Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I believe that this Nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to earth.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index W > Category: Window

Window Quotes (58 quotes)

A celebrated medical lecturer began one day “Fumigations, gentlemen, are of essential importance. They make such an abominable smell that they compel you to open the window.” I wish all the disinfecting fluids invented made such an “abominable smell” that they forced you to admit fresh air. That would be a useful invention.
In Notes on Nursing: What It Is and What It Is Not (1860), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Abominable (4)  |  Admit (45)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Compel (30)  |  Disinfect (2)  |  Essential (199)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Fumigation (2)  |  Importance (286)  |  Invention (369)  |  Lecturer (12)  |  Open (274)  |  Smell (27)  |  Useful (250)  |  Wish (212)

Arithmetic is where the answer is right and everything is nice and you can look out of the window and see the blue sky—or the answer is wrong and you have to start all over and try again and see how it comes out this time.
From 'Arithmetic', Harvest Poems, 1910-1960 (1960), 115.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Blue (56)  |  Everything (476)  |  Look (582)  |  Nice (13)  |  Right (452)  |  See (1081)  |  Sky (161)  |  Start (221)  |  Time (1877)  |  Try (283)  |  Wrong (234)

Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. Without books the development of civilization would have been impossible. They are engines of change, windows on the world, “lighthouses,” (as a poet said), “erected in the sea of time.”
In Authors League Bulletin (1979). As city in Charles Francis (ed.), Wisdom Well Said (2009), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Carrier (5)  |  Change (593)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Crippled (2)  |  Development (422)  |  Dumb (11)  |  Engine (98)  |  History (673)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Lighthouse (6)  |  Literature (103)  |  Poet (83)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Silence (56)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  World (1774)

But beyond the bright searchlights of science,
Out of sight of the windows of sense,
Old riddles still bid us defiance,
Old questions of Why and of Whence.
from Recent Development of Physical Science (p. 10)
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bright (79)  |  Old (481)  |  Poem (96)  |  Question (621)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Searchlight (5)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sight (132)  |  Still (613)  |  Why (491)

But soft! what light through yonder window breaks?
It speaks, and yet says nothing.
Romeo and Juliet, Act 2, Scene 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Break (99)  |  Light (607)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Say (984)  |  Soft (29)  |  Speak (232)  |  Through (849)

Doubt comes in at the window, when Inquiry is denied at the door.
In 'On the Interpretation of Scripture', Essays and Reviews (1860), 373.
Science quotes on:  |  Deny (66)  |  Door (93)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Inquiry (78)

Even if the open windows of science at first make us shiver after the cozy indoor warmth of traditional humanizing myths, in the end the fresh air brings vigor, and the great spaces have a splendor of their own.
What I Believe (1925). In The Basic Writings of Bertrand Russell, 1903-1959 (1992), 370.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  End (590)  |  First (1283)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Great (1574)  |  Myth (56)  |  Open (274)  |  Science (3879)  |  Space (500)  |  Splendor (17)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vigor (9)  |  Warmth (21)

Exper. I. I made a small hole in a window-shutter, and covered it with a piece of thick paper, which I perforated with a fine needle. For greater convenience of observation I placed a small looking-glass without the window-shutter, in such a position as to reflect the sun's light, in a direction nearly horizontal, upon the opposite wall, and to cause the cone of diverging light to pass over a table on which were several little screens of card-paper. I brought into the sunbeam a slip of card, about one-thirtieth of an inch in breadth, and observed its shadow, either on the wall or on other cards held at different distances. Besides the fringes of colour on each side of the shadow, the shadow itself was divided by similar parallel fringes, of smaller dimensions, differing in number, according to the distance at which the shadow was observed, but leaving the middle of the shadow always white. Now these fringes were the joint effects of the portions of light passing on each side of the slip of card and inflected, or rather diffracted, into the shadow. For, a little screen being placed a few inches from the card, so as to receive either edge of the shadow on its margin, all the fringes which had before been observed in the shadow on the wall, immediately disappeared, although the light inflected on the other side was allowed to retain its course, and although this light must have undergone any modification that the proximity of the other edge of the slip of card might have been capable of occasioning... Nor was it for want of a sufficient intensity of light that one of the two portions was incapable of producing the fringes alone; for when they were both uninterrupted, the lines appeared, even if the intensity was reduced to one-tenth or one-twentieth.
'Experiments and Calculations Relative to Physical Optics' (read in 1803), Philosophical Transactions (1804), 94, 2-3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Breadth (15)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cone (7)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Course (409)  |  Different (577)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Direction (175)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Distance (161)  |  Divided (50)  |  Edge (47)  |  Effect (393)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fringe (6)  |  Glass (92)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hole (16)  |  Horizontal (9)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Interference (21)  |  Joint (31)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Looking (189)  |  Modification (55)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Number (699)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passing (76)  |  Portion (84)  |  Receive (114)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Retain (56)  |  Screen (7)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Side (233)  |  Small (477)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunbeam (3)  |  Table (104)  |  Two (937)  |  Uninterrupted (7)  |  Wall (67)  |  Want (497)  |  White (127)

For the environmentalists, The Space Option is the ultimate environmental solution. For the Cornucopians, it is the technological fix that they are relying on. For the hard core space community, the obvious by-product would be the eventual exploration and settlement of the solar system. For most of humanity however, the ultimate benefit is having a realistic hope in a future with possibilities.... If our species does not soon embrace this unique opportunity with sufficient commitment, it may miss its one and only chance to do so. Humanity could soon be overwhelmed by one or more of the many challenges it now faces. The window of opportunity is closing as fast as the population is increasing. Our future will be either a Space Age or a Stone Age.
Arthur Woods and Marco Bernasconi
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Benefit (114)  |  By-Product (7)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Chance (239)  |  Close (69)  |  Commitment (27)  |  Community (104)  |  Core (18)  |  Do (1908)  |  Embrace (46)  |  Environment (216)  |  Environmentalist (5)  |  Eventual (9)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Face (212)  |  Fast (45)  |  Fix (25)  |  Future (429)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hope (299)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Increase (210)  |  Miss (51)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Option (9)  |  Overwhelm (5)  |  Overwhelmed (5)  |  Population (110)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Product (160)  |  Realistic (6)  |  Rely (11)  |  Settlement (3)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Solution (267)  |  Soon (186)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Age (3)  |  Species (401)  |  Stone (162)  |  Stone Age (12)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  System (537)  |  Technological (61)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unique (67)  |  Will (2355)

Groves hated the weather, and the weathermen; they represented chaos and the messengers of chaos. Weather violated boundaries, ignored walls and gates, failed to adhere to deadlines, disobeyed orders. Weather caused delays. The weather forecasters had opposed the [atomic bomb] test date for months—it was set within a window of unfavorable conditions: thunderstorms, rain, high winds, inversion layers. Groves had overridden them. … Groves saw it as a matter of insubordination when the weather forecasters refused to forecast good weather for the test.
In Atomic Spaces: Living on the Manhattan Project (1999), 312. For the attitude of Groves toward the weather see his, 'Some Recollections of July 16, 1945', Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Jun 1970), 26, No. 6, 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Condition (356)  |  Delay (20)  |  Disobedience (4)  |  Fail (185)  |  Forecast (13)  |  Gate (32)  |  Good (889)  |  Leslie Richard Groves (13)  |  High (362)  |  Layer (40)  |  Matter (798)  |  Month (88)  |  Order (632)  |  Rain (62)  |  Represent (155)  |  Saw (160)  |  Schedule (5)  |  Set (394)  |  Test (211)  |  Thunderstorm (5)  |  Trinity (9)  |  Wall (67)  |  Weather (44)  |  Wind (128)

Half the modern drugs could well be thrown out the window except that the birds might eat them
Martin H. Fischer, Howard Fabing (ed.) and Ray Marr (ed.), Fischerisms (1944).
Science quotes on:  |  Bird (149)  |  Drug (57)  |  Eat (104)  |  Modern (385)

Houston, Apollo 11… I’ve got the world in my window.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Apollo (7)  |  Houston (5)  |  World (1774)

I built the solenoid and with great expectations late one evening I pressed the switch which sent a current of 40 amperes through the coil. The result was spectacular—a deafening explosion, the apparatus disappeared, all windows were blown in or out, a wall caved in, and thus ended my pioneering experiment on liquid hydrogen cooled coils! [Recalling the result of his experiment, on 31 Mar 1930, to maximize the magnetic field by cooling the coils of an electromagnet in liquid hydrogen to reduce their resistance.]
'Magnets I have Known', Lecture Notes in Physics (1983), 177, 542-548. Quoted from his memoirs in M.J.M. Leask, 'Obituary: Professor Nicholas Kurti', The Independent (27 Nov 1998).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Biography (240)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Current (118)  |  Disappear (82)  |  End (590)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Field (364)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Late (118)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Magnetic Field (7)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Research (664)  |  Resistance (40)  |  Result (677)  |  Spectacular (18)  |  Through (849)  |  Wall (67)

I find sitting at a specially equipped desk in front of some pretty ugly plastics and staring at a little window is a very unnatural event.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Desk (13)  |  Equip (5)  |  Equipped (17)  |  Event (216)  |  Find (998)  |  Front (16)  |  Little (707)  |  Plastic (28)  |  Pretty (20)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Specially (3)  |  Stare (9)  |  Ugly (14)  |  Unnatural (15)

I grew up in Brooklyn, New York … a city neighborhood that included houses, lampposts, walls, and bushes. But with an early bedtime in the winter, I could look out my window and see the stars, and the stars were not like anything else in my neighborhood. [At age 5] I didn’t know what they were.
[At age 9] my mother … said to me, “You have a library card now, and you know how to read. Take the streetcar to the library and get a book on stars.” … I stepped up to the big librarian and asked for a book on stars. … I sat down and found out the answer, which was something really stunning.
I found out that the stars are glowing balls of gas. I also found out that the Sun is a star but really close and that the stars are all suns except really far away I didn’t know any physics or mathematics at that time, but I could imagine how far you’d have to move the Sun away from us till it was only as bright as a star. It was in that library, reading that book, that the scale of the universe opened up to me. There was something beautiful about it.
At that young age, I already knew that I’d be very happy if I could devote my life to finding out more about the stars and the planets that go around them. And it’s been my great good fortune to do just that.
Quoted in interview with Jack Rightmyer, in 'Stars in His Eyes', Highlights For Children (1 Jan 1997). Ages as given in Tom Head (ed.), Conversations with Carl Sagan (2006), x.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Ball (62)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Biography (240)  |  Book (392)  |  Bright (79)  |  Brooklyn (3)  |  Career (75)  |  Child (307)  |  City (78)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Early (185)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Gas (83)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  House (140)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Know (1518)  |  Library (48)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Mother (114)  |  Move (216)  |  Neighborhood (12)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Planet (356)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Scale (121)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wall (67)  |  Winter (44)  |  Young (227)

I had at one time a very bad fever of which I almost died. In my fever I had a long consistent delirium. I dreamt that I was in Hell, and that Hell is a place full of all those happenings that are improbable but not impossible. The effects of this are curious. Some of the damned, when they first arrive below, imagine that they will beguile the tedium of eternity by games of cards. But they find this impossible, because, whenever a pack is shuffled, it comes out in perfect order, beginning with the Ace of Spades and ending with the King of Hearts. There is a special department of Hell for students of probability. In this department there are many typewriters and many monkeys. Every time that a monkey walks on a typewriter, it types by chance one of Shakespeare's sonnets. There is another place of torment for physicists. In this there are kettles and fires, but when the kettles are put on the fires, the water in them freezes. There are also stuffy rooms. But experience has taught the physicists never to open a window because, when they do, all the air rushes out and leaves the room a vacuum.
'The Metaphysician's Nightmare', Nightmares of Eminent Persons and Other Stories (1954), 38-9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Arrival (15)  |  Bad (180)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Chance (239)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Curious (91)  |  Damned (4)  |  Death (388)  |  Delirium (3)  |  Department (92)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dream (208)  |  Effect (393)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fever (29)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Freeze (5)  |  Game (101)  |  Happening (58)  |  Heart (229)  |  Hell (32)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Improbable (13)  |  Kettle (3)  |  Long (790)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Never (1087)  |  Open (274)  |  Opening (15)  |  Order (632)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Probability (130)  |  Room (40)  |  Rush (18)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  Shuffle (5)  |  Sonnet (4)  |  Special (184)  |  Student (300)  |  Tedium (3)  |  Time (1877)  |  Torment (18)  |  Type (167)  |  Typewriter (6)  |  Vacuum (39)  |  Walk (124)  |  Water (481)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Will (2355)

I have always attached great importance to the manner in which an experiment is set up and conducted ... the experiment should be set up to open as many windows as possible on the unforeseen.
(1954). In Charles Coulston Gillespie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1973), Vol. 7, 153.
Science quotes on:  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Great (1574)  |  Importance (286)  |  Open (274)  |  Possible (552)  |  Research (664)  |  Set (394)  |  Unforeseen (10)

I once lodged in Hanover in a room whose window gave on to a narrow Street which formed a communicating link between two bigger streets. It was very pleasant to see how people's faces changed when they entered the little Street, where they thought they were less observed; how here one pissed, there another fixed her garter, one gave way to private laughter and another shook his head. Girls thought with a smile of the night before and adjusted their ribbons for conquests in the big Street ahead.
Aphorism 19 in Notebook C (1772-1773), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 34.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Conquest (28)  |  Enter (141)  |  Face (212)  |  Form (959)  |  Girl (37)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Little (707)  |  Lodging (2)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  People (1005)  |  Ribbon (2)  |  See (1081)  |  Smile (31)  |  Street (23)  |  Thought (953)  |  Two (937)  |  Way (1217)

I pray every day and I think everybody should. I don’t think you can be up here and look out the window as I did the first day and look out at the Earth from this vantage point. We’re not so high compared to people who went to the moon and back. But to look out at this kind of creation out here and not believe in God is, to me, impossible. It just strengthens my faith.
From NASA transcript of News Conference by downlink from Space Shuttle Discovery during its STS-95 Mission in Earth orbit (5 Nov 1998). In response to question from Paul Hoveston of USA Today asking John Glenn about how the space flight strengthened his faith and if he had any time to pray in orbit.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Belief (578)  |  Creation (327)  |  Earth (996)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Faith (203)  |  First (1283)  |  God (757)  |  High (362)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Kind (557)  |  Look (582)  |  Moon (237)  |  People (1005)  |  Point (580)  |  Pray (16)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  Think (1086)

If I were a physician I would try my patients thus. I would wheel them to a window and let Nature feel their pulse. It will soon appear if their sensuous existence is sound. The sounds are but the throbbing of some pulse in me.
(26 Feb 1841). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: I: 1837-1846 (1906), 224.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Existence (456)  |  Feel (367)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Pulse (20)  |  Sensuous (5)  |  Soon (186)  |  Sound (183)  |  Throb (6)  |  Try (283)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Will (2355)

If we drove an automobile the way we try to run civilization, I think we would face backwards, looking through the back window, admiring where we came from, and not caring where we are going. If you want a good life you must look to the future. … I think it is all right to have courses in history. But history is the “gonest” thing in the world. … Let’s keep history, but let’s take a small part of the time and study where we are going. … We can do something about the unmade history.
As quoted in book review, T.A. Boyd, 'Charles F. Kettering: Prophet of Progress', Science (30 Jan 1959), 256.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Automobile (22)  |  Back (390)  |  Backwards (17)  |  Caring (6)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Course (409)  |  Do (1908)  |  Face (212)  |  Future (429)  |  Good (889)  |  History (673)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Must (1526)  |  Right (452)  |  Run (174)  |  Small (477)  |  Something (719)  |  Study (653)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Try (283)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

In 1808 … Malus chanced to look through a double refracting prism at the light of the setting sun, reflected from the windows of the Luxembourg Palace. In turning the prism round, he was surprised to find that the ordinary image disappeared at two opposite positions of the prism. He remarked that the reflected light behaved like light which had been polarized by passing through another prism.
In Principles of Science (1874), Vols. 1-2, Book IV, Chap. 18, 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Behave (17)  |  Chance (239)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Find (998)  |  Image (96)  |  Light (607)  |  Look (582)  |  Étienne-Louis Malus (2)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Palace (8)  |  Passing (76)  |  Polarize (2)  |  Position (77)  |  Prism (7)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Remark (28)  |  Round (26)  |  Setting (44)  |  Sun (385)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Through (849)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)

Intelligence, in diapers, is invisible. And when it matures, out the window it flies. We have to pounce on it earlier.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Diaper (2)  |  Early (185)  |  Fly (146)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Mature (16)  |  Pounce (4)

It needs no dictionary of quotations to remind me that the eyes are the windows of the soul.
In Zuleika Dobson (1911), 54-55.
Science quotes on:  |  Dictionary (15)  |  Eye (419)  |  Need (290)  |  Quotation (18)  |  Remind (13)  |  Soul (226)

It’s not quite as exhilarating a feeling as orbiting the earth, but it’s close. In addition, it has an exotic, bizarre quality due entirely to the nature of the surface below. The earth from orbit is a delight - offering visual variety and an emotional feeling of belonging “down there.” Not so with this withered, sun-seared peach pit out of my window. There is no comfort to it; it is too stark and barren; its invitation is monotonous and meant for geologists only.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Addition (66)  |  Barren (30)  |  Belong (162)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Below (24)  |  Bizarre (6)  |  Close (69)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Delight (108)  |  Down (456)  |  Due (141)  |  Earth (996)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Exhilarating (3)  |  Exotic (6)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Invitation (11)  |  Mean (809)  |  Monotonous (3)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Offer (141)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Peach (3)  |  Pit (19)  |  Quality (135)  |  Sear (2)  |  Stark (3)  |  Sun (385)  |  Surface (209)  |  Variety (132)  |  Visual (15)  |  Wither (8)

Mathematicians … believed that prediction was just a function of keeping track of things. If you knew enough, you could predict anything. … Chaos theory throws it right out the window because … in fact there are great categories of phenomena that are inherently unpredictable.
In novel, Jurassic Park (1990, 1991), 158.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Chaos Theory (4)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Function (228)  |  Great (1574)  |  Inherently (5)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Right (452)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Track (38)  |  Unpredictable (17)

My first view - a panorama of brilliant deep blue ocean, shot with shades of green and gray and white - was of atolls and clouds. Close to the window I could see that this Pacific scene in motion was rimmed by the great curved limb of the Earth. It had a thin halo of blue held close, and beyond, black space. I held my breath, but something was missing - I felt strangely unfulfilled. Here was a tremendous visual spectacle, but viewed in silence. There was no grand musical accompaniment; no triumphant, inspired sonata or symphony. Each one of us must write the music of this sphere for ourselves.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Black (42)  |  Blue (56)  |  Breath (59)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Close (69)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Curve (49)  |  Deep (233)  |  Earth (996)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Grand (27)  |  Gray (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Green (63)  |  Halo (7)  |  Hold (95)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Limb (8)  |  Miss (51)  |  Missing (21)  |  Motion (310)  |  Music (129)  |  Musical (10)  |  Must (1526)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Pacific (2)  |  Panorama (5)  |  Rim (5)  |  Scene (36)  |  See (1081)  |  Shade (31)  |  Shoot (19)  |  Silence (56)  |  Something (719)  |  Sonata (2)  |  Space (500)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Strangely (5)  |  Symphony (9)  |  Thin (16)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Triumphant (10)  |  Unfulfilled (3)  |  View (488)  |  Visual (15)  |  White (127)  |  Write (230)

People are like stained glass windows: they sparkle and shine when the sun is out, but when the darkness sets in their true beauty is revealed only if there is a light within.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Glass (92)  |  Light (607)  |  People (1005)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Set (394)  |  Shine (45)  |  Sparkle (8)  |  Stained Glass (2)  |  Sun (385)  |  True (212)

Scientific apparatus offers a window to knowledge, but as they grow more elaborate, scientists spend ever more time washing the windows.
[Unverified. Please contact Webmaster if you can identify the primary source.]
Science quotes on:  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Grow (238)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  More (2559)  |  Offer (141)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Spend (95)  |  Time (1877)  |  Washing (3)

Scientists have come up with a fantastic invention for looking through solid walls. It’s called a window.
Anonymous
Found feral on the web attributed (spuriously?) to Richard Feynmann, but Webmaster has not yet found a primary source for Feynmann saying or writing this.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Call (769)  |  Fantastic (20)  |  Invention (369)  |  Joke (83)  |  Looking (189)  |  Optics (23)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Solid (116)  |  Through (849)  |  Wall (67)

Speaking about symmetry, look out our window, and you may see a cardinal attacking its reflection in the window. The cardinal is the only bird we have who often does this. If it has a nest nearby, the cardinal thinks there is another cardinal trying to invade its territory. It never realizes it is attacking its own reflection. Cardinals don’t know much about mirror symmetry!
In István Hargittai, 'A Great Communicator of Mathematics and Other Games: A Conversation with Martin Gardner', The Mathematical Intelligencer. (1997), 194(4), 36-40. Quoted in István and Magdolna Hargittai, In Our Own Image (2000), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Bird (149)  |  Cardinal (9)  |  Know (1518)  |  Look (582)  |  Mirror (41)  |  Nest (23)  |  Never (1087)  |  Realize (147)  |  Reflection (90)  |  See (1081)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Territory (24)  |  Think (1086)  |  Trying (144)

The earth's atmosphere is an imperfect window on the universe. Electromagnetic waves in the optical part of the spectrum (that is, waves longer than X rays and shorter than radio waves) penetrate to the surface of the earth only in a few narrow spectral bands. The widest of the transmitted bands corresponds roughly to the colors of visible light; waves in the flanking ultraviolet and infrared regions of the optical spectrum are almost totally absorbed by the atmosphere. In addition, atmospheric turbulence blurs the images of celestial objects, even when they are viewed through the most powerful ground-based telescopes.
in an article promoting the construction of the Hubble Space Telescope
Scientific American (July 1977)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  Addition (66)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Blur (8)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Color (137)  |  Construction (112)  |  Earth (996)  |  Electromagnetic Wave (2)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hubble Space Telescope (9)  |  Image (96)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Light (607)  |  Most (1731)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Object (422)  |  Optical (11)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Radio (50)  |  Ray (114)  |  Space (500)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Through (849)  |  Turbulence (4)  |  Universe (857)  |  View (488)  |  Visible (84)  |  Visible Light (2)  |  Wave (107)

The Europeans and the Americans are not throwing $10 billion down this gigantic tube for nothing. We're exploring the very forefront of physics and cosmology with the Large Hadron Collider because we want to have a window on creation, we want to recreate a tiny piece of Genesis to unlock some of the greatest secrets of the universe.
Quoted by Alexander G. Higgins (AP), in 'Particle Collider: Black Hole or Crucial Machine', The Journal Gazette (7 Aug 2009).
Science quotes on:  |  America (127)  |  Billion (95)  |  Cosmology (25)  |  Creation (327)  |  Dollar (22)  |  Down (456)  |  Europe (43)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Forefront (2)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Large (394)  |  Large Hadron Collider (6)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Piece (38)  |  Recreation (20)  |  Research (664)  |  Secret (194)  |  Throw (43)  |  Throwing (17)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Tube (5)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unlock (10)  |  Unlocking (2)  |  Want (497)

The eye is the window of the human body through which it feels its way and enjoys the beauty of the world.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Body (537)  |  Enjoy (40)  |  Eye (419)  |  Feel (367)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Through (849)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

The eye, the window of the soul, is the chief means whereby the understanding can most fully and abundantly appreciate the infinite works of Nature; and the ear is second.
As quoted in Daniel J. Boorstin, The Discoverers (1983), 350.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Chief (97)  |  Ear (68)  |  Eye (419)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Second (62)  |  Soul (226)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Work (1351)

The laboratory was an unattractive half basement and low ceilinged room with an inner dark room for the galvanometer and experimental animals. It was dark, crowded with equipment and uninviting. Into it came patients for electrocardiography, dogs for experiments, trays with coffee and buns for lunch. It was hot and dusty in summer and cold in winter. True a large fire burnt brightly in the winter but anyone who found time to warm his backside at it was not beloved by [Sir Thomas] Lewis. It was no good to try and look out of the window for relaxation, for it was glazed with opaque glass. The scientific peaks were our only scenery, and it was our job to try and find the pathways to the top.
Magazine
'Tribute to Sir Thomas Lewis', University College Hospital Magazine (1955), 40, 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Basement (3)  |  Coffee (19)  |  Cold (112)  |  Dark (140)  |  Dog (70)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  Galvanometer (4)  |  Glass (92)  |  Good (889)  |  Hot (60)  |  Inner (71)  |  Job (82)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Large (394)  |  Sir Thomas Lewis (2)  |  Look (582)  |  Low (80)  |  Lunch (6)  |  Opaque (7)  |  Pathway (15)  |  Patient (199)  |  Peak (20)  |  Scenery (7)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Summer (54)  |  Time (1877)  |  Top (96)  |  Try (283)  |  Warm (69)  |  Winter (44)

The motion of the stars over our heads is as much an illusion as that of the cows, trees and churches that flash past the windows of our train.
The Stars in their Courses (1931), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Cow (39)  |  Flash (49)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Motion (310)  |  Past (337)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Train (114)  |  Tree (246)

The only thing that I’d rather own than Windows is English, because then I could charge you two hundred and forty-nine dollars for the right to speak it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Charge (59)  |  Dollar (22)  |  English (35)  |  Forty-Nine (2)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Right (452)  |  Speak (232)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)

The rays of the sun
filter through the window
making me toasty
and warm
burning the paper
browning the plants
the magic you have
upon the world
through the summer
your always there
making us all so happy
a big ball of sunshine
for all to share
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ball (62)  |  Big (48)  |  Brown (23)  |  Burn (87)  |  Burning (48)  |  Filter (9)  |  Happy (105)  |  Magic (86)  |  Making (300)  |  Paper (182)  |  Plant (294)  |  Ray (114)  |  Share (75)  |  Summer (54)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunshine (10)  |  Through (849)  |  Warm (69)  |  World (1774)

The recommendation not to throw yourself out of a second-floor window is a part of the science of mutually gravitating bodies.
In 'The Religion of Humanity', Essays and Addresses by the Right Hon. Arthur J. Balfour (1893), 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Recommendation (12)  |  Science (3879)  |  Throw (43)

The view of the moon that we’ve been having recently is really spectacular. It fills about three-quarters of the hatch window, and of course we can see the entire circumference even though part of it is in complete shadow and part of it is in earthshine. It’s a view worth the price of the trip.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Circumference (23)  |  Complete (204)  |  Course (409)  |  Entire (47)  |  Fill (61)  |  Hatch (4)  |  Moon (237)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Part (222)  |  Price (51)  |  Really (78)  |  Recently (3)  |  See (1081)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Spectacular (18)  |  Three-Quarters (2)  |  Trip (10)  |  View (488)  |  Worth (169)

The views of the Earth are really beautiful. If you’ve ever seen a space IMAX movie, that’s really what it looks like. I wish I’d had more time just to sit and look out the window with a map, but our science program kept us very busy in the lab most of the time.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Busy (28)  |  Earth (996)  |  Keep (101)  |  Look (582)  |  Map (44)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Movie (16)  |  Program (52)  |  Really (78)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Sit (48)  |  Space (500)  |  Time (1877)  |  View (488)  |  Wish (212)

The worst primary school scolding I ever received was for ridiculing a classmate who asked, ‘What’s an atom?’ To my third grader’s mind, the question betrayed a level of ignorance more befitting a preschooler, but the teacher disagreed and banned me from recess for a week. I had forgotten the incident until a few years ago, while sitting in on a quantum mechanics class taught by a Nobel Prizewinning physicist. Midway through a brutally abstract lecture on the hydrogen atom, a plucky sophomore raised his hand and asked the very same question. To the astonishment of all, our speaker fell silent. He stared out the window for what seemed like an eternity before answering, ‘I don’t know.’
'The Secret Life of Atoms'. Discover (Jun 2007), 28:6, 52.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Atom (355)  |  Bad (180)  |  Ban (9)  |  Betray (8)  |  Class (164)  |  Disagree (11)  |  Disagreed (4)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Fall (230)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Incident (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Level (67)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Midway (4)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Primary (80)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Question (621)  |  Raise (35)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recess (8)  |  Ridicule (23)  |  Same (157)  |  School (219)  |  Scold (6)  |  Seem (145)  |  Silent (29)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Speaker (6)  |  Star (427)  |  Stare (9)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Third (15)  |  Through (849)  |  Week (70)  |  Worst (57)  |  Year (933)

Theory is a window into the world. Theory leads to prediction. Without prediction, experience and examples teach nothing.
In The New Economics for Industry, Government, Education (1993), 103.
Science quotes on:  |  Example (94)  |  Experience (467)  |  Lead (384)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Teach (277)  |  Theory (970)  |  World (1774)

This mysterious 3.141592..., which comes in at every door and window, and down every chimney.
Science quotes on:  |  Door (93)  |  Down (456)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Pi (13)

Three train travelers, passing through Scottish countryside, saw a black sheep through the window.
Engineer: Aha! I see that Scottish sheep are black.
Physician: Hmm. You mean that some Scottish sheep are black.
Mathematician: No, all we know is that there is at least one sheep in Scotland, and that at least one side of that one sheep is black.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Black (42)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Joke (83)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mean (809)  |  Passing (76)  |  Physician (273)  |  Saw (160)  |  Scotland (5)  |  Scottish (4)  |  See (1081)  |  Sheep (11)  |  Side (233)  |  Through (849)  |  Train (114)  |  Traveler (30)

To day we made the grand experiment of burning the diamond and certainly the phenomena presented were extremely beautiful and interesting… The Duke’s burning glass was the instrument used to apply heat to the diamond. It consists of two double convex lenses … The instrument was placed in an upper room of the museum and having arranged it at the window the diamond was placed in the focus and anxiously watched. The heat was thus continued for 3/4 of an hour (it being necessary to cool the globe at times) and during that time it was thought that the diamond was slowly diminishing and becoming opaque … On a sudden Sir H Davy observed the diamond to burn visibly, and when removed from the focus it was found to be in a state of active and rapid combustion. The diamond glowed brilliantly with a scarlet light, inclining to purple and, when placed in the dark, continued to burn for about four minutes. After cooling the glass heat was again applied to the diamond and it burned again though not for nearly so long as before. This was repeated twice more and soon after the diamond became all consumed. This phenomenon of actual and vivid combustion, which has never been observed before, was attributed by Sir H Davy to be the free access of air; it became more dull as carbonic acid gas formed and did not last so long.
Entry (Florence, 27 Mar 1814) in his foreign journal kept whilst on a continental tour with Sir Humphry Davy. In Michael Faraday, Bence Jones (ed.), The Life and Letters of Faraday (1870), Vol. 1, 119. Silvanus Phillips Thompson identifies the Duke as the Grand Duke of Tuscany, in Michael Faraday, His Life and Work (1901), 21.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Access (20)  |  Acid (83)  |  Active (76)  |  Actual (117)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Burn (87)  |  Burning (48)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Combustion (18)  |  Consist (223)  |  Convex (6)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Dark (140)  |  Sir Humphry Davy (47)  |  Diamond (21)  |  Dull (54)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Focus (35)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Gas (83)  |  Glass (92)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hour (186)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Last (426)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Minute (125)  |  More (2559)  |  Museum (31)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observed (149)  |  Opaque (7)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Present (619)  |  Soon (186)  |  State (491)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Watch (109)

To speculate without facts is to attempt to enter a house of which one has not the key, by wandering aimlessly round and round, searching the walls and now and then peeping through the windows. Facts are the key.
'Heredity: 1. The Behaviour of the Chromosomes', in Essays in Popular Science (1926, 1945), 1-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Enter (141)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  House (140)  |  Key (50)  |  Search (162)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Through (849)  |  Wall (67)

True science thrives best in glass houses where everyone can look in. When the windows are blacked out, as in war, the weeds take over; when secrecy muffles criticism, charlatans and cranks flourish.
In Is Science Necessary?: Essays on Science and Scientists (1989), xvi.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Black (42)  |  Charlatan (8)  |  Crank (18)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Glass (92)  |  House (140)  |  Look (582)  |  Science (3879)  |  Secrecy (2)  |  Thrive (18)  |  True (212)  |  True Science (23)  |  War (225)  |  Weed (18)

Want to make your computer go really fast? Throw it out a window.
Anonymous
In L. R. Parenti, Durata Del Dramma: Life Of Drama (2005), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Computer (127)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fast (45)  |  Quip (80)  |  Throw (43)  |  Want (497)

We have the opportunity of observing her [Nature] through these delicate and pellucid teguments of the bodies of Insects acting according to her usual course and way, undisturbed, whereas when we endeavour to pry into her secrets by breaking open the doors upon her, and dissecting and mangling creatures whil'st there is life yet within them, we find her indeed at work, but put into such disorder by the violence offer'd, as it may easily be imagin'd how differing a thing we should find, if we could, as we can with a Microscope, in these smaller creatures, quietly peep in at the windows, without frighting her out of her usual byas.
Micrographia, or some Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies made by Magnifying Glasses with Observations and Inquiries thereupon (1665), 186.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Course (409)  |  Creature (233)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Door (93)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Find (998)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Insect (77)  |  Life (1795)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Offer (141)  |  Open (274)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Secret (194)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Violence (34)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

We know enough to be sure that the scientific achievements of the next fifty years will be far greater, more rapid, and more surprising, than those we have already experienced. … Wireless telephones and television, following naturally upon the their present path of development, would enable their owner to connect up to any room similarly equipped and hear and take part in the conversation as well as if he put his head in through the window.
From 'Fifty Years Hence', Strand Magazine (Dec 1931). Reprinted in Popular Mechanics (Mar 1932), 57, No. 3, 394-396.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Already (222)  |  Connect (125)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Development (422)  |  Enable (119)  |  Enough (340)  |  Equipped (17)  |  Experienced (2)  |  Greater (288)  |  Head (81)  |  Hear (139)  |  Know (1518)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Path (144)  |  Present (619)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Room (40)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Surprising (4)  |  Telephone (27)  |  Television (30)  |  Through (849)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wireless (5)  |  Year (933)

We sleep, and at length awake to the still reality of a winter morning. The snow lies warm as cotton or down upon the window-sill; the broadened sash and frosted panes admit a dim and private light, which enhances the snug cheer within. The stillness of the morning is impressive... From the eaves and fences hang stalactites of snow, and in the yard stand stalagmites covering some concealed core. The trees and shrubs rear white arms to the sky on every side; and where were walls and fences we see fantastic forms stretching in the frolic gambols across the dusky landscape, as if nature had strewn her fresh designs over the fields by night as models for man’s art.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Across (32)  |  Admit (45)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Art (657)  |  Awake (19)  |  Broaden (3)  |  Cheer (7)  |  Conceal (18)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Core (18)  |  Cotton (8)  |  Cover (37)  |  Covering (14)  |  Design (195)  |  Dim (8)  |  Down (456)  |  Dusky (4)  |  Enhance (16)  |  Fantastic (20)  |  Fence (11)  |  Field (364)  |  Form (959)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Frost (14)  |  Gambol (2)  |  Hang (45)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Landscape (39)  |  Length (23)  |  Lie (364)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Model (102)  |  Morning (94)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Night (120)  |  Pane (2)  |  Private (23)  |  Reality (261)  |  Rear (7)  |  See (1081)  |  Shrub (5)  |  Side (233)  |  Sky (161)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Snow (37)  |  Stand (274)  |  Still (613)  |  Stillness (5)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Strew (3)  |  Tree (246)  |  Wall (67)  |  Warm (69)  |  White (127)  |  Winter (44)  |  Yard (7)

When I was a small boy [my father] used to sit me on his lap and read to me from the [Encyclopaedia] Britannica … say, about … the Tyrannosaurus rex, and it would say something like, “This dinosaur is twenty-five feet high and its head is six feet across.” My father would stop reading and say, “Now, let’s see what that means. That would mean that if he stood in our front yard, he would be tall enough to put his head through our window up here.” (We were on the second floor.) “But his head would be too wide to fit in the window.” Everything he read to me he would translate as best he could into some reality. …
In 'The Making of a Scientist', What Do You Care What Other People Think?": Further Adventures of a Curious Character (2001), 12-13. I learned from my father to translate: everything I read I try to figure out what it really means, what it’s really saying.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Best (459)  |  Boy (94)  |  Dinosaur (26)  |  Enough (340)  |  Everything (476)  |  Father (110)  |  Fit (134)  |  Head (81)  |  Height (32)  |  High (362)  |  Lap (9)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Reality (261)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Small (477)  |  Something (719)  |  Through (849)  |  Translate (19)  |  Tyrannosaurus Rex (2)  |  Wide (96)  |  Width (5)

When science makes minor mysteries disappear, greater mysteries stand confessed. For one object of delight whose emotional value science has inevitably lessened—as Newton damaged the rainbow for Keats—science gives back double. To the grand primary impressions of the world­power, the immensities, the pervading order, and the universal flux, with which the man of feeling has been nurtured from of old, modern science has added thrilling impressions of manifoldness, intricacy, uniformity, inter-relatedness, and evolution. Science widens and clears the emotional window. There are great vistas to which science alone can lead, and they make for elevation of mind. The opposition between science and feeling is largely a misunderstanding. As one of our philosophers has remarked, science is in a true sense 'one of the humanities.'
J. Arthur Thomson (ed.), The Outline of Science: A Plain Story Simply Told (1921/2), Vol. 2, Science and Modern Thought, 787.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Back (390)  |  Confess (42)  |  Delight (108)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Elevation (13)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Flux (21)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Humanities (20)  |  Impression (114)  |  Inter (11)  |  Intricacy (8)  |  Lead (384)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Misunderstanding (12)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Object (422)  |  Old (481)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Order (632)  |  Pervading (7)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Power (746)  |  Primary (80)  |  Rainbow (16)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Stand (274)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Universal (189)  |  Value (365)  |  Vista (10)  |  Widen (10)  |  World (1774)

Wherever you have seen God pass, mark that spot, and go and sit in that window again.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 165
Science quotes on:  |  God (757)  |  Mark (43)  |  Pass (238)  |  See (1081)  |  Sit (48)  |  Spot (17)  |  Wherever (51)

While reading in a textbook of chemistry, … I came across the statement, “nitric acid acts upon copper.” I was getting tired of reading such absurd stuff and I determined to see what this meant. Copper was more or less familiar to me, for copper cents were then in use. I had seen a bottle marked “nitric acid” on a table in the doctor’s office where I was then “doing time.” I did not know its peculiarities, but I was getting on and likely to learn. The spirit of adventure was upon me. Having nitric acid and copper, I had only to learn what the words “act upon” meant … I put one of them [cent] on the table, opened the bottle marked “nitric acid”; poured some of the liquid on the copper; and prepared to make an observation. But what was this wonderful thing which I beheld? The cent was already changed, and it was no small change either. A greenish blue liquid foamed and fumed over the cent and over the table. The air in the neighborhood of the performance became colored dark red. A great colored cloud arose. This was disagreeable and suffocating—how should I stop this? I tried to get rid of the objectionable mess by picking it up and throwing it out of the window, which I had meanwhile opened. I learned another fact—nitric acid not only acts upon copper but it acts upon fingers. The pain led to another unpremeditated experiment. I drew my fingers across my trousers and another fact was discovered. Nitric acid acts upon trousers. Taking everything into consideration, that was the most impressive experiment, and, relatively, probably the most costly experiment I have ever performed.
In F.H. Getman, The Life of Ira Remsen (1940), 9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurd (59)  |  Absurdity (32)  |  Acid (83)  |  Act (272)  |  Adventure (56)  |  Air (347)  |  Already (222)  |  Biography (240)  |  Bottle (15)  |  Cent (5)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Color (137)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Copper (25)  |  Cost (86)  |  Dark (140)  |  Disagreeable (5)  |  Discover (553)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Doing (280)  |  Everything (476)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Finger (44)  |  Foam (3)  |  Fume (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Impressiveness (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Marked (55)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mess (13)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Most (1731)  |  Neighborhood (12)  |  Nitric Acid (2)  |  Observation (555)  |  Office (71)  |  Open (274)  |  Pain (136)  |  Peculiarity (25)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Reading (133)  |  See (1081)  |  Small (477)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Statement (142)  |  Suffocation (2)  |  Table (104)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Throwing (17)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trousers (5)  |  Use (766)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Word (619)

Years ago I used to worry about the degree to which I specialized. Vision is limited enough, yet I was not really working on vision, for I hardly made contact with visual sensations, except as signals, nor with the nervous pathways, nor the structure of the eye, except the retina. Actually my studies involved only the rods and cones of the retina, and in them only the visual pigments. A sadly limited peripheral business, fit for escapists. But it is as though this were a very narrow window through which at a distance, one can only see a crack of light. As one comes closer the view grows wider and wider, until finally looking through the same narrow window one is looking at the universe. It is like the pupil of the eye, an opening only two to three millimetres across in daylight, but yielding a wide angle of view, and manoeuvrable enough to be turned in all directions. I think this is always the way it goes in science, because science is all one. It hardly matters where one enters, provided one can come closer, and then one does not see less and less, but more and more, because one is not dealing with an opaque object, but with a window.
In Scientific American, 1960s, attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Angle (20)  |  Business (149)  |  Closer (43)  |  Cone (7)  |  Contact (65)  |  Crack (15)  |  Daylight (22)  |  Dealing (10)  |  Degree (276)  |  Direction (175)  |  Distance (161)  |  Enough (340)  |  Enter (141)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fit (134)  |  Grow (238)  |  Involved (90)  |  Light (607)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Looking (189)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Object (422)  |  Opaque (7)  |  Opening (15)  |  Pathway (15)  |  Peripheral (3)  |  Pigment (8)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Really (78)  |  Retina (4)  |  Rod (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Signal (27)  |  Structure (344)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  View (488)  |  Vision (123)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wide (96)  |  Year (933)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.