Celebrating 20 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday


Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I was going to record talking... the foil was put on; I then shouted 'Mary had a little lamb',... and the machine reproduced it perfectly.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index H > Category: Hole

Hole Quotes (16 quotes)

Common sense iz instinkt, and instinkt don’t make enny blunders mutch, no more than a rat duz, in coming out, or going intew a hole, he hits the hole the fust time, and just fills it.
In The Complete Works of Josh Billings (1876), 79.
Science quotes on:  |  Blunder (21)  |  Coming (114)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Fill (61)  |  First (1284)  |  Hit (20)  |  Instinct (88)  |  More (2559)  |  Rat (37)  |  Sense (770)  |  Time (1877)

Consider a cow. A cow doesn’t have the problem-solving skill of a chimpanzee, which has discovered how to get termites out of the ground by putting a stick into a hole. Evolution has developed the brain’s ability to solve puzzles, and at the same time has produced in our brain a pleasure of solving problems.
In John Tierney, 'For Decades, Puzzling People With Mathematics', New York Times (20 Oct 2009), D2.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (153)  |  Brain (270)  |  Chimpanzee (13)  |  Consider (416)  |  Cow (39)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (424)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (785)  |  Evolution (593)  |  Ground (218)  |  Pleasure (179)  |  Problem (679)  |  Problem-Solving (3)  |  Produced (187)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Skill (109)  |  Solution (269)  |  Solve (130)  |  Stick (24)  |  Termite (7)  |  Time (1877)

Dr. Walter Baade of Mount Wilson Observatory facetiously accused the present generation of Milky Way astronomers of not having looked sufficiently far beyond our “local swimming hole”.
At then-recent symposium of the American Astronomical Society, as stated in Leaflet The Cemter of the Galaxy (1948), No. 230, 254.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuse (4)  |  Astronomer (94)  |  Walter Baade (3)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Facetious (2)  |  Generation (242)  |  Local (19)  |  Look (582)  |  Milky Way (26)  |  Mount (42)  |  Mount Wilson (2)  |  Observatory (15)  |  Present (620)  |  Swimming (19)  |  Way (1216)

Exper. I. I made a small hole in a window-shutter, and covered it with a piece of thick paper, which I perforated with a fine needle. For greater convenience of observation I placed a small looking-glass without the window-shutter, in such a position as to reflect the sun's light, in a direction nearly horizontal, upon the opposite wall, and to cause the cone of diverging light to pass over a table on which were several little screens of card-paper. I brought into the sunbeam a slip of card, about one-thirtieth of an inch in breadth, and observed its shadow, either on the wall or on other cards held at different distances. Besides the fringes of colour on each side of the shadow, the shadow itself was divided by similar parallel fringes, of smaller dimensions, differing in number, according to the distance at which the shadow was observed, but leaving the middle of the shadow always white. Now these fringes were the joint effects of the portions of light passing on each side of the slip of card and inflected, or rather diffracted, into the shadow. For, a little screen being placed a few inches from the card, so as to receive either edge of the shadow on its margin, all the fringes which had before been observed in the shadow on the wall, immediately disappeared, although the light inflected on the other side was allowed to retain its course, and although this light must have undergone any modification that the proximity of the other edge of the slip of card might have been capable of occasioning... Nor was it for want of a sufficient intensity of light that one of the two portions was incapable of producing the fringes alone; for when they were both uninterrupted, the lines appeared, even if the intensity was reduced to one-tenth or one-twentieth.
'Experiments and Calculations Relative to Physical Optics' (read in 1803), Philosophical Transactions (1804), 94, 2-3.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4107)  |  Alone (312)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (494)  |  Breadth (15)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cause (542)  |  Cone (7)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Course (408)  |  Different (577)  |  Dimension (62)  |  Direction (175)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Distance (163)  |  Divided (50)  |  Edge (47)  |  Effect (394)  |  Experiment (696)  |  Fringe (6)  |  Glass (92)  |  Greater (288)  |  Horizontal (9)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Interference (21)  |  Joint (31)  |  Light (609)  |  Little (708)  |  Looking (189)  |  Modification (55)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Number (701)  |  Observation (560)  |  Observed (149)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (183)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passing (76)  |  Portion (84)  |  Receive (114)  |  Reflection (91)  |  Retain (56)  |  Screen (7)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Side (232)  |  Small (479)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Sun (387)  |  Sunbeam (3)  |  Table (104)  |  Two (937)  |  Uninterrupted (7)  |  Wall (67)  |  Want (497)  |  White (127)  |  Window (58)

For terrestrial vertebrates, the climate in the usual meteorological sense of the term would appear to be a reasonable approximation of the conditions of temperature, humidity, radiation, and air movement in which terrestrial vertebrates live. But, in fact, it would be difficult to find any other lay assumption about ecology and natural history which has less general validity. … Most vertebrates are much smaller than man and his domestic animals, and the universe of these small creatures is one of cracks and crevices, holes in logs, dense underbrush, tunnels, and nests—a world where distances are measured in yards rather than miles and where the difference between sunshine and shadow may be the difference between life and death. Actually, climate in the usual sense of the term is little more than a crude index to the physical conditions in which most terrestrial animals live.
From 'Interaction of physiology and behavior under natural conditions', collected in R.I. Bowman (ed.), The Galapagos (1966), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Actually (27)  |  Air (349)  |  Animal (617)  |  Appear (118)  |  Approximation (31)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Climate (97)  |  Condition (357)  |  Crack (15)  |  Creature (233)  |  Crude (31)  |  Death (391)  |  Dense (5)  |  Difference (337)  |  Difficult (247)  |  Distance (163)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Fact (1212)  |  Find (999)  |  General (511)  |  History (675)  |  Humidity (3)  |  Index (4)  |  Less (103)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1799)  |  Little (708)  |  Live (629)  |  Log (6)  |  Man (2249)  |  Measure (233)  |  Mile (39)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1729)  |  Movement (155)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nest (23)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Radiation (45)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Sense (770)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Small (479)  |  Sunshine (10)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Term (349)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Tunnel (12)  |  Underbrush (2)  |  Universe (861)  |  Validity (47)  |  Vertebrate (20)  |  World (1778)  |  Yard (7)

Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round heads in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They’re not fond of rules. You can quote them. Disagree with them. Glorify or vilify them. But the only thing you can’t do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.
In Apple Computer newspaper advertisement (1997) as quoted and cited in Tad Lathrop and Jim Pettigrew, This Business of Music Marketing and Promotion (1999), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (595)  |  Crazy (26)  |  Differently (4)  |  Disagree (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enough (341)  |  Fond (12)  |  Forward (102)  |  Genius (285)  |  Glorify (6)  |  Head (81)  |  Human (1470)  |  Human Race (103)  |  Ignore (46)  |  Misfit (3)  |  People (1005)  |  Push (63)  |  Quote (43)  |  Race (268)  |  Rebel (7)  |  Round (26)  |  Rule (295)  |  See (1082)  |  Square (70)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Troublemaker (2)  |  Vilify (2)  |  World (1778)

It is said that the composing of the Lilavati was occasioned by the following circumstance. Lilavati was the name of the author’s daughter, concerning whom it appeared, from the qualities of the ascendant at her birth, that she was destined to pass her life unmarried, and to remain without children. The father ascertained a lucky hour for contracting her in marriage, that she might be firmly connected and have children. It is said that when that hour approached, he brought his daughter and his intended son near him. He left the hour cup on the vessel of water and kept in attendance a time-knowing astrologer, in order that when the cup should subside in the water, those two precious jewels should be united. But, as the intended arrangement was not according to destiny, it happened that the girl, from a curiosity natural to children, looked into the cup, to observe the water coming in at the hole, when by chance a pearl separated from her bridal dress, fell into the cup, and, rolling down to the hole, stopped the influx of water. So the astrologer waited in expectation of the promised hour. When the operation of the cup had thus been delayed beyond all moderate time, the father was in consternation, and examining, he found that a small pearl had stopped the course of the water, and that the long-expected hour was passed. In short, the father, thus disappointed, said to his unfortunate daughter, I will write a book of your name, which shall remain to the latest times—for a good name is a second life, and the ground-work of eternal existence.
In Preface to the Persian translation of the Lilavati by Faizi (1587), itself translated into English by Strachey and quoted in John Taylor (trans.) Lilawati, or, A Treatise on Arithmetic and Geometry by Bhascara Acharya (1816), Introduction, 3. [The Lilavati is the 12th century treatise on mathematics by Indian mathematician, Bhaskara Acharya, born 1114.]
Science quotes on:  |  12th Century (2)  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  All (4107)  |  Appear (118)  |  Approach (108)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Ascendant (2)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Astrologer (10)  |  Attendance (2)  |  Author (168)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Birth (147)  |  Book (394)  |  Bring (90)  |  Chance (239)  |  Child (309)  |  Children (200)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Coming (114)  |  Compose (17)  |  Concern (228)  |  Connect (125)  |  Contract (11)  |  Course (408)  |  Cup (7)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Daughter (30)  |  Delay (20)  |  Destined (42)  |  Destiny (51)  |  Disappoint (14)  |  Disappointed (6)  |  Down (455)  |  Dress (9)  |  Eternal (111)  |  Examine (78)  |  Existence (460)  |  Expect (201)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Fall (230)  |  Father (110)  |  Find (999)  |  Firmly (6)  |  Follow (379)  |  Girl (37)  |  Good (889)  |  Ground (218)  |  Happen (275)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hour (186)  |  Indian (27)  |  Influx (2)  |  Intend (16)  |  Jewel (10)  |  Keep (101)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Late (118)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1799)  |  Long (789)  |  Look (582)  |  Lucky (13)  |  Marriage (39)  |  Mathematician (389)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1333)  |  Moderate (6)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Observe (168)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Operation (213)  |  Order (632)  |  Pass (238)  |  Pearl (7)  |  Precious (42)  |  Promise (68)  |  Quality (134)  |  Remain (349)  |  Roll (40)  |  Say (984)  |  Second (62)  |  Separate (143)  |  Short (197)  |  Small (479)  |  Son (24)  |  Stop (80)  |  Subside (5)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Two (937)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  United (14)  |  Unmarried (3)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Wait (58)  |  Water (482)  |  Will (2354)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (231)

One should drill the hole where the board is thickest.
Critical Fragment 10 in Friedrich Schlegel's Lucinde and the Fragments (1971), 144.
Science quotes on:  |  Board (12)  |  Drill (11)

Scientists often invent words to fill the holes in their understanding.These words are meant as conveniences until real understanding can be found. … Words such as dimension and field and infinity … are not descriptions of reality, yet we accept them as such because everyone is sure someone else knows what the words mean.
In God’s Debris: A Thought Experiment (2004), 20-21.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (192)  |  Acceptance (53)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Description (84)  |  Dimension (62)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Field (365)  |  Fill (61)  |  Infinity (91)  |  Invention (377)  |  Know (1519)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (235)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Reality (262)  |  Scientist (825)  |  Sure (14)  |  Understanding (514)  |  Word (622)

Shoe leather epidemiology.
[Langmuir stressed that investigators go into the field to collect their own data and directly view the locale of a public health problem. His graduates wore lapel pins of a shoe with a hole in the sole.]
As stated in 'Alexander Langmuir Dies at 83', New York Times (24 Nov 1993), D19.
Science quotes on:  |  Collection (64)  |  Data (156)  |  Epidemiology (2)  |  Field (365)  |  Graduate (31)  |  Health (193)  |  Investigation (231)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Leather (4)  |  Locale (2)  |  Pin (18)  |  Problem (679)  |  Public Health (10)  |  Shoe (11)  |  Sole (49)  |  Stress (22)  |  View (488)

The Humorless Person: I have a friend who has about as much sense of humor as the wooden Indian of commerce. Some time ago he made a trip through the Mammoth Cave of Kentucky. … He did his sight-seeing very thoroughly. He didn’t miss a single ramification in that great crack in the face of Mother Nature. … I asked him what he thought of the Mammoth Cave. “Well,” said he, “taking it as a hole, it is all right.”
In A Sample Case of Humor (1919), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Ask (411)  |  Commerce (21)  |  Crack (15)  |  Face (212)  |  Friend (168)  |  Great (1575)  |  Humor (8)  |  Indian (27)  |  Kentucky (4)  |  Mammoth (9)  |  Miss (51)  |  Mother (114)  |  Mother Nature (4)  |  Nature (1928)  |  Person (363)  |  Ramification (7)  |  Right (452)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sight (132)  |  Sight-Seeing (2)  |  Single (354)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Thought (954)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trip (10)

The secular world is full of holes. We have secularized badly.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 27
Science quotes on:  |  Badly (32)  |  Full (66)  |  Secular (11)  |  World (1778)

To the east was our giant neighbor Makalu, unexplored and unclimbed, and even on top of Everest the mountaineering instinct was sufficient strong to cause me to spend some moments conjecturing as to whether a route up that mountain might not exist. Far away across the clouds the great bulk of Kangchenjunga loomed on the horizon. To the west, Cho Oyu, our old adversary from 1952, dominated the scene and we could see the great unexplored ranges of Nepal stretching off into the distance. The most important photograph, I felt, was a shot down the north ridge, showing the North Col and the old route that had been made famous by the struggles of those great climbers of the 1920s and 1930s. I had little hope of the results being particularly successful, as I had a lot of difficulty in holding the camera steady in my clumsy gloves, but I felt that they would at least serve as a record. After some ten minutes of this, I realized that I was becoming rather clumsy-fingered and slow-moving, so I quickly replaced my oxygen set and experience once more the stimulating effect of even a few liters of oxygen. Meanwhile, Tenzing had made a little hole in the snow and in it he placed small articles of food – a bar of chocolate, a packet of biscuits and a handful of lollies. Small offerings, indeed, but at least a token gifts to the gods that all devoted Buddhists believe have their home on this lofty summit. While we were together on the South Col two days before, Hunt had given me a small crucifix that he had asked me to take to the top. I, too, made a hole in the snow and placed the crucifix beside Tenzing’s gifts.
As quoted in Whit Burnett, The Spirit of Adventure: The Challenge (1955), 349.
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Adversary (6)  |  All (4107)  |  Article (22)  |  Ask (411)  |  Bar (9)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Buddhist (5)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Camera (6)  |  Cause (542)  |  Chocolate (4)  |  Climb (35)  |  Climber (7)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Clumsy (6)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Difficulty (198)  |  Distance (163)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Down (455)  |  East (18)  |  Effect (394)  |  Everest (10)  |  Exist (444)  |  Experience (470)  |  Famous (10)  |  Far (154)  |  Feel (366)  |  Food (199)  |  Giant (68)  |  Gift (104)  |  Give (202)  |  Glove (4)  |  God (758)  |  Great (1575)  |  Handful (13)  |  Hold (95)  |  Home (170)  |  Hope (299)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Hunt (30)  |  Important (210)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Least (75)  |  Little (708)  |  Lofty (13)  |  Loom (20)  |  Lot (151)  |  Meanwhile (2)  |  Minute (125)  |  Moment (254)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1729)  |  Mountain (187)  |  Mountaineering (4)  |  Neighbor (11)  |  Nepal (2)  |  North (11)  |  Offering (2)  |  Old (480)  |  Oxygen (67)  |  Packet (3)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Photograph (20)  |  Place (177)  |  Quickly (18)  |  Range (99)  |  Realize (147)  |  Record (154)  |  Replace (31)  |  Result (678)  |  Ridge (7)  |  Route (15)  |  Scene (36)  |  See (1082)  |  Serve (59)  |  Set (394)  |  Shoot (19)  |  Show (346)  |  Slow (101)  |  Small (479)  |  Snow (38)  |  South (38)  |  Spend (95)  |  Steady (44)  |  Stimulate (18)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Strong (174)  |  Struggle (106)  |  Successful (123)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Summit (26)  |  Together (387)  |  Token (9)  |  Top (96)  |  Two (937)  |  Unexplored (14)  |  West (17)

Whether you take the doughnut hole as a blank space or as an entity unto itself is a purely metaphysical question and does not affect the taste of the doughnut one bit.
A Wild Sheep Chase. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 45
Science quotes on:  |  Affect (19)  |  Bit (22)  |  Blank (11)  |  Doughnut (3)  |  Entity (35)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Purely (110)  |  Question (622)  |  Space (501)  |  Taste (90)  |  Unto (8)

[S]uppose you make a hole in an ordinary evacuated electric light bulb and allow the air molecules to pass in at the rate of 1,000,000 a second, the bulb will become full of air in approximately 100,000,000 years.
In Lecture (1936) on 'Forty Years of Atomic Theory', collected in Needham and Pagel (eds.) in Background to Modern Science: Ten Lectures at Cambridge Arranged by the History of Science Committee, (1938), 99.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (349)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Atomic Size (2)  |  Become (815)  |  Bulb (10)  |  Electric (76)  |  Full (66)  |  Light (609)  |  Light Bulb (6)  |  Million (114)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Pass (238)  |  Rate (29)  |  Second (62)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Will (2354)  |  Year (932)

[Why people buy quarter-inch drill bits.] They don't want quarter-inch bits. They want quarter-inch holes.
As quoted in Theodore Levitt, The Marketing Imagination (1983, 1986), 128. The quote is sometimes attributed to Theodore Levitt, who popularized it. If you know biographical information about Leo McGinneva, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Bit (22)  |  Buy (20)  |  Drill (11)  |  Marketing (3)  |  People (1005)  |  Tool (117)  |  Want (497)  |  Why (491)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.