Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, ... finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell ... whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Summer

Summer Quotes (54 quotes)

A small cabin stands in the Glacier Peak Wilderness, about a hundred yards off a trail that crosses the Cascade Range. In midsummer, the cabin looked strange in the forest. It was only twelve feet square, but it rose fully two stories and then had a high and steeply peaked roof. From the ridge of the roof, moreover, a ten-foot pole stuck straight up. Tied to the top of the pole was a shovel. To hikers shedding their backpacks at the door of the cabin on a cold summer evening—as the five of us did—it was somewhat unnerving to look up and think of people walking around in snow perhaps thirty-five feet above, hunting for that shovel, then digging their way down to the threshold.
In Encounters with the Archdruid (1971), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Cabin (4)  |  Cascade (3)  |  Cold (112)  |  Cross (16)  |  Dig (21)  |  Digging (11)  |  Door (93)  |  Down (456)  |  Five (16)  |  Foot (60)  |  Forest (150)  |  Fully (21)  |  Glacier (17)  |  High (362)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Hunt (30)  |  Hunting (23)  |  Look (582)  |  Midsummer (2)  |  Moreover (3)  |  Peak (20)  |  People (1005)  |  Pole (46)  |  Range (99)  |  Ridge (7)  |  Rise (166)  |  Roof (13)  |  Rose (34)  |  Shed (5)  |  Small (477)  |  Snow (37)  |  Square (70)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stick (24)  |  Story (118)  |  Straight (73)  |  Strange (157)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thirty-Five (2)  |  Threshold (10)  |  Tie (38)  |  Top (96)  |  Trail (10)  |  Two (937)  |  Walk (124)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wilderness (45)  |  Yard (7)

All the summer long is the swallow a most instructive pattern of unwearied industry and affection; for, from morning to night, while there is a family to be supported, she spends the whole day in skimming close to the ground, and exerting the most sudden turns and quick evolutions. Avenues, and long walks under hedges, and pasture-fields, and mown meadows where cattle graze, are her delight, especially if there are trees interspersed; because in such spots insects most abound. When a fly is taken a smart snap from her bill is heard, resembling the noise at the shutting of a watch case; but the motion of the mandibles are too quick for the eye.
In Letter to Daines Barrington (29 Jan 1774), in In The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne (1789), 169-170.
Science quotes on:  |  Abound (17)  |  Affection (43)  |  All (4108)  |  Avenue (14)  |  Cattle (18)  |  Delight (108)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  Family (94)  |  Field (364)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Ground (217)  |  Industry (137)  |  Insect (77)  |  Long (790)  |  Meadow (18)  |  Morning (94)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Noise (37)  |  Pasture (13)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Smart (26)  |  Snap (7)  |  Spend (95)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Support (147)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Tree (246)  |  Turn (447)  |  Walk (124)  |  Watch (109)  |  Whole (738)

An animal might be frozen to death in the midst of summer by repeatedly sprinkling ether upon him, for its evaporation would shortly carry off the whole of his vital heat.
From 'Artist and Mechanic', The artist & Tradesman’s Guide: embracing some leading facts & principles of science, and a variety of matter adapted to the wants of the artist, mechanic, manufacturer, and mercantile community (1827), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Carry (127)  |  Death (388)  |  Ether (35)  |  Evaporation (7)  |  Frozen (2)  |  Heat (174)  |  Latent Heat (7)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Sprinkle (3)  |  Vital (85)  |  Whole (738)

Animals generally seem naturally disposed to … intercourse at about the same period of the year, and that is when winter is changing into summer…. In the human species, the male experiences more under sexual excitement in winter, and the female in summer.
Aristotle
In The Works of Aristotle: Historia Animalium (350 BC), (The History of Animals), Book V, Part 8, 542a20 translated in William David Ross and John Alexander Smith (eds.), D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson (trans.), (1910), Vol. 4, 27-28
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Change (593)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Experience (467)  |  Female (50)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intercourse (4)  |  Male (26)  |  More (2559)  |  Period (198)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Sexual (26)  |  Sexuality (11)  |  Species (401)  |  Winter (44)  |  Year (933)

At the bottom of every leaf-stem is a cradle, and in it is an infant germ; the winds will rock it, the birds will sing to it all summer long, but the next season it will unfold and go alone.
In Proverbs from Plymouth Pulpit (1887), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Bird (149)  |  Cradle (19)  |  Germ (53)  |  Infant (26)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Long (790)  |  Next (236)  |  Rock (161)  |  Rocking (2)  |  Season (47)  |  Song (37)  |  Stem (31)  |  Unfolding (16)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)

Basic research at universities comes in two varieties: research that requires big bucks and research that requires small bucks. Big bucks research is much like government research and in fact usually is government research but done for the government under contract. Like other government research, big bucks academic research is done to understand the nature and structure of the universe or to understand life, which really means that it is either for blowing up the world or extending life, whichever comes first. Again, that's the government's motivation. The universities' motivation for conducting big bucks research is to bring money in to support professors and graduate students and to wax the floors of ivy-covered buildings. While we think they are busy teaching and learning, these folks are mainly doing big bucks basic research for a living, all the while priding themselves on their terrific summer vacations and lack of a dress code.
Smalls bucks research is the sort of thing that requires paper and pencil, and maybe a blackboard, and is aimed primarily at increasing knowledge in areas of study that don't usually attract big bucks - that is, areas that don't extend life or end it, or both. History, political science, and romance languages are typically small bucks areas of basic research. The real purpose of small bucks research to the universities is to provide a means of deciding, by the quality of their small bucks research, which professors in these areas should get tenure.
Accidental Empires (1992), 78.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Academic (18)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Basic (138)  |  Basic Research (14)  |  Blackboard (11)  |  Blowing (22)  |  Both (493)  |  Building (156)  |  Code (31)  |  Doing (280)  |  End (590)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Government (110)  |  Graduate (29)  |  Graduate Student (11)  |  History (673)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lack (119)  |  Language (293)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Money (170)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Political (121)  |  Political Science (2)  |  Professor (128)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quality (135)  |  Require (219)  |  Research (664)  |  Romance (15)  |  Science (3879)  |  Small (477)  |  Structure (344)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Support (147)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Tenure (7)  |  Terrific (4)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  University (121)  |  Usually (176)  |  Wax (13)  |  World (1774)

Birds sing sweetly; but someone awakened by them at 5 A.M. of a summer morning might dispute the adverb.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 197.
Science quotes on:  |  Adverb (2)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Bird (149)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Morning (94)  |  Ornithology (21)  |  Sing (26)

Creatures that by a rule in nature teach
The act of order to a peopled kingdom.
They have a king and officers of sorts;
Where some, like magistrates, correct at home,
Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad,
Others, like soldiers, armed in their stings,
Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds;
Which pillage they with merry march bring home
To the tent-royal of their emperor.
Who, busied in his majesty, surveys
The singing masons building roofs of gold;
The civil citizens kneading up the honey;
The poor mechanic porters crowding
Their heavy burdens at his narrow gate;
The sad-eyed justice, with his surly hum,
Delivering o'er to executors pale
The lazy yawning drone.
Henry V (1599), I, ii.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abroad (18)  |  Act (272)  |  Arm (81)  |  Building (156)  |  Burden (27)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Civil (26)  |  Creature (233)  |  Drone (4)  |  Emperor (6)  |  Gate (32)  |  Gold (97)  |  Home (170)  |  Honey (15)  |  Justice (39)  |  King (35)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Magistrate (2)  |  Majesty (21)  |  March (46)  |  Mason (2)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Merchant (6)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Officer (12)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poor (136)  |  Porter (2)  |  Roof (13)  |  Royal (57)  |  Rule (294)  |  Singing (19)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Sting (3)  |  Survey (33)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Tent (11)  |  Velvet (4)

Do what we can, summer will have its flies.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Fly (146)  |  Will (2355)

During my stay in London I resided for a considerable time in Clapham Road in the neighbourhood of Clapham Common... One fine summer evening I was returning by the last bus 'outside' as usual, through the deserted streets of the city, which are at other times so full of life. I fell into a reverie (Träumerei), and 10, the atoms were gambolling before my eyes! Whenever, hitherto, these diminutive beings had appeared to me, they had always been in motion: but up to that time I had never been able to discern the nature of their motion. Now, however, I saw how, frequently, two smaller atoms united to form a pair: how the larger one embraced the two smaller ones: how still larger ones kept hold of three or even four of the smaller: whilst the whole kept whirling in a giddy dance. I saw how the larger ones formed a chain, dragging the smaller ones after them but only at the ends of the chain. I saw what our past master, Kopp, my highly honoured teacher and friend has depicted with such charm in his Molekular-Welt: but I saw it long before him. The cry of the conductor 'Clapham Road', awakened me from my dreaming: but I spent part of the night in putting on paper at least sketches of these dream forms. This was the origin of the 'Structural Theory'.
Kekule at Benzolfest in Berichte (1890), 23, 1302.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chain (50)  |  Charm (51)  |  City (78)  |  Common (436)  |  Compound (113)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Cry (29)  |  Dance (32)  |  Desert (56)  |  Discern (33)  |  Dragging (6)  |  Dream (208)  |  End (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  Form (959)  |  Friend (168)  |  Honour (56)  |  Hermann Franz Moritz Kopp (2)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Master (178)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outside (141)  |  Paper (182)  |  Past (337)  |  Saw (160)  |  Spent (85)  |  Still (613)  |  Structural (29)  |  Structure (344)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Whole (738)

Exits sun; enters moon.
This moon is never alone.
Stars are seen all around.
These twinklers do not make a sound.
The tiny ones shine from their place.
Mother moon watches with a smiling face.
Its light is soothing to the eyes.
Night’s darkness hides its face.
Cool and calm is its light.
Heat and sweat are never felt.
Some days, moon is not seen.
Makes kids wonder, where had it been?
Partial eclipse shades the moon.
In summers it does not arrive soon.
Beautiful is this milky ball.
It is the love of one and all.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Ball (62)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Calm (31)  |  Cool (13)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eclipse (23)  |  Enter (141)  |  Exit (4)  |  Eye (419)  |  Face (212)  |  Feel (367)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hide (69)  |  Kid (15)  |  Light (607)  |  Love (309)  |  Moon (237)  |  Mother (114)  |  Never (1087)  |  Night (120)  |  Partial (10)  |  Place (177)  |  See (1081)  |  Shade (31)  |  Shine (45)  |  Smile (31)  |  Soon (186)  |  Soothing (3)  |  Sound (183)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sweat (15)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Watch (109)  |  Wonder (236)

For the time of making Observations none can ever be amiss; there being no season, nor indeed hardly any place where in some Natural Thing or other does not present it self worthy of Remark: yea there are some things that require Observation all the Year round, as Springs, Rivers, &c. Nor is there any Season amiss for the gathering Natural Things. Bodies of one kind or other presenting themselves at all times, and in Winter as well as Summer.
In Brief Instructions for Making Observations in all Parts of the World (1696), 10-11.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Kind (557)  |  Making (300)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Present (619)  |  Require (219)  |  River (119)  |  Season (47)  |  Self (267)  |  Spring (133)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Winter (44)  |  Year (933)

Geology ... offers always some material for observation. ... [When] spring and summer come round, how easily may the hammer be buckled round the waist, and the student emerge from the dust of town into the joyous air of the country, for a few delightful hours among the rocks.
In The Story of a Boulder: or, Gleanings from the Note-book of a Field Geologist (1858), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Buckle (4)  |  Count (105)  |  Country (251)  |  Delight (108)  |  Delightful (17)  |  Dust (64)  |  Ease (35)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Geology (220)  |  Hammer (25)  |  Hour (186)  |  Joy (107)  |  Material (353)  |  Observation (555)  |  Offer (141)  |  Rock (161)  |  Season (47)  |  Spring (133)  |  Student (300)  |  Town (27)  |  Waist (2)  |  Year (933)

He had been eight years upon a project for extracting sunbeams out of cucumbers, which were to be put into vials hermetically sealed, and let out to warm the air in raw, inclement summers.
Travels Into Several Remote Nations of the World, by Lemuel Gulliver (1726), Vol. 1, 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Cucumber (4)  |  Project (73)  |  Raw (28)  |  Seal (18)  |  Vial (4)  |  Warm (69)  |  Year (933)

I always love geology. In winter, particularly, it is pleasant to listen to theories about the great mountains one visited in the summer; or about the Flood or volcanoes; about great catastrophes or about blisters; above all about fossils … Everywhere there are hypotheses, but nowhere truths; many workmen, but no experts; priests, but no God. In these circumstances each man can bring his hypothesis like a candle to a burning altar, and on seeing his candle lit declare ‘Smoke for smoke, sir, mine is better than yours’. It is precisely for this reason that I love geology.
In Nouvelles Genevoises (1910), 306. First edition, 1841.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Altar (10)  |  Better (486)  |  Blister (2)  |  Bring (90)  |  Burning (48)  |  Candle (30)  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Declare (45)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Expert (65)  |  Flood (50)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Geology (220)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Light (607)  |  Listen (73)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mine (76)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Priest (28)  |  Reason (744)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Visit (26)  |  Volcano (39)  |  Winter (44)  |  Workman (13)

I have known silence: the cold earthy silence at the bottom of a newly dug well; the implacable stony silence of a deep cave; the hot, drugged midday silence when everything is hypnotised and stilled into silence by the eye of the sun;… I have heard summer cicadas cry so that the sound seems stitched into your bones. I have heard tree frogs in an orchestration as complicated as Bach singing in a forest lit by a million emerald fireflies. I have heard the Keas calling over grey glaciers that groaned to themselves like old people as they inched their way to the sea. I have heard the hoarse street vendor cries of the mating Fur seals as they sang to their sleek golden wives, the crisp staccato admonishment of the Rattlesnake, the cobweb squeak of the Bat and the belling roar of the Red deer knee-deep in purple heather.
Letter to Lee McGeorge (31 Jul 1978). Collected in Letters of Note: Volume 2: An Eclectic Collection of Correspondence (2016), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Bach (7)  |  Bat (10)  |  Bone (95)  |  Cave (15)  |  Cicada (3)  |  Cobweb (6)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Cry (29)  |  Deep (233)  |  Deer (9)  |  Everything (476)  |  Eye (419)  |  Firefly (7)  |  Forest (150)  |  Frog (38)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Golden (45)  |  Groan (5)  |  Hot (60)  |  Implacable (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Midday (4)  |  Old (481)  |  Orchestration (2)  |  People (1005)  |  Rattlesnake (2)  |  Roar (5)  |  Sea (308)  |  Seal (18)  |  Silence (56)  |  Sing (26)  |  Singing (19)  |  Sound (183)  |  Squeak (2)  |  Staccato (2)  |  Still (613)  |  Sun (385)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Tree (246)  |  Tree Frog (2)  |  Way (1217)

I think that I shall never see
A poem as lovely as a tree.
A tree whose hungry mouth is prest
Against the earth’s sweet flowing breast;
A tree that looks at God all day,
And lifts her leafy arms to pray;
A tree that may in Summer wear
A nest of robins in her hair;
Upon whose bosom snow has lain;
Who intimately lives with rain.
Poems are made by fools like me,
But only God can make a tree.
Trees and Other Poems (1914), 19.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Bosom (13)  |  Branch (150)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fool (116)  |  God (757)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Lift (55)  |  Live (628)  |  Look (582)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Nest (23)  |  Never (1087)  |  Poem (96)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Rain (62)  |  Robin (4)  |  See (1081)  |  Snow (37)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tree (246)

If basketball was going to enable Bradley to make friends, to prove that a banker’s son is as good as the next fellow, to prove that he could do without being the greatest-end-ever at Missouri, to prove that he was not chicken, and to live up to his mother’s championship standards, and if he was going to have some moments left over to savor his delight in the game, he obviously needed considerable practice, so he borrowed keys to the gym and set a schedule for himself that he adhereded to for four full years—in the school year, three and a half hours every day after school, nine to five on Saturday, one-thirty to five on Sunday, and, in the summer, about three hours a day.
A Sense of Where You Are: Bill Bradley at Princeton
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Basketball (3)  |  Being (1278)  |  Borrow (30)  |  Bradley (2)  |  Championship (2)  |  Chicken (8)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Delight (108)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enable (119)  |  End (590)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Five (16)  |  Friend (168)  |  Full (66)  |  Game (101)  |  Good (889)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Gym (2)  |  Half (56)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hour (186)  |  Key (50)  |  Leave (130)  |  Live (628)  |  Moment (253)  |  Mother (114)  |  Need (290)  |  Next (236)  |  Nine To Five (3)  |  Obviously (11)  |  Practice (204)  |  Prove (250)  |  Saturday (11)  |  Schedule (5)  |  School (219)  |  Set (394)  |  Son (24)  |  Standard (57)  |  Sunday (7)  |  Year (933)

In the summer after kindergarten, a friend introduced me to the joys of building plastic model airplanes and warships. By the fourth grade, I graduated to an erector set and spent many happy hours constructing devices of unknown purpose where the main design criterion was to maximize the number of moving parts and overall size. The living room rug was frequently littered with hundreds of metal “girders” and tiny nuts and bolts surrounding half-finished structures. An understanding mother allowed me to keep the projects going for days on end.
Autobiography in Gösta Ekspong (ed.), Nobel Lectures: Physics 1996-2000 (2002), 116.
Science quotes on:  |  Airplane (41)  |  Bolt (9)  |  Building (156)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Design (195)  |  Device (70)  |  End (590)  |  Finish (59)  |  Friend (168)  |  Happy (105)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Joy (107)  |  Kindergarten (5)  |  Litter (5)  |  Living (491)  |  Meccano (5)  |  Metal (84)  |  Model (102)  |  Mother (114)  |  Number (699)  |  Overall (9)  |  Plastic (28)  |  Project (73)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Set (394)  |  Spent (85)  |  Structure (344)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unknown (182)

In the summer of 1937, … I told Banach about an expression Johnny [von Neumann] had once used in conversation with me in Princeton before stating some non-Jewish mathematician’s result, “Die Goim haben den folgendenSatzbewiesen” (The goys have proved the following theorem). Banach, who was pure goy, thought it was one of the funniest sayings he had ever heard. He was enchanted by its implication that if the goys could do it, Johnny and I ought to be able to do it better. Johnny did not invent this joke, but he liked it and we started using it.
In Adventures of a Mathematician (1976, 1991), 107. Von Neumann, who was raised in Budapest by a Jewish family, knew the Yiddish word “goy” was equivalent to “gentile” or a non-Jew. Stefan Banach, a Polish mathematician, was raised in a Catholic family, hence “pure goy”. Ulam thus gives us the saying so often elsewhere seen attributed to von Neumann without the context: “The goys have proved the following theorem.” It is seen anecdotally as stated by von Neumann to begin a classroom lecture.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Better (486)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enchanted (2)  |  Expression (175)  |  Funny (11)  |  Implication (23)  |  Invent (51)  |  Jewish (15)  |  Joke (83)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Originate (36)  |  Princeton (4)  |  Prove (250)  |  Pure (291)  |  Result (677)  |  Sayings (2)  |  Start (221)  |  State (491)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Thought (953)  |  John von Neumann (28)

In this House on July 24, 1895 the Secret of Dreams was revealed to Dr. Sigmund Freud.
Plaque was placed on 6 May 1977 at Bellevue (a house on the slopes of the Wienerwald) where the Freud family spent their summers.
From a letter to Wilhelm Fliess, 20 Jun 1900. Quoted in Ernst L. Freud (ed.), Letters of Sigmund Freud 1873-1939 (1961), 250.
Science quotes on:  |  Dream (208)  |  Family (94)  |  House (140)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Secret (194)  |  Slope (9)  |  Spent (85)

It is a happy world after all. The air, the earth, the water teem with delighted existence. In a spring noon, or a summer evening, on whichever side I turn my eyes, myriads of happy beings crowd upon my view. “The insect youth are on the wing.” Swarms of new-born flies are trying their pinions in the air. Their sportive motions, their wanton mazes, their gratuitous activity testify their joy and the exultation they feel in their lately discovered faculties … The whole winged insect tribe, it is probable, are equally intent upon their proper employments, and under every variety of constitution, gratified, and perhaps equally gratified, by the offices which the author of their nature has assigned to them.
Natural Theology: or, Evidences of the Existence and Attributes of The Deity, Collected from the Appearances of Nature (1802), 490-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Assignment (12)  |  Author (167)  |  Being (1278)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Delight (108)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Earth (996)  |  Employment (32)  |  Equality (31)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evening (12)  |  Existence (456)  |  Exultation (4)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fly (146)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Happy (105)  |  Insect (77)  |  Intent (8)  |  Joy (107)  |  Lateness (4)  |  Maze (10)  |  Motion (310)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  New-born (2)  |  Noon (14)  |  Office (71)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proper (144)  |  Properness (2)  |  Side (233)  |  Sport (22)  |  Spring (133)  |  Swarm (14)  |  Teeming (5)  |  Testament (4)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Turn (447)  |  Variety (132)  |  View (488)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wing (75)  |  World (1774)  |  Youth (101)

It is one of the striking generalizations of biochemistry—which surprisingly is hardly ever mentioned in the biochemical text-books—that the twenty amino acids and the four bases, are, with minor reservations, the same throughout Nature. As far as I am aware the presently accepted set of twenty amino acids was first drawn up by Watson and myself in the summer of 1953 in response to a letter of Gamow's.
'On the Genetic Code', Nobel Lecture, 11 December 1962. In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1942-1962 (1964), 811.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Acid (83)  |  Amino Acid (11)  |  Base (117)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Book (392)  |  First (1283)  |  George Gamow (12)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Letter (109)  |  Mention (82)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Response (53)  |  Set (394)  |  Striking (48)  |  Throughout (98)  |  James Watson (33)

It was to Hofmeister, working as a young man, an amateur and enthusiast, in the early morning hours of summer months, before business, at Leipzig in the years before 1851, that the vision first appeared of a common type of Life-Cycle, running through Mosses and Ferns to Gymnosperms and Flowering Plants, linking the whole series in one scheme of reproduction and life-history.
(1919). As quoted in E.J.H. Corner, The Life of Plants (1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Amateur (19)  |  Business (149)  |  Common (436)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Early (185)  |  Enthusiast (7)  |  Fern (9)  |  First (1283)  |  Flower (106)  |  History (673)  |  Wilhelm Hofmeister (2)  |  Hour (186)  |  Life (1795)  |  Life Cycle (4)  |  Life History (2)  |  Linking (8)  |  Man (2251)  |  Month (88)  |  Morning (94)  |  Moss (10)  |  Plant (294)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Running (61)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Series (149)  |  Through (849)  |  Type (167)  |  Vision (123)  |  Whole (738)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)

Jupiter was very large and bright. Apparently, there was a small reddish star appended to its side. This is called “an alliance.”
[Observation in summer 365 B.C., speculated to be of Ganymede.]
Gan De
In the lost book Suixing Jing (Treatise on Jupiter), quoted in the extensive compilation Kaiyuan Zhanjing, (The Kaiyuan Treatise on Astrology (compiled 718-726). As given Helaine Selin, Encyclopaedia of the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine in Non-Western Cultures (1997), 342. It has been speculated that it was the moon Ganymede beside Jupiter, by Xi Zezong in 'The Discovery of Jupiter’s Satellite Made by Gan De 2000 years Before Galileo,' Chinese Physics (1982), 2, No. 3, 664–67.
Science quotes on:  |  Alliance (5)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Bright (79)  |  Call (769)  |  Ganymede (2)  |  Jupiter (26)  |  Large (394)  |  Moon (237)  |  Observation (555)  |  Red (35)  |  Side (233)  |  Small (477)  |  Star (427)

Let Nature do your bottling and your pickling and preserving. For all Nature is doing her best each moment to make us well. She exists for no other end. Do not resist her. With the least inclination to be well, we should not be sick. Men have discovered—or think they have discovered—the salutariness of a few wild things only, and not of all nature. Why, “nature” is but another name for health, and the seasons are but different states of health. Some men think that they are not well in spring, or summer, or autumn, or winter; it is only because they are not well in them.
(23 Aug 1853). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: V: March 5-November 30, 1853 (1906), 395.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Autumn (9)  |  Best (459)  |  Bottle (15)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  End (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Health (193)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Moment (253)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pickle (3)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Preserving (18)  |  Resist (15)  |  Salutary (5)  |  Season (47)  |  Sick (81)  |  Spring (133)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Why (491)  |  Wild (87)  |  Winter (44)

Many animals even now spring out of the soil,
Coalescing from the rains and the heat of the sun.
Small wonder, then, if more and bigger creatures,
Full-formed, arose from the new young earth and sky.
The breed, for instance, of the dappled birds
Shucked off their eggshells in the springtime, as
Crickets in summer will slip their slight cocoons
All by themselves, and search for food and life.
Earth gave you, then, the first of mortal kinds,
For all the fields were soaked with warmth and moisture.
On the Nature of Things, trans. Anthony M. Esolen (1995), Book 5, lines 794-803, 181.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Bird (149)  |  Cocoon (3)  |  Creature (233)  |  Cricket (7)  |  Earth (996)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  Food (199)  |  Form (959)  |  Heat (174)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Moisture (20)  |  More (2559)  |  Mortal (54)  |  New (1216)  |  Rain (62)  |  Search (162)  |  Sky (161)  |  Small (477)  |  Soil (86)  |  Spring (133)  |  Springtime (5)  |  Sun (385)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Young (227)

Nature vibrates with rhythms, climatic and diastrophic, those finding stratigraphic expression ranging in period from the rapid oscillation of surface waters, recorded in ripple-mark, to those long-deferred stirrings of the deep imprisoned titans which have divided earth history into periods and eras. The flight of time is measured by the weaving of composite rhythms- day and night, calm and storm, summer and winter, birth and death such as these are sensed in the brief life of man. But the career of the earth recedes into a remoteness against which these lesser cycles are as unavailing for the measurement of that abyss of time as would be for human history the beating of an insect's wing. We must seek out, then, the nature of those longer rhythms whose very existence was unknown until man by the light of science sought to understand the earth. The larger of these must be measured in terms of the smaller, and the smaller must be measured in terms of years.
'Rhythm and the Measurement of Geologic Time', Bulletin of the Geological Society of America, 1917, 28,746.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abyss (29)  |  Against (332)  |  Birth (147)  |  Brief (36)  |  Calm (31)  |  Career (75)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Death (388)  |  Deep (233)  |  Divided (50)  |  Earth (996)  |  Era (51)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expression (175)  |  Flight (98)  |  Geology (220)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imprison (10)  |  Insect (77)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Oscillation (13)  |  Period (198)  |  Recede (11)  |  Record (154)  |  Remoteness (9)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Ripple (9)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Storm (51)  |  Surface (209)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Vibrate (7)  |  Water (481)  |  Weaving (5)  |  Wing (75)  |  Winter (44)  |  Year (933)

One evening at a Joint Summer Research Congerence in the early 1990’s Nicholai Reshetikhin and I [David Yetter] button-holed Flato, and explained at length Shum’s coherence theorem and the role of categories in “quantum knot invariants”. Flato was persistently dismissive of categories as a “mere language”. I retired for the evening, leaving Reshetikhin and Flato to the discussion. At the next morning’s session, Flato tapped me on the shoulder, and, giving a thumbs-up sign, whispered, “Hey! Viva les categories! These new ones, the braided monoidal ones.”
In David N. Yetter, Functorial Knot Theory: Categories of Tangles, Coherence, Categorical Deformations, and Topological Invariants (2001), 8. Yetter writes this personal anecdote is given as a narrative in his own words. Presumable the phrases in quotation marks are based on recollection when written years later.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Category (18)  |  Coherence (13)  |  David (6)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Early (185)  |  Explain (322)  |  Give (202)  |  Invariant (10)  |  Joint (31)  |  Knot (11)  |  Language (293)  |  Leave (130)  |  Length (23)  |  Mere (84)  |  Morning (94)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Research (664)  |  Retire (3)  |  Role (86)  |  Session (3)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Sign (58)  |  Tap (10)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Thumb (17)  |  Whisper (11)

One summer day, while I was walking along the country road on the farm where I was born, a section of the stone wall opposite me, and not more than three or four yards distant, suddenly fell down. Amid the general stillness and immobility about me the effect was quite startling. ... It was the sudden summing up of half a century or more of atomic changes in the material of the wall. A grain or two of sand yielded to the pressure of long years, and gravity did the rest.
Under the Apple-Trees (1916), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Century (310)  |  Change (593)  |  Country (251)  |  Down (456)  |  Effect (393)  |  Entropy (44)  |  Fall (230)  |  Farm (26)  |  General (511)  |  Grain (50)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Long (790)  |  Material (353)  |  More (2559)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Rest (280)  |  Road (64)  |  Sand (62)  |  Section (11)  |  Startling (15)  |  Stillness (5)  |  Stone (162)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Suddenness (6)  |  Sum (102)  |  Two (937)  |  Walk (124)  |  Wall (67)  |  Year (933)  |  Yield (81)  |  Yielding (2)

One summer night, out on a flat headland, all but surrounded by the waters of the bay, the horizons were remote and distant rims on the edge of space. Millions of stars blazed in darkness, and on the far shore a few lights burned in cottages. Otherwise there was no reminder of human life. My companion and I were alone with the stars: the misty river of the Milky Way flowing across the sky, the patterns of the constellations standing out bright and clear, a blazing planet low on the horizon. It occurred to me that if this were a sight that could be seen only once in a century, this little headland would be thronged with spectators. But it can be seen many scores of nights in any year, and so the lights burned in the cottages and the inhabitants probably gave not a thought to the beauty overhead; and because they could see it almost any night, perhaps they never will.
In The Sense of Wonder (1956), as condensed in Reader’s Digest (1986), 129, 174.
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Bay (5)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Blaze (14)  |  Bright (79)  |  Burn (87)  |  Century (310)  |  Clear (100)  |  Companion (19)  |  Constellation (17)  |  Cottage (4)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Distant (33)  |  Edge (47)  |  Far (154)  |  Flat (33)  |  Flow (83)  |  Give (202)  |  Headland (2)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Low (80)  |  Milky Way (26)  |  Millions (17)  |  Misty (6)  |  Never (1087)  |  Night (120)  |  Occur (150)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Planet (356)  |  Probably (49)  |  Reminder (13)  |  Remote (83)  |  Rim (5)  |  River (119)  |  Score (8)  |  See (1081)  |  Shore (24)  |  Sight (132)  |  Sky (161)  |  Space (500)  |  Spectator (10)  |  Stand (274)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Surround (30)  |  Thought (953)  |  Throng (3)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

Rest is not idleness, and to lie sometimes on the grass under trees on a summer’s day, listening to the murmur of the water, or watching the clouds float across the sky, is by no means a waste of time.
In The Use of Life (1895), 66.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Float (30)  |  Grass (46)  |  Idleness (13)  |  Lie (364)  |  Listening (25)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Murmur (4)  |  Rest (280)  |  Sky (161)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Waste (101)  |  Water (481)

Science! true daughter of Old Time thou art!
alterest all things with thy peering eyes.
preyest thou thus upon the poet’s heart,
Vulture, whose wings are dull realities?
How should he love thee? or how deem thee wise,
Who wouldst not leave him in his wandering .
To seek for treasure in the jewelled skies,
Albeit he soared with an undaunted wing?
Hast thou not dragged Diana from her car?
And driven the Hamadryad from the wood
To seek a shelter in some happier star?
Hast thou not torn the Naiad from her flood,
The Elfin from the green grass, and from me
The summer dread beneath the tamarind tree?
Sonnet, 'To Science' (1829), Saturday Evening Post (11 Sep 1830). In Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (1917), 33, and Notes, 169.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Alter (62)  |  Art (657)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Car (71)  |  Daughter (29)  |  Dull (54)  |  Eye (419)  |  Flood (50)  |  Grass (46)  |  Green (63)  |  Heart (229)  |  Love (309)  |  Old (481)  |  Poet (83)  |  Prey (13)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Shelter (22)  |  Soar (23)  |  Star (427)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Torn (17)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Tree (246)  |  Vulture (5)  |  Wing (75)  |  Wise (131)  |  Wood (92)

Since Britain lies far north toward the pole, the nights are short in summer, and at midnight it is hard to tell whether the evening twilight still lingers or whether dawn is approaching, since the sun at night passes not far below the earth in its journey round the north back to the east. Consequently the days are long in summer, as are the nights in winter when the sun withdraws into African regions.
Bede
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (35)  |  African (10)  |  Back (390)  |  Britain (24)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Earth (996)  |  Hard (243)  |  Journey (42)  |  Lie (364)  |  Linger (14)  |  Long (790)  |  Midnight (11)  |  Night (120)  |  North (11)  |  Pole (46)  |  Short (197)  |  Still (613)  |  Sun (385)  |  Tell (340)  |  Twilight (6)  |  Winter (44)  |  Withdraw (9)

Sometime in my early teens, I started feeling an inner urgency, ups and downs of excitement and frustration, caused by such unlikely occupations as reading Granville’s course of calculus ... I found this book in the attic of a friend’s apartment. Among other standard stuff, it contained the notorious epsilon-delta definition of continuous functions. After struggling with this definition for some time (it was the hot Crimean summer, and I was sitting in the shadow of a dusty apple tree), I got so angry that I dug a shallow grave for the book between the roots, buried it there, and left in disdain. Rain started in an hour. I ran back to the tree and exhumed the poor thing. Thus, I discovered that I loved it, regardless.
'Mathematics as Profession and vocation', in V. Arnold et al. (eds.), Mathematics: Frontiers and Perspectives (2000), 153. Reprinted in Mathematics as Metaphor: Selected Essays of Yuri I. Manin (2007), 79.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anger (20)  |  Angry (8)  |  Apartment (4)  |  Apple (40)  |  Attic (3)  |  Back (390)  |  Biography (240)  |  Book (392)  |  Burial (7)  |  Bury (16)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Cause (541)  |  Contain (68)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Course (409)  |  Definition (221)  |  Dig (21)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Disdain (10)  |  Down (456)  |  Dusty (8)  |  Early (185)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Find (998)  |  Friend (168)  |  Frustration (12)  |  Function (228)  |  Grave (52)  |  Hot (60)  |  Hour (186)  |  Inner (71)  |  Leave (130)  |  Love (309)  |  Notorious (8)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poor (136)  |  Rain (62)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Regardless (4)  |  Root (120)  |  Run (174)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Shallow (8)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Sometime (4)  |  Standard (57)  |  Start (221)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Stuff (21)  |  Teen (2)  |  Teenager (4)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Unlikely (13)  |  Urgency (12)

The axe and saw are insanely busy, chips are flying thick as snowflakes, and every summer thousands of acres of priceless forests, with their underbrush, soil, springs, climate, scenery, and religion, are vanishing away in clouds of smoke, while, except in the national parks, not one forest guard is employed.
John Muir
From 'The American Forests', The Atlantic (Aug 1897), 80, No. 478, 157.
Science quotes on:  |  Acre (12)  |  Axe (15)  |  Busy (28)  |  Chip (4)  |  Climate (97)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Employ (113)  |  Employed (3)  |  Flying (72)  |  Forest (150)  |  Guard (18)  |  National Park (4)  |  Priceless (7)  |  Religion (361)  |  Saw (160)  |  Scenery (7)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Snowflake (14)  |  Soil (86)  |  Spring (133)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Underbrush (2)  |  Vanishing (11)

The cause of rain is now, I consider, no longer an object of doubt. If two masses of air of unequal temperatures, by the ordinary currents of the winds, are intermixed, when saturated with vapour, a precipitation ensues. If the masses are under saturation, then less precipitation takes place, or none at all, according to the degree. Also, the warmer the air, the greater is the quantity of vapour precipitated in like circumstances. ... Hence the reason why rains are heavier in summer than in winter, and in warm countries than in cold.
Memoirs of the Literary and Philosophical Society of Manchester (1819), 3, 507. Quoted in George Drysdale Dempsey and Daniel Kinnear Clark, On the Drainage of Lands, Towns, & Buildings (1887), 246.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Cold (112)  |  Consider (416)  |  Current (118)  |  Degree (276)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Greater (288)  |  Intermix (3)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Object (422)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Precipitation (7)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Rain (62)  |  Reason (744)  |  Saturation (9)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Two (937)  |  Unequal (12)  |  Vapour (16)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Why (491)  |  Wind (128)  |  Winter (44)

The day dawned grey and dreary
The sky made of silver
While the first snowflakes
Began to fall.
A lone bird chirped
In a tree bare of its leaves.
Standing on a lonely road
I stood watching as the world
Started changing.
And I embraced the winter
With memories of summer’s warmth
Still in my heart.
And soon the snowflakes
Began to dance about me
And I twirled around and around
As everything
Turned into a winter wonderland.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bare (33)  |  Begin (260)  |  Bird (149)  |  Change (593)  |  Dance (32)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Dreary (5)  |  Embrace (46)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fall (230)  |  First (1283)  |  Grey (10)  |  Heart (229)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lone (2)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Memory (134)  |  Road (64)  |  Silver (46)  |  Sky (161)  |  Snowflake (14)  |  Soon (186)  |  Stand (274)  |  Start (221)  |  Still (613)  |  Tree (246)  |  Turn (447)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Watch (109)  |  Winter (44)  |  World (1774)

The greatest enemy, however, to true arithmetic work is found in so-called practical or illustrative problems, which are freely given to our pupils, of a degree of difficulty and complexity altogether unsuited to their age and mental development. … I am, myself, no bad mathematician, and all the reasoning powers with which nature endowed me have long been as fully developed as they are ever likely to be; but I have, not infrequently, been puzzled, and at times foiled, by the subtle logical difficulty running through one of these problems, given to my own children. The head-master of one of our Boston high schools confessed to me that he had sometimes been unable to unravel one of these tangled skeins, in trying to help his own daughter through her evening’s work. During this summer, Dr. Fairbairn, the distinguished head of one of the colleges of Oxford, England, told me that not only had he himself encountered a similar difficulty, in the case of his own children, but that, on one occasion, having as his guest one of the first mathematicians of England, the two together had been completely puzzled by one of these arithmetical conundrums.
Address before the Grammar-School Section of the Massachusetts Teachers’ Association (25 Nov 1887), 'The Teaching of Arithmetic in the Boston Schools', printed The Academy (Jan 1888). Collected in Francis Amasa Walker, Discussions in Education (1899), 253.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Bad (180)  |  Boston (7)  |  Call (769)  |  Children (200)  |  College (66)  |  Completely (135)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Confess (42)  |  Conundrum (3)  |  Daughter (29)  |  Degree (276)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Enemy (82)  |  First (1283)  |  Greatest (328)  |  High (362)  |  Himself (461)  |  Long (790)  |  Master (178)  |  Mental (177)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Oxford (16)  |  Power (746)  |  Practical (200)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Running (61)  |  School (219)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  True (212)  |  Trying (144)  |  Two (937)  |  Unravel (14)  |  Work (1351)

The laboratory was an unattractive half basement and low ceilinged room with an inner dark room for the galvanometer and experimental animals. It was dark, crowded with equipment and uninviting. Into it came patients for electrocardiography, dogs for experiments, trays with coffee and buns for lunch. It was hot and dusty in summer and cold in winter. True a large fire burnt brightly in the winter but anyone who found time to warm his backside at it was not beloved by [Sir Thomas] Lewis. It was no good to try and look out of the window for relaxation, for it was glazed with opaque glass. The scientific peaks were our only scenery, and it was our job to try and find the pathways to the top.
Magazine
'Tribute to Sir Thomas Lewis', University College Hospital Magazine (1955), 40, 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Basement (3)  |  Coffee (19)  |  Cold (112)  |  Dark (140)  |  Dog (70)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  Galvanometer (4)  |  Glass (92)  |  Good (889)  |  Hot (60)  |  Inner (71)  |  Job (82)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Large (394)  |  Sir Thomas Lewis (2)  |  Look (582)  |  Low (80)  |  Lunch (6)  |  Opaque (7)  |  Pathway (15)  |  Patient (199)  |  Peak (20)  |  Scenery (7)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Time (1877)  |  Top (96)  |  Try (283)  |  Warm (69)  |  Window (58)  |  Winter (44)

The long summer was over. For ages a tropical climate had prevailed over a great part of the earth, and animals whose home is now beneath the Equator roamed over the world from the far South to the very borders of the Arctics ... But their reign was over. A sudden intense winter, that was also to last for ages, fell upon our globe.
Geological Sketches (1866), 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arctic (10)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Climate (97)  |  Earth (996)  |  Equator (6)  |  Great (1574)  |  Home (170)  |  Ice Age (9)  |  Last (426)  |  Long (790)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Reign (23)  |  South (38)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Winter (44)  |  World (1774)

The rays of the sun
filter through the window
making me toasty
and warm
burning the paper
browning the plants
the magic you have
upon the world
through the summer
your always there
making us all so happy
a big ball of sunshine
for all to share
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ball (62)  |  Big (48)  |  Brown (23)  |  Burn (87)  |  Burning (48)  |  Filter (9)  |  Happy (105)  |  Magic (86)  |  Making (300)  |  Paper (182)  |  Plant (294)  |  Ray (114)  |  Share (75)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunshine (10)  |  Through (849)  |  Warm (69)  |  Window (58)  |  World (1774)

The tendency of the sciences has long been an increasing proclivity of separation and dismemberment … The mathematician turns away from the chemist; the chemist from the naturalist; the mathematician, left to himself divides himself into a pure mathematician and a mixed mathematician, who soon part company … And thus science, even mere physical science, loses all traces of unity. A curious illustration of this result may be observed in the want of any name by which we can designate the students of the knowledge of the material world collectively. We are informed that this difficulty was felt very oppressively by the members of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, at their meetings at York, Oxford and Cambridge, in the last three summers. There was no general term by which these gentlemen could describe themselves with reference to their pursuits … some ingenious gentleman [William Whewell] proposed that, by analogy with artist, they might form Scientist, and added that there could be no scruple … when we have words such as sciolist, economist, and atheist—but this was not generally palatable.
In Review of Mrs Somerville, 'On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences', The Quarterly Review (1834), 51, 58-61.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (62)  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Artist (90)  |  Association (46)  |  Atheist (15)  |  British (41)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Company (59)  |  Curious (91)  |  Describe (128)  |  Description (84)  |  Designation (13)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Dismemberment (3)  |  Divide (75)  |  Division (65)  |  Economist (17)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Himself (461)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Inform (47)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Long (790)  |  Lose (159)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Name (333)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Observed (149)  |  Oxford (16)  |  Palatable (3)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Proposal (17)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sciolist (2)  |  Separation (57)  |  Soon (186)  |  Student (300)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Term (349)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Trace (103)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unity (78)  |  Want (497)  |  William Whewell (70)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

The wintry clouds drop spangles on the mountains. If the thing occurred once in a century historians would chronicle and poets would sing of the event; but Nature, prodigal of beauty, rains down her hexagonal ice-stars year by year, forming layers yards in thickness. The summer sun thaws and partially consolidates the mass. Each winter's fall is covered by that of the ensuing one, and thus the snow layer of each year has to sustain an annually augmented weight. It is more and more compacted by the pressure, and ends by being converted into the ice of a true glacier, which stretches its frozen tongue far down beyond the limits of perpetual snow. The glaciers move, and through valleys they move like rivers.
The Glaciers of the Alps & Mountaineering in 1861 (1911), 247.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Annual (5)  |  Augment (12)  |  Augmentation (4)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Century (310)  |  Chronicle (6)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Compact (13)  |  Consolidation (4)  |  Conversion (17)  |  Cover (37)  |  Down (456)  |  Drop (76)  |  End (590)  |  Ensuing (3)  |  Event (216)  |  Fall (230)  |  Forming (42)  |  Freezing (16)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Hexagon (4)  |  Historian (54)  |  Ice (54)  |  Layer (40)  |  Limit (280)  |  Mass (157)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Partially (8)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Perpetuity (9)  |  Poet (83)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Prodigal (2)  |  Rain (62)  |  River (119)  |  Snow (37)  |  Song (37)  |  Spangle (2)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Thaw (2)  |  Thickness (5)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Valley (32)  |  Weight (134)  |  Winter (44)  |  Yard (7)  |  Year (933)

The wisest decision I ever made with regard to science, I made as a child. In the summer of 1932, shortly after my thirteenth birthday, I decided to become a zoologist, because I thought it would be fascinating to visit distant parts of the world and study exotic animals. I was right. It has been.
In 'Integrative Biology: An Organismic Biologist’s Point of View', Integrative and Comparative Biology (2005), 45, 332.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Become (815)  |  Birthday (8)  |  Child (307)  |  Decide (41)  |  Decision (91)  |  Distant (33)  |  Exotic (6)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Part (222)  |  Regard (305)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Study (653)  |  Thirteenth (2)  |  Thought (953)  |  Visit (26)  |  Wise (131)  |  World (1774)  |  Zoologist (12)

There is a clarity, a brilliance to space that simply doesn’t exist on earth, even on a cloudless summer’s day in the Rockies, and nowhere else can you realize so fully the majesty of our Earth and be so awed at the thought that it’s only one of untold thousands of planets.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Awe (43)  |  Brilliance (13)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Earth (996)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fully (21)  |  Majesty (21)  |  Nowhere (28)  |  Planet (356)  |  Realize (147)  |  Simply (53)  |  Space (500)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Untold (6)

There is no part of the country where in the summer you cannot get a sufficient supply of the best specimens. Teach your children to bring them in for themselves. Take your text from the brooks, not from the booksellers.
Lecture at a teaching laboratory on Penikese Island, Buzzard's Bay. Quoted from the lecture notes by David Starr Jordan, Science Sketches (1911), 146-147.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Bring (90)  |  Brook (6)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Country (251)  |  Specimen (28)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Supply (93)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Text (14)  |  Themselves (433)

This Academy [at Lagado] is not an entire single Building, but a Continuation of several Houses on both Sides of a Street; which growing waste, was purchased and applied to that Use.
I was received very kindly by the Warden, and went for many Days to the Academy. Every Room hath in it ' one or more Projectors; and I believe I could not be in fewer than five Hundred Rooms.
The first Man I saw was of a meagre Aspect, with sooty Hands and Face, his Hair and Beard long, ragged and singed in several Places. His Clothes, Shirt, and Skin were all of the same Colour. He had been Eight Years upon a Project for extracting Sun-Beams out of Cucumbers, which were to be put into Vials hermetically sealed, and let out to warm the Air in raw inclement Summers. He told me, he did not doubt in Eight Years more, that he should be able to supply the Governor's Gardens with Sunshine at a reasonable Rate; but he complained that his Stock was low, and interested me to give him something as an Encouragement to Ingenuity, especially since this had been a very dear Season for Cucumbers. I made him a small Present, for my Lord had furnished me with Money on purpose, because he knew their Practice of begging from all who go to see them.
I saw another at work to calcine Ice into Gunpowder; who likewise shewed me a Treatise he had written concerning the Malleability of Fire, which he intended to publish.
There was a most ingenious Architect who had contrived a new Method for building Houses, by beginning at the Roof, and working downwards to the Foundation; which he justified to me by the life Practice of those two prudent Insects the Bee and the Spider.
In another Apartment I was highly pleased with a Projector, who had found a device of plowing the Ground with Hogs, to save the Charges of Plows, Cattle, and Labour. The Method is this: In an Acre of Ground you bury at six Inches Distance, and eight deep, a quantity of Acorns, Dates, Chestnuts, and other Masts or Vegetables whereof these Animals are fondest; then you drive six Hundred or more of them into the Field, where in a few Days they will root up the whole Ground in search of their Food, and make it fit for sowing, at the same time manuring it with their Dung. It is true, upon Experiment they found the Charge and Trouble very great, and they had little or no Crop. However, it is not doubted that this Invention may be capable of great Improvement.
I had hitherto seen only one Side of the Academy, the other being appropriated to the Advancers of speculative Learning.
Some were condensing Air into a dry tangible Substance, by extracting the Nitre, and letting the acqueous or fluid Particles percolate: Others softening Marble for Pillows and Pin-cushions. Another was, by a certain Composition of Gums, Minerals, and Vegetables outwardly applied, to prevent the Growth of Wool upon two young lambs; and he hoped in a reasonable Time to propagate the Breed of naked Sheep all over the Kingdom.
Gulliver's Travels (1726, Penguin ed. 1967), Part III, Chap. 5, 223.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Academy (35)  |  Acorn (4)  |  Acre (12)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Applied (177)  |  Architect (29)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Beam (24)  |  Bee (40)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Breed (24)  |  Building (156)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cattle (18)  |  Certain (550)  |  Charge (59)  |  Chestnut (2)  |  Composition (84)  |  Continuation (20)  |  Crop (25)  |  Cucumber (4)  |  Date (13)  |  Deep (233)  |  Device (70)  |  Distance (161)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Dry (57)  |  Dung (7)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Face (212)  |  Field (364)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Fit (134)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Food (199)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Garden (60)  |  Governor (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Growing (98)  |  Growth (187)  |  Gunpowder (16)  |  Hermetic Seal (2)  |  Hog (4)  |  House (140)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Ice (54)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Ingenuity (39)  |  Insect (77)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invention (369)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Labour (98)  |  Lamb (6)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Lord (93)  |  Low (80)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marble (20)  |  Mast (3)  |  Method (505)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Money (170)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Pillow (4)  |  Pin (18)  |  Plow (7)  |  Practice (204)  |  Present (619)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Project (73)  |  Projector (3)  |  Publish (36)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Raw (28)  |  Root (120)  |  Save (118)  |  Saw (160)  |  Seal (18)  |  Search (162)  |  Season (47)  |  See (1081)  |  Sheep (11)  |  Side (233)  |  Single (353)  |  Skin (47)  |  Small (477)  |  Something (719)  |  Soot (9)  |  Sowing (9)  |  Spider (14)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunbeam (3)  |  Supply (93)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Vial (4)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Waste (101)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wool (4)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)

We inhabit a dead ember swimming wide in the blank of space, dizzily spinning as it swims, and lighted up from several million miles away by a more horrible hell-fire than was ever conceived by the theological imagination. Yet the dead ember is a green, commodious dwelling-place; and the reverberation of this hell-fire ripens flower and fruit and mildly warms us on summer eves upon the lawn.
In Lay Morals, collected in Works: Letters and Miscellanies of Robert Louis Stevenson: Sketches, Criticism, Etc. (1898) Vol. 22, 552.
Science quotes on:  |  Blank (11)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Dead (59)  |  Dizzy (4)  |  Dwelling (11)  |  Ember (2)  |  Eve (4)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flower (106)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Green (63)  |  Horrible (10)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inhabit (16)  |  Lawn (5)  |  Light (607)  |  Mildly (2)  |  Mile (39)  |  Million (114)  |  More (2559)  |  Reverberation (3)  |  Ripen (4)  |  Space (500)  |  Spin (26)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Swim (30)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Theological (2)  |  Warm (69)  |  Wide (96)

We might expect … in the summer of the “great year,” which we are now considering, that there would be a great predominance of tree-ferns and plants allied to the palms and arborescent grasses in the isles of the wide ocean, while the dicotyledenous plants and other forms now most common in temperate regions would almost disappear from the earth. Then might these genera of animals return, of which the memorials are preserved in the ancient rocks of our continents. The huge iguanodon might reappear in the woods, and the ichthyosaur in the sea, while the pterodactyle might flit again through umbrageous groves of tree-ferns. Coral reefs might be prolonged beyond the arctic circle, where the whale and narwal [sic] now abound. Turtles might deposit their eggs in the sand of the sea beach, where now the walrus sleeps, and where the seal is drifted on the ice-floe.
In Principles of Geology (1830-3), Vol. 1, 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Abound (17)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arctic (10)  |  Beach (21)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Circle (110)  |  Common (436)  |  Continent (76)  |  Coral Reef (12)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Earth (996)  |  Egg (69)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fern (9)  |  Floe (3)  |  Form (959)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ice (54)  |  Iceberg (4)  |  Most (1731)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Other (2236)  |  Palm (5)  |  Plant (294)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Pterodactyl (2)  |  Return (124)  |  Rock (161)  |  Sand (62)  |  Sea (308)  |  Seal (18)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Through (849)  |  Tree (246)  |  Turtle (8)  |  Walrus (4)  |  Whale (32)  |  Wide (96)  |  Wood (92)  |  Year (933)

We need to be realistic. There is very little we can do now to stop the ice from disappearing from the North Pole in the Summer. And we probably cannot prevent the melting of the permafrost and the resulting release of methane. In addition, I fear that we may be too late to help the oceans maintain their ability to absorb carbon dioxide. But there is something we can do—and it could make the whole difference and buy us time to develop the necessary low carbon economies. We can halt the destruction of the world’s rainforests—and even restore parts of them—in order to ensure that the forests do what they are so good at—in other words storing carbon naturally. This is a far easier, cheaper and quicker option than imagining we can rely on as yet unproven technology to capture carbon at a cost of some $50 per tonne or, for that matter, imagining we can achieve what is necessary through plantation timber.
Presidential Lecture (3 Nov 2008) at the Presidential Palace, Jakarta, Indonesia. On the Prince of Wales website.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Absorb (49)  |  Absorbing (3)  |  Addition (66)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Carbon Dioxide (22)  |  Cheaper (6)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Cost (86)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Do (1908)  |  Easier (53)  |  Economy (55)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Fear (197)  |  Forest (150)  |  Global Warming (27)  |  Good (889)  |  Halt (9)  |  Ice (54)  |  Late (118)  |  Little (707)  |  Low (80)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Matter (798)  |  Melting (6)  |  Methane (7)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  North Pole (5)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plantation (2)  |  Pole (46)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Rain Forest (29)  |  Realism (7)  |  Release (27)  |  Restore (8)  |  Result (677)  |  Something (719)  |  Stop (80)  |  Storage (6)  |  Technology (257)  |  Through (849)  |  Timber (7)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unproven (5)  |  Whole (738)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

Who could believe in the prophecies ... that the world would end this summer, while one milkweed with faith matured its seeds.
In William Ellery Channing, Thoreau, the Poet-Naturalist: with Memorial Verses (1873), 205. Also identified as Journal entry (24 Sep 1851), collected in Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry David Thoreau: Journal (1906), Vol. 3, 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  End (590)  |  Faith (203)  |  Matured (2)  |  Prophesy (10)  |  Seed (93)  |  World (1774)

[Luis] Alvarez could no more refrain from invention than he could from breathing. In the midst of an illness so severe as to incapacitate him for most of a summer, he amused himself by attempting to build a better detector of gallstones.
In 'Luie's Gadgets: A Profile of Luis Alvarez', The American Scholar (Winter 1992), 61, No. 1, 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Luis W. Alvarez (24)  |  Amuse (2)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Better (486)  |  Breathe (45)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Build (204)  |  Detector (4)  |  Himself (461)  |  Illness (34)  |  Incapacitate (2)  |  Invention (369)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Refrain (9)  |  Severe (16)

…small, yet they are extremely wise: Ants are creatures of little strength, yet they store up their food in the summer…
Bible
In Proverbs, 'Sayings of Agur', Ch. 30, v.24-25 in The Bible: New International Version (2001), 364.
Science quotes on:  |  Ant (28)  |  Creature (233)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Food (199)  |  Little (707)  |  Small (477)  |  Store (48)  |  Strength (126)  |  Wise (131)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.