Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Representative

Representative Quotes (9 quotes)

A conflict arises when a religious community insists on the absolute truthfulness of all statements recorded in the Bible. This means an intervention on the part of religion into the sphere of science; this is where the struggle of the Church against the doctrines of Galileo and Darwin belongs. On the other hand, representatives of science have often made an attempt to arrive at fundamental judgments with respect to values and ends on the basis of scientific method, and in this way have set themselves in opposition to religion. These conflicts have all sprung from fatal errors.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (65)  |  Arise (32)  |  Arrive (17)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Basis (60)  |  Belong (33)  |  Bible (83)  |  Church (30)  |  Community (65)  |  Conflict (49)  |  Darwin (12)  |  Doctrine (53)  |  End (141)  |  Error (230)  |  Fatal (10)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Galileo Galilei (101)  |  Insist (13)  |  Intervention (8)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Means (109)  |  Often (69)  |  On The Other Hand (16)  |  Opposition (29)  |  Part (146)  |  Record (56)  |  Religion (210)  |  Religious (44)  |  Respect (57)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Set (56)  |  Sphere (40)  |  Spring (47)  |  Statement (56)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Value (180)

And yet I think that the Full House model does teach us to treasure variety for its own sake–for tough reasons of evolutionary theory and nature’s ontology, and not from a lamentable failure of thought that accepts all beliefs on the absurd rationale that disagreement must imply disrespect. Excellence is a range of differences, not a spot. Each location on the range can be occupied by an excellent or an inadequate representative– and we must struggle for excellence at each of these varied locations. In a society driven, of ten unconsciously, to impose a uniform mediocrity upon a former richness of excellence–where McDonald’s drives out the local diner, and the mega-Stop & Shop eliminates the corner Mom and Pop–an understanding and defense of full ranges as natural reality might help to stem the tide and preserve the rich raw material of any evolving system: variation itself.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (20)  |  Accept (37)  |  Belief (400)  |  Corner (24)  |  Defense (15)  |  Difference (208)  |  Disagreement (11)  |  Disrespect (2)  |  Drive (38)  |  Eliminate (15)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Evolutionary (16)  |  Excellence (28)  |  Excellent (15)  |  Failure (118)  |  Former (18)  |  Full (38)  |  Help (68)  |  House (36)  |  Imply (12)  |  Impose (17)  |  Inadequate (13)  |  Lamentable (3)  |  Local (15)  |  Location (5)  |  Material (124)  |  Mediocrity (8)  |  Model (64)  |  Natural (128)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Occupy (18)  |  Pop (2)  |  Preserve (38)  |  Range (38)  |  Rationale (5)  |  Raw (10)  |  Reality (140)  |  Reason (330)  |  Rich (48)  |  Richness (14)  |  Sake (17)  |  Shop (11)  |  Society (188)  |  Spot (11)  |  Stem (11)  |  Struggle (60)  |  System (141)  |  Teach (102)  |  Theory (582)  |  Think (205)  |  Thought (374)  |  Tide (18)  |  Tough (8)  |  Treasure (35)  |  Unconsciously (3)  |  Understand (189)  |  Uniform (14)  |  Variation (50)  |  Variety (53)  |  Vary (14)

Essentially only one thing in life interests us: our psychical constitution, the mechanism of which was and is wrapped in darkness. All human resources, art, religion, literature, philosophy and historical sciences, all of them join in bringing lights in this darkness. But man has still another powerful resource: natural science with its strictly objective methods. This science, as we all know, is making huge progress every day. The facts and considerations which I have placed before you at the end of my lecture are one out of numerous attempts to employ a consistent, purely scientific method of thinking in the study of the mechanism of the highest manifestations of life in the dog, the representative of the animal kingdom that is man's best friend.
'Physiology of Digestion', Nobel Lecture (12 Dec 1904). In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1901-1921 (1967), 134
Science quotes on:  |  Animal Kingdom (9)  |  Art (205)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Consistency (21)  |  Constitution (26)  |  Darkness (25)  |  Dog (39)  |  Employment (22)  |  Essential (87)  |  Fact (609)  |  History (302)  |  Human (445)  |  Interest (170)  |  Lecture (54)  |  Life (917)  |  Literature (64)  |  Manifestation (30)  |  Mechanism (41)  |  Method (154)  |  Numerous (21)  |  Objective (49)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Progress (317)  |  Psychology (125)  |  Religion (210)  |  Resource (47)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Strictness (2)  |  Study (331)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Wrap (4)

Every situation, every moment—is of infinite worth; for it is the representative of a whole eternity.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 166
Science quotes on:  |  Eternity (44)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Moment (61)  |  Situation (41)  |  Whole (122)  |  Worth (74)

Literary intellectuals at one pole—at the other scientists, and as the most representative, the physical scientists. Between the two a gulf of mutual incomprehension—sometimes (particularly among the young) hostility and dislike, but most of all lack of understanding.
The Two Cultures: The Rede Lecture (1959), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Dislike (11)  |  Gulf (10)  |  Hostility (10)  |  Incomprehension (2)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Lack (52)  |  Literary (7)  |  Mutual (22)  |  Physical Science (54)  |  Pole (14)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Understanding (317)

The conditions that direct the order of the whole of the living world around us, are marked by their persistence in improving the birthright of successive generations. They determine, at much cost of individual comfort, that each plant and animal shall, on the general average, be endowed at its birth with more suitable natural faculties than those of its representative in the preceding generation.
In 'The Observed Order of Events', Inquiries Into Human Faculty and Its Development (1882), 229.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Average (31)  |  Birth (81)  |  Birthright (3)  |  Comfort (42)  |  Condition (119)  |  Cost (31)  |  Determine (45)  |  Endow (9)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Faculty (36)  |  Generation (111)  |  Improve (39)  |  Individual (177)  |  Live (186)  |  Natural (128)  |  Order (167)  |  Persistence (16)  |  Plant (173)  |  Precede (11)  |  Successive (14)  |  World (667)

The scientist is not responsible for the laws of nature. It is his job to find out how these laws operate. It is the scientist’s job to find the ways in which these laws can serve the human will. However, it is not the scientist’s job to determine whether a hydrogen bomb should be constructed, whether it should be used, or how it should be used. This responsibility rests with the American people and with their chosen representatives.
In 'Back to the Laboratories', Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Mar 1950), 6, No. 3, 71. Quoted in L. Wolpert and A. Richards (eds.), A Passion for Science (1988), 9, but incorrectly attributed to Robert Oppenheimer.
Science quotes on:  |  American (34)  |  Choice (64)  |  Find (248)  |  Hydrogen Bomb (7)  |  Job (33)  |  Law Of Nature (52)  |  People (269)  |  Responsibility (47)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Serve (34)  |  Use (70)  |  Will (29)

The starting point of Darwin’s theory of evolution is precisely the existence of those differences between individual members of a race or species which morphologists for the most part rightly neglect. The first condition necessary, in order that any process of Natural Selection may begin among a race, or species, is the existence of differences among its members; and the first step in an enquiry into the possible effect of a selective process upon any character of a race must be an estimate of the frequency with which individuals, exhibiting any given degree of abnormality with respect to that, character, occur. The unit, with which such an enquiry must deal, is not an individual but a race, or a statistically representative sample of a race; and the result must take the form of a numerical statement, showing the relative frequency with which the various kinds of individuals composing the race occur.
Biometrika: A Joumal for the Statistical Study of Biological Problems (1901), 1, 1-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (114)  |  Composition (52)  |  Condition (119)  |  Charles Darwin (284)  |  Difference (208)  |  Enquiry (75)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Existence (254)  |  First (174)  |  Form (210)  |  Frequency (13)  |  Individual (177)  |  Kind (99)  |  Member (27)  |  Natural Selection (79)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Neglect (23)  |  Number (179)  |  Occurrence (30)  |  Precision (38)  |  Process (201)  |  Race (76)  |  Relative (24)  |  Result (250)  |  Sample (8)  |  Species (181)  |  Start (68)  |  Starting Point (6)  |  Statement (56)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Step (67)  |  Theory (582)  |  Various (25)

When some portion of the biosphere is rather unpopular with the human race–a crocodile, a dandelion, a stony valley, a snowstorm, an odd-shaped flint–there are three sorts of human being who are particularly likely still to see point in it and befriend it. They are poets, scientists and children. Inside each of us, I suggest, representatives of all these groups can be found.
Animals and Why They Matter; A Journey Around the Species Barrier (1983), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  Biosphere (10)  |  Child (189)  |  Crocodile (7)  |  Dandelion (2)  |  Human Being (54)  |  Poet (59)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Stone (57)  |  Unpopular (2)  |  Valley (16)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.