Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition, we must lead it... That is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by God. That’s what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index B > Category: Blank

Blank Quotes (11 quotes)

Any ignorance is blank ignorance, because knowledge of any factor requires no ignorance.
'The Relatedness of Nature', The Principle of Relativity (1922, 2007), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Factor (34)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Requirement (45)

Da Vinci was as great a mechanic and inventor as were Newton and his friends. Yet a glance at his notebooks shows us that what fascinated him about nature was its variety, its infinite adaptability, the fitness and the individuality of all its parts. By contrast what made astronomy a pleasure to Newton was its unity, its singleness, its model of a nature in which the diversified parts were mere disguises for the same blank atoms.
From The Common Sense of Science (1951), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptability (4)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Atom (251)  |  Contrast (16)  |  Leonardo da Vinci (34)  |  Disguise (8)  |  Diversified (2)  |  Fascinated (2)  |  Fitness (7)  |  Friend (63)  |  Glance (8)  |  Individuality (12)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Inventor (49)  |  Mechanic (13)  |  Model (64)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (258)  |  Notebook (4)  |  Part (146)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Singleness (2)  |  Unity (43)  |  Variety (53)

No one should feel at all offended or threatened by the obvious fact that we are not all born entirely blank, or entirely the same, in our mixture of the broad behavioral propensities defining what we call ‘temperament.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (28)  |  Broad (18)  |  Call (68)  |  Define (29)  |  Entirely (23)  |  Fact (609)  |  Feel (93)  |  Mixture (22)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Offend (4)  |  Propensity (7)  |  Same (92)  |  Temperament (8)  |  Threaten (6)

Nothing could have been worse for the development of my mind than Dr. Butler's school, as it was strictly classical, nothing else being taught, except a little ancient geography and history. The school as a means of education to me was simply a blank. During my whole life I have been singularly incapable of mastering any language. Especial attention was paid to versemaking, and this I could never do well. I had many friends, and got together a good collection of old verses, which by patching together, sometimes aided by other boys, I could work into any subject.
In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of His Published Letters (1892), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (68)  |  Classical (11)  |  Development (228)  |  Education (280)  |  Geography (25)  |  History (302)  |  Language (155)  |  Mind (544)  |  Poetry (96)  |  School (87)  |  Teaching (99)  |  Verse (7)

The Himalayas are the crowning achievement of the Indo-Australian plate. India in the Oligocene crashed head on into Tibet, hit so hard that it not only folded and buckled the plate boundaries but also plowed into the newly created Tibetan plateau and drove the Himalayas five and a half miles into the sky. The mountains are in some trouble. India has not stopped pushing them, and they are still going up. Their height and volume are already so great they are beginning to melt in their own self-generated radioactive heat. When the climbers in 1953 planted their flags on the highest mountain, they set them in snow over the skeletons of creatures that had lived in a warm clear ocean that India, moving north, blanked out. Possibly as much as 20,000 feet below the sea floor, the skeletal remains had turned into rock. This one fact is a treatise in itself on the movements of the surface of the earth.
If by some fiat, I had to restrict all this writing to one sentence; this is the one I would choose: the summit of Mount Everest is marine limestone.
Annals of the Former World
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  Already (16)  |  Begin (52)  |  Below (11)  |  Boundary (27)  |  Buckle (4)  |  Choose (35)  |  Clear (52)  |  Climber (3)  |  Crash (8)  |  Create (98)  |  Creature (127)  |  Crown (19)  |  Drive (38)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fiat (5)  |  Five (14)  |  Flag (10)  |  Floor (16)  |  Fold (4)  |  Foot (39)  |  Great (300)  |  Half (35)  |  Hard (70)  |  Head (52)  |  Heat (90)  |  Height (24)  |  High (78)  |  Himalayas (2)  |  Hit (14)  |  India (15)  |  Limestone (6)  |  Live (186)  |  Marine (7)  |  Melt (15)  |  Mile (24)  |  Mount Everest (2)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Move (58)  |  Movement (65)  |  Newly (3)  |  North (7)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Plant (173)  |  Plate (5)  |  Plateau (4)  |  Plow (6)  |  Possibly (9)  |  Push (22)  |  Radioactive (7)  |  Remain (77)  |  Restrict (8)  |  Rock (107)  |  Sea (143)  |  Sentence (20)  |  Set (56)  |  Skeletal (2)  |  Skeleton (15)  |  Sky (68)  |  Snow (15)  |  Stop (56)  |  Summit (7)  |  Surface Of The Earth (2)  |  Tibet (2)  |  Treatise (19)  |  Trouble (55)  |  Turn (72)  |  Volume (13)  |  Warm (20)  |  Write (87)

The ocean is not just blank blue space but rather the habitat for amazing wildlife, and we have to take care how we use it. If we want to keep having the goods and services it provides, we have to treat it more carefully in terms of fishing and dumping.
As quoted by Ain Stewart in '2 Long Islanders Get MacArthurs', New York Times (18 Jun 2000), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Amazing (16)  |  Blue (30)  |  Care (73)  |  Fishing (12)  |  Goods (6)  |  Habitat (10)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Provide (48)  |  Service (54)  |  Space (154)  |  Treat (17)  |  Wildlife (11)

We inhabit a dead ember swimming wide in the blank of space, dizzily spinning as it swims, and lighted up from several million miles away by a more horrible hell-fire than was ever conceived by the theological imagination. Yet the dead ember is a green, commodious dwelling-place; and the reverberation of this hell-fire ripens flower and fruit and mildly warms us on summer eves upon the lawn.
In Lay Morals, collected in Works: Letters and Miscellanies of Robert Louis Stevenson: Sketches, Criticism, Etc. (1898) Vol. 22, 552.
Science quotes on:  |  Conceive (22)  |  Dead (45)  |  Dizzy (3)  |  Dwelling (9)  |  Eve (3)  |  Flower (65)  |  Fruit (63)  |  Green (23)  |  Horrible (7)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Inhabit (13)  |  Lawn (3)  |  Light (246)  |  Mildly (2)  |  Mile (24)  |  Million (89)  |  Reverberation (3)  |  Ripen (3)  |  Space (154)  |  Spin (8)  |  Summer (26)  |  Swim (12)  |  Theological (2)  |  Warm (20)  |  Wide (14)

When the climbers in 1953 planted their flags on the highest mountain, they set them in snow over the skeletons of creatures that had lived in the warm clear ocean that India, moving north, blanked out. Possibly as much as twenty thousand feet below the seafloor, the skeletal remains had turned into rock. This one fact is a treatise in itself on the movements of the surface of the earth. If by some fiat I had to restrict all this writing to one sentence, this is the one I would choose: The summit of Mt. Everest is marine limestone.
Annals of the Former World
Science quotes on:  |  Below (11)  |  Choose (35)  |  Clear (52)  |  Climber (3)  |  Creature (127)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fiat (5)  |  Flag (10)  |  Foot (39)  |  High (78)  |  India (15)  |  Limestone (6)  |  Live (186)  |  Marine (7)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Move (58)  |  Movement (65)  |  North (7)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Plant (173)  |  Possibly (9)  |  Remain (77)  |  Restrict (8)  |  Rock (107)  |  Seafloor (2)  |  Sentence (20)  |  Set (56)  |  Skeletal (2)  |  Skeleton (15)  |  Snow (15)  |  Summit (7)  |  Surface Of The Earth (2)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Treatise (19)  |  Turn (72)  |  Warm (20)  |  Write (87)

Whether you take the doughnut hole as a blank space or as an entity unto itself is a purely metaphysical question and does not affect the taste of the doughnut one bit.
A Wild Sheep Chase. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 45
Science quotes on:  |  Affect (10)  |  Bit (13)  |  Doughnut (2)  |  Entity (23)  |  Hole (11)  |  Metaphysical (5)  |  Purely (15)  |  Question (315)  |  Space (154)  |  Taste (35)  |  Unto (6)

Without some idea of oxidation processes, of the chemical structure of food, and of the chemical reactions in digestion, visceral behavior is a blank. And without some understanding of visceral behavior, psychic behavior is up in the air.
From Why We Behave Like Human Beings (1925), xiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Behavior (49)  |  Biochemistry (46)  |  Chemical Reaction (3)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Food (139)  |  Oxidation (6)  |  Process (201)  |  Psychology (125)  |  Structure (191)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Visceral (3)

[L]et us not overlook the further great fact, that not only does science underlie sculpture, painting, music, poetry, but that science is itself poetic. The current opinion that science and poetry are opposed is a delusion. ... On the contrary science opens up realms of poetry where to the unscientific all is a blank. Those engaged in scientific researches constantly show us that they realize not less vividly, but more vividly, than others, the poetry of their subjects. Whoever will dip into Hugh Miller's works on geology, or read Mr. Lewes's “Seaside Studies,” will perceive that science excites poetry rather than extinguishes it. And whoever will contemplate the life of Goethe will see that the poet and the man of science can co-exist in equal activity. Is it not, indeed, an absurd and almost a sacrilegious belief that the more a man studies Nature the less he reveres it? Think you that a drop of water, which to the vulgar eye is but a drop of water, loses anything in the eye of the physicist who knows that its elements are held together by a force which, if suddenly liberated, would produce a flash of lightning? Think you that what is carelessly looked upon by the uninitiated as a mere snow-flake, does not suggest higher associations to one who has seen through a microscope the wondrously varied and elegant forms of snow-crystals? Think you that the rounded rock marked with parallel scratches calls up as much poetry in an ignorant mind as in the mind of a geologist, who knows that over this rock a glacier slid a million years ago? The truth is, that those who have never entered upon scientific pursuits know not a tithe of the poetry by which they are surrounded. Whoever has not in youth collected plants and insects, knows not half the halo of interest which lanes and hedge-rows can assume. Whoever has not sought for fossils, has little idea of the poetical associations that surround the places where imbedded treasures were found. Whoever at the seaside has not had a microscope and aquarium, has yet to learn what the highest pleasures of the seaside are. Sad, indeed, is it to see how men occupy themselves with trivialities, and are indifferent to the grandest phenomena—care not to understand the architecture of the Heavens, but are deeply interested in some contemptible controversy about the intrigues of Mary Queen of Scots!—are learnedly critical over a Greek ode, and pass by without a glance that grand epic written by the finger of God upon the strata of the Earth!
Education: Intellectual, Moral, and Physical (1889), 82-83.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurdity (16)  |  Aquarium (2)  |  Collection (38)  |  Contemplation (37)  |  Current (43)  |  Delusion (13)  |  Drop (27)  |  Excitation (7)  |  Flash (25)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Glacier (13)  |  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (127)  |  George Henry Lewes (18)  |  Lightning (28)  |  Microscope (68)  |  Hugh Miller (14)  |  Music (66)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Opposition (29)  |  Painting (24)  |  Poetry (96)  |  Research (517)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Sculpture (8)  |  Seaside (2)  |  Snowflake (9)  |  Strata (18)  |  Water (244)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.