Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I have no satisfaction in formulas unless I feel their arithmetical magnitude.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Contrast

Contrast Quotes (25 quotes)

Can any thoughtful person admit for a moment that, in a society so constituted that these overwhelming contrasts of luxury and privation are looked upon as necessities, and are treated by the Legislature as matters with which it has practically nothing do, there is the smallest probability that we can deal successfully with such tremendous social problems as those which involve the marriage tie and the family relation as a means of promoting the physical and moral advancement of the race? What a mockery to still further whiten the sepulchre of society, in which is hidden ‘all manner of corruption,’ with schemes for the moral and physical advancement of the race!
In 'Human Selection', Fortnightly Review (1890),48, 330.
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (40)  |  Advancement (38)  |  Constituted (5)  |  Corruption (10)  |  Deal (40)  |  Family (44)  |  Further (6)  |  Hidden (40)  |  Involve (43)  |  Legislature (3)  |  Luxury (15)  |  Manner (47)  |  Marriage (33)  |  Matter (322)  |  Mean (93)  |  Mockery (2)  |  Moment (98)  |  Moral (115)  |  Necessity (138)  |  Nothing (363)  |  Overwhelming (19)  |  Person (145)  |  Physical (119)  |  Practically (10)  |  Privation (5)  |  Probability (104)  |  Problem (451)  |  Promoting (7)  |  Race (100)  |  Relation (127)  |  Scheme (25)  |  Sepulchre (3)  |  Smallest (9)  |  Social (102)  |  Society (215)  |  Successfully (5)  |  Thoughtful (10)  |  Tie (22)  |  Treated (2)  |  Tremendous (15)

Da Vinci was as great a mechanic and inventor as were Newton and his friends. Yet a glance at his notebooks shows us that what fascinated him about nature was its variety, its infinite adaptability, the fitness and the individuality of all its parts. By contrast what made astronomy a pleasure to Newton was its unity, its singleness, its model of a nature in which the diversified parts were mere disguises for the same blank atoms.
From The Common Sense of Science (1951), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptability (5)  |  Astronomy (193)  |  Atom (272)  |  Blank (11)  |  Leonardo da Vinci (76)  |  Disguise (8)  |  Diversified (3)  |  Fascinated (2)  |  Fitness (9)  |  Friend (82)  |  Glance (18)  |  Individuality (13)  |  Infinite (117)  |  Inventor (53)  |  Mechanic (20)  |  Model (76)  |  Nature (1154)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (311)  |  Notebook (4)  |  Part (199)  |  Pleasure (122)  |  Singleness (2)  |  Unity (49)  |  Variety (62)

Heroes and scholars represent the opposite extremes... The scholar struggles for the benefit of all humanity, sometimes to reduce physical effort, sometimes to reduce pain, and sometimes to postpone death, or at least render it more bearable. In contrast, the patriot sacrifices a rather substantial part of humanity for the sake of his own prestige. His statue is always erected on a pedestal of ruins and corpses... In contrast, all humanity crowns a scholar, love forms the pedestal of his statues, and his triumphs defy the desecration of time and the judgment of history.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999) 41-42.
Science quotes on:  |  Bearable (2)  |  Benefit (68)  |  Corpse (5)  |  Crown (25)  |  Death (285)  |  Defiance (5)  |  Effort (136)  |  Hero (34)  |  History (348)  |  Humanity (119)  |  Judgment (89)  |  Love (207)  |  Opposite (48)  |  Pain (95)  |  Part (199)  |  Patriot (4)  |  Pedestal (2)  |  Prestige (11)  |  Reduction (40)  |  Render (26)  |  Ruin (25)  |  Sacrifice (31)  |  Sake (21)  |  Scholar (36)  |  Statue (10)  |  Struggle (74)  |  Substantial (13)  |  Time (562)  |  Triumph (43)

I hate science. It denies a man’s responsibility for his own deeds, abolishes the brotherhood that springs from God’s fatherhood. It is a hectoring, dictating expertise, which makes the least lovable of the Church Fathers seem liberal by contrast. It is far easier for a Hitler or a Stalin to find a mock-scientific excuse for persecution than it was for Dominic to find a mock-Christian one.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abolish (12)  |  Brotherhood (5)  |  Church (34)  |  Deed (21)  |  Deny (37)  |  Dictate (11)  |  Easy (86)  |  Excuse (17)  |  Expertise (5)  |  Far (144)  |  Father (55)  |  Fatherhood (2)  |  Find (373)  |  God (509)  |  Hate (36)  |  Adolf Hitler (18)  |  Least (62)  |  Liberal (8)  |  Persecution (9)  |  Pseudoscience (16)  |  Responsibility (52)  |  Science (1939)  |  Seem (135)  |  Spring (63)  |  Stalin_Joseph (5)

It is hard to imagine while strenuously walking in the heart of an equatorial rain forest, gasping for every breath in a stifling humid sauna, how people could have ever adapted to life under these conditions. It is not just the oppressive climate - the tall forest itself is dark, little light reaching the floor from the canopy, and you do not see any animals. It is a complete contrast to the herbivore-rich dry savannahs of tropical Africa. Yet there are many animals here, evident by the loud, continual noise of large cryptic insects and the constant threat of stepping on a deadly king cobra. This was my first impression of the rain forest in Borneo.
The Humans Who Went Extinct
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (25)  |  Africa (19)  |  Animal (340)  |  Borneo (3)  |  Breath (30)  |  Canopy (4)  |  Climate (42)  |  Cobra (2)  |  Complete (70)  |  Condition (144)  |  Constant (52)  |  Continual (18)  |  Cryptic (2)  |  Dark (72)  |  Deadly (9)  |  Dry (18)  |  Evident (22)  |  First (285)  |  Floor (18)  |  Forest (101)  |  Gasp (5)  |  Hard (96)  |  Heart (136)  |  Imagine (69)  |  Impression (67)  |  Insect (63)  |  King (32)  |  Large (120)  |  Life (1071)  |  Light (331)  |  Little (174)  |  Loud (9)  |  Noise (28)  |  Oppressive (2)  |  People (360)  |  Rain Forest (24)  |  Reach (115)  |  See (354)  |  Step (99)  |  Stifle (5)  |  Tall (9)  |  Threat (28)  |  Tropical (7)  |  Walk (65)

It is not only a decided preference for synthesis and a complete denial of general methods which characterizes the ancient mathematics as against our newer Science [modern mathematics]: besides this extemal formal difference there is another real, more deeply seated, contrast, which arises from the different attitudes which the two assumed relative to the use of the concept of variability. For while the ancients, on account of considerations which had been transmitted to them from the Philosophie school of the Eleatics, never employed the concept of motion, the spatial expression for variability, in their rigorous system, and made incidental use of it only in the treatment of phonoromically generated curves, modern geometry dates from the instant that Descartes left the purely algebraic treatment of equations and proceeded to investigate the variations which an algebraic expression undergoes when one of its variables assumes a continuous succession of values.
In 'Untersuchungen über die unendlich oft oszillierenden und unstetigen Functionen', Ostwald’s Klassiker der exacten Wissenschaften (1905), No. 153, 44-45. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 115. From the original German, “Nicht allein entschiedene Vorliebe für die Synthese und gänzliche Verleugnung allgemeiner Methoden charakterisiert die antike Mathematik gegenüber unserer neueren Wissenschaft; es gibt neben diesem mehr äußeren, formalen, noch einen tiefliegenden realen Gegensatz, welcher aus der verschiedenen Stellung entspringt, in welche sich beide zu der wissenschaftlichen Verwendung des Begriffes der Veränderlichkeit gesetzt haben. Denn während die Alten den Begriff der Bewegung, des räumlichen Ausdruckes der Veränderlichkeit, aus Bedenken, die aus der philosophischen Schule der Eleaten auf sie übergegangen waren, in ihrem strengen Systeme niemals und auch in der Behandlung phoronomisch erzeugter Kurven nur vorübergehend verwenden, so datiert die neuere Mathematik von dem Augenblicke, als Descartes von der rein algebraischen Behandlung der Gleichungen dazu fortschritt, die Größenveränderungen zu untersuchen, welche ein algebraischer Ausdruck erleidet, indem eine in ihm allgemein bezeichnete Größe eine stetige Folge von Werten durchläuft.”
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (79)  |  Ancient (95)  |  Attitude (57)  |  Curve (29)  |  Denial (14)  |  René Descartes (78)  |  Difference (237)  |  Equation (88)  |  Geometry (192)  |  Investigate (61)  |  Mathematics (1027)  |  Method (200)  |  Modern (148)  |  Motion (150)  |  Preference (21)  |  Synthesis (42)  |  Treatment (95)  |  Value (223)  |  Variable (13)

It is scientists, not sceptics, who are most willing to consider explanations that conflict with their own. And far from quashing dissent, it is the scientists, not the sceptics, who do most to acknowledge gaps in their studies and point out the limitations of their data—which is where sceptics get much of the mud they fling at the scientists. By contrast, the [sceptics] are not trying to build a theory of anything. They have set the bar much lower, and are happy muddying the waters.
Editorial, Nature (28 Jul 2011), 475, 423-424.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledgment (11)  |  Build (103)  |  Climate Change (59)  |  Conflict (55)  |  Consider (71)  |  Data (115)  |  Dissent (7)  |  Explanation (173)  |  Gap (21)  |  Global Warming (26)  |  Happiness (92)  |  Limitation (25)  |  Mud (15)  |  Scientist (499)  |  Skeptic (7)  |  Study (434)  |  Theory (661)  |  Trying (18)  |  Water (278)  |  Willing (7)

Man is a part of nature, not something contrasted with nature. His thoughts and his bodily movements follow the same laws that describe the motions of stars and atoms.
Opening of What I Believe (1925), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (272)  |  Body (229)  |  Describe (48)  |  Follow (110)  |  Law (485)  |  Man (366)  |  Motion (150)  |  Movement (78)  |  Nature (1154)  |  Part (199)  |  Same (139)  |  Star (323)  |  Thought (484)

My passionate sense of social justice and social responsibility has always contrasted oddly with my pronounced lack of need for direct contact with other human beings and human communities.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Community (79)  |  Contact (31)  |  Direct (74)  |  Human (526)  |  Human Beings (21)  |  Justice (26)  |  Lack (74)  |  Need (261)  |  Oddly (3)  |  Passionate (14)  |  Pronounce (4)  |  Sense (300)  |  Social (102)  |  Social Responsibility (2)

Obviously we biologists should fit our methods to our materials. An interesting response to this challenge has been employed particularly by persons who have entered biology from the physical sciences or who are distressed by the variability in biology; they focus their research on inbred strains of genetically homogeneous laboratory animals from which, to the maximum extent possible, variability has been eliminated. These biologists have changed the nature of the biological system to fit their methods. Such a bold and forthright solution is admirable, but it is not for me. Before I became a professional biologist, I was a boy naturalist, and I prefer a contrasting approach; to change the method to fit the system. This approach requires that one employ procedures which allow direct scientific utilization of the successful long-term evolutionary experiments which are documented by the fascinating diversity and variability of the species of animals which occupy the earth. This is easy to say and hard to do.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (18)  |  Allow (41)  |  Animal (340)  |  Approach (49)  |  Become (163)  |  Biological (35)  |  Biologist (39)  |  Biology (163)  |  Bold (7)  |  Boy (44)  |  Challenge (53)  |  Change (347)  |  Direct (74)  |  Distress (6)  |  Diversity (50)  |  Document (7)  |  Earth (611)  |  Easy (86)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Employ (28)  |  Enter (28)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Experiment (580)  |  Extent (44)  |  Fascinating (21)  |  Fit (42)  |  Focus (27)  |  Genetically (2)  |  Hard (96)  |  Homogeneous (5)  |  Interest (221)  |  Laboratory (129)  |  Long-Term (9)  |  Material (143)  |  Maximum (12)  |  Method (200)  |  Naturalist (54)  |  Nature (1154)  |  Obviously (11)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Particularly (19)  |  Person (145)  |  Physical Science (61)  |  Possible (138)  |  Prefer (24)  |  Procedure (23)  |  Professional (35)  |  Require (66)  |  Research (568)  |  Response (28)  |  Say (214)  |  Scientific (215)  |  Solution (195)  |  Species (213)  |  Strain (11)  |  Successful (38)  |  System (181)  |  Utilization (8)  |  Variability (5)

Our science, in contrast with others, is not founded on a single period of human history, but has accompanied the development of culture through all its stages. Mathematics is as much interwoven with Greek culture as with the most modern problems in Engineering. She not only lends a hand to the progressive natural sciences but participates at the same time in the abstract investigations of logicians and philosophers.
In Klein und Riecke: Ueber angewandte Mathematik und Physik (1900), 228.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (70)  |  Accompany (21)  |  Culture (96)  |  Development (260)  |  Engineering (121)  |  Founded (19)  |  Greek (66)  |  Help (93)  |  Human History (5)  |  Interwoven (8)  |  Investigation (157)  |  Logician (10)  |  Mathematics (1027)  |  Modern (148)  |  Natural Science (83)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (41)  |  Participate (6)  |  Period (62)  |  Philosopher (157)  |  Problem (451)  |  Progressive (17)  |  Science (1939)  |  Stage (53)

Plants, generally speaking, meet the impact of the terrestrial environment head on, although of course they in turn modify the physical environment by adventitious group activity. The individual plant cannot select its habitat; its location is largely determined by the vagaries of the dispersal of seeds or spores and is thus profoundly affected by chance. Because of their mobility and their capacity for acceptance or rejection terrestrial animals, in contrast, can and do actively seek out and utilize the facets of the environment that allow their physiological capacities to function adequately. This means that an animal by its behavior can fit the environment to its physiology by selecting situations in which its physiological capacities can cope with physical conditions. If one accepts this idea, it follows that there is no such thing as The Environment, for there exist as many different terrestrial environments as there are species of animals.
From 'The role of physiology in the distribution of terrestrial vertebrates', collected in C.L. Hubbs (ed.), Zoogeography: Publ. 51 (1958), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (58)  |  Acceptance (45)  |  Actively (3)  |  Activity (122)  |  Adequately (3)  |  Affect (17)  |  Allow (41)  |  Animal (340)  |  Behavior (58)  |  Capacity (58)  |  Chance (152)  |  Condition (144)  |  Cope (3)  |  Determine (64)  |  Different (155)  |  Environment (159)  |  Exist (134)  |  Facet (8)  |  Fit (42)  |  Follow (110)  |  Function (120)  |  Generally (12)  |  Group (62)  |  Habitat (14)  |  Head (72)  |  Idea (545)  |  Impact (25)  |  Individual (205)  |  Largely (13)  |  Location (9)  |  Means (152)  |  Meet (27)  |  Mobility (7)  |  Modify (14)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Physical (119)  |  Physiological (17)  |  Physiology (80)  |  Plant (188)  |  Profoundly (13)  |  Rejection (25)  |  Seed (61)  |  Seek (95)  |  Select (9)  |  Situation (50)  |  Speak (78)  |  Species (213)  |  Spore (2)  |  Terrestrial (22)  |  Turn (116)  |  Utilize (9)  |  Vagary (2)

Religion, in contrast to science, deploys the repugnant view that the world is too big for our understanding. Science, in contrast to religion, opens up the great questions of being to rational discussion, to discussion with the prospect of resolution and elucidation.
Essay collected in John Cornwell (ed.), 'The Limitless Power of Science', Nature's Imagination: The Frontiers of Scientific Vision (1995), 125.
Science quotes on:  |  Deploy (2)  |  Discussion (42)  |  Elucidation (6)  |  Prospect (22)  |  Question (383)  |  Rational (52)  |  Repugnant (4)  |  Resolution (18)  |  Science And Religion (289)  |  Understanding (325)  |  View (157)  |  World (854)

Samuel Pierpoint Langley, at that time regarded as one of the most distinguished scientists in the United States … evidently believed that a full sized airplane could be built and flown largely from theory alone. This resulted in two successive disastrous plunges into the Potomac River, the second of which almost drowned his pilot. This experience contrasts with that of two bicycle mechanics Orville and Wilbur Wright who designed, built and flew the first successful airplane. But they did this after hundreds of experiments extending over a number of years.
In article Total Quality: Its Origins and its Future (1995), published at the Center for Quality and Productivity Improvement.
Science quotes on:  |  Airplane (38)  |  Alone (88)  |  Bicycle (9)  |  Build (103)  |  Design (108)  |  Disastrous (3)  |  Distinguished (6)  |  Drown (11)  |  Experience (322)  |  Experiment (580)  |  Fly (97)  |  Samuel Pierpont Langley (3)  |  Largely (13)  |  Mechanic (20)  |  Pilot (12)  |  Plunge (9)  |  Regarded (4)  |  Result (328)  |  Scientist (499)  |  Success (234)  |  Theory (661)  |  United States (31)  |  Orville Wright (8)

Science is the organised attempt of mankind to discover how things work as causal systems. The scientific attitude of mind is an interest in such questions. It can be contrasted with other attitudes, which have different interests; for instance the magical, which attempts to make things work not as material systems but as immaterial forces which can be controlled by spells; or the religious, which is interested in the world as revealing the nature of God.
In The Scientific Attitude (1941), Foreword, 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (114)  |  Attitude (57)  |  Cause (269)  |  Control (106)  |  Difference (237)  |  Discovery (660)  |  Force (235)  |  God (509)  |  Immaterial (4)  |  Instance (29)  |  Interest (221)  |  Magic (75)  |  Mankind (232)  |  Material (143)  |  Mind (691)  |  Nature (1154)  |  Organization (84)  |  Question (383)  |  Revealing (4)  |  Science And Religion (289)  |  Scientific (215)  |  Spell (8)  |  Work (589)  |  World (854)

Science tries to answer the question: ‘How?’ How do cells act in the body? How do you design an airplane that will fly faster than sound? How is a molecule of insulin constructed? Religion, by contrast, tries to answer the question: ‘Why?’ Why was man created? Why ought I to tell the truth? Why must there be sorrow or pain or death? Science attempts to analyze how things and people and animals behave; it has no concern whether this behavior is good or bad, is purposeful or not. But religion is precisely the quest for such answers: whether an act is right or wrong, good or bad, and why.
Science and Imagination, ch. 4, Basic Books (1967).
Science quotes on:  |  Act (106)  |  Airplane (38)  |  Analyze (9)  |  Animal (340)  |  Answer (237)  |  Attempt (114)  |  Bad (91)  |  Behave (16)  |  Behavior (58)  |  Body (229)  |  Cell (133)  |  Concern (99)  |  Construct (34)  |  Create (135)  |  Death (285)  |  Design (108)  |  Fast (39)  |  Fly (97)  |  Good (311)  |  Insulin (8)  |  Molecule (130)  |  Pain (95)  |  People (360)  |  Precisely (22)  |  Quest (32)  |  Question (383)  |  Religion (231)  |  Right (180)  |  Science (1939)  |  Sorrow (11)  |  Sound (79)  |  Tell (101)  |  Truth (881)  |  Try (134)  |  Wrong (130)

That only Galileo’s physical finger is preserved but the descendants of his techniques thrive is also symbolic of the transitoriness of personal existence in contrast to the immortality of knowledge.
In Galileo's Finger: The Ten Great Ideas of Science (2003), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Descendant (12)  |  Existence (289)  |  Finger (43)  |  Galileo Galilei (120)  |  Immortality (11)  |  Knowledge (1244)  |  Personal (64)  |  Preserve (47)  |  Symbol (55)  |  Technique (47)  |  Thrive (11)  |  Transitory (4)

The great masters of modern analysis are Lagrange, Laplace, and Gauss, who were contemporaries. It is interesting to note the marked contrast in their styles. Lagrange is perfect both in form and matter, he is careful to explain his procedure, and though his arguments are general they are easy to follow. Laplace on the other hand explains nothing, is indifferent to style, and, if satisfied that his results are correct, is content to leave them either with no proof or with a faulty one. Gauss is as exact and elegant as Lagrange, but even more difficult to follow than Laplace, for he removes every trace of the analysis by which he reached his results, and studies to give a proof which while rigorous shall be as concise and synthetical as possible.
In History of Mathematics (3rd Ed., 1901), 468.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (148)  |  Anecdote (18)  |  Concise (5)  |  Contemporary (29)  |  Content (54)  |  Correct (73)  |  Difficult (104)  |  Easy (86)  |  Elegant (14)  |  Exact (57)  |  Explanation (173)  |  Faulty (3)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (71)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (19)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (58)  |  Leave (116)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (83)  |  Perfection (85)  |  Procedure (23)  |  Proof (235)  |  Reasoning (88)  |  Remove (25)  |  Result (328)  |  Rigor (19)  |  Satisfy (25)  |  Style (19)  |  Synthetic (14)

The material world begins to seem so trivial, so arbitrary, so ephemeral when contrasted with the timeless beauty of mathematics.
In The Mathematical Universe: An Alphabetical Journey Through the Great Proofs, Problems, and Personalities (1994), 160.
Science quotes on:  |  Arbitrary (20)  |  Beauty (230)  |  Begin (97)  |  Ephemeral (4)  |  Material World (7)  |  Mathematics (1027)  |  Seem (135)  |  Timeless (6)  |  Trivial (39)

The true contrast between science and religion is that science unites the world and makes it possible for people of widely differing backgrounds to work together and to cooperate. Religion, on the other hand, by its very claim to know “The Truth” through “revelation,” is inherently divisive and a creator of separatism and hostility.
Conclusion to 'Uniting the World—Or Dividing It: Which Outlook Is Truly Universal, which Parochial in the Extreme?', Free Inquiry (Spring 1998), 18, No.2. Collected in Science and Religion: Are They Compatible?, 148. Not found in that article, a widely circulated, brief form of this idea is: “Religion divides us, while it is our human characteristics that bind us to each other.” but Webmaster has not yet confirmed any source for that form. If you know a primary source for it, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Background (29)  |  Cooperation (30)  |  Hostility (10)  |  Human Nature (58)  |  Religion (231)  |  Revelation (32)  |  Science And Religion (289)  |  Truth (881)  |  Unite (18)

There are no better terms available to describe the difference between the approach of the natural and the social sciences than to call the former ‘objective’ and the latter ‘subjective.’ ... While for the natural scientist the contrast between objective facts and subjective opinions is a simple one, the distinction cannot as readily be applied to the object of the social sciences. The reason for this is that the object, the ‘facts’ of the social sciences are also opinions—not opinions of the student of the social phenomena, of course, but opinions of those whose actions produce the object of the social scientist.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (178)  |  Apply (59)  |  Approach (49)  |  Available (25)  |  Better (178)  |  Call (114)  |  Describe (48)  |  Difference (237)  |  Distinction (43)  |  Fact (688)  |  Former (23)  |  Latter (17)  |  Natural (153)  |  Natural Scientist (5)  |  Object (152)  |  Objective (58)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Opinion (168)  |  Phenomenon (256)  |  Produce (92)  |  Readily (9)  |  Reason (424)  |  Simple (155)  |  Social (102)  |  Social Science (30)  |  Social Scientist (3)  |  Student (188)  |  Subjective (11)  |  Term (112)

To illustrate the apparent contrast between statistics and truth … may I quote a remark I once overheard: “There are three kinds of lies: white lies, which are justifiable; common lies—these have no justification; and statistics.” Our meaning is similar when we say: “Anything can be proved by figures”; or, modifying a well-known quotation from Goethe, with numbers “all men may contend their charming systems to defend.”
In Probability, Statistics, and Truth (1939), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparent (35)  |  Charming (3)  |  Common (108)  |  Contend (5)  |  Defend (28)  |  Figure (59)  |  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (143)  |  Illustrate (8)  |  Justifiable (3)  |  Kind (130)  |  Lie (107)  |  Number (252)  |  Prove (101)  |  Quote (18)  |  Statistics (144)  |  System (181)  |  Truth (881)  |  White (55)

We were able to see the plankton blooms resulting from the upwelling off the coast of Chile. The plankton itself extended along the coastline and had some long tenuous arms reaching out to sea. The arms or lines of plankton were pushed around in a random direction, fairly well-defined yet somewhat weak in color, in contrast with the dark blue ocean. The fishing ought to be good down there.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Arm (24)  |  Bloom (8)  |  Blue (54)  |  Coast (13)  |  Coastline (2)  |  Color (95)  |  Dark (72)  |  Direction (66)  |  Down (83)  |  Extend (35)  |  Fairly (4)  |  Fish (92)  |  Good (311)  |  Line (82)  |  Long (152)  |  Ocean (143)  |  Plankton (3)  |  Push (29)  |  Random (24)  |  Reach (115)  |  Result (328)  |  Sea (179)  |  See (354)  |  Tenuous (3)  |  Weak (38)  |  Well-Defined (3)

What beauty. I saw clouds and their light shadows on the distant dear earth…. The water looked like darkish, slightly gleaming spots…. When I watched the horizon, I saw the abrupt, contrasting transition from the earth’s light-colored surface to the absolutely black sky. I enjoyed the rich color spectrum of the earth. It is surrounded by a light blue aureole that gradually darkens, becomes turquoise, dark blue, violet, and finally coal black.
Describing his view while making the first manned orbit of the earth (12 Apr 1961). As quoted in Don Knefel, Writing and Life: A Rhetoric for Nonfiction with Readings (1986), 93. Front Cover
Science quotes on:  |  Abrupt (3)  |  Absolutely (34)  |  Beauty (230)  |  Black (42)  |  Blue (54)  |  Cloud (67)  |  Coal (44)  |  Color (95)  |  Dark (72)  |  Distant (32)  |  Earth (611)  |  Enjoy (35)  |  Gleam (12)  |  Gradually (19)  |  Horizon (27)  |  Light (331)  |  Rich (56)  |  Shadow (51)  |  Sky (118)  |  Space Flight (23)  |  Spectrum (24)  |  Spot (17)  |  Surface (97)  |  Surround (28)  |  Transition (17)  |  Violet (6)  |  Watch (60)  |  Water (278)

[A plant] does not change itself gradually, but remains unaffected during all succeeding generations. It only throws off new forms, which are sharply contrasted with the parent, and which are from the very beginning as perfect and as constant, as narrowly defined, and as pure of type as might be expected of any species.
In Species and Varieties: Their Origin and Mutation (1905), 28-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (120)  |  Change (347)  |  Constant (52)  |  Defined (4)  |  Expectation (53)  |  Form (278)  |  Generation (127)  |  Gradually (19)  |  Narrow (43)  |  New (455)  |  Parent (45)  |  Perfect (72)  |  Plant (188)  |  Pure (89)  |  Remain (100)  |  Sharply (4)  |  Species (213)  |  Succeeding (2)  |  Throw (42)  |  Type (48)  |  Unaffected (4)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.