Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index I > Category: Inhabitant

Inhabitant Quotes (19 quotes)

Question: Why do the inhabitants of cold climates eat fat? How would you find experimentally the relative quantities of heat given off when equal weights of sulphur, phosphorus, and carbon are thoroughly burned?
Answer: An inhabitant of cold climates (called Frigid Zoans) eats fat principally because he can't get no lean, also because he wants to rise is temperature. But if equal weights of sulphur phosphorus and carbon are burned in his neighbourhood he will give off eating quite so much. The relative quantities of eat given off will depend upon how much sulphur etc. is burnt and how near it is burned to him. If I knew these facts it would be an easy sum to find the answer.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 183, Question 32. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Burning (17)  |  Carbon (48)  |  Climate (38)  |  Cold (38)  |  Eating (21)  |  Emission (16)  |  Equal (53)  |  Examination (60)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fat (10)  |  Finding (30)  |  Heat (90)  |  Howler (15)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Lean (6)  |  Neighborhood (7)  |  Phosphorus (15)  |  Quantity (35)  |  Question (315)  |  Relative (24)  |  Sulphur (15)  |  Sum (30)  |  Temperature (42)  |  Weight (61)  |  Zone (4)

A noteworthy and often-remarked similarity exists between the facts and methods of geology and those of linguistic study. The science of language is, as it were, the geology of the most modern period, the Age of the Man, having for its task to construct the history of development of the earth and its inhabitants from the time when the proper geological record remains silent … The remains of ancient speech are like strata deposited in bygone ages, telling of the forms of life then existing, and of the circumstances which determined or affected them; while words are as rolled pebbles, relics of yet more ancient formations, or as fossils, whose grade indicates the progress of organic life, and whose resemblances and relations show the correspondence or sequence of the different strata; while, everywhere, extensive denudation has marred the completeness of the record, and rendered impossible a detailed exhibition of the whole course of development.
In Language and the Study of Language (1867), 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (137)  |  Ancient (68)  |  Construction (69)  |  Denudation (2)  |  Development (228)  |  Earth (487)  |  Fact (609)  |  Formation (54)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Geology (187)  |  History (302)  |  Language (155)  |  Life (917)  |  Man (345)  |  Method (154)  |  Modern (104)  |  Organic (48)  |  Pebble (17)  |  Period (49)  |  Progress (317)  |  Record (56)  |  Sequence (32)  |  Speech (40)  |  Stratum (7)  |  Task (68)  |  Word (221)

According to Herr Cook's observation, the inhabitants of New Guinea have something they set light to which burns up almost like gunpowder. They also put it into hollow staves, and from a distance you could believe they are shooting. But it does not produce so much as a bang. Presumably they are trying to imitate the Europeans. They have failed to realize its real purpose.
Aphorism 27 in Notebook D (1773-1775), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropology (51)  |  Europe (32)  |  Gunpowder (11)  |  Imitation (17)  |  New Guinea (2)  |  Rifle (2)  |  Shooting (6)

Every inhabitant of this planet must contemplate the day when this planet may no longer be habitable. Every man, woman and child lives under a nuclear sword of Damocles, hanging by the slenderest of threads, capable of being cut at any moment by accident or miscalculation or by madness. The weapons of war must be abolished before they abolish us.
Address to the United Nations General Assembly, (25 Sep 1961). On U.S. Department of State website.
Science quotes on:  |  Abolish (11)  |  Accident (54)  |  Atomic Bomb (101)  |  Contemplating (2)  |  Habitable (3)  |  Hanging (4)  |  Life (917)  |  Madness (26)  |  Nuclear (24)  |  Planet (199)  |  Thread (14)  |  War (144)  |  Weapon (57)

Genius, like the inhabitants of the depths of the sea, moves by its own light.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Depth (32)  |  Genius (186)  |  Light (246)  |  Move (58)  |  Sea (143)

Genius, without religion, is only a lamp on the outer gate of a palace. It may serve to cast a gleam of light on those that are without while the inhabitant sits in darkness.
Louis Klopsch, Many Thoughts of Many Minds (1896), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Cast (15)  |  Darkness (25)  |  Gate (8)  |  Genius (186)  |  Gleam (9)  |  Lamp (12)  |  Light (246)  |  Outer (7)  |  Palace (6)  |  Religion (210)  |  Serve (34)  |  Sit (24)

Human personality resembles a coral reef: a large hard/dead structure built and inhabited by tiny soft/live animals. The hard/dead part of our personality consists of habits, memories, and compulsions and will probably be explained someday by some sort of extended computer metaphor. The soft/live part of personality consists of moment-to-moment direct experience of being. This aspect of personality is familiar but somewhat ineffable and has eluded all attempts at physical explanation.
Quoted in article 'Nick Herbert', in Gale Cengage Learning, Contemporary Authors Online (2002).
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Aspect (37)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Being (39)  |  Build (80)  |  Compulsion (11)  |  Computer (84)  |  Coral Reef (7)  |  Dead (45)  |  Direct (44)  |  Elude (2)  |  Experience (268)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Extend (20)  |  Familiar (22)  |  Habit (78)  |  Hard (70)  |  Human (445)  |  Ineffable (2)  |  Large (82)  |  Life (917)  |  Memory (81)  |  Metaphor (19)  |  Moment (61)  |  Personality (40)  |  Physical (94)  |  Probability (83)  |  Resemblance (18)  |  Soft (10)  |  Someday (4)  |  Structure (191)  |  Tiny (25)

It is known that there are an infinite number of worlds, simply because there is an infinite amount of space for them to be in. However, not every one of them is inhabited. Therefore, there must be a finite number of inhabited worlds. Any finite number divided by infinity is as near to nothing as makes no odds, so the average population of all the planets in the Universe can be said to be zero. From this it follows that the population of the whole Universe is also zero, and that any people you may meet from time to time are merely the products of a deranged imagination.
In The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (1980, 2005), 142-143. Slightly revised from 'Fit the Fifth', The Original Hitchhiker Radio Scripts (1985), 102. The show was recorded for the BBC on 21 Feb 1978.
Science quotes on:  |  Deranged (2)  |  Division (27)  |  Finite (22)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Meet (16)  |  Number (179)  |  Planet (199)  |  Population (71)  |  Universe (563)  |  World (667)  |  Zero (15)

It is of priceless value to the human race to know that the sun will supply the needs of the earth, as to light and heat, for millions of years; that the stars are not lanterns hung out at night, but are suns like our own; and that numbers of them probably have planets revolving around them, perhaps in many cases with inhabitants adapted to the conditions existing there. In a sentence, the main purpose of the science is to learn the truth about the stellar universe; to increase human knowledge concerning our surroundings, and to widen the limits of intellectual life.
In 'The Nature of the Astronomer’s Work', North American Review (Jun 1908), 187, No. 631, 915.
Science quotes on:  |  Condition (119)  |  Earth (487)  |  Hang (13)  |  Heat (90)  |  Human Race (49)  |  Increase (107)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Lantern (5)  |  Learn (160)  |  Life (917)  |  Light (246)  |  Limit (86)  |  Million (89)  |  Need (211)  |  Night (73)  |  Planet (199)  |  Priceless (4)  |  Probability (83)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Research (517)  |  Revolve (6)  |  Science (1699)  |  Star (251)  |  Stellar (3)  |  Sun (211)  |  Supply (31)  |  Surrounding (11)  |  Truth (750)  |  Universe (563)  |  Value (180)  |  Widen (3)  |  Year (214)

It is reported of Margaret Fuller that she said she accepted the universe. “Gad, she'd better!” retorted Carlyle. Carlyle himself did not accept the universe in a very whole-hearted manner. Looking up at the midnight stars, he exclaimed: “A sad spectacle! If they be inhabited, what a scope for misery and folly; if they be na inhabited, what a waste of space!”
Opening paragraph of book of collected essays, Accepting the Universe (1920), 3. “‘I accept the universe’ is reported to have been a favorite utterance of our New England transcendentalist, Margaret Fuller…” was stated by William James in The Varieties of Religious Experience (1902), 41. James continues, “and when some one repeated this phrase to Thomas Carlyle, his sardonic comment is said to have been: ‘Gad! she'd better!’” Note that James does not here merge Carlyle's remark about the universe. Burroughs’ attribution of the “sad spectacle” quote is, so far, the earliest found by the Webmaster, who has not located it in a printed work by Carlisle himself. If you know a primary source, or earlier attribution, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (41)  |  Exclamation (2)  |  Folly (27)  |  Margaret Fuller (3)  |  Midnight (7)  |  Misery (19)  |  Report (31)  |  Retort (2)  |  Sadness (26)  |  Space (154)  |  Spectacle (11)  |  Star (251)  |  Universe (563)  |  Waste (57)

Organized Fossils are to the naturalist as coins to the antiquary; they are the antiquities of the earth; and very distinctly show its gradual regular formation, with the various changes inhabitants in the watery element.
Stratigraphical System of Organized Fossils (1817), ix-x.
Science quotes on:  |  Antiquary (2)  |  Antiquity (12)  |  Change (291)  |  Coin (9)  |  Formation (54)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Naturalist (49)  |  Organization (79)  |  Water (244)

The Almighty lecturer, by displaying the principles of science in the structure of the universe, has invited man to study and to imitation. It is as if he had said to the inhabitants of this globe that we call ours, “I have made an earth for man to dwell upon, and I have rendered the starry heavens visible, to teach him science and the arts. He can now provide for his own comfort, and learn from my munificence to all, to be kind to all, to be kind to each other.”
In The Age of Reason: Being an Investigation of True and Fabulous Theology (27 Jan O.S. 1794), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Almighty (8)  |  Comfort (42)  |  Display (22)  |  Dwell (8)  |  Earth (487)  |  Globe (39)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Imitation (17)  |  Invitation (8)  |  Kindness (10)  |  Lecturer (7)  |  Made (14)  |  Principle (228)  |  Provide (48)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Star (251)  |  Structure (191)  |  Study (331)  |  Teaching (99)  |  Universe (563)

The attainment of knowledge is the high and exclusive attribute of man, among the numberless myriads of animated beings, inhabitants of the terrestrial globe. On him alone is bestowed, by the bounty of the Creator of the universe, the power and the capacity of acquiring knowledge. Knowledge is the attribute of his nature which at once enables him to improve his condition upon earth, and to prepare him for the enjoyment of a happier existence hereafter.
Report, as chairman of a committee, on the establishment of the Smithsonian Institution (Jan 1836). In Josiah Quincy, Memoir of the life of John Quincy Adams (1858), 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquiring (5)  |  Alone (61)  |  Animated (4)  |  Attainment (35)  |  Attribute (22)  |  Being (39)  |  Bounty (2)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Condition (119)  |  Creator (40)  |  Earth (487)  |  Enable (25)  |  Enjoyment (27)  |  Exclusive (9)  |  Existence (254)  |  Globe (39)  |  High (78)  |  Improve (39)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Myriad (18)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Numberless (3)  |  Power (273)  |  Prepare (19)  |  Terrestrial (14)  |  Universe (563)

The bushels of rings taken from the fingers of the slain at the battle of Cannζ, above two thousand years ago, are recorded; … but the bushels of corn produced in England at this day, or the number of the inhabitants of the country, are unknown, at the very time that we are debating that most important question, whether or not there is sufficient substance for those who live in the kingdom.
In The Statistical Breviary: Shewing, on a Principle Entirely New, the Resources of Every State and Kingdom in Europe (1801), 7-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Battle (30)  |  Bushel (3)  |  Corn (10)  |  Country (121)  |  Debate (19)  |  England (31)  |  Importance (183)  |  Kingdom (34)  |  Number (179)  |  Produce (63)  |  Question (315)  |  Record (56)  |  Ring (14)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Substance (73)  |  Sufficient (24)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Unknown (87)  |  Year (214)

The earth lies polluted under its inhabitants; for they have transgressed laws, violated the statutes, broken the everlasting covenant. Therefore a curse devours the earth, and its inhabitants suffer for their guilt.
Bible
Isaiah 24:5-6 in Holy Bible: New Revised Standard Version (2011), 504.
Science quotes on:  |  Climate Change (56)  |  Curse (9)  |  Devour (10)  |  Earth (487)  |  Everlasting (5)  |  Global Warming (26)  |  Guilt (8)  |  Law (418)  |  Pollution (37)  |  Statute (2)  |  Suffering (26)  |  Violation (6)

The material world is only the shell of the universe: the world of life are its inhabitants.
From The Spectator (25 Oct 1712), No. 519, collected in The Works of the Right Honorable Joseph Addison (1721), Vol. 4, 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Biology (150)  |  Life (917)  |  Material (124)  |  Shell (35)  |  Universe (563)  |  World (667)

Think of the image of the world in a convex mirror. ... A well-made convex mirror of moderate aperture represents the objects in front of it as apparently solid and in fixed positions behind its surface. But the images of the distant horizon and of the sun in the sky lie behind the mirror at a limited distance, equal to its focal length. Between these and the surface of the mirror are found the images of all the other objects before it, but the images are diminished and flattened in proportion to the distance of their objects from the mirror. ... Yet every straight line or plane in the outer world is represented by a straight line or plane in the image. The image of a man measuring with a rule a straight line from the mirror, would contract more and more the farther he went, but with his shrunken rule the man in the image would count out exactly the same results as in the outer world, all lines of sight in the mirror would be represented by straight lines of sight in the mirror. In short, I do not see how men in the mirror are to discover that their bodies are not rigid solids and their experiences good examples of the correctness of Euclidean axioms. But if they could look out upon our world as we look into theirs without overstepping the boundary, they must declare it to be a picture in a spherical mirror, and would speak of us just as we speak of them; and if two inhabitants of the different worlds could communicate with one another, neither, as far as I can see, would be able to convince the other that he had the true, the other the distorted, relation. Indeed I cannot see that such a question would have any meaning at all, so long as mechanical considerations are not mixed up with it.
In 'On the Origin and Significance of Geometrical Axioms,' Popular Scientific Lectures< Second Series (1881), 57-59. In Robert Γ‰douard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica (1914), 357-358.
Science quotes on:  |  Axiom (26)  |  Behind (25)  |  Boundary (27)  |  Convex (2)  |  Distortion (10)  |  Euclid (28)  |  Experience (268)  |  Horizon (13)  |  Image (38)  |  Line (44)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Mirror (21)  |  Object (110)  |  Solid (34)  |  Surface (74)  |  World (667)

This is the kingdom of the chemical elements, the substances from which everything tangible is made. It is not an extensive country, for it consists of only a hundred or so regions (as we shall often term the elements), yet it accounts for everything material in our actual world. From the hundred elements that are at the center of our story, all planets, rocks, vegetation, and animals are made. These elements are the basis of the air, the oceans, and the Earth itself. We stand on the elements, we eat the elements, we are the elements. Because our brains are made up of elements, even our opinions are, in a sense, properties of the elements and hence inhabitants of the kingdom.
In 'The Terrain', The Periodic Kingdom: A Journey Into the Land of the Chemical Elements (1995), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (34)  |  Air (151)  |  Animal (309)  |  Basis (60)  |  Brain (181)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Earth (487)  |  Eat (38)  |  Element (129)  |  Hundred (46)  |  Kingdom (34)  |  Material (124)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Planet (199)  |  Property (96)  |  Rock (107)  |  Sense (240)  |  Stand (60)  |  Story (58)  |  Substance (73)  |  Tangible (4)  |  Term (87)  |  Vegetation (16)  |  World (667)

When the morning breezes blow toward the town at sunrise, if they bring with them mists from marshes and, mingled with the mist, the poisonous breath of the creatures of the marshes to be wafted into the bodies of the inhabitants, they will make the site unhealthy.
Vitruvius
In De Architectura, Book 1, Chap 4, Sec. 1. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Blow (13)  |  Body (193)  |  Breath (24)  |  Breeze (3)  |  Creature (127)  |  Disease (257)  |  Malaria (8)  |  Marsh (5)  |  Mingle (6)  |  Mist (4)  |  Morning (31)  |  Poisonous (3)  |  Site (11)  |  Sunrise (7)  |  Town (18)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.