Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Genius is two percent inspiration, ninety-eight percent perspiration.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index D > Category: Drum

Drum Quotes (8 quotes)

Can we ring the bells backward? Can we unlearn the arts that pretend to civilize, and then burn the world? There is a march of science; but who shall beat the drums for its retreat?
Letter to George Dyer (20 Dec 1830). In Charles Lamb and Thomas Noon Talfourd (Ed.), Works: Including His Most Interesting Letters, (1867), 168.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Beat (41)  |  Bell (35)  |  Burn (87)  |  March (46)  |  March Of Science (4)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Unlearn (11)  |  World (1774)

If today you can take a thing like evolution and make it a crime to teach it in the public schools, tomorrow you can make it a crime to teach it in the private schools, and next year you can make it a crime to teach it to the hustings or in the church. At the next session you may ban books and the newspapers. Soon you may set Catholic against Protestant and Protestant against Protestant, and try to foist your own religion upon the minds of men. If you can do one you can do the other. Ignorance and fanaticism are ever busy and need feeding. Always it is feeding and gloating for more. Today it is the public school teachers; tomorrow the private. The next day the preachers and the lecturers, the magazines, the books, the newspapers. After a while, Your Honor, it is the setting of man against man and creed against creed until with flying banners and beating drums we are marching backward to the glorious ages of the sixteenth century when bigots lighted fagots to burn the men who dared to bring any intelligence and enlightenment and culture to the human mind.
Darrow’s concluding remarks before adjournment of the second day of the Scopes Monkey Trial, Dayton, Tennessee (Monday, 13 Jul 1925). In The World's Most Famous Court Trial: Tennessee Evolution Case: a Complete Stenographic Report of the Famous Court Test of the Tennessee Anti-Evolution Act, at Dayton, July 10 to 21, 1925 (1925), Second Day's Proceedings, 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Age (499)  |  Banner (7)  |  Bigot (6)  |  Book (392)  |  Burn (87)  |  Catholic (15)  |  Century (310)  |  Church (56)  |  Creed (27)  |  Crime (38)  |  Culture (143)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Enlightenment (20)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Flying (72)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Honor (54)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Lecturer (12)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Other (2236)  |  Preacher (13)  |  Religion (361)  |  School (219)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Soon (186)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Try (283)  |  Year (933)

The doctor listens in with a stethoscope and hears sounds of a warpath Indian drum.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Doctor (187)  |  Hear (139)  |  Indian (27)  |  Listen (73)  |  Sound (183)

The faith of scientists in the power and truth of mathematics is so implicit that their work has gradually become less and less observation, and more and more calculation. The promiscuous collection and tabulation of data have given way to a process of assigning possible meanings, merely supposed real entities, to mathematical terms, working out the logical results, and then staging certain crucial experiments to check the hypothesis against the actual empirical results. But the facts which are accepted by virtue of these tests are not actually observed at all. With the advance of mathematical technique in physics, the tangible results of experiment have become less and less spectacular; on the other hand, their significance has grown in inverse proportion. The men in the laboratory have departed so far from the old forms of experimentation—typified by Galileo's weights and Franklin's kite—that they cannot be said to observe the actual objects of their curiosity at all; instead, they are watching index needles, revolving drums, and sensitive plates. No psychology of 'association' of sense-experiences can relate these data to the objects they signify, for in most cases the objects have never been experienced. Observation has become almost entirely indirect; and readings take the place of genuine witness.
Philosophy in a New Key; A Study in Inverse the Symbolism of Reason, Rite, and Art (1942), 19-20.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Actual (117)  |  Advance (280)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Association (46)  |  Become (815)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  Collection (64)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Data (156)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Empiricism (21)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Faith (203)  |  Form (959)  |  Benjamin Franklin (91)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Implicit (12)  |  Indirect (18)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Merely (316)  |  Meter (9)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Process (423)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Reading (133)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Significance (113)  |  Signify (17)  |  Spectacular (18)  |  Tabulation (2)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Technique (80)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Test (211)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weight (134)  |  Witness (54)  |  Work (1351)

The most persistent sound which reverberates through men’s history is the beating of war drums.
In Prologue to Janus: A Summing Up (1978), 2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beating (4)  |  History (673)  |  Most (1731)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Sound (183)  |  Through (849)  |  War (225)

This whole theory of electrostatics constitutes a group of abstract ideas and general propositions, formulated in the clear and precise language of geometry and algebra, and connected with one another by the rules of strict logic. This whole fully satisfies the reason of a French physicist and his taste for clarity, simplicity and order. The same does not hold for the Englishman. These abstract notions of material points, force, line of force, and equipotential surface do not satisfy his need to imagine concrete, material, visible, and tangible things. 'So long as we cling to this mode of representation,' says an English physicist, 'we cannot form a mental representation of the phenomena which are really happening.' It is to satisfy the need that he goes and creates a model.
The French or German physicist conceives, in the space separating two conductors, abstract lines of force having no thickness or real existence; the English physicist materializes these lines and thickens them to the dimensions of a tube which he will fill with vulcanised rubber. In place of a family of lines of ideal forces, conceivable only by reason, he will have a bundle of elastic strings, visible and tangible, firmly glued at both ends to the surfaces of the two conductors, and, when stretched, trying both to contact and to expand. When the two conductors approach each other, he sees the elastic strings drawing closer together; then he sees each of them bunch up and grow large. Such is the famous model of electrostatic action imagined by Faraday and admired as a work of genius by Maxwell and the whole English school.
The employment of similar mechanical models, recalling by certain more or less rough analogies the particular features of the theory being expounded, is a regular feature of the English treatises on physics. Here is a book* [by Oliver Lodge] intended to expound the modern theories of electricity and to expound a new theory. In it are nothing but strings which move around pulleys, which roll around drums, which go through pearl beads, which carry weights; and tubes which pump water while others swell and contract; toothed wheels which are geared to one another and engage hooks. We thought we were entering the tranquil and neatly ordered abode of reason, but we find ourselves in a factory.
*Footnote: O. Lodge, Les Thιories Modernes (Modern Views on Electricity) (1889), 16.
The Aim and Structure of Physical Theory (1906), 2nd edition (1914), trans. Philip P. Wiener (1954), 70-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Action (327)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Approach (108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (392)  |  Both (493)  |  Carry (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Closer (43)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Connect (125)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Contact (65)  |  Create (235)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electrostatic (7)  |  Electrostatics (6)  |  Employment (32)  |  End (590)  |  Engage (39)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expand (53)  |  Factory (20)  |  Family (94)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geometry (255)  |  German (36)  |  Grow (238)  |  Happening (58)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Language (293)  |  Large (394)  |  Sir Oliver Joseph Lodge (13)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Material (353)  |  Materialize (2)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mental (177)  |  Model (102)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Move (216)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notion (113)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Point (580)  |  Precise (68)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regular (46)  |  Representation (53)  |  Roll (40)  |  Rubber (9)  |  Rule (294)  |  Say (984)  |  School (219)  |  See (1081)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Surface (209)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Taste (90)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Together (387)  |  Tooth (29)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trying (144)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)  |  Visible (84)  |  Water (481)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

We are like the inhabitants of an isolated valley in New Guinea who communicate with societies in neighboring valleys (quite different societies, I might add) by runner and by drum. When asked how a very advanced society will communicate, they might guess by an extremely rapid runner or by an improbably large drum. They might not guess a technology beyond their ken. And yet, all the while, a vast international cable and radio traffic passes over them, around them, and through them... We will listen for the interstellar drums, but we will miss the interstellar cables. We are likely to receive our first messages from the drummers of the neighboring galactic valleys - from civilizations only somewhat in our future. The civilizations vastly more advanced than we, will be, for a long time, remote both in distance and in accessibility. At a future time of vigorous interstellar radio traffic, the very advanced civilizations may be, for us, still insubstantial legends.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accessibility (3)  |  Add (40)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Both (493)  |  Cable (11)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Different (577)  |  Distance (161)  |  Drummer (3)  |  Extremely (16)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  Galactic (6)  |  Guess (61)  |  Improbable (13)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  International (37)  |  Interstellar (8)  |  Isolate (22)  |  Ken (2)  |  Large (394)  |  Legend (17)  |  Likely (34)  |  Listen (73)  |  Long (790)  |  Message (49)  |  Miss (51)  |  More (2559)  |  Neighboring (5)  |  New (1216)  |  New Guinea (3)  |  Pass (238)  |  Radio (50)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Receive (114)  |  Remote (83)  |  Runner (2)  |  Society (326)  |  Still (613)  |  Technology (257)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Traffic (10)  |  Valley (32)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vastly (8)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Will (2355)

Who … is not familiar with Maxwell’s memoirs on his dynamical theory of gases? … from one side enter the equations of state; from the other side, the equations of motion in a central field. Ever higher soars the chaos of formulae. Suddenly we hear, as from kettle drums, the four beats “put n=5.” The evil spirit v vanishes; and … that which had seemed insuperable has been overcome as if by a stroke of magic … One result after another follows in quick succession till at last … we arrive at the conditions for thermal equilibrium together with expressions for the transport coefficients.
In Ceremonial Speech (15 Nov 1887) celebrating the 301st anniversary of the Karl-Franzens-University Graz. Published as Gustav Robert Kirchhoff: Festrede zur Feier des 301. Grόndungstages der Karl-Franzens-Universitδt zu Graz (1888), 29, as translated in In Michael Dudley Sturge, Statistical and Thermal Physics (2003), 343. A more complete alternate translation also appears on the Ludwig Boltzmann Quotes page of this website.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beat (41)  |  Central (80)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Coefficient (5)  |  Condition (356)  |  Dynamical (15)  |  Enter (141)  |  Equation (132)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Evil (116)  |  Expression (175)  |  Field (364)  |  Follow (378)  |  Formula (98)  |  Hear (139)  |  Kettle (3)  |  Last (426)  |  Magic (86)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  Motion (310)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Result (677)  |  Side (233)  |  Soar (23)  |  Spirit (265)  |  State (491)  |  Stroke (18)  |  Succession (77)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thermal (15)  |  Together (387)  |  Transport (30)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.