Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I have no satisfaction in formulas unless I feel their arithmetical magnitude.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index V > Category: Valley

Valley Quotes (32 quotes)

Photo of view down a large steep-sided grass-covered valley with snow-topped mountain peaks in background
Photo by Unsplash CC0 (source)

A bewildering assortment of (mostly microscopic) life-forms has been found thriving in what were once thought to be uninhabitable regions of our planet. These hardy creatures have turned up in deep, hot underground rocks, around scalding volcanic vents at the bottom of the ocean, in the desiccated, super-cold Dry Valleys of Antarctica, in places of high acid, alkaline, and salt content, and below many meters of polar ice. ... Some deep-dwelling, heat-loving microbes, genetic studies suggest, are among the oldest species known, hinting that not only can life thrive indefinitely in what appear to us totally alien environments, it may actually originate in such places.
In Life Everywhere: the Maverick Science of Astrobiology (2002), xi.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Alien (34)  |  Alkali (6)  |  Antarctica (7)  |  Assortment (5)  |  Bewilderment (8)  |  Cold (112)  |  Creature (233)  |  Deep (233)  |  Dry (57)  |  Environment (216)  |  Form (959)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Heat (174)  |  High (362)  |  Hot (60)  |  Ice (54)  |  Known (454)  |  Life (1795)  |  Life-Form (6)  |  Microbe (28)  |  Microbes (14)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Origin (239)  |  Originate (36)  |  Planet (356)  |  Polar (12)  |  Rock (161)  |  Salt (46)  |  Species (401)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thrive (18)  |  Thriving (2)  |  Turn (447)  |  Underground (11)  |  Vent (2)  |  Volcano (39)

A rill in a barnyard and the Grand Canyon represent, in the main, stages of valley erosion that began some millions of years apart.
Uniformitarianism. An Inquiry into Principle, Theory, and Method in Geohistory and Biohistory', M. K. Hecht and W. C. Steere (eds.), Essays in Evolution and Genetics in Honor of Theodosius Dobzhansky (1970), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Barnyard (2)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Grand Canyon (4)  |  Represent (155)  |  Representation (53)  |  Stage (143)  |  Year (933)

And so many think incorrectly that everything was created by the Creator in the beginning as it is seen, that not only the mountains, valleys, and waters, but also various types of minerals occurred together with the rest of the world, and therefore it is said that it is unnecessary to investigate the reasons why they differ in their internal properties and their locations. Such considerations are very dangerous for the growth of all the sciences, and hence for natural knowledge of the Earth, particularly the art of mining, though it is very easy for those clever people to be philosophers, having learnt by heart the three words 'God so created' and to give them in reply in place of all reasons.
About the Layers of the Earth and other Works on Geology (1757), trans. A. P. Lapov (1949), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Clever (38)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creator (91)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Differ (85)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easy (204)  |  Everything (476)  |  Geology (220)  |  God (757)  |  Growth (187)  |  Heart (229)  |  Internal (66)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Location (15)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Mining (18)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Natural (796)  |  People (1005)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reply (56)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Think (1086)  |  Together (387)  |  Type (167)  |  Unnecessary (23)  |  Various (200)  |  Water (481)  |  Why (491)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

At last have made wonderful discovery in valley; a magnificent tomb with seals intact; re-covered same for your arrival; congratulations.
Telegram (6 Nov 1922) sent to Lord Carnarvon. In The Discovery of the Tomb of Tutankhamen (1923, 1977), 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrival (15)  |  Congratulation (5)  |  Congratulations (3)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Intact (8)  |  Last (426)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Seal (18)  |  Tomb (15)  |  Wonderful (149)

But here it may be objected, that the present Earth looks like a heap of Rubbish and Ruines; And that there are no greater examples of confusion in Nature than Mountains singly or jointly considered; and that there appear not the least footsteps of any Art or Counsel either in the Figure and Shape, or Order and Disposition of Mountains and Rocks. Wherefore it is not likely they came so out of God's hands ... To which I answer, That the present face of the Earth with all its Mountains and Hills, its Promontaries and Rocks, as rude and deformed as they appear, seems to me a very beautiful and pleasant object, and with all the variety of Hills, and Valleys, and Inequalities far more grateful to behold, than a perfectly level Countrey without any rising or protuberancy, to terminate the sight: As anyone that hath but seen the Isle of Ely, or any the like Countrey must need acknowledge.
John Ray
Miscellaneous Discourses Concerning the Dissolution and Changes of the World (1692), 165-6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Acknowledgment (12)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Art (657)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Counsel (11)  |  Country (251)  |  Deformation (3)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Earth (996)  |  Example (94)  |  Face (212)  |  Figure (160)  |  Footstep (5)  |  God (757)  |  Gratitude (13)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hand (143)  |  Heap (14)  |  Hill (20)  |  Inequality (9)  |  Isle (6)  |  Look (582)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Objection (32)  |  Order (632)  |  Pleasantness (3)  |  Present (619)  |  Promontory (3)  |  Protuberance (2)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rising (44)  |  Rock (161)  |  Rubbish (12)  |  Rudeness (5)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Shape (72)  |  Sight (132)  |  Termination (4)  |  Variety (132)

Dam Hetch Hetchy! As well dam for water-tanks the people’s cathedrals and churches, for no holier temple has ever been consecrated by the heart of man.
[Muir was aghast that the Hetch Hetchy Valley in Yosemite was to be flooded by the O'Shaughnessy Dam to provide water for San Francisco. Muir lost this land conservation battle; the dam was completed in 1914.]
John Muir
Closing remark in The Yosemite (1912), 262.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Cathedral (27)  |  Church (56)  |  Completed (30)  |  Consecration (3)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Dam (6)  |  Flood (50)  |  Heart (229)  |  Holiness (6)  |  Man (2251)  |  People (1005)  |  Tank (6)  |  Temple (42)  |  Water (481)

Every river appears to consist of a main trunk, fed from a variety of branches, each running in a valley proportional to its size, and all of them together forming a system of vallies, communicating with one another, and having such a nice adjustment of their declivities that none of them join the principal valley on too high or too low a level; a circumstance which would be infinitely improbable if each of these vallies were not the work of the stream that flows in it.
Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Adjustment (20)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Branch (150)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Communication (94)  |  Consist (223)  |  Feeding (7)  |  Flow (83)  |  Forming (42)  |  High (362)  |  Improbability (11)  |  Level (67)  |  Low (80)  |  Principal (63)  |  Proportionality (2)  |  River (119)  |  Run (174)  |  Running (61)  |  Size (60)  |  Stream (81)  |  System (537)  |  Together (387)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Variety (132)  |  Work (1351)

I have enjoyed the trees and scenery of Kentucky exceedingly. How shall I ever tell of the miles and miles of beauty that have been flowing into me in such measure? These lofty curving ranks of lobing, swelling hills, these concealed valleys of fathomless verdure, and these lordly trees with the nursing sunlight glancing in their leaves upon the outlines of the magnificent masses of shade embosomed among their wide branches—these are cut into my memory to go with me forever.
John Muir
Letter, written “among the hills of Bear Creek, seven miles southeast of Burkesville, Kentucky” (Sep 1867). In John Muir and William Frederick Badé (Ed.), A Thousand-Mile Walk to the Gulf (1916), xix. This was by far Muir's longest botanical excursion made in his earlier years.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Branch (150)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Cut (114)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Excursion (11)  |  Fathomless (3)  |  Forever (103)  |  Hill (20)  |  Kentucky (4)  |  Lofty (13)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Measure (232)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mile (39)  |  Nursing (9)  |  Rank (67)  |  Scenery (7)  |  Shade (31)  |  Sunlight (23)  |  Tell (340)  |  Tree (246)  |  Wide (96)

I think we may picture those domains where understanding exists, whether in physics, chemistry, biology, psychology, economics or any other discipline as cultivated valleys in a formidably mountainous country. We may recognise in principle that we all inhabit the same world but in practice we do well to cultivate our own valleys, with an occasional assault on the more accessible foothills, rather than to build roads in a vain attempt at colonisation.
From Inaugural Lecture as Cavendish Professor of Physics, Cambridge, as quoted in Gordon L. Glegg, The Development of Design (1981), 1-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (25)  |  All (4108)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Biology (216)  |  Build (204)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Colonization (3)  |  Country (251)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Do (1908)  |  Domain (69)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Exist (443)  |  Foothill (3)  |  Inhabiting (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Occasional (22)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Picture (143)  |  Practice (204)  |  Principle (507)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Think (1086)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vain (83)  |  World (1774)

If you were going to risk all that, not just risk the hardship and the pain but risk your life. Put everything on line for a dream, for something that’s worth nothing, that can’t be proved to anybody. You just have the transient moment on a summit and when you come back down to the valley it goes. It is actually a completely illogical thing to do. It is not justifiable by any rational terms. That’s probably why you do it.
The Beckoning Silence
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Actually (27)  |  All (4108)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Back (390)  |  Completely (135)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Dream (208)  |  Everything (476)  |  Hardship (4)  |  Illogical (2)  |  Justifiable (3)  |  Life (1795)  |  Line (91)  |  Moment (253)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Pain (136)  |  Probably (49)  |  Prove (250)  |  Rational (90)  |  Risk (61)  |  Something (719)  |  Summit (25)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Transient (12)  |  Why (491)  |  Worth (169)

It is difficult to give an idea of the vast extent of modern mathematics. The word “extent” is not the right one: I mean extent crowded with beautiful detail—not an extent of mere uniformity such as an objectless plain, but of a tract of beautiful country seen at first in the distance, but which will bear to be rambled through and studied in every detail of hillside and valley, stream, rock, wood, and flower.
President’s address (1883) to the British Association for the Advancement of Science, in The Collected Mathematical Papers (1895), Vol. 8, xxii.
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (159)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Country (251)  |  Detail (146)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Distance (161)  |  Distant (33)  |  Extent (139)  |  First (1283)  |  Flower (106)  |  Hillside (4)  |  Idea (843)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Plain (33)  |  Ramble (3)  |  Right (452)  |  Rock (161)  |  Stream (81)  |  Study (653)  |  Through (849)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Vast (177)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wood (92)  |  Word (619)

It seems to me that the physical constitution of the valley, on which I am reporting, must cast doubt in the minds of those who may have accepted the assumptions of any of the geologic systems hitherto proposed; and that those who delight in science would do better to enrich themselves with empirical facts than take upon themselves the burden of defending and applying general hypotheses.
Della valle vulcanico-marina di Roncà nel Territorio Veronese (1778), trans. Ezio Vaccari, vii-viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Better (486)  |  Cast (66)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Delight (108)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Enrich (24)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  General (511)  |  Geology (220)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Physical (508)  |  Reporting (9)  |  Science (3879)  |  System (537)  |  Themselves (433)

My interest in the biology of tissue and organ transplantation arose from my [WW II] military experience at Valley Forge General Hospital in Pennsylvania … a major plastic surgical center. While there, I spent all my available spare time on the plastic surgical wards which were jammed with hundreds of battle casualties. I enjoyed talking to the patients, helping with dressings, and observing the results of the imaginative reconstructive surgical operations.
As a First Lieutenant with only a nine-month surgical internship, randomly assigned to VFGH to await overseas duty. In Tore Frängsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 556.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Available (78)  |  Battle (34)  |  Biography (240)  |  Biology (216)  |  Casualty (3)  |  Experience (467)  |  Forge (9)  |  General (511)  |  Help (105)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Imaginative (8)  |  Interest (386)  |  Major (84)  |  Military (40)  |  Observe (168)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Organ (115)  |  Patient (199)  |  Plastic (28)  |  Result (677)  |  Spent (85)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Transplantation (4)  |  Ward (7)

Not since the Lord himself showed his stuff to Ezekiel in the valley of dry bones had anyone shown such grace and skill in the reconstruction of animals from disarticulated skeletons. Charles R. Knight, the most celebrated of artists in the reanimation of fossils, painted all the canonical figures of dinosaurs that fire our fear and imagination to this day.
In Wonderful Life: the Burgess Shale and the Nature of History (1990), 23. First sentence of chapter one.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Artist (90)  |  Bone (95)  |  Celebration (7)  |  Dinosaur (26)  |  Dry (57)  |  Fear (197)  |  Figure (160)  |  Fire (189)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Grace (31)  |  Himself (461)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Charles R. Knight (2)  |  Lord (93)  |  Most (1731)  |  Painting (44)  |  Reconstruction (14)  |  Show (346)  |  Skeleton (22)  |  Skill (109)

Now the American eagle is verging on extinction. Even the polar bear on its ice floes has become easy game for flying sportsmen. A peninsula named Udjung Kulon holds the last two or three dozen Javan rhinoceroses. The last known herd of Arabian oryx has been machine-gunned by a sheik. Blue whales have nearly been harpooned out of their oceans. Pollution ruins bays and rivers. Refuse litters beaches. Dam projects threaten Colorado canyons, Hudson valleys, every place of natural beauty that can be a reservoir for power. Obviously the scientific progress so alluring to me is destroying qualities of greater worth.
In 'The Wisdom of Wilderness', Life (22 Dec 1967), 63, No. 25, 8-9. (Note: the Arabian oryx is no longer listed as extinct.)
Science quotes on:  |  Alluring (5)  |  Arabian (2)  |  Beach (21)  |  Bear (159)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Become (815)  |  Blue Whale (3)  |  Canyon (9)  |  Dam (6)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Eagle (19)  |  Easy (204)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Floe (3)  |  Flying (72)  |  Game (101)  |  Greater (288)  |  Herd (15)  |  Hudson (3)  |  Ice (54)  |  Java (2)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Litter (5)  |  Machine (257)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Beauty (5)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Ocean Pollution (10)  |  Peninsula (2)  |  Polar (12)  |  Polar Bear (2)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Power (746)  |  Progress (465)  |  Project (73)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Reservoir (7)  |  Rhinoceros (2)  |  River (119)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Progress (14)  |  Threat (30)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Two (937)  |  Whale (32)  |  Worth (169)

Ploughing deep, your recipe for killing weeds, is also the recipe for almost every good thing in farming. … We now plough horizontally following the curvatures of the hills and hollows, on the dead level, however crooked the lines may be. Every furrow thus acts as a reservoir to receive and retain the waters, all of which go to the benefit of the growing plant, instead of running off into streams … In point of beauty nothing can exceed that of the waving lines and rows winding along the face of the hills and vallies.
In letter (17 Apr 1813) from Jefferson at Monticello to Charles Willson Peale. Collected in The Jefferson Papers: 1770-1826 (1900), 178-180.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Crooked (3)  |  Curvature (8)  |  Deep (233)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Face (212)  |  Farming (8)  |  Following (16)  |  Furrow (4)  |  Good (889)  |  Growing (98)  |  Hill (20)  |  Hollow (4)  |  Horizontal (9)  |  Killing (14)  |  Level (67)  |  Line (91)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Plant (294)  |  Plough (13)  |  Ploughing (3)  |  Point (580)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recipe (7)  |  Reservoir (7)  |  Retain (56)  |  Row (9)  |  Running (61)  |  Stream (81)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Water (481)  |  Water Conservation (3)  |  Weed (18)  |  Winding (8)

Science keeps religion from sinking into the valley of crippling irrationalism and paralyzing obscurantism. Religion prevents science from falling into the marsh of obsolete materialism and moral nihilism.
In 'A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart', Strength To Love (1963), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Cripple (3)  |  Fall (230)  |  Irrational (13)  |  Marsh (6)  |  Materialism (11)  |  Moral (195)  |  Nihilism (3)  |  Obscurantism (3)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Obsolete (15)  |  Paralyze (3)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Sink (37)

That which we call the Atlantic Ocean is only a valley excavated by the force of the waters; the form of the seacoast, the salient and re-entrant angles of America, of Africa, and of Europe proclaim this catastrophe.
'Esquisse d'un tableau geologique de L'amerique maridonale', Journal de Physique, de Chemie, d'Histoire Naturelle (1801), 53, 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (35)  |  America (127)  |  Atlantic Ocean (7)  |  Call (769)  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Coast (13)  |  Europe (43)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  Water (481)

The epoch of intense cold which preceded the present creation has been only a temporary oscillation of the earth’s temperature, more important than the century-long phases of cooling undergone by the Alpine valleys. It was associated with the disappearance of the animals of the diluvial epoch of the geologists, as still demonstrated by the Siberian mammoths; it preceded the uplifting of the Alps and the appearance of the present-day living organisms, as demonstrated by the moraines and the existence of fishes in our lakes. Consequently, there is complete separation between the present creation and the preceding ones, and if living species are sometimes almost identical to those buried inside the earth, we nevertheless cannot assume that the former are direct descendants of the latter or, in other words, that they represent identical species.
From Discours de Neuchâtel (1837), as translated by Albert V. Carozzi in Studies on Glaciers: Preceded by the Discourse of Neuchâtel (1967), lviii.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alp (9)  |  Alps (8)  |  Animal (617)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Century (310)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complete (204)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Creation (327)  |  Descendant (17)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Earth (996)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Existence (456)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Former (137)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Geology (220)  |  Ice Age (9)  |  Identical (53)  |  Lake (32)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Mammoth (9)  |  More (2559)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Organism (220)  |  Oscillation (13)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phase (36)  |  Present (619)  |  Represent (155)  |  Separation (57)  |  Species (401)  |  Still (613)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Temporary (23)  |  Word (619)

The evening was calm, the calmest we had known above the North Col. The smooth, outward dipping slabs glowed in the fast setting sun and, at an immense distance beneath, clouds concealed the valleys and lesser peaks. There was nothing to obstruct the tremendous prospect. Seen from Everest, great peaks that dominate the climber as he toils along the East Rongbuk Glacier, and up the slopes of the North Col, show like insignificant ripples at the base of a great ocean roller. Even the North Peak was but a stepping-stone to quick-footed vision.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Base (117)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Calm (31)  |  Climber (7)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Conceal (18)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Dip (3)  |  Distance (161)  |  Dominate (20)  |  East (18)  |  Everest (10)  |  Fast (45)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Glow (14)  |  Great (1574)  |  Immense (86)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Lesser (5)  |  North (11)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obstruct (3)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Outward (7)  |  Peak (20)  |  Prospect (30)  |  Ripple (9)  |  Roller (3)  |  See (1081)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Show (346)  |  Slope (9)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Stone (162)  |  Sun (385)  |  Toil (25)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Vision (123)

The pursuit of science has often been compared to the scaling of mountains, high and not so high. But who amongst us can hope, even in imagination, to scale the Everest and reach its summit when the sky is blue and the air is still, and in the stillness of the air survey the entire Himalayan range in the dazzling white of the snow stretching to infinity? None of us can hope for a comparable vision of nature and of the universe around us. But there is nothing mean or lowly in standing in the valley below and awaiting the sun to rise over Kinchinjunga.
Truth and Beauty: Aesthetics and Motivations in Science (1987), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Dazzling (13)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  High (362)  |  Hope (299)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Range (99)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rise (166)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sky (161)  |  Snow (37)  |  Still (613)  |  Summit (25)  |  Sun (385)  |  Survey (33)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vision (123)  |  White (127)

The rocks have a history; gray and weatherworn, they are veterans of many battles; they have most of them marched in the ranks of vast stone brigades during the ice age; they have been torn from the hills, recruited from the mountaintops, and marshaled on the plains and in the valleys; and now the elemental war is over, there they lie waging a gentle but incessant warfare with time and slowly, oh, so slowly, yielding to its attacks!
In Under the Apple-Trees (1916), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Attack (84)  |  Battle (34)  |  Brigade (3)  |  Elemental (3)  |  Gentle (7)  |  Geology (220)  |  Gray (8)  |  Hill (20)  |  History (673)  |  Ice (54)  |  Ice Age (9)  |  Incessant (8)  |  Lie (364)  |  March (46)  |  Marshal (4)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Plain (33)  |  Rank (67)  |  Recruit (2)  |  Rock (161)  |  Stone (162)  |  Tear (42)  |  Time (1877)  |  Torn (17)  |  Vast (177)  |  War (225)  |  Warfare (11)  |  Yielding (2)

The science hangs like a gathering fog in a valley, a fog which begins nowhere and goes nowhere, an incidental, unmeaning inconvenience to passers-by.
repr. In The Works of H.G. Wells, vol. 9 (1925). A Modern Utopia, ch. 3, sect. 3 (1905)
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (260)  |  Fog (10)  |  Gather (72)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Hang (45)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Inconvenience (3)  |  Nowhere (28)  |  Science (3879)

The wintry clouds drop spangles on the mountains. If the thing occurred once in a century historians would chronicle and poets would sing of the event; but Nature, prodigal of beauty, rains down her hexagonal ice-stars year by year, forming layers yards in thickness. The summer sun thaws and partially consolidates the mass. Each winter's fall is covered by that of the ensuing one, and thus the snow layer of each year has to sustain an annually augmented weight. It is more and more compacted by the pressure, and ends by being converted into the ice of a true glacier, which stretches its frozen tongue far down beyond the limits of perpetual snow. The glaciers move, and through valleys they move like rivers.
The Glaciers of the Alps & Mountaineering in 1861 (1911), 247.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Annual (5)  |  Augment (12)  |  Augmentation (4)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Century (310)  |  Chronicle (6)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Compact (13)  |  Consolidation (4)  |  Conversion (17)  |  Cover (37)  |  Down (456)  |  Drop (76)  |  End (590)  |  Ensuing (3)  |  Event (216)  |  Fall (230)  |  Forming (42)  |  Freezing (16)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Hexagon (4)  |  Historian (54)  |  Ice (54)  |  Layer (40)  |  Limit (280)  |  Mass (157)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Partially (8)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Perpetuity (9)  |  Poet (83)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Prodigal (2)  |  Rain (62)  |  River (119)  |  Snow (37)  |  Song (37)  |  Spangle (2)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Summer (54)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Thaw (2)  |  Thickness (5)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Weight (134)  |  Winter (44)  |  Yard (7)  |  Year (933)

To have a railroad, there must have been first the discoverers, who found out the properties of wood and iron, fire and water, and their latent power to carry men over the earth; next the organizers, who put these elements together, surveyed the route, planned the structure, set men to grade the hill, to fill the valley, and pave the road with iron bars; and then the administrators, who after all that is done, procure the engines, engineers, conductors, ticket-distributors, and the rest of the “hands;” they buy the coal and see it is not wasted, fix the rates of fare, calculate the savings, and distribute the dividends. The discoverers and organizers often fare hard in the world, lean men, ill-clad and suspected, often laughed at, while the administrator is thought the greater man, because he rides over their graves and pays the dividends, where the organizer only called for the assessments, and the discoverer told what men called a dream. What happens in a railroad happens also in a Church, or a State.
Address at the Melodeon, Boston (5 Mar 1848), 'A Discourse occasioned by the Death of John Quincy Adams'. Collected in Discourses of Politics: The Collected Works of Theodore Parker: Part 4 (1863), 139. Note: Ralph Waldo Emerson earlier used the phrase “pave the road with iron bars,” in Nature (1836), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Administrator (11)  |  All (4108)  |  Assessment (3)  |  Bar (8)  |  Buy (20)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Call (769)  |  Carry (127)  |  Church (56)  |  Coal (57)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Distribute (15)  |  Dividend (3)  |  Dream (208)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  Engine (98)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Fare (5)  |  Fill (61)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Fix (25)  |  Grade (11)  |  Grave (52)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hand (143)  |  Happen (274)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hill (20)  |  Iron (96)  |  Latent (12)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Next (236)  |  Pave (8)  |  Pay (43)  |  Plan (117)  |  Power (746)  |  Procure (5)  |  Property (168)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Rate (29)  |  Rest (280)  |  Ride (21)  |  Road (64)  |  Route (15)  |  Saving (20)  |  See (1081)  |  Set (394)  |  State (491)  |  Structure (344)  |  Survey (33)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thought (953)  |  Ticket (5)  |  Together (387)  |  Waste (101)  |  Water (481)  |  Wood (92)  |  World (1774)

We are like the inhabitants of an isolated valley in New Guinea who communicate with societies in neighboring valleys (quite different societies, I might add) by runner and by drum. When asked how a very advanced society will communicate, they might guess by an extremely rapid runner or by an improbably large drum. They might not guess a technology beyond their ken. And yet, all the while, a vast international cable and radio traffic passes over them, around them, and through them... We will listen for the interstellar drums, but we will miss the interstellar cables. We are likely to receive our first messages from the drummers of the neighboring galactic valleys - from civilizations only somewhat in our future. The civilizations vastly more advanced than we, will be, for a long time, remote both in distance and in accessibility. At a future time of vigorous interstellar radio traffic, the very advanced civilizations may be, for us, still insubstantial legends.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accessibility (3)  |  Add (40)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Both (493)  |  Cable (11)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Different (577)  |  Distance (161)  |  Drum (8)  |  Drummer (3)  |  Extremely (16)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  Galactic (6)  |  Guess (61)  |  Improbable (13)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  International (37)  |  Interstellar (8)  |  Isolate (22)  |  Ken (2)  |  Large (394)  |  Legend (17)  |  Likely (34)  |  Listen (73)  |  Long (790)  |  Message (49)  |  Miss (51)  |  More (2559)  |  Neighboring (5)  |  New (1216)  |  New Guinea (3)  |  Pass (238)  |  Radio (50)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Receive (114)  |  Remote (83)  |  Runner (2)  |  Society (326)  |  Still (613)  |  Technology (257)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Traffic (10)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vastly (8)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Will (2355)

We may conclude, that the flux and reflux of the ocean have produced all the mountains, valleys, and other inequalities on the surface of the earth; that currents of the sea have scooped out the valleys, elevated the hills, and bestowed on them their corresponding directions; that that same waters of the ocean, by transporting and depositing earth, &c., have given rise to the parallel strata; that the waters from the heavens gradually destroy the effects of the sea, by continually diminishing the height of the mountains, filling up the valleys, and choking the mouths of rivers; and, by reducing every thing to its former level, they will, in time, restore the earth to the sea, which, by its natural operations, will again create new continents, interspersed with mountains and valleys, every way similar to those we inhabit.
'Second Discours: Histoire et Théorie de la Terre', Histoire Naturelle, Générale et Particulière, Avec la Description du Cabinet du Roi (1749), Vol. I, 124; Natural History, General and Particular (1785), Vol. I, Irans. W. Smellie, 57-8.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bestow (18)  |  Choking (3)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Continent (76)  |  Create (235)  |  Current (118)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Direction (175)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Flux (21)  |  Former (137)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Natural (796)  |  New (1216)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Produced (187)  |  Rain (62)  |  Reflux (2)  |  Rise (166)  |  River (119)  |  Sea (308)  |  Strata (35)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

What induces you, oh man, to depart from your home in town, to leave parents and friends, and go to the countryside over mountains and valleys, if it is not for the beauty of the world of nature?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Countryside (5)  |  Depart (4)  |  Friend (168)  |  Home (170)  |  Induce (22)  |  Leave (130)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Parent (76)  |  Town (27)  |  World (1774)

When it’s too easy to get money, then you get a lot of noise mixed in with the real innovation and entrepreneurship. Tough times bring out the best parts of Silicon Valley
As quoted by Jessica Guynn, reporting on a media roundtable at a conference on Google’s campus, in 'Google’s Schmidt, Page and Brin hold court at Zeitgeist', Los Angeles Times (17 Sep 2008). On latimesblogs.latimes.com webpage.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Best (459)  |  Bring Out (4)  |  Easy (204)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Lot (151)  |  Mix (19)  |  Money (170)  |  Noise (37)  |  Real (149)  |  Silicon (4)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tough (19)

When living with the Indians in their homes and pursuing my ethnological studies: One day I suddenly realized with a rude shock that, unlike my Indian friends, I was an alien, a stranger in my native land; its fauna and flora had no fond, familiar place amid my mental imagery, nor did any thoughts of human aspiration or love give to its hills and valleys the charm of personal companionship. I was alone, even in my loneliness.
Opening of Preface, Indian Games and Dances with Native Songs (1915), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Alien (34)  |  Alone (311)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Charm (51)  |  Companionship (4)  |  Ethnology (7)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Flora (9)  |  Fond (12)  |  Friend (168)  |  Hill (20)  |  Home (170)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imagery (3)  |  Indian (27)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Loneliness (5)  |  Love (309)  |  Mental (177)  |  Native (38)  |  Native Land (3)  |  Personal (67)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Realize (147)  |  Shock (37)  |  Strange (157)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Thought (953)  |  Unlike (8)

When some portion of the biosphere is rather unpopular with the human race–a crocodile, a dandelion, a stony valley, a snowstorm, an odd-shaped flint–there are three sorts of human being who are particularly likely still to see point in it and befriend it. They are poets, scientists and children. Inside each of us, I suggest, representatives of all these groups can be found.
Animals and Why They Matter; A Journey Around the Species Barrier (1983), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biosphere (13)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Crocodile (14)  |  Dandelion (2)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Poet (83)  |  Point (580)  |  Portion (84)  |  Race (268)  |  Representative (14)  |  Scientist (820)  |  See (1081)  |  Still (613)  |  Stone (162)  |  Unpopular (4)

…I distinguish two parts of it, which I call respectively the brighter and the darker. The brighter seems to surround and pervade the whole hemisphere; but the darker part, like a sort of cloud, discolours the Moon’s surface and makes it appear covered with spots. Now these spots, as they are somewhat dark and of considerable size, are plain to everyone and every age has seen them, wherefore I will call them great or ancient spots, to distinguish them from other spots, smaller in size, but so thickly scattered that they sprinkle the whole surface of the Moon, but especially the brighter portion of it. These spots have never been observed by anyone before me; and from my observations of them, often repeated, I have been led to the opinion which I have expressed, namely, that I feel sure that the surface of the Moon is not perfectly smooth, free from inequalities and exactly spherical… but that, on the contrary, it is full of inequalities, uneven, full of hollows and protuberances, just like the surface of the Earth itself, which is varied everywhere by lofty mountains and deep valleys.
Describing his pioneering telescope observations of the Moon made from Jan 1610. In The Starry Messenger (Mar 1610). Quoted in Patrick Moore, Patrick Moore on the Moon (2006), 56.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Call (769)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Crater (8)  |  Dark (140)  |  Deep (233)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Earth (996)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Express (186)  |  Feel (367)  |  Free (232)  |  Great (1574)  |  Moon (237)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Portion (84)  |  Protuberance (2)  |  Respectively (13)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Two (937)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.