (7)  |  Culture (143)  |  Desire (204)  |  Diet (54)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  First (1283)  |  Founder (26)  |  Great (1574)  |  Health (193)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Improve (58)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Motive (59)  |  New (1216)  |  Physician (273)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Show (346)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Vegetarian (13)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Wish (212)

I would efface the word atoms from science, persuaded that it goes further than experience... In chemistry we should never go further than experience. Could there be any hope of ever identifying the minuscule entities?
Quoted, without citation, in Nick Herbert, Quantum Reality: Beyond the New Physics, (1985), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Efface (6)  |  Entity (35)  |  Further (6)  |  Hope (299)  |  Identifying (2)  |  Never (1087)  |  Persuation (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Word (619)

I, however, believe that for the ripening of experience the light of an intelligent theory is required. People are amused by the witticism that the man with a theory forces from nature that answer to his question which he wishes to have but nature never answers unless she is questioned, or to speak more accurately, she is always talking to us and with a thousand tongues but we only catch the answer to our own question.
Quoted in Major Greenwood, Epidemiology Historical and Experimental. The Herter Lectures for 1931 (1932), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Force (487)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  People (1005)  |  Question (621)  |  Required (108)  |  Speak (232)  |  Talking (76)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Tongue (43)

If ... the past may be no Rule for the future, all Experience becomes useless and can give rise to no Inferences or Conclusions.
An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Future (429)  |  Inference (45)  |  Past (337)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rule (294)

If I were working in astrophysics I would find it quite hard to explain to people what I was doing. Natural history is a pretty easy thing to explain. It does have its complexities, but nowhere do you speak about things that are outside people’s experience. You might speak about a species that is outside their experience, but nothing as remote as astrophysics.
From interview with Michael Bond, 'It’s a Wonderful Life', New Scientist (14 Dec 2002), 176, No. 2373, 48.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Astrophysics (15)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Easy (204)  |  Explain (322)  |  Find (998)  |  Hard (243)  |  History (673)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Outside (141)  |  People (1005)  |  Remote (83)  |  Speak (232)  |  Species (401)  |  Thing (1915)

If our so-called facts are changing shadows, they are shadows cast by the light of constant truth. So too in religion we are repelled by that confident theological doctrine… but we need not turn aside from the measure of light that comes into our experience showing us a Way through the unseen world.
Swarthmore Lecture (1929) at Friends’ House, London, printed in Science and the Unseen World (1929), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Cast (66)  |  Confident (25)  |  Constant (144)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Light (607)  |  Measure (232)  |  Religion (361)  |  Shadow (72)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unseen (22)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

If the kind of controversy which so often springs up between modernism and traditionalism in religion were applied to more commonplace affairs of life we might see some strange results. …It arises, let us say, from a passage in an obituary notice which mentions that the deceased had loved to watch the sunsets from his peaceful country home.. …it is forgotten that what the deceased man looked out for each evening was an experience and not a creed.
Swarthmore Lecture (1929) at Friends’ House, London, printed in Science and the Unseen World (1929), 84-85.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (177)  |  Arise (158)  |  Commonplace (23)  |  Controversy (29)  |  Country (251)  |  Creed (27)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Home (170)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Notice (77)  |  Passage (50)  |  Religion (361)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Spring (133)  |  Strange (157)  |  Sunset (26)  |  Watch (109)

If this seems complex, the reason is because Tao is both simple and complex. It is complex when we try to understand it, and simple when we allow ourselves to experience it.
In Gary William Flake, The Computational Beauty of Nature (2000), 327.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Reason (744)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Tao (2)  |  Try (283)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

If we admit our depression openly and freely, those around us get from it an experience of freedom rather than the depression itself.
Paulus Harper & Row 73
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (45)  |  Depression (24)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Freely (13)  |  Openly (2)

If we can combine our knowledge of science with the wisdom of wildness, if we can nurture civilization through roots in the primitive, man’s potentialities appear to be unbounded, Through this evolving awareness, and his awareness of that awareness, he can emerge with the miraculous—to which we can attach what better name than “God”? And in this merging, as long sensed by intuition but still only vaguely perceived by rationality, experience may travel without need for accompanying life.
A Letter From Lindbergh', Life (4 Jul 1969), 61. In Eugene C. Gerhart, Quote it Completely! (1998), 409.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accompany (22)  |  Attach (56)  |  Awareness (36)  |  Better (486)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Combine (57)  |  God (757)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Name (333)  |  Nurture (16)  |  Potential (69)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Root (120)  |  Science (3879)  |  Still (613)  |  Through (849)  |  Travel (114)  |  Wildness (4)  |  Wisdom (221)

If we work, it is less to obtain those positive results the common people think are our only interest, than to feel that aesthetic emotion and communicate it to those able to experience it.
From the original French, “Si nous travaillons, c’est moins pour obtenir ces résultats auxquels le vulgaire nous croit uniquement attachés, que pour ressentir cette émotion esthétique et la communiquer ŕ ceux qui sont capables de l’éprouver,” quoted in Henri Poincaré,'Notice sur Halphen', Journal de l’École Polytechnique (1890), 60, 143, cited in Oeuvres de G.H. Halphen (1916), Vol. 1, xxiv. As translated in Armand Borel, 'On the Place of Mathematics in Culture', in Armand Borel: Śvres: Collected Papers (1983), Vol. 4, 421.
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Common (436)  |  Common People (2)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Feel (367)  |  Interest (386)  |  Obtain (163)  |  People (1005)  |  Positive (94)  |  Result (677)  |  Think (1086)  |  Work (1351)

In a sense, of course, probability theory in the form of the simple laws of chance is the key to the analysis of warfare;… My own experience of actual operational research work, has however, shown that its is generally possible to avoid using anything more sophisticated. … In fact the wise operational research worker attempts to concentrate his efforts in finding results which are so obvious as not to need elaborate statistical methods to demonstrate their truth. In this sense advanced probability theory is something one has to know about in order to avoid having to use it.
In 'Operations Research', Physics Today (Nov 1951), 19. As cited by Maurice W. Kirby and Jonathan Rosenhead, 'Patrick Blackett (1897)' in Arjang A. Assad (ed.) and Saul I. Gass (ed.),Profiles in Operations Research: Pioneers and Innovators (2011), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Advanced (11)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Chance (239)  |  Concentrate (26)  |  Course (409)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Finding (30)  |  Form (959)  |  Key (50)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Order (632)  |  Possible (552)  |  Probability (130)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Something (719)  |  Sophisticated (15)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Use (766)  |  Warfare (11)  |  Wise (131)  |  Work (1351)

In all speculations on the origin, or agents that have produced the changes on this globe, it is probable that we ought to keep within the boundaries of the probable effects resulting from the regular operations of the great laws of nature which our experience and observation have brought within the sphere of our knowledge. When we overleap those limits, and suppose a total change in nature's laws, we embark on the sea of uncertainty, where one conjecture is perhaps as probable as another; for none of them can have any support, or derive any authority from the practical facts wherewith our experience has brought us acquainted.
Observations on the Geology of the United States of America (1817), iv-v.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Agent (70)  |  All (4108)  |  Authority (95)  |  Change (593)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Derive (65)  |  Effect (393)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Geology (220)  |  Great (1574)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Limit (280)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Origin (239)  |  Practical (200)  |  Probability (130)  |  Produced (187)  |  Regular (46)  |  Sea (308)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Support (147)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Total (94)  |  Uncertainty (56)

In both social and natural sciences, the body of positive knowledge grows by the failure of a tentative hypothesis to predict phenomena the hypothesis professes to explain; by the patching up of that hypothesis until someone suggests a new hypothesis that more elegantly or simply embodies the troublesome phenomena, and so on ad infinitum. In both, experiment is sometimes possible, sometimes not (witness meteorology). In both, no experiment is ever completely controlled, and experience often offers evidence that is the equivalent of controlled experiment. In both, there is no way to have a self-contained closed system or to avoid interaction between the observer and the observed. The Gödel theorem in mathematics, the Heisenberg uncertainty principle in physics, the self-fulfilling or self-defeating prophecy in the social sciences all exemplify these limitations.
Inflation and Unemployment (1976), 348.
Science quotes on:  |  Ad Infinitum (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Closed (38)  |  Completely (135)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Explain (322)  |  Failure (161)  |  Kurt Gödel (8)  |  Grow (238)  |  Werner Heisenberg (42)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meteorology (33)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  New (1216)  |  Observed (149)  |  Offer (141)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Positive (94)  |  Possible (552)  |  Predict (79)  |  Principle (507)  |  Prophecy (13)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Self (267)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  System (537)  |  Tentative (16)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Uncertainty Principle (8)  |  Way (1217)  |  Witness (54)

In early times, when the knowledge of nature was small, little attempt was made to divide science into parts, and men of science did not specialize. Aristotle was a master of all science known in his day, and wrote indifferently treatises on physics or animals. As increasing knowledge made it impossible for any one man to grasp all scientific subjects, lines of division were drawn for convenience of study and of teaching. Besides the broad distinction into physical and biological science, minute subdivisions arose, and, at a certain stage of development, much attention was, given to methods of classification, and much emphasis laid on the results, which were thought to have a significance beyond that of the mere convenience of mankind.
But we have reached the stage when the different streams of knowledge, followed by the different sciences, are coalescing, and the artificial barriers raised by calling those sciences by different names are breaking down. Geology uses the methods and data of physics, chemistry and biology; no one can say whether the science of radioactivity is to be classed as chemistry or physics, or whether sociology is properly grouped with biology or economics. Indeed, it is often just where this coalescence of two subjects occurs, when some connecting channel between them is opened suddenly, that the most striking advances in knowledge take place. The accumulated experience of one department of science, and the special methods which have been developed to deal with its problems, become suddenly available in the domain of another department, and many questions insoluble before may find answers in the new light cast upon them. Such considerations show us that science is in reality one, though we may agree to look on it now from one side and now from another as we approach it from the standpoint of physics, physiology or psychology.
In article 'Science', Encyclopedia Britannica (1911), 402.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulated (2)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Answer (366)  |  Approach (108)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attention (190)  |  Available (78)  |  Barrier (32)  |  Become (815)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Cast (66)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Class (164)  |  Classification (97)  |  Coalesce (5)  |  Coalescence (2)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Data (156)  |  Deal (188)  |  Department (92)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Divide (75)  |  Division (65)  |  Domain (69)  |  Down (456)  |  Early (185)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Geology (220)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indifferent (16)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Master (178)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Minute (125)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Occur (150)  |  Open (274)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Problem (676)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Question (621)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reality (261)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Show (346)  |  Side (233)  |  Significance (113)  |  Small (477)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Special (184)  |  Specialize (3)  |  Stage (143)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Stream (81)  |  Striking (48)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)

In my experience most mathematicians are intellectually lazy and especially dislike reading experimental papers. He (René Thom) seemed to have very strong biological intuitions but unfortunately of negative sign.
In What Mad Pursuit: A Personal View of Scientific Discovery (1988), 136.
Science quotes on:  |  Biological (137)  |  Dislike (15)  |  Especially (31)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Lazy (9)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Most (1731)  |  Negative (63)  |  Paper (182)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Strong (174)  |  René Frédéric Thom (2)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  Unfortunately (38)

In my experience of anorexia nervosa it is exclusively a disease of private patients.
Cited as “Attributed” to Sir Adolf Abrams of Westminster Hospital, in Oxford Dictionary of Medical Quotations (2004), 1. Webmaster assumes this is properly “Sir Adolphe Abrahams,” of that hospital, (confirmed there by an obituary), after finding nothing for the sound-alike “Sir Adolf Abrams.” If you know a primary source for the quote, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Disease (328)  |  Patient (199)  |  Private Patient (2)

In order to survive, an animal must be born into a favoring or at least tolerant environment. Similarly, in order to achieve preservation and recognition, a specimen of fossil man must be discovered in intelligence, attested by scientific knowledge, and interpreted by evolutionary experience. These rigorous prerequisites have undoubtedly caused many still-births in human palaeontology and are partly responsible for the high infant mortality of discoveries of geologically ancient man.
Apes, Men and Morons (1938), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Animal (617)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Birth (147)  |  Discover (553)  |  Environment (216)  |  Excavation (8)  |  Fossil (136)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Infant (26)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Paleontologist (19)  |  Prerequisite (9)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Specimen (28)  |  Still (613)  |  Survive (79)

In point of fact, no conclusive disproof of a theory can ever be produced; for it is always possible to say that the experimental results are not reliable or that the discrepancies which are asserted to exist between the experimental results and the theory are only apparent and that they will disappear with the advance of our understanding. If you insist on strict proof (or strict disproof) in the empirical sciences, you will never benefit from experience, and never learn from it how wrong you are.
The Logic of Scientific Discovery: Logik Der Forschung (1959, 2002), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Assert (66)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Conclusive (11)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Empirical Science (9)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Learn (629)  |  Never (1087)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Produced (187)  |  Proof (287)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Theory (970)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wrong (234)

In reality, all Arguments from Experience are founded on the Similarity which we discover among natural Objects, and by which we are induc'd to expect effects similar to those which we have found to follow from such Objects. And tho' none but a Fool or Madman will ever pretend to dispute the Authority of Experience, or to reject that great Guide of human Life, it may surely be allow'd a Philosopher to have so much Curiosity at least as to examine the Principle of human Nature, which gives this mighty Authority to Experience, and makes us draw Advantage from that Similarity which Nature has plac'd among different Objects. From Causes which appear similar we expect similar Effects. This is the Sum of our experimental Conclusions.
An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Authority (95)  |  Cause (541)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Draw (137)  |  Effect (393)  |  Examine (78)  |  Expect (200)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fool (116)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guide (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Life (1795)  |  Madman (6)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reject (63)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Sum (102)  |  Surely (101)  |  Will (2355)

In that pure enjoyment experienced on approaching to the ideal, in that eagerness to draw aside the veil from the hidden truth, and even in that discord which exists between the various workers, we ought to see the surest pledges of further scientific success. Science thus advances, discovering new truths, and at the same time obtaining practical results.
In The Principles of Chemistry (1891), Vol. 1, preface, footnote, ix, as translated from the Russian 5th edition by George Kamensky, edited by A. J. Greenaway.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Approach (108)  |  Discord (10)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Draw (137)  |  Eagerness (5)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Exist (443)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Ideal (99)  |  New (1216)  |  Obtaining (5)  |  Pledge (4)  |  Practical (200)  |  Pure (291)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Success (302)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Various (200)  |  Veil (26)  |  Worker (31)

In the animal world we have seen that the vast majority of species live in societies, and that they find in association the best arms for the struggle for life: understood, of course, in its wide Darwinian sense—not as a struggle for the sheer means of existence, but as a struggle against all natural conditions unfavourable to the species. The animal species, in which individual struggle has been reduced to its narrowest limits, and the practice of mutual aid has attained the greatest development, are invariably the most numerous, the most prosperous, and the most open to further progress. The mutual protection which is obtained in this case, the possibility of attaining old age and of accumulating experience, the higher intellectual development, and the further growth of sociable habits, secure the maintenance of the species, its extension, and its further progressive evolution. The unsociable species, on the contrary, are doomed to decay.
Mutual Aid: A Factor of Evolution (1902), 293.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Age (499)  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Association (46)  |  Attain (125)  |  Best (459)  |  Condition (356)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Course (409)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Decay (53)  |  Development (422)  |  Doom (32)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Existence (456)  |  Extension (59)  |  Find (998)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Growth (187)  |  Habit (168)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Live (628)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Majority (66)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Natural (796)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Old (481)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Open (274)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Practice (204)  |  Progress (465)  |  Protection (36)  |  Sense (770)  |  Society (326)  |  Species (401)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (40)  |  Understood (156)  |  Vast (177)  |  Wide (96)  |  World (1774)

In the light of knowledge attained, the happy achievement seems almost a matter of course, and any intelligent student can grasp it without too much trouble. But the years of anxious searching in the dark, with their intense longing, their alternations of confidence and exhaustion, and the final emergence into the light—only those who have experienced it can understand that.
Quoted in Banesh Hoffmann and Helen Dukas, Albert Einstein: Creator and Rebel (1972), 124.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Alternation (5)  |  Anxious (3)  |  Attain (125)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Course (409)  |  Dark (140)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Exhaustion (16)  |  Final (118)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Happy (105)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Intense (20)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Longing (19)  |  Matter (798)  |  Search (162)  |  Student (300)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Understand (606)  |  Year (933)

In the temple of science are many mansions, and various indeed are they that dwell therein and the motives that have led them thither. Many take to science out of a joyful sense of superior intellectual power; science is their own special sport to which they look for vivid experience and the satisfaction of ambition; many others are to be found in the temple who have offered the products of their brains on this altar for purely utilitarian purposes. Were an angel of the Lord to come and drive all the people belonging to these two categories out of the temple, the assemblage would be seriously depleted, but there would still be some men, of both present and past times, left inside. Our Planck is one of them, and that is why we love him.
Address at Physical Society, Berlin (1918), for Max Planck’s 60th birthday, 'Principles of Research' in Essays in Science (1934, 2004), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Altar (10)  |  Ambition (43)  |  Angel (44)  |  Assemblage (17)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Both (493)  |  Brain (270)  |  Depletion (3)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Joy (107)  |  Look (582)  |  Lord (93)  |  Love (309)  |  Motive (59)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  People (1005)  |  Max Planck (64)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Product (160)  |  Purely (109)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Special (184)  |  Sport (22)  |  Still (613)  |  Superior (81)  |  Temple (42)  |  Temple Of Science (8)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Utility (49)  |  Various (200)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Why (491)

In this respect mathematics fails to reproduce with complete fidelity the obvious fact that experience is not composed of static bits, but is a string of activity, or the fact that the use of language is an activity, and the total meanings of terms are determined by the matrix in which they are embedded.
In The Nature of Physical Theory (1936), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Bit (22)  |  Complete (204)  |  Compose (17)  |  Determine (144)  |  Embed (7)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fail (185)  |  Language (293)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matrix (14)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Respect (207)  |  Static (8)  |  String (21)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Total (94)  |  Use (766)

Louis Agassiz quote: In-depth studies have an influence on general ideas, whereas theories, in turn, in order to maintain themse
In-depth studies have an influence on general ideas, whereas theories, in turn, in order to maintain themselves, push their spectators to search for new evidence. The mind’s activity that is maintained by the debates about these works, is probably the source of the greatest joys given to man to experience on Earth.
La théorie des glaciers et ses progrčs les plus récents. Bibl. universelle de Geneve, (3), Vol. 41, p. 139. Trans. Karin Verrecchia.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Activity (210)  |  Debate (38)  |  Depth (94)  |  Earth (996)  |  Evidence (248)  |  General (511)  |  Geology (220)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Idea (843)  |  Influence (222)  |  Joy (107)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Push (62)  |  Search (162)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Turn (447)  |  Work (1351)

Induction is the process of generalizing from our known and limited experience, and framing wider rules for the future than we have been able to test fully. At its simplest, then, an induction is a habit or an adaptation—the habit of expecting tomorrow’s weather to be like today’s, the adaptation to the unwritten conventions of community life.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Community (104)  |  Future (429)  |  Generalize (19)  |  Habit (168)  |  Induction (77)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Logic (287)  |  Process (423)  |  Rule (294)  |  Test (211)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Weather (44)

It did not cause anxiety that Maxwell’s equations did not apply to gravitation, since nobody expected to find any link between electricity and gravitation at that particular level. But now physics was faced with an entirely new situation. The same entity, light, was at once a wave and a particle. How could one possibly imagine its proper size and shape? To produce interference it must be spread out, but to bounce off electrons it must be minutely localized. This was a fundamental dilemma, and the stalemate in the wave-photon battle meant that it must remain an enigma to trouble the soul of every true physicist. It was intolerable that light should be two such contradictory things. It was against all the ideals and traditions of science to harbor such an unresolved dualism gnawing at its vital parts. Yet the evidence on either side could not be denied, and much water was to flow beneath the bridges before a way out of the quandary was to be found. The way out came as a result of a brilliant counterattack initiated by the wave theory, but to tell of this now would spoil the whole story. It is well that the reader should appreciate through personal experience the agony of the physicists of the period. They could but make the best of it, and went around with woebegone faces sadly complaining that on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays they must look on light as a wave; on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, as a particle. On Sundays they simply prayed.
The Strange Story of the Quantum (1947), 42.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Agony (7)  |  All (4108)  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Apply (160)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Best (459)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Cause (541)  |  Dilemma (11)  |  Dualism (4)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electron (93)  |  Enigma (14)  |  Entity (35)  |  Equation (132)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Expect (200)  |  Face (212)  |  Find (998)  |  Flow (83)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Interference (21)  |  Light (607)  |  Look (582)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Particle (194)  |  Period (198)  |  Photon (11)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Proper (144)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Remain (349)  |  Result (677)  |  Saturday (11)  |  Science (3879)  |  Side (233)  |  Situation (113)  |  Soul (226)  |  Spread (83)  |  Story (118)  |  Tell (340)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Two (937)  |  Vital (85)  |  Water (481)  |  Wave (107)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)

It has become a cheap intellectual pastime to contrast the infinitesimal pettiness of man with the vastnesses of the stellar universes. Yet all such comparisons are illicit. We cannot compare existence and meaning; they are disparate. The characteristic life of a man is itself the meaning of vast stretches of existences, and without it the latter have no value or significance. There is no common measure of physical existence and conscious experience because the latter is the only measure there is of the former. The significance of being, though not its existence, is the emotion it stirs, the thought it sustains.
Philosophy and Civilization (1931), reprinted in David Sidorsky (ed.), John Dewey: The Essential Writings (1977), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Common (436)  |  Compare (69)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Existence (456)  |  Former (137)  |  Human (1468)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Measure (232)  |  Pastime (4)  |  Pettiness (3)  |  Physical (508)  |  Significance (113)  |  Stir (21)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universe (857)  |  Value (365)  |  Vast (177)

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Better (486)  |  Blue (56)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Character (243)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Conceit (15)  |  Deal (188)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Distant (33)  |  Dot (16)  |  Folly (43)  |  Home (170)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humble (50)  |  Image (96)  |  Kindly (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  More (2559)  |  Pale (9)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Say (984)  |  Tiny (72)  |  World (1774)

It has often been said, and certainly not without justification, that the man of science is a poor philosopher. Why then should it not be the right thing for the physicist to let the philosopher do the philosophising? Such might indeed be the right thing to do a time when the physicist believes he has at his disposal a rigid system of fundamental laws which are so well that waves of doubt can't reach them; but it cannot be right at a time when the very foundations of physics itself have become problematic as they are now … when experience forces us to seek a newer and more solid foundation.
‘Physics and Reality’, Franklin Institute Journal (Mar 1936). Collected in Out of My Later Years (1950), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Force (487)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Justification (48)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  More (2559)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Poor (136)  |  Reach (281)  |  Right (452)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Solid (116)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wave (107)  |  Why (491)

It is a melancholy experience for a professional mathematician to find him writing about mathematics. The function of a mathematician is to do something, to prove new theorems, to add to mathematics, and not to talk about what he or other mathematicians have done. Statesmen despise publicists, painters despise art-critics, and physiologists, physicists, or mathematicians have usually similar feelings; there is no scorn more profound, or on the whole more justifiable, than that of men who make for the men who explain. Exposition, criticism, appreciation, is work for second-rate minds.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, reprint with Foreward by C.P. Snow 1992), 61 (Hardy's opening lines after Snow's foreward).
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Art (657)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Do (1908)  |  Explain (322)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Find (998)  |  Function (228)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Painter (29)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Professional (70)  |  Profound (104)  |  Prove (250)  |  Scorn (12)  |  Something (719)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Usually (176)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)

It is a peculiar feature in the fortune of principles of such high elementary generality and simplicity as characterise the laws of motion, that when they are once firmly established, or supposed to be so, men turn with weariness and impatience from all questionings of the grounds and nature of their authority. We often feel disposed to believe that truths so clear and comprehensive are necessary conditions, rather than empirical attributes of their subjects: that they are legible by their own axiomatic light, like the first truths of geometry, rather than discovered by the blind gropings of experience.
In An Introduction to Dynamics (1832), x.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Authority (95)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Blind (95)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Condition (356)  |  Discover (553)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Generality (45)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Ground (217)  |  High (362)  |  Impatience (13)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Motion (14)  |  Laws Of Motion (10)  |  Light (607)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Principle (507)  |  Question (621)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Subject (521)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turn (447)  |  Weariness (6)

It is admitted by all that a finished or even a competent reasoner is not the work of nature alone; the experience of every day makes it evident that education develops faculties which would otherwise never have manifested their existence. It is, therefore, as necessary to learn to reason before we can expect to be able to reason, as it is to learn to swim or fence, in order to attain either of those arts. Now, something must be reasoned upon, it matters not much what it is, provided it can be reasoned upon with certainty. The properties of mind or matter, or the study of languages, mathematics, or natural history, may be chosen for this purpose. Now of all these, it is desirable to choose the one which admits of the reasoning being verified, that is, in which we can find out by other means, such as measurement and ocular demonstration of all sorts, whether the results are true or not. When the guiding property of the loadstone was first ascertained, and it was necessary to learn how to use this new discovery, and to find out how far it might be relied on, it would have been thought advisable to make many passages between ports that were well known before attempting a voyage of discovery. So it is with our reasoning faculties: it is desirable that their powers should be exerted upon objects of such a nature, that we can tell by other means whether the results which we obtain are true or false, and this before it is safe to trust entirely to reason. Now the mathematics are peculiarly well adapted for this purpose, on the following grounds:
1. Every term is distinctly explained, and has but one meaning, and it is rarely that two words are employed to mean the same thing.
2. The first principles are self-evident, and, though derived from observation, do not require more of it than has been made by children in general.
3. The demonstration is strictly logical, taking nothing for granted except self-evident first principles, resting nothing upon probability, and entirely independent of authority and opinion.
4. When the conclusion is obtained by reasoning, its truth or falsehood can be ascertained, in geometry by actual measurement, in algebra by common arithmetical calculation. This gives confidence, and is absolutely necessary, if, as was said before, reason is not to be the instructor, but the pupil.
5. There are no words whose meanings are so much alike that the ideas which they stand for may be confounded. Between the meaning of terms there is no distinction, except a total distinction, and all adjectives and adverbs expressing difference of degrees are avoided.
In On the Study and Difficulties of Mathematics (1898), chap. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Actual (117)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adjective (2)  |  Admit (45)  |  Adverb (2)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Arithmetical (11)  |  Art (657)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Authority (95)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Being (1278)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Choose (112)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Common (436)  |  Competent (20)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Confound (21)  |  Degree (276)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Derive (65)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Develop (268)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Distinctly (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Employ (113)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Evident (91)  |  Exert (39)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expect (200)  |  Explain (322)  |  Express (186)  |  Faculty (72)  |  False (100)  |  Falsehood (28)  |  Far (154)  |  Fence (11)  |  Find (998)  |  Find Out (21)  |  Finish (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  Grant (73)  |  Ground (217)  |  Guide (97)  |  History (673)  |  Idea (843)  |  Independent (67)  |  Instructor (5)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Language (293)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lodestone (7)  |  Logical (55)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Means (579)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Ocular (3)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passage (50)  |  Peculiarly (4)  |  Port (2)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Probability (130)  |  Property (168)  |  Provide (69)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rarely (21)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Rely (11)  |  Require (219)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Safe (54)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Evident (21)  |  Something (719)  |  Sort (49)  |  Stand (274)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Study (653)  |  Swim (30)  |  Tell (340)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Total (94)  |  True (212)  |  Trust (66)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Verify (23)  |  Voyage (11)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

It is both a sad and a happy fact of engineering history that disasters have been powerful instruments of change. Designers learn from failure. Industrial society did not invent grand works of engineering, and it was not the first to know design failure. What it did do was develop powerful techniques for learning from the experience of past disasters. It is extremely rare today for an apartment house in North America, Europe, or Japan to fall down. Ancient Rome had large apartment buildings too, but while its public baths, bridges and aqueducts have lasted for two thousand years, its big residential blocks collapsed with appalling regularity. Not one is left in modern Rome, even as ruin.
In Why Things Bite Back: Technology and the Revenge of Unintended Consequences (1997), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  America (127)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Apartment (4)  |  Appalling (10)  |  Aqueduct (4)  |  Bath (10)  |  Both (493)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Bridge Engineering (8)  |  Building (156)  |  Change (593)  |  Collapse (17)  |  Design (195)  |  Designer (6)  |  Develop (268)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fall (230)  |  First (1283)  |  Grand (27)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  History (673)  |  House (140)  |  Industry (137)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Invention (369)  |  Know (1518)  |  Large (394)  |  Last (426)  |  Lasting (7)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Modern (385)  |  Past (337)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Rare (89)  |  Rarity (11)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Residence (2)  |  Rome (19)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Sadness (35)  |  Society (326)  |  Technique (80)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Today (314)  |  Two (937)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

It is certainly true that principles cannot be more securely founded than on experience and consciously clear thinking.
'The Goal' lecture at Princeton University (1939), quoted in Philipp Frank and George Rosen, Einstein (2002), 287.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainly (185)  |  More (2559)  |  Principle (507)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Thinking (414)

It is difficult even to attach a precise meaning to the term “scientific truth.” So different is the meaning of the word “truth” according to whether we are dealing with a fact of experience, a mathematical proposition or a scientific theory. “Religious truth” conveys nothing clear to me at all.
From 'Scientific Truth' in Essays in Science (1934, 2004), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Attach (56)  |  Clear (100)  |  Convey (16)  |  Different (577)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Precise (68)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Religious (126)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Theory (24)  |  Scientific Truth (23)  |  Term (349)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Word (619)

It is difficult for the matter-of-fact physicist to accept the view that the substratum of everything is of mental character. But no one can deny that mind is the first and most direct thing in our experience, and all else is remote inference—inference either intuitive or deliberate.
From Gifford Lecture, Edinburgh, (1927), 'Reality', collected in The Nature of the Physical World (1928), 281.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Character (243)  |  Deliberate (18)  |  Deny (66)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direct (225)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Inference (45)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Remote (83)  |  Thing (1915)  |  View (488)

It is not surprising that our language should be incapable of describing the processes occurring within the atoms, for, as has been remarked, it was invented to describe the experiences of daily life, and these consists only of processes involving exceedingly large numbers of atoms. Furthermore, it is very difficult to modify our language so that it will be able to describe these atomic processes, for words can only describe things of which we can form mental pictures, and this ability, too, is a result of daily experience. Fortunately, mathematics is not subject to this limitation, and it has been possible to invent a mathematical scheme—the quantum theory—which seems entirely adequate for the treatment of atomic processes; for visualization, however, we must content ourselves with two incomplete analogies—the wave picture and the corpuscular picture.
The Physical Principles of the Quantum Theory, trans. Carl Eckart and Frank C. Hoyt (1949), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Adequate (46)  |  Atom (355)  |  Consist (223)  |  Daily (87)  |  Daily Life (17)  |  Describe (128)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Form (959)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Language (293)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Must (1526)  |  Number (699)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Particle (194)  |  Picture (143)  |  Possible (552)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Result (677)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Subject (521)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Two (937)  |  Wave (107)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

It is now necessary to indicate more definitely the reason why mathematics not only carries conviction in itself, but also transmits conviction to the objects to which it is applied. The reason is found, first of all, in the perfect precision with which the elementary mathematical concepts are determined; in this respect each science must look to its own salvation .... But this is not all. As soon as human thought attempts long chains of conclusions, or difficult matters generally, there arises not only the danger of error but also the suspicion of error, because since all details cannot be surveyed with clearness at the same instant one must in the end be satisfied with a belief that nothing has been overlooked from the beginning. Every one knows how much this is the case even in arithmetic, the most elementary use of mathematics. No one would imagine that the higher parts of mathematics fare better in this respect; on the contrary, in more complicated conclusions the uncertainty and suspicion of hidden errors increases in rapid progression. How does mathematics manage to rid itself of this inconvenience which attaches to it in the highest degree? By making proofs more rigorous? By giving new rules according to which the old rules shall be applied? Not in the least. A very great uncertainty continues to attach to the result of each single computation. But there are checks. In the realm of mathematics each point may be reached by a hundred different ways; and if each of a hundred ways leads to the same point, one may be sure that the right point has been reached. A calculation without a check is as good as none. Just so it is with every isolated proof in any speculative science whatever; the proof may be ever so ingenious, and ever so perfectly true and correct, it will still fail to convince permanently. He will therefore be much deceived, who, in metaphysics, or in psychology which depends on metaphysics, hopes to see his greatest care in the precise determination of the concepts and in the logical conclusions rewarded by conviction, much less by success in transmitting conviction to others. Not only must the conclusions support each other, without coercion or suspicion of subreption, but in all matters originating in experience, or judging concerning experience, the results of speculation must be verified by experience, not only superficially, but in countless special cases.
In Werke [Kehrbach] (1890), Bd. 5, 105. As quoted, cited and translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Arise (158)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Belief (578)  |  Better (486)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Care (186)  |  Carry (127)  |  Case (99)  |  Chain (50)  |  Check (24)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Coercion (3)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Computation (24)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Continue (165)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Convince (41)  |  Correct (86)  |  Countless (36)  |  Danger (115)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Definitely (5)  |  Degree (276)  |  Depend (228)  |  Detail (146)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Elementary (96)  |  End (590)  |  Error (321)  |  Fail (185)  |  Fare (5)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Generally (15)  |  Give (202)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Hide (69)  |  High (362)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Thought (7)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Inconvenience (3)  |  Increase (210)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Instant (45)  |  Isolate (22)  |  Judge (108)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lead (384)  |  Least (75)  |  Less (103)  |  Logical (55)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Making (300)  |  Manage (23)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Metaphysic (6)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Old (481)  |  Originate (36)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Part (222)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfectly (10)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Point (580)  |  Precise (68)  |  Precision (68)  |  Progression (23)  |  Proof (287)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Reach (281)  |  Realm (85)  |  Reason (744)  |  Respect (207)  |  Result (677)  |  Reward (68)  |  Rid (13)  |  Right (452)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Rule (294)  |  Salvation (11)  |  Same (157)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Single (353)  |  Soon (186)  |  Special (184)  |  Special Case (9)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Speculative (9)  |  Still (613)  |  Success (302)  |  Superficial (12)  |  Support (147)  |  Survey (33)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Thought (953)  |  Transmit (11)  |  True (212)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Use (766)  |  Verify (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

It is often the scientist’s experience that he senses the nearness of truth when … connections are envisioned. A connection is a step toward simplification, unification. Simplicity is indeed often the sign of truth and a criterion of beauty.
In Toward the Habit of Truth (1990).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Connection (162)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Envision (3)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Simplification (20)  |  Step (231)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unification (11)

It is the heart which experiences God, and not the reason.
In Pensées (1670), Section 26, No. 5. From Blaise Pascal, W.F. Trotter (trans.), 'Thoughts', collected in Charles W. Eliot (ed.), The Harvard Classics (1910), Vol. 48, 99. Also seen translated as, “It is the heart which perceives God, and not the reason”. From the French, “C'est le cśur qui sent Dieu, et non la raison,” in Ernest Havet (ed.),Pensées de Pascal (1852), 296.
Science quotes on:  |  God (757)  |  Heart (229)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Reason (744)

It is the object of science to replace, or save, experiences, by the reproduction and anticipation of facts in thought. Memory is handier than experience, and often answers the same purpose. This economical office of science, which fills its whole life, is apparent at first glance; and with its full recognition all mysticism in science disappears.
In 'The Economy of Science', The Science of Mechanics: A Critical and Historical Exposition of Its Principles (1893), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Economical (9)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fill (61)  |  First (1283)  |  Glance (34)  |  Handy (2)  |  Life (1795)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mysticism (14)  |  Object (422)  |  Office (71)  |  Often (106)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Replace (31)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Save (118)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thought (953)  |  Whole (738)

It is the old experience that a rude instrument in the hand of a master craftsman will achieve more than the finest tool wielded by the uninspired journeyman.
Quoted in The Life, Letters and Labours of Francis Galton (1930), Vol. 3A, 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Craftsman (5)  |  Hand (143)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Journeyman (3)  |  Master (178)  |  More (2559)  |  Old (481)  |  Rude (6)  |  Tool (117)  |  Uninspired (2)  |  Wield (10)  |  Will (2355)

It is the unqualified result of all my experience with the sick that, second only to their need of fresh air, is their need of light; that, after a close room, what hurts them most is a dark room and that it is not only light but direct sunlight they want.
Notes on Nursing: What it is and what it is not (1860), 120.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Dark (140)  |  Direct (225)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Health (193)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Light (607)  |  Most (1731)  |  Patient (199)  |  Result (677)  |  Sick (81)  |  Sunlight (23)  |  Want (497)

It is time, therefore, to abandon the superstition that natural science cannot be regarded as logically respectable until philosophers have solved the problem of induction. The problem of induction is, roughly speaking, the problem of finding a way to prove that certain empirical generalizations which are derived from past experience will hold good also in the future.
Language, Truth and Logic (1960), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Certain (550)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Future (429)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Good (889)  |  Induction (77)  |  Logic (287)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Past (337)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Problem (676)  |  Prove (250)  |  Regard (305)  |  Science (3879)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

It is true that mathematics, owing to the fact that its whole content is built up by means of purely logical deduction from a small number of universally comprehended principles, has not unfittingly been designated as the science of the self-evident [Selbstverständlichen]. Experience however, shows that for the majority of the cultured, even of scientists, mathematics remains the science of the incomprehensible [Unverständlichen].
In Ueber Wert und angeblichen Unwert der Mathematik, Jahresbericht der Deutschen Maihemaliker Vereinigung (1904), 357.
Science quotes on:  |  Content (69)  |  Culture (143)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Designation (13)  |  Evident (91)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Incomprehensible (29)  |  Logic (287)  |  Majority (66)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Number (699)  |  Owing (39)  |  Principle (507)  |  Purely (109)  |  Remain (349)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Evident (21)  |  Show (346)  |  Small (477)  |  Universal (189)  |  Whole (738)

It is usual to say that the two sources of experience are Observation and Experiment. When we merely note and record the phenomena which occur around us in the ordinary course of nature we are said to observe. When we change the course of nature by the intervention of our will and muscular powers, and thus produce unusual combinations and conditions of phenomena, we are said to experiment. [Sir John] Herschel has justly remarked that we might properly call these two modes of experience passive and active observation. In both cases we must certainly employ our senses to observe, and an experiment differs from a mere observation in the fact that we more or less influence the character of the events which we observe. Experiment is thus observation plus alteration of conditions.
Principles of Science: A Treatise on Logic and Scientific Method (1874, 2nd ed., 1913), 400.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Both (493)  |  Call (769)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Change (593)  |  Character (243)  |  Combination (144)  |  Condition (356)  |  Course (409)  |  Definition (221)  |  Differ (85)  |  Employ (113)  |  Event (216)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Sir John Herschel (23)  |  Influence (222)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Note (34)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Occur (150)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Plus (43)  |  Power (746)  |  Record (154)  |  Say (984)  |  Sense (770)  |  Source (93)  |  Two (937)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Will (2355)

It is very remarkable that while the words Eternal, Eternity, Forever, are constantly in our mouths, and applied without hesitation, we yet experience considerable difficulty in contemplating any definite term which bears a very large proportion to the brief cycles of our petty chronicles. There are many minds that would not for an instant doubt the God of Nature to have existed from all Eternity, and would yet reject as preposterous the idea of going back a million of years in the History of His Works. Yet what is a million, or a million million, of solar revolutions to an Eternity?
Memoir on the Geology of Central France (1827), 165.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Back (390)  |  Bear (159)  |  Brief (36)  |  Chronicle (6)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contemplating (11)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Definite (110)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Exist (443)  |  Forever (103)  |  God (757)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  History (673)  |  Idea (843)  |  Instant (45)  |  Large (394)  |  Million (114)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Petty (9)  |  Preposterous (8)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Reject (63)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Sun (385)  |  Term (349)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

It must be conceded that a theory has an important advantage if its basic concepts and fundamental hypotheses are 'close to experience,' and greater confidence in such a theory is certainly justified. There is less danger of going completely astray, particularly since it takes so much less time and effort to disprove such theories by experience. Yet more and more, as the depth of our knowledge increases, we must give up this advantage in our quest for logical simplicity in the foundations of physical theory...
'On the Generalized Theory of Gravitation', Scientific American (Apr 1950), 13. In David H. Levy (Ed.), The Scientific American Book of the Cosmos (2000), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Astray (11)  |  Basic (138)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Completely (135)  |  Concept (221)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Danger (115)  |  Depth (94)  |  Disprove (23)  |  Effort (227)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Increase (210)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Physical (508)  |  Proof (287)  |  Quest (39)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)

It must happen that in some cases the author is not understood, or is very imperfectly understood; and the question is what is to be done. After giving a reasonable amount of attention to the passage, let the student pass on, reserving the obscurity for future efforts. … The natural tendency of solitary students, I believe, is not to hurry away prematurely from a hard passage, but to hang far too long over it; the just pride that does not like to acknowledge defeat, and the strong will that cannot endure to be thwarted, both urge to a continuance of effort even when success seems hopeless. It is only by experience we gain the conviction that when the mind is thoroughly fatigued it has neither the power to continue with advantage its course in .an assigned direction, nor elasticity to strike out a new path; but that, on the other hand, after being withdrawn for a time from the pursuit, it may return and gain the desired end.
In 'Private Study of Mathematics', Conflict of Studies and other Essays (1873), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Amount (151)  |  Assign (13)  |  Attention (190)  |  Author (167)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Both (493)  |  Case (99)  |  Continuance (2)  |  Continue (165)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Course (409)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Desire (204)  |  Direction (175)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elasticity (8)  |  End (590)  |  Endure (20)  |  Far (154)  |  Fatigue (12)  |  Future (429)  |  Gain (145)  |  Give (202)  |  Hang (45)  |  Happen (274)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hopeless (16)  |  Hurry (15)  |  Imperfectly (2)  |  Let (61)  |  Long (790)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  New (1216)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passage (50)  |  Path (144)  |  Power (746)  |  Premature (20)  |  Pride (78)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Reserve (24)  |  Return (124)  |  Seem (145)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Strike (68)  |  Strong (174)  |  Student (300)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Success (302)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Urge (17)  |  Will (2355)  |  Withdraw (9)

It seems to me it [hands-on experience] was more prevalent in a more primitive society, where you’re closer to machinery. [As a university teacher,] I see this with farm kids all the time. They have a more or less rugged self-reliance.
About the his concern that as society is changing, education is losing the benefits of childhood hand-on experience. In interview, Rushworth M. Kidder, 'Grounded in Space Science', Christian Science Monitor (22 Dec 1989).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  All The Time (4)  |  Childhood (38)  |  Closer (43)  |  Diminish (17)  |  Education (378)  |  Farm (26)  |  Hands-On (2)  |  Kid (15)  |  Machinery (56)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Prevalent (4)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Rugged (7)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Reliance (2)  |  Society (326)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Time (1877)  |  University (121)

It takes someone with a vision of the possibilities to attain new levels of experience. Someone with the courage to live his dreams.
Les Brown
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (125)  |  Courage (69)  |  Dream (208)  |  Level (67)  |  Live (628)  |  New (1216)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Someone (22)  |  Vision (123)

It would appear that Deductive and Demonstrative Sciences are all, without exception, Inductive Sciences: that their evidence is that of experience, but that they are also, in virtue of the peculiar character of one indispensable portion of the general formulae according to which their inductions are made, Hypothetical Sciences. Their conclusions are true only upon certain suppositions, which are, or ought to be, approximations to the truth, but are seldom, if ever, exactly true; and to this hypothetical character is to be ascribed the peculiar certainty, which is supposed to be inherent in demonstration.
In System of Logic, Bk. 2, chap. 6, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Approximation (31)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Character (243)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Demonstrative (14)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Exception (73)  |  Formula (98)  |  General (511)  |  Hypothetical (5)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Induction (77)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Portion (84)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Supposition (50)  |  True (212)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Virtue (109)

It... [can] be easily shown:
1. That all present mountains did not exist from the beginning of things.
2. That there is no growing of mountains.
3. That the rocks or mountains have nothing in common with the bones of animals except a certain resemblance in hardness, since they agree in neither matter nor manner of production, nor in composition, nor in function, if one may be permitted to affirm aught about a subject otherwise so little known as are the functions of things.
4. That the extension of crests of mountains, or chains, as some prefer to call them, along the lines of certain definite zones of the earth, accords with neither reason nor experience.
5. That mountains can be overthrown, and fields carried over from one side of a high road across to the other; that peaks of mountains can be raised and lowered, that the earth can be opened and closed again, and that other things of this kind occur which those who in their reading of history wish to escape the name of credulous, consider myths.
The Prodromus of Nicolaus Steno's Dissertation Concerning a Solid Body enclosed by Process of Nature within a Solid (1669), trans. J. G. Winter (1916), 232-4.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aught (6)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Bone (95)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Closed (38)  |  Common (436)  |  Composition (84)  |  Consider (416)  |  Credulous (9)  |  Definite (110)  |  Earth (996)  |  Escape (80)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Extension (59)  |  Field (364)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Function (228)  |  Growing (98)  |  Growth (187)  |  High (362)  |  History (673)  |  Kind (557)  |  Known (454)  |  Little (707)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Myth (56)  |  Name (333)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Occur (150)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overthrown (8)  |  Present (619)  |  Production (183)  |  Reading (133)  |  Reason (744)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Rock (161)  |  Side (233)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Wish (212)

It’s beyond imagination until you actually get up and see it and experience it and feel it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Actually (27)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Feel (367)  |  Get Up (5)  |  Imagination (328)  |  See (1081)

Judging from our experience upon this planet, such a history, that begins with elementary particles, leads perhaps inevitably toward a strange and moving end: a creature that knows, a science-making animal, that turns back upon the process that generated him and attempts to understand it. Without his like, the universe could be, but not be known, and this is a poor thing. Surely this is a great part of our dignity as men, that we can know, and that through us matter can know itself; that beginning with protons and electrons, out of the womb of time and the vastnesses of space, we can begin to understand; that organized as in us, the hydrogen, the carbon, the nitrogen, the oxygen, those 16-21 elements, the water, the sunlight—all having become us, can begin to understand what they are, and how they came to be.
In 'The Origins of Life', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1964), 52, 609-110.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Back (390)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Creature (233)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Electron (93)  |  Element (310)  |  Elementary (96)  |  End (590)  |  Generation (242)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Judge (108)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Lead (384)  |  Making (300)  |  Matter (798)  |  Moving (11)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Organized (9)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Particle (194)  |  Planet (356)  |  Poor (136)  |  Process (423)  |  Proton (21)  |  Science (3879)  |  Space (500)  |  Strange (157)  |  Sunlight (23)  |  Surely (101)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vastness (15)  |  Water (481)  |  Womb (24)

Knowledge and wisdom are indeed not identical; and every man’s experience must have taught him that there may be much knowledge with little wisdom, and much wisdom with little knowledge. But with imperfect knowledge it is difficult or impossible to arrive at right conclusions. Many of the vices, many of the miseries, many of the follies and absurdities by which human society has been infested and disgraced may be traced to a want of knowledge.
Presidential Address to Anniversary meeting of the Royal Society (30 Nov 1859), Proceedings of the Royal Society of London (1860), 10, 163.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurdity (32)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Disgrace (12)  |  Folly (43)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Society (13)  |  Identical (53)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lack (119)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Misery (30)  |  Must (1526)  |  Right (452)  |  Society (326)  |  Vice (40)  |  Want (497)  |  Wisdom (221)

Later, I realized that the mission had to end in a let-down because the real barrier wasn’t in the sky but in our knowledge and experience of supersonic flight.
Science quotes on:  |  Barrier (32)  |  Down (456)  |  End (590)  |  Flight (98)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Late (118)  |  Mission (21)  |  Real (149)  |  Realize (147)  |  Sky (161)  |  Supersonic (4)

Learn to reverence night and to put away the vulgar fear of it, for, with the banishment of night from the experience of man, there vanishes as well a religious emotion, a poetic mood, which gives depth to the adventure of humanity. By day, space is one with the earth and with man - it is his sun that is shining, his clouds that are floating past; at night, space is his no more. When the great earth, abandoning day, rolls up the deeps of the heavens and the universe, a new door opens for the human spirit, and there are few so clownish that some awareness of the mystery of being does not touch them as they gaze. For a moment of night we have a glimpse of ourselves and of our world islanded in its stream of stars - pilgrims of mortality, voyaging between horizons across eternal seas of space and time. Fugitive though the instant be, the spirit of man is, during it, ennobled by a genuine moment of emotional dignity, and poetry makes its own both the human spirit and experience.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Across (32)  |  Adventure (56)  |  Awareness (36)  |  Banishment (3)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Clown (2)  |  Deep (233)  |  Depth (94)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Door (93)  |  Earth (996)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Ennoble (8)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Fear (197)  |  Float (30)  |  Fugitive (3)  |  Gaze (21)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Give (202)  |  Glimpse (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Spirit (12)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Instant (45)  |  Island (46)  |  Learn (629)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moment (253)  |  Mood (13)  |  More (2559)  |  Mortality (15)  |  Mystery (177)  |  New (1216)  |  Night (120)  |  Open (274)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Past (337)  |  Pilgrim (4)  |  Poetic (7)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Religious (126)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Roll (40)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shine (45)  |  Shining (35)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stream (81)  |  Sun (385)  |  Time (1877)  |  Touch (141)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vanish (18)  |  Voyage (11)  |  Vulgar (33)  |  World (1774)

Learning teacheth more in one year than experience in twenty.
The Scholemaster (1570). In Robert Chambers (ed.), Cyclopaedia of English Literature: A Selection of the Choicest Productions (1858), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Learning (274)  |  More (2559)  |  Year (933)

Let us then suppose the Mind to be, as we say, white Paper, void of all Characters, without any Ideas; How comes it to be furnished? Whence comes it by that vast store, which the busy and boundless Fancy of Man has painted on it, with an almost endless variety? Whence has it all the materials of Reason and Knowledge? To this I answer, in one word, from Experience: In that, all our Knowledge is founded; and from that it ultimately derives it self. Our Observation employ’d either about external, sensible Objects; or about the internal Operations of our Minds, perceived and reflected on by our selves, is that, which supplies our Understandings with all the materials of thinking.
In 'Of Ideas in general, and their Original', An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690), Book 2, Chap. 1, Sec. 2, 37.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Character (243)  |  Derive (65)  |  Employ (113)  |  Endless (56)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Idea (843)  |  Internal (66)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Paper (182)  |  Reason (744)  |  Say (984)  |  Self (267)  |  Store (48)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Variety (132)  |  Vast (177)  |  Void (31)  |  White (127)  |  Word (619)

Life is a series of experiences, each one of which makes us bigger, even though it is hard to realize this. For the world was built to develop character, and we must learn that the setbacks and griefs which we endure help us in our marching onward.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Big (48)  |  Build (204)  |  Character (243)  |  Develop (268)  |  Endure (20)  |  Grief (18)  |  Hard (243)  |  Help (105)  |  Learn (629)  |  Life (1795)  |  March (46)  |  Must (1526)  |  Onward (6)  |  Realize (147)  |  Series (149)  |  Setback (3)  |  World (1774)

Life is order, death is disorder. A fundamental law of Nature states that spontaneous chemical changes in the universe tend toward chaos. But life has, during milliards of years of evolution, seemingly contradicted this law. With the aid of energy derived from the sun it has built up the most complicated systems to be found in the universe—living organisms. Living matter is characterized by a high degree of chemical organisation on all levels, from the organs of large organisms to the smallest constituents of the cell. The beauty we experience when we enjoy the exquisite form of a flower or a bird is a reflection of a microscopic beauty in the architecture of molecules.
The Nobel Prize for Chemistry: Introductory Address'. Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1981-1990 (1992), 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Bird (149)  |  Build (204)  |  Cell (138)  |  Change (593)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Change (8)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Contradict (40)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Death (388)  |  Degree (276)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Energy (344)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Flower (106)  |  Form (959)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  High (362)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Order (632)  |  Organ (115)  |  Organism (220)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Seemingly (28)  |  Spontaneous (27)  |  State (491)  |  Sun (385)  |  System (537)  |  Tend (124)  |  Universe (857)  |  Year (933)

Life is short, and the Art long; the occasion fleeting; experience fallacious, and judgment difficult. The physician must not only be prepared to do what is right himself, but also to make the patient, the attendants, and externals cooperate.
The Genuine Works of Hippocrates, trans. Francis Adams (1886), Vol. 2, 192.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fallacious (12)  |  Himself (461)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Must (1526)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Right (452)  |  Short (197)

Life is short, the Art long, opportunity fleeting, experience treacherous, judgment difficult. The physician must be ready, not only to do his duty himself, but also to secure the co-operation of the patient, of the attendants and of externals.
Aphorisms, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1931), Vol. 4, 99.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Himself (461)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nurse (25)  |  Operation (213)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Short (197)

Logic does not pretend to teach the surgeon what are the symptoms which indicate a violent death. This he must learn from his own experience and observation, or from that of others, his predecessors in his peculiar science. But logic sits in judgment on the sufficiency of that observation and experience to justify his rules, and on the sufficiency of his rules to justify his conduct. It does not give him proofs, but teaches him what makes them proofs, and how he is to judge of them.
In A System of Logic, Ratiocinative and Inductive: Being a Connected View of the Principles of Evidence, and the Methods of Scientific Investigation (1843), Vol. 1, 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Conduct (69)  |  Death (388)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Judge (108)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Justify (24)  |  Learn (629)  |  Logic (287)  |  Make (25)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Proof (287)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sufficiency (16)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Teach (277)  |  Violent (17)

Man has never been a particularly modest or self-deprecatory animal, and physical theory bears witness to this no less than many other important activities. The idea that thought is the measure of all things, that there is such a thing as utter logical rigor, that conclusions can be drawn endowed with an inescapable necessity, that mathematics has an absolute validity and controls experience—these are not the ideas of a modest animal. Not only do our theories betray these somewhat bumptious traits of self-appreciation, but especially obvious through them all is the thread of incorrigible optimism so characteristic of human beings.
In The Nature of Physical Theory (1936), 135-136.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Betray (8)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Control (167)  |  Do (1908)  |  Endow (14)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Idea (843)  |  Important (209)  |  Inescapable (7)  |  Logic (287)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Modest (15)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Optimism (14)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Rigor (27)  |  Self (267)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thread (32)  |  Through (849)  |  Trait (22)  |  Utter (7)  |  Validity (47)  |  Witness (54)

Man is but a perambulating tool-box and workshop or office, fashioned for itself by a piece of very clever slime, as the result of long experience. ... Hence we speak of man's body as his “trunk.”
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 18.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Body (537)  |  Box (22)  |  Clever (38)  |  Cleverness (15)  |  Definition (221)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Office (71)  |  Result (677)  |  Slime (6)  |  Speak (232)  |  Tool (117)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Workshop (14)

Man tries to make for himself in the fashion that suits him best a simplified and intelligible picture of the world; he then tries to some extent to substitute this cosmos of his for the world of experience, and thus to overcome it. This is what the painter, the poet, the speculative philosopher, and the natural scientist do, each in his own fashion. Each makes this cosmos and its construction the pivot of his emotional life, in order to find in this way the peace and security which he cannot find in the narrow whirlpool of personal experience.
Address at The Physical Society, Berlin (1918) for Max Planck’s 60th birthday, 'Principles of Research', collected in Essays in Science (1934, 2004) 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Construction (112)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Do (1908)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Find (998)  |  Himself (461)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Scientist (5)  |  Order (632)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Painter (29)  |  Peace (108)  |  Personal (67)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Picture (143)  |  Poet (83)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Security (47)  |  Speculative (9)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Suit (11)  |  Try (283)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

Many scientific theories have, for very long periods of time, stood the test of experience until they had to be discarded owing to man’s decision, not merely to make other experiments, but to have different experiences.
In The Disinherited Mind: Essays in Modern German Literature and Thought (1952), 20.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Decision (91)  |  Different (577)  |  Discard (29)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owing (39)  |  Period (198)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Theory (24)  |  Test (211)  |  Time (1877)

Mathematics associates new mental images with ... physical abstractions; these images are almost tangible to the trained mind but are far removed from those that are given directly by life and physical experience. For example, a mathematician represents the motion of planets of the solar system by a flow line of an incompressible fluid in a 54-dimensional phase space, whose volume is given by the Liouville measure
Mathematics and Physics (1981), Foreward. Reprinted in Mathematics as Metaphor: Selected Essays of Yuri I. Manin (2007), 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Associate (25)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Directly (22)  |  Example (94)  |  Far (154)  |  Flow (83)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Give (202)  |  Image (96)  |  Life (1795)  |  Line (91)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  New (1216)  |  Phase (36)  |  Phase Space (2)  |  Physical (508)  |  Planet (356)  |  Remove (45)  |  Represent (155)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Space (500)  |  System (537)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Train (114)  |  Volume (19)

Mathematics must subdue the flights of our reason; they are the staff of the blind; no one can take a step without them; and to them and experience is due all that is certain in physics.
In Oeuvres Completes (1880), t. 35, 219.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Blind (95)  |  Certain (550)  |  Due (141)  |  Flight (98)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Must (1526)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Reason (744)  |  Staff (5)  |  Step (231)  |  Subdue (7)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)

Mathematics … belongs to every inquiry, moral as well as physical. Even the rules of logic, by which it is rigidly bound, could not be deduced without its aid. The laws of argument admit of simple statement, but they must be curiously transposed before they can be applied to the living speech and verified by observation. In its pure and simple form the syllogism cannot be directly compared with all experience, or it would not have required an Aristotle to discover it. It must be transmuted into all the possible shapes in which reasoning loves to clothe itself. The transmutation is the mathematical process in the establishment of the law.
From Memoir (1870) read before the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, printed in 'Linear Associative Algebra', American Journal of Mathematics (1881), 4, 97-98.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Argument (138)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Belong (162)  |  Bound (119)  |  Compare (69)  |  Curious (91)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discover (553)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Form (959)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Law (894)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Logic (287)  |  Love (309)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics And Logic (12)  |  Moral (195)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possible (552)  |  Process (423)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Rule (294)  |  Shape (72)  |  Simple (406)  |  Speech (61)  |  Statement (142)  |  Syllogism (8)  |  Transmutation (22)  |  Transmute (3)  |  Transpose (2)  |  Verify (23)

May we not suspect that the vague but very real fears of children, which are quite independent of experience, are the inherited effects of real dangers and abject superstitions during ancient savage times?
Mind, 1877
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Children (200)  |  Danger (115)  |  Effect (393)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Fear (197)  |  Inherit (33)  |  Inherited (21)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vague (47)

Medicine is a science of experience; its object is to eradicate diseases by means of remedies. The knowledge of disease, the knowledge of remedies and the knowledge of their employment, constitute medicine.
In 'The Medicine of Experience' (1805), collected in R.E. Dudgeon (ed., trans.) The Lesser Writings of Samuel Hahnemann (1851), 501.
Science quotes on:  |  Constitute (97)  |  Disease (328)  |  Employment (32)  |  Eradicate (5)  |  Eradication (2)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Object (422)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Science (3879)

Memory is a fascinating trickster. Words and images have enormous power and can easily displace actual experience over the years.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Displace (8)  |  Easily (35)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Image (96)  |  Memory (134)  |  Power (746)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)

Men always fool themselves when they give up experience for systems born of the imagination. Man is the work of nature, he exists in nature, he is subject to its laws, he can not break free, he can not leave even in thought; it is in vain that his spirit wants to soar beyond the bounds of the visible world, he is always forced to return.
Opening statement of first chapter of Systčme de la Nature (1770), Vol. 1, 1. Translation by Webmaster using Google Translate. From the original French, “Les hommes se tromperont toujours, quand ils abandonneront l'expérience pour des systčmes enfantés par l’imagination. L’homme est l’ouvrage de la nature, il existe dans la nature, il est soumis ŕ ses lois, il ne peut s’en affranchir, il ne peut męme par la pensée en sortir; c’est en vain que son esprit veut s’élancer au delŕ des bornes du monde visible, il est toujours forcé d’y rentrer.” In the English edition (1820-21), Samuel Wilkinson gives this as “Man has always deceived himself when he abandoned experience to follow imaginary systems.—He is the work of nature.—He exists in Nature.—He is submitted to the laws of Nature.—He cannot deliver himself from them:—cannot step beyond them even in thought. It is in vain his mind would spring forward beyond the visible world: direful and imperious necessity ever compels his return.”
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bound (119)  |  Break (99)  |  Escape (80)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fool (116)  |  Free (232)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Return (124)  |  Soar (23)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Subject (521)  |  Submit (18)  |  System (537)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Vain (83)  |  Visible (84)  |  Want (497)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Men are wise in proportion, not to their experience, but to their capacity for experience.
In 'Maxims for Revolutionists: Experience', in Man and Superman (1903), 239.
Science quotes on:  |  Capacity (100)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Wise (131)

Men who have had a great deal of experience learn not to lose their tempers.
Quoted without citation in Tryon Edwards, A Dictionary of Thoughts: Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations (1891), 565. Webmaster invites help pinpointing the primary source.
Science quotes on:  |  Deal (188)  |  Great (1574)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lose (159)  |  Temper (9)

Mental events proceeding beneath the threshold of consciousness are the substrate upon which all conscious experience depends. To argue that all we need of our mental equipment is that part of which we are conscious is about as helpful as equating the United States with the Senate or England with the Houses of Parliament.
Quoted in 'Anthony (George) Stevens' in Gale, Contemporary Authors Online (2005).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Argue (23)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Depend (228)  |  England (40)  |  Equating (2)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Event (216)  |  Helpful (16)  |  House (140)  |  Mental (177)  |  Need (290)  |  Parliament (7)  |  Part (222)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  State (491)  |  Substrate (2)  |  Threshold (10)  |  United States (31)

Mind is the first and most direct thing in our experience; all else is remote inference.
Swarthmore Lecture (1929) at Friends’ House, London, printed in Science and the Unseen World (1929), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Direct (225)  |  First (1283)  |  Inference (45)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Remote (83)  |  Thing (1915)

Mistakes are a source of experience; and it is the essence of experience that we call wisdom.
From Henry Ford and Ralph Waldo Trine, The Power that Wins (1929), 25-26.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Essence (82)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Source (93)  |  Wisdom (221)

Modern Physics impresses us particularly with the truth of the old doctrine which teaches that there are realities existing apart from our sense-perceptions, and that there are problems and conflicts where these realities are of greater value for us than the richest treasures of the world of experience.
In The Universe in the Light of Modern Physics (1931), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Conflict (73)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Exist (443)  |  Greater (288)  |  Impress (64)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Physics (23)  |  Old (481)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Perception (97)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Problem (676)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Reality (261)  |  Rich (62)  |  Sense (770)  |  Teach (277)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Value (365)  |  World (1774)

Most of the arts, as painting, sculpture, and music, have emotional appeal to the general public. This is because these arts can be experienced by some one or more of our senses. Such is not true of the art of mathematics; this art can be appreciated only by mathematicians, and to become a mathematician requires a long period of intensive training. The community of mathematicians is similar to an imaginary community of musical composers whose only satisfaction is obtained by the interchange among themselves of the musical scores they compose.
In Anton Z. Capri, Quips, Quotes and Quanta: An Anecdotal History of Physics (2007), 151. The author described Lanczos invited up on the platform at the Trieste Conference to celebrate Dirac’s 70th birthday, and gave an impromptu quote by Lanczos speaking about Pauli. The author followed that unrelated topic with another beginning, “Here is a comment by Lanczos…” followed by the subject quote above.
Science quotes on:  |  Appeal (45)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Art (657)  |  Become (815)  |  Community (104)  |  Compose (17)  |  Composer (7)  |  Emotion (100)  |  General (511)  |  General Public (7)  |  Imaginary (16)  |  Intensive (8)  |  Interchange (4)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Music (129)  |  Musical (10)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Painting (44)  |  Period (198)  |  Require (219)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Score (8)  |  Sculpture (12)  |  Sense (770)  |  Similar (36)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Training (80)

Most of the scientists in their twenties and thirties who went in 1939 to work on wartime problems were profoundly affected by their experience. The belief that Rutherford's boys were the best boys, that we could do anything that was do-able and could master any subject in a few days was of enormous value.
'The Effect of World War II on the Development of Knowledge in the Physical Sciences', Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 1975, Series A, 342, 531.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Belief (578)  |  Best (459)  |  Boy (94)  |  Do (1908)  |  Master (178)  |  Most (1731)  |  Problem (676)  |  Sir Ernest Rutherford (53)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Subject (521)  |  Value (365)  |  War (225)  |  Wartime (4)  |  Work (1351)

Much is said about the progress of science in these centuries. I should say that the useful results of science had accumulated, but that there had been no accumulation of knowledge, strictly speaking, for posterity; for knowledge is to be acquired only by corresponding experience. How can be know what we are told merely? Each man can interpret another’s experience only by his own.
In A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1862), 384.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Progress (465)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Useful (250)

Music is the pleasure the human soul experiences from counting without being aware that it is counting.
As quoted, without citation, in William L. Schaaf, 'The Highest Rung', National Mathematics Magazine (May 1942), 16, 8, 395.
Science quotes on:  |  Aware (31)  |  Being (1278)  |  Count (105)  |  Counting (26)  |  Human (1468)  |  Music (129)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Soul (226)

My decision to begin research in radio astronomy was influenced both by my wartime experience with electronics and antennas and by one of my teachers, Jack Ratcliffe, who had given an excellent course on electromagnetic theory during my final undergraduate year.
From Autobiography in Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1974/Nobel Lectures (1975)
Science quotes on:  |  Antenna (4)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Begin (260)  |  Both (493)  |  Career (75)  |  Course (409)  |  Decision (91)  |  Electromagnetic Theory (5)  |  Electronics (11)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Final (118)  |  Influence (222)  |  Radio (50)  |  Radio Astronomy (2)  |  Ratcliffe_Jack (2)  |  Research (664)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Theory (970)  |  Undergraduate (15)  |  War (225)  |  Wartime (4)  |  Year (933)

My experiences with science led me to God. They challenge science to prove the existence of God. But must we really light a candle to see the sun?
In letter to California State board of Education (14 Sep 1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Candle (30)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Existence (456)  |  God (757)  |  Leading (17)  |  Light (607)  |  Must (1526)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prove (250)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  See (1081)  |  Sun (385)

My interest in the biology of tissue and organ transplantation arose from my [WW II] military experience at Valley Forge General Hospital in Pennsylvania … a major plastic surgical center. While there, I spent all my available spare time on the plastic surgical wards which were jammed with hundreds of battle casualties. I enjoyed talking to the patients, helping with dressings, and observing the results of the imaginative reconstructive surgical operations.
As a First Lieutenant with only a nine-month surgical internship, randomly assigned to VFGH to await overseas duty. In Tore Frängsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 556.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Available (78)  |  Battle (34)  |  Biography (240)  |  Biology (216)  |  Casualty (3)  |  Forge (9)  |  General (511)  |  Help (105)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Imaginative (8)  |  Interest (386)  |  Major (84)  |  Military (40)  |  Observe (168)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Organ (115)  |  Patient (199)  |  Plastic (28)  |  Result (677)  |  Spent (85)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Transplantation (4)  |  Valley (32)  |  Ward (7)

My view of the matter, for what it is worth, is that there is no such thing as a logical method of having new ideas, or a logical reconstruction of this process. My view may be expressed by saying that every discovery contains an “irrational element,” or “a creative intuition,” in Bergson's sense. In a similar way Einstein speaks of the “search for those highly universal laws … from which a picture of the world can be obtained by pure deduction. There is no logical path.” he says, “leading to these … laws. They can only be reached by intuition, based upon something like an intellectual love (Einfühlung) of the objects of experience.”
In The Logic of Scientific Discovery: Logik Der Forschung (1959, 2002), 8.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Creative (137)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Element (310)  |  Express (186)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Law (894)  |  Love (309)  |  Matter (798)  |  Method (505)  |  New (1216)  |  Object (422)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Path (144)  |  Picture (143)  |  Process (423)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reconstruction (14)  |  Say (984)  |  Search (162)  |  Sense (770)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Universal (189)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

Nature is a source of truth. Experience does not ever err, it is only your judgment that errs in promising itself results which are not caused by your experiments.
The Notebook. As cited in Edward Schwartz, One Step Forward, Two Steps Backward (2003), 38, with caption “examining objects in all their diversity.” Also quoted in Daniel J. Boorstin, The Discoverers (1983), 350.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Err (4)  |  Error (321)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Promise (67)  |  Result (677)  |  Source (93)  |  Truth (1057)

No experience whatsoever could prove that the heavens rotate daily and not the earth.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Daily (87)  |  Earth (996)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Prove (250)  |  Rotate (8)  |  Whatsoever (41)

No Man’s Knowledge here, can go beyond his Experience.
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690). Edited by Peter Nidditch (1975), Book 2, Chapter 1, Section 19, 115.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)

No true geologist holds by the development hypothesis;—it has been resigned to sciolists and smatterers;—and there is but one other alternative. They began to be, through the miracle of creation. From the evidence furnished by these rocks we are shut down either to belief in miracle, or to something else infinitely harder of reception, and as thoroughly unsupported by testimony as it is contrary to experience. Hume is at length answered by the severe truths of the stony science.
The Foot-prints of the Creator: Or, The Asterolepis of Stromness (1850, 1859), 301.
Science quotes on:  |  Alternative (29)  |  Answer (366)  |  Belief (578)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Creation (327)  |  Development (422)  |  Down (456)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Geologist (75)  |  David Hume (33)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reception (15)  |  Rock (161)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sciolist (2)  |  Shut (41)  |  Something (719)  |  Superficial (12)  |  Testimony (21)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)

No video, no photographs, no verbal descriptions, no lectures can provide the enchantment that a few minutes out-of-doors can: watch a spider construct a web; observe a caterpillar systematically ravaging the edge of a leaf; close your eyes, cup your hands behind your ears, and listen to aspen leaves rustle or a stream muse about its pools and eddies. Nothing can replace plucking a cluster of pine needles and rolling them in your fingers to feel how they’re put together, or discovering that “sedges have edges and grasses are round,” The firsthand, right-and-left-brain experience of being in the out-of-doors involves all the senses including some we’ve forgotten about, like smelling water a mile away. No teacher, no student, can help but sense and absorb the larger ecological rhythms at work here, and the intertwining of intricate, varied and complex strands that characterize a rich, healthy natural world.
Into the Field: A Guide to Locally Focused Teaching
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  All (4108)  |  Behind (137)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brain (270)  |  Caterpillar (4)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Close (69)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Complex (188)  |  Construct (124)  |  Cup (7)  |  Description (84)  |  Discover (553)  |  Door (93)  |  Ear (68)  |  Ecological (7)  |  Eddy (4)  |  Edge (47)  |  Enchantment (8)  |  Eye (419)  |  Feel (367)  |  Finger (44)  |  Firsthand (2)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Grass (46)  |  Hand (143)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Help (105)  |  Include (90)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Involve (90)  |  Large (394)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Listen (73)  |  Mile (39)  |  Minute (125)  |  Muse (10)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural World (25)  |  Needle (5)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observe (168)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Pine (9)  |  Pluck (5)  |  Pool (15)  |  Provide (69)  |  Ravage (7)  |  Replace (31)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Rich (62)  |  Right (452)  |  Roll (40)  |  Round (26)  |  Rustle (2)  |  Sense (770)  |  Smell (27)  |  Spider (14)  |  Strand (9)  |  Stream (81)  |  Student (300)  |  Systematically (7)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Together (387)  |  Vary (27)  |  Verbal (10)  |  Video (2)  |  Watch (109)  |  Water (481)  |  Web (16)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Nor need you doubt that Pythagoras, a long time before he found the demonstration for the Hecatomb, had been certain that the square of the side subtending the right angle in a rectangular triangle was equal to the square of the other two sides; the certainty of the conclusion helped not a little in the search for a demonstration. But whatever was the method of Aristotle, and whether his arguing a priori preceded sense a posteriori, or the contrary, it is sufficient that the same Aristotle (as has often been said) put sensible experiences before all discourses. As to the arguments a priori, their force has already been examined.
Dialogue on the Great World Systems (1632). Revised and Annotated by Giorgio De Santillana (1953), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  A Posteriori (2)  |  A Priori (26)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Argument (138)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Force (487)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Method (505)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Right (452)  |  Search (162)  |  Sense (770)  |  Side (233)  |  Square (70)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Time (1877)  |  Triangle (18)  |  Two (937)  |  Whatever (234)

Nothing in our experience suggests the introduction of [complex numbers]. Indeed, if a mathematician is asked to justify his interest in complex numbers, he will point, with some indignation, to the many beautiful theorems in the theory of equations, of power series, and of analytic functions in general, which owe their origin to the introduction of complex numbers. The mathematician is not willing to give up his interest in these most beautiful accomplishments of his genius.
In 'The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences,' Communications in Pure and Applied Mathematics (Feb 1960), 13, No. 1 (February 1960). Collected in Eugene Paul Wigner, A.S. Wightman (ed.), Jagdish Mehra (ed.), The Collected Works of Eugene Paul Wigner (1955), Vol. 6, 537.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Ask (411)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complex Number (3)  |  Equation (132)  |  Function (228)  |  General (511)  |  Genius (284)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indignation (4)  |  Interest (386)  |  Justify (24)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Origin (239)  |  Owe (71)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Series (149)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Theory (970)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)

Nothing is more flatly contradicted by experience than the belief that a man, distinguished in one of the departments of science is more likely to think sensibly about ordinary affairs than anyone else.
In 'Has the Intellect A Function?', The Collected Papers of Wilfred Trotter, FRS (1941), 181.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Contradict (40)  |  Department (92)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Think (1086)

Now, I must tell you of a strange experience which bore fruit in my later life. ... We had a cold [snap] drier that ever observed before. People walking in the snow left a luminous trail behind them and a snowball thrown against an obstacle gave a flare of light like a loaf of sugar hit with a knife. [As I stroked] MaÄŤak's back, [it became] a sheet of light and my hand produced a shower of sparks. ... My father ... remarked, this is nothing but electricity, the same thing you see on the trees in a storm. My mother seemed alarmed. Stop playing with the cat, she said, he might start a fire. I was thinking abstractly. Is nature a cat? If so, who strokes its back? It can only be God, I concluded. ...
I cannot exaggerate the effect of this marvelous sight on my childish imagination. Day after day I asked myself what is electricity and found no answer. Eighty years have gone by since and I still ask the same question, unable to answer it.
Letter to Miss Pola Fotitch, 'A Story of Youth Told by Age' (1939). In John Ratzlaff, editor, Tesla Said (1984), 283-84. Cited in Marc J. Seifer, Wizard: The Life and Times of Nikola Tesla (1998), 5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Alarm (18)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Back (390)  |  Behind (137)  |  Biography (240)  |  Cat (47)  |  Childish (20)  |  Cold (112)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Father (110)  |  Fire (189)  |  Fruit (102)  |  God (757)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Knife (23)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Loaf (5)  |  Luminous (18)  |  Marvelous (29)  |  Mother (114)  |  Must (1526)  |  Myself (212)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  People (1005)  |  Playing (42)  |  Produced (187)  |  Question (621)  |  See (1081)  |  Sight (132)  |  Snap (7)  |  Snow (37)  |  Snowball (4)  |  Spark (31)  |  Start (221)  |  Still (613)  |  Storm (51)  |  Strange (157)  |  Stroke (18)  |  Sugar (23)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Tree (246)  |  Year (933)

Observation is so wide awake, and facts are being so rapidly added to the sum of human experience, that it appears as if the theorizer would always be in arrears, and were doomed forever to arrive at imperfect conclusion; but the power to perceive a law is equally rare in all ages of the world, and depends but little on the number of facts observed.
In A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1862), 383.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Awake (19)  |  Being (1278)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Depend (228)  |  Doom (32)  |  Equally (130)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Forever (103)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Law (894)  |  Little (707)  |  Number (699)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Power (746)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Rare (89)  |  Sum (102)  |  Theory (970)  |  Wide (96)  |  World (1774)

Official science is fully committed to the principle of muddling through and not looking beyond the tip of your nose. All past experience, it is said, teaches us to take only one step at a time.
From transcript of BBC radio Reith Lecture (12 Nov 1967), 'A Runaway World', on the bbc.co.uk website.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Commit (41)  |  Looking (189)  |  Muddle (3)  |  Nose (11)  |  Official (6)  |  Past (337)  |  Principle (507)  |  Science (3879)  |  Step (231)  |  Teach (277)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tip (2)

Often a liberal antidote of experience supplies a sovereign cure for a paralyzing abstraction built upon a theory.
In The Paradoxes of Legal Science (1928).
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Antidote (9)  |  Cure (122)  |  Sovereign (5)  |  Theory (970)

On Breaking Habits. To begin knocking off the habit in the evening, then the afternoon as well and, finally, the morning too is better than to begin cutting it off in the morning and then go on to the afternoon and evening. I speak from experience as regards smoking and can say that when one comes to within an hour or two of smoke-time one begins to be impatient for it, whereas there will be no impatience after the time for knocking off has been confirmed as a habit.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 220.
Science quotes on:  |  Afternoon (5)  |  Begin (260)  |  Better (486)  |  Break (99)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Cut Off (2)  |  Evening (12)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hour (186)  |  Impatience (13)  |  Morning (94)  |  Regard (305)  |  Say (984)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Smoking (27)  |  Speak (232)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)

On the whole, at least in the author's experience, the preparation of species-specific antiserum fractions and the differentiation of closely related species with precipitin sera for serum proteins does not succeed so regularly as with agglutinins and lysins for blood cells. This may be due to the fact that in the evolutional scale the proteins undergo continuous variations whereas cell antigens are subject to sudden changes not linked by intermediary stages.
The Specificity of Serological Reactions (1936), 12-3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Agglutinin (2)  |  Antigen (5)  |  Author (167)  |  Blood (134)  |  Cell (138)  |  Change (593)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Due (141)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Protein (54)  |  Scale (121)  |  Serum (11)  |  Species (401)  |  Specific (95)  |  Stage (143)  |  Subject (521)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Variation (90)  |  Whole (738)

One and all
We lend an ear—nay, Science takes thereto—
Encourages the meanest who has racked
Nature until he gains from her some fact,
To state what truth is from his point of view,
Mere pin-point though it be: since many such
Conduce to make a whole, she bids our friend
Come forward unabashed and haply lend
His little life-experience to our much
Of modern knowledge.
'With Francis Furini', The Complete Poetic and Dramatic Works of Robert Browning (1895), 967.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ear (68)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Forward (102)  |  Friend (168)  |  Gain (145)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Modern (385)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Pin (18)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  State (491)  |  Truth (1057)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)

One cannot ignore half of life for the purposes of science, and then claim that the results of science give a full and adequate picture of the meaning of life. All discussions of “life” which begin with a description of man's place on a speck of matter in space, in an endless evolutionary scale, are bound to be half-measures, because they leave out most of the experiences which are important to use as human beings.
In Religion and the Rebel (1957), 309.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adequate (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Begin (260)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bound (119)  |  Claim (146)  |  Description (84)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Endless (56)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Full (66)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Important (209)  |  Leave Out (2)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Measure (232)  |  Most (1731)  |  Picture (143)  |  Place (177)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Result (677)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Space (500)  |  Speck (23)  |  Use (766)

One rarely hears of the mathematical recitation as a preparation for public speaking. Yet mathematics shares with these studies [foreign languages, drawing and natural science] their advantages, and has another in a higher degree than either of them.
Most readers will agree that a prime requisite for healthful experience in public speaking is that the attention of the speaker and hearers alike be drawn wholly away from the speaker and concentrated upon the thought. In perhaps no other classroom is this so easy as in the mathematical, where the close reasoning, the rigorous demonstration, the tracing of necessary conclusions from given hypotheses, commands and secures the entire mental power of the student who is explaining, and of his classmates. In what other circumstances do students feel so instinctively that manner counts for so little and mind for so much? In what other circumstances, therefore, is a simple, unaffected, easy, graceful manner so naturally and so healthfully cultivated? Mannerisms that are mere affectation or the result of bad literary habit recede to the background and finally disappear, while those peculiarities that are the expression of personality and are inseparable from its activity continually develop, where the student frequently presents, to an audience of his intellectual peers, a connected train of reasoning. …
One would almost wish that our institutions of the science and art of public speaking would put over their doors the motto that Plato had over the entrance to his school of philosophy: “Let no one who is unacquainted with geometry enter here.”
In A Scrap-book of Elementary Mathematics: Notes, Recreations, Essays (1908), 210-211.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Alike (60)  |  Art (657)  |  Attention (190)  |  Audience (26)  |  Background (43)  |  Bad (180)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Classroom (10)  |  Command (58)  |  Concentrate (26)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Connect (125)  |  Count (105)  |  Degree (276)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Develop (268)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Do (1908)  |  Door (93)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entrance (15)  |  Expression (175)  |  Feel (367)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hear (139)  |  Inseparable (16)  |  Institution (69)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Language (293)  |  Listener (7)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peer (12)  |  Personality (62)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plato (76)  |  Power (746)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Present (619)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Recede (11)  |  Recitation (2)  |  Result (677)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Share (75)  |  Simple (406)  |  Speaker (6)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Student (300)  |  Thought (953)  |  Train (114)  |  Unaffected (6)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

One's instinct is at first to try and get rid of a discrepancy, but I believe that experience shows such an endeavour to be a mistake. What one ought to do is to magnify a small discrepancy with a view to finding out the explanation.
General Monthly Meeting, on Argon, (1 Apr 1895), Proceedings of the Royal Institution (1895), 14, 525.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Discrepancy (7)  |  Do (1908)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Magnification (9)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Show (346)  |  Small (477)  |  Try (283)  |  View (488)

Ordinary scientist: one who possesses an assortment of information not verified by personal experience, and which is often disproved by another “scientist”.
In On Love & Psychological Exercises: With Some Aphorisms & Other Essays (1998), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Assortment (5)  |  Disprove (23)  |  Information (166)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Personal (67)  |  Possess (156)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Verify (23)

Our children will enjoy in their homes electrical energy too cheap to meter. ... Transmutation of the elements, unlimited power, ability to investigate the working of living cells by tracer atoms, the secret of photosynthesis about to be uncovered, these and a host of other results, all in about fifteen short years. It is not too much to expect that our children will know of great periodic famines in the world only as matters of history, will travel effortlessly over the seas and under the and through the air with a minimum of danger and at great speeds, and will experience a life span far longer than ours, as disease yields and man comes to understand what causes him to age.
Speech at the 20th anniversary of the National Association of Science Writers, New York City (16 Sep 1954), asquoted in 'Abundant Power From Atom Seen', New York Times (17 Sep 1954) 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Age (499)  |  Aging (9)  |  Air (347)  |  Airplane (41)  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cell (138)  |  Cheapness (2)  |  Children (200)  |  Danger (115)  |  Disease (328)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Element (310)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Famine (15)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Home (170)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lifespan (7)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Meter (9)  |  Minimum (12)  |  Other (2236)  |  Photosynthesis (19)  |  Power (746)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Sea (308)  |  Secret (194)  |  Ship (62)  |  Short (197)  |  Speed (65)  |  Submarine (12)  |  Through (849)  |  Transmutation (22)  |  Travel (114)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unlimited (22)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)  |  Yield (81)

Our commercial and mercantile law was no sudden invention. It was not the work of a day, or of one set of minds… In the incipient, the early existence of this system, a single maxim obtained force, others succeeded; one rule of right formed a nucleus around which other kindred rules might cling; the necessities of trade originated customs, customs ripened into law; a few feeble decisions of courts laid the foundation for others; the wisdom and experience of each succeeding generation improved upon the wisdom and experience of generations that were past; and thus the edifice arose, perfect in its parts, beautiful in its proportions.
From biographical preface by T. Bigelow to Austin Abbott (ed.), Official Report of the Trial of Henry Ward Beecher (1875), Vol. 1, xi-xii.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Commercial (26)  |  Court (33)  |  Custom (42)  |  Decision (91)  |  Early (185)  |  Edifice (26)  |  Existence (456)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Generation (242)  |  Improve (58)  |  Invention (369)  |  Kindred (12)  |  Law (894)  |  Maxim (17)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Right (452)  |  Ripen (4)  |  Rule (294)  |  Set (394)  |  Single (353)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Succeeding (14)  |  Sudden (67)  |  System (537)  |  Trade (31)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Work (1351)

Our contemporary culture, primed by population growth and driven by technology, has created problems of environmental degradation that directly affect all of our senses: noise, odors and toxins which bring physical pain and suffering, and ugliness, barrenness, and homogeneity of experience which bring emotional and psychological suffering and emptiness. In short, we are jeopardizing our human qualities by pursuing technology as an end rather than a means. Too often we have failed to ask two necessary questions: First, what human purpose will a given technology or development serve? Second, what human and environmental effects will it have?
Report of the Subcommittee on Air and Water Pollution (7 Aug 1969). 'Environmental Quality: Summary and Discussion of Major Provisions', U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Legal Compilation, (Jan 1973), Water, Vol. 3, 1365. EPA website.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Barrenness (2)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Culture (143)  |  Degradation (17)  |  Development (422)  |  Drive (55)  |  Effect (393)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Emptiness (11)  |  End (590)  |  Environment (216)  |  Fail (185)  |  First (1283)  |  Growth (187)  |  Homogeneity (8)  |  Human (1468)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Noise (37)  |  Odor (10)  |  Pain (136)  |  Physical (508)  |  Population (110)  |  Population Growth (8)  |  Problem (676)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Question (621)  |  Sense (770)  |  Short (197)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Technology (257)  |  Toxin (8)  |  Two (937)  |  Ugliness (3)  |  Will (2355)

Our experience shows that not everything that is observable and measurable is predictable, no matter how complete our past observations may have been.
In Presidential Address (8 Feb 1963), Quarterly Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society (Mar 1963), 4, 197.
Science quotes on:  |  Complete (204)  |  Completion (22)  |  Everything (476)  |  Matter (798)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Observable (21)  |  Observation (555)  |  Past (337)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Show (346)

Our experience up to date justifies us in feeling sure that in Nature is actualized the ideal of mathematical simplicity. It is my conviction that pure mathematical construction enables us to discover the concepts and the laws connecting them, which gives us the key to understanding nature… In a certain sense, therefore, I hold it true that pure thought can grasp reality, as the ancients dreamed.
In Herbert Spencer Lecture at Oxford (10 Jun 1933), 'On the Methods of Theoretical Physics'. Printed in Discovery (Jul 1933), 14, 227. Also quoted in Stefano Zambelli and Donald A. R. George, Nonlinearity, Complexity and Randomness in Economics (2012).
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Certain (550)  |  Concept (221)  |  Connection (162)  |  Construction (112)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Dream (208)  |  Enable (119)  |  Enabling (7)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Justification (48)  |  Key (50)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reality (261)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understanding (513)

Our knowledge is the amassed thought and experience of innumerable minds.
In Hialmer Day Gould, New Practical Spelling (1905), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Amass (6)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Thought (953)

Our novice runs the risk of failure without additional traits: a strong inclination toward originality, a taste for research, and a desire to experience the incomparable gratification associated with the act of discovery itself.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Addition (66)  |  Association (46)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Failure (161)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Incomparable (12)  |  Novice (2)  |  Originality (19)  |  Research (664)  |  Risk (61)  |  Run (174)  |  Strength (126)  |  Strong (174)  |  Taste (90)  |  Trait (22)  |  Without (13)

Our system of philosophy is itself on trial; it must stand or fall according as it is broad enough to find room for this experience as an element of life.
Swarthmore Lecture (1929) at Friends’ House, London, printed in Science and the Unseen World (1929), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Element (310)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fall (230)  |  Find (998)  |  Life (1795)  |  Must (1526)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Stand (274)  |  System (537)  |  Trial (57)

People exaggerate the value of things they haven’t got: everybody worships truth and unselfishness because they have no experience with them.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Everybody (70)  |  Exaggerate (6)  |  People (1005)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Value (365)  |  Worship (32)

Perhaps I can best describe my experience of doing mathematics in terms of a journey through a dark unexplored mansion. You enter the first room of the mansion and it’s completely dark. You stumble around bumping into the furniture, but gradually you learn where each piece of furniture is. Finally, after six months or so, you find the light switch, you turn it on, and suddenly it’s all illuminated. You can see exactly where you were. Then you move into the next room and spend another six months in the dark. So each of these breakthroughs, while sometimes they’re momentary, sometimes over a period of a day or two, they are the culmination of—and couldn’t exist without—the many months of stumbling around in the dark that proceed them.
Quoted in interview for website for PBS TV Nova program, 'The Proof'.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Best (459)  |  Breakthrough (15)  |  Completely (135)  |  Culmination (4)  |  Dark (140)  |  Describe (128)  |  Doing (280)  |  Enter (141)  |  Exist (443)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Furniture (8)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Illumination (15)  |  Journey (42)  |  Learn (629)  |  Light (607)  |  Mansion (4)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Month (88)  |  Move (216)  |  Next (236)  |  Period (198)  |  Proceed (129)  |  See (1081)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spend (95)  |  Stumble (19)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Through (849)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)

Perhaps the majority of paleontologists of the present time, who believe in orthogenesis, the irreversibility of evolution and the polyphyletic origin families, will assume that a short molar must keep on getting shorter, that it can never get longer and then again grow relatively shorter and therefore that Propliopithecus with its extremely short third molar and Dryopithecus its long m3 are alike excluded from ancestry of the Gorilla, in which the is a slight retrogression in length of m3. After many years reflection and constant study of the evolution of the vertebrates however, I conclude that 'orthogenesis' should mean solely that structures and races evolve in a certain direction, or toward a certain goal, only until the direction of evolution shifts toward some other goal. I believe that the 'irreversibility of evolution' means only that past changes irreversibly limit and condition future possibilities, and that, as a matter of experience, if an organ is once lost the same (homogenous) organ can be regained, although nature is fertile in substituting imitations. But this not mean, in my judgement, that if one tooth is smaller than its fellows it will in all cases continue to grow smaller.
'Studies on the Evolution of the Primates’, Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 1916, 35, 307.
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancestry (12)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Condition (3