Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index I > Category: Immediate

Immediate Quotes (43 quotes)

A discovery in science, or a new theory, even when it appears most unitary and most all-embracing, deals with some immediate element of novelty or paradox within the framework of far vaster, unanalysed, unarticulated reserves of knowledge, experience, faith, and presupposition. Our progress is narrow; it takes a vast world unchallenged and for granted. This is one reason why, however great the novelty or scope of new discovery, we neither can, nor need, rebuild the house of the mind very rapidly. This is one reason why science, for all its revolutions, is conservative. This is why we will have to accept the fact that no one of us really will ever know very much. This is why we shall have to find comfort in the fact that, taken together, we know more and more.
Science and the Common Understanding (1954), 53-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (45)  |  Analysis (166)  |  Articulation (2)  |  Challenge (61)  |  Comfort (49)  |  Conservative (11)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Element (162)  |  Experience (342)  |  Fact (733)  |  Faith (157)  |  Framework (20)  |  Granted (5)  |  House (43)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Mind (760)  |  Narrow (48)  |  Need (287)  |  Novelty (23)  |  Paradox (43)  |  Progress (368)  |  Rapidly (13)  |  Reason (471)  |  Rebuild (4)  |  Reserve (15)  |  Revolution (69)  |  Scope (23)  |  Theory (696)  |  Unitary (2)  |  Vastness (11)

A poem in my opinion, is opposed to a work of science by having for its immediate object, pleasure, not truth.
'Letter to B——— ———', in Southern Literary Messenger (Jul 1836). Quoted in Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (1917), 169, and Appendix, 311. According to different commentators, B——— may be merely a fictional character, or Bulwer-Lyton, or the publisher Elam Bliss.
Science quotes on:  |  Object (175)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Oppose (24)  |  Pleasure (133)  |  Poem (92)  |  Science (2067)  |  Truth (928)

All men and women are born, live suffer and die; what distinguishes us one from another is our dreams, whether they be dreams about worldly or unworldly things, and what we do to make them come about... We do not choose to be born. We do not choose our parents. We do not choose our historical epoch, the country of our birth, or the immediate circumstances of our upbringing. We do not, most of us, choose to die; nor do we choose the time and conditions of our death. But within this realm of choicelessness, we do choose how we live.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (67)  |  Birth (93)  |  Choose (60)  |  Circumstance (66)  |  Condition (163)  |  Country (147)  |  Death (302)  |  Die (82)  |  Distinguish (64)  |  Dream (167)  |  Epoch (21)  |  Historical (15)  |  Live (272)  |  Parent (46)  |  Realm (55)  |  Suffer (40)  |  Time (595)  |  Upbringing (2)  |  Woman (111)  |  Worldly (2)

Archimedes constructing his circle pays with his life for his defective biological adaptation to immediate circumstances.
In Ernst Mach and Thomas J. McCormack, Knowledge and Error: Sketches on the Psychology of Enquiry (1976, 2012), Chap. 4, 45. First published in German as Erkenntnis und Irrtum (1905). Translated from 5th edition (1926). The context is the legend that Archimedes was too engrossed in his work to pay attention to an invading Roman soldier, who killed him.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (49)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Biological (35)  |  Circle (56)  |  Circumstance (66)  |  Construct (41)  |  Defective (4)  |  Life (1131)  |  Pay (43)

Every well established truth is an addition to the sum of human power, and though it may not find an immediate application to the economy of every day life, we may safely commit it to the stream of time, in the confident anticipation that the world will not fail to realize its beneficial results.
In 'Report of the Secretary', Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution for 1856 (1857), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipation (14)  |  Application (170)  |  Benefit (73)  |  Economy (54)  |  Life (1131)  |  Result (389)  |  Truth (928)  |  World (898)

Examine your words well, and you will find that even when you have no motive to be false, it is a very hard thing to say the exact truth, even about your own immediate feelings—much harder than to say something fine about them which is not the exact truth.
In Adam Bede (1859, 1860), 151.
Science quotes on:  |  Exact (68)  |  Examine (44)  |  False (99)  |  Feeling (91)  |  Find (408)  |  Fine (33)  |  Hard (99)  |  Harder (6)  |  Motive (33)  |  Say (228)  |  Truth (928)  |  Word (302)

I am truly a ‘lone traveler’ and have never belonged to my country, my home, my friends, or even my immediate family, with my whole heart; in the face of all these ties, I have never lost a sense of distance and a need for solitude.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (53)  |  Country (147)  |  Distance (77)  |  Face (108)  |  Family (47)  |  Friend (86)  |  Heart (139)  |  Home (84)  |  Lone (2)  |  Lose (94)  |  Need (287)  |  Sense (321)  |  Solitude (11)  |  Tie (24)  |  Traveler (26)  |  Truly (33)  |  Whole (192)

I gang my own gait and have never belonged to my country, my home, my friends, or even my immediate family, with my whole heart; in the face of all these ties I have never lost an obstinate sense of detachment, of the need for solitude–a feeling which increases with the years.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (53)  |  Country (147)  |  Detachment (7)  |  Face (108)  |  Family (47)  |  Feel (167)  |  Friend (86)  |  Gang (4)  |  Heart (139)  |  Home (84)  |  Increase (146)  |  Lose (94)  |  Need (287)  |  Obstinate (5)  |  Sense (321)  |  Solitude (11)  |  Tie (24)  |  Whole (192)  |  Year (299)

I recall my own emotions: I had just been initiated into the mysteries of the complex number. I remember my bewilderment: here were magnitudes patently impossible and yet susceptible of manipulations which lead to concrete results. It was a feeling of dissatisfaction, of restlessness, a desire to fill these illusory creatures, these empty symbols, with substance. Then I was taught to interpret these beings in a concrete geometrical way. There came then an immediate feeling of relief, as though I had solved an enigma, as though a ghost which had been causing me apprehension turned out to be no ghost at all, but a familiar part of my environment.
In Tobias Dantzig and Joseph Mazur (ed.), 'The Two Realities', Number: The Language of Science (1930, ed. by Joseph Mazur 2007), 254.
Science quotes on:  |  Apprehension (16)  |  Bewilderment (5)  |  Cause (285)  |  Complex Number (3)  |  Concrete (32)  |  Creature (155)  |  Desire (142)  |  Dissatisfaction (6)  |  Emotion (78)  |  Empty (40)  |  Enigma (10)  |  Environment (181)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Fill (61)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Ghost (25)  |  Illusory (2)  |  Impossible (113)  |  Initiate (6)  |  Interpret (19)  |  Magnitude (45)  |  Manipulation (14)  |  Mystery (153)  |  Patently (3)  |  Recall (10)  |  Relief (18)  |  Remember (82)  |  Restless (11)  |  Result (389)  |  Solve (78)  |  Substance (87)  |  Susceptible (8)  |  Symbol (73)  |  Teach (188)  |  Turn Out (9)

Thomas Robert Malthus quote Food is necessary to…existence
colorization © todayinsci (Terms of Use) (source)

Please respect the colorization artist’s wishes and do not copy this image for ONLINE use anywhere else.

Thank you.

For offline use, click Terms of Use tab on top menu.

I think I may fairly make two postulata. First, That food is necessary to the existence of man. Secondly, That the passion between the sexes is necessary and will remain nearly in its present state. These two laws ever since we have had any knowledge of mankind, appear to have been fixed laws of our nature; and, as we have not hitherto seen any alteration in them, we have no right to conclude that they will ever cease to be what they are now, without an immediate act of power in that Being who first arranged the system of the universe; and for the advantage of his creatures, still executes, according to fixed laws, all its various operations.
First 'Essay on the Principle of Population' (1798), reprinted in Parallel Chapters from the First and Second editions of An Essay on the Principle of Population (1895), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (117)  |  Advantage (77)  |  Alteration (25)  |  Arranged (4)  |  Being (41)  |  Cease (39)  |  Conclude (16)  |  Creator (55)  |  Creature (155)  |  Existence (299)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Food (154)  |  God (535)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Law (515)  |  Law Of Nature (64)  |  Man (373)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Necessary (154)  |  Passion (71)  |  Postulate (31)  |  Power (366)  |  Present (176)  |  Remain (113)  |  Right (197)  |  Sex (49)  |  State (137)  |  System (191)  |  Universe (686)

In geometry, as in most sciences, it is very rare that an isolated proposition is of immediate utility. But the theories most powerful in practice are formed of propositions which curiosity alone brought to light, and which long remained useless without its being able to divine in what way they should one day cease to be so. In this sense it may be said, that in real science, no theory, no research, is in effect useless.
In 'Geometry', A Philosophical Dictionary, (1881), Vol. l, 374.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (106)  |  Bring (90)  |  Cease (39)  |  Curiosity (106)  |  Divine (61)  |  Effect (166)  |  Form (314)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Isolate (22)  |  Light (347)  |  Long (174)  |  Powerful (68)  |  Practice (94)  |  Proposition (83)  |  Rare (50)  |  Real (149)  |  Remain (113)  |  Research (590)  |  Say (228)  |  Science (2067)  |  Sense (321)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Theory (696)  |  Useless (32)  |  Utility (33)

It is entirely unprecedented that evolution should provide a species with an organ which it does not know how to use. … But the evolution of man’s brain has so wildly overshot man’s immediate needs that he is still breathlessly catching up with its unexploited, unexplored possibilities.
In The Ghost in the Machine (1967), 298-299. This is often seen paraphrased as “The evolution of the brain not only overshot the needs of prehistoric man, it is the only example of evolution providing a species with an organ which it does not know how to use.”
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (213)  |  Catch Up (2)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Example (94)  |  Need (287)  |  Organ (64)  |  Possibility (116)  |  Prehistoric Man (2)  |  Provide (69)  |  Species (221)  |  Unexplored (13)  |  Unprecedented (8)  |  Use (76)

It is therefore easy to see why the churches have always fought science and persecuted its devotees. On the other hand, I maintain that the cosmic religious feeling is the strongest and noblest motive for scientific research. Only those who realize the immense efforts and, above all, the devotion without which pioneer work in theoretical science cannot be achieved are able to grasp the strength of the emotion out of which alone such work, remote as it is from the immediate realities of life, can issue. What a deep conviction of the rationality of the universe and what a yearning to understand, were it but a feeble reflection of the mind revealed in this world, Kepler and Newton must have had to enable them to spend years of solitary labor in disentangling the principles of celestial mechanics! Those whose acquaintance with scientific research is derived chiefly from its practical results easily develop a completely false notion of the mentality of the men who, surrounded by a skeptical world, have shown the way to kindred spirits scattered wide through the world and through the centuries. Only one who has devoted his life to similar ends can have a vivid realization of what has inspired these men and given them the strength to remain true to their purpose in spite of countless failures. It is cosmic religious feeling that gives a man such strength. A contemporary has said, not unjustly, that in this materialistic age of ours the serious scientific workers are the only profoundly religious people.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (64)  |  Acquaintance (23)  |  Age (178)  |  Alone (106)  |  Celestial Mechanics (3)  |  Century (131)  |  Chiefly (12)  |  Church (34)  |  Completely (32)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Conviction (71)  |  Cosmic (47)  |  Countless (22)  |  Deep (124)  |  Derive (33)  |  Develop (107)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Devotion (25)  |  Disentangle (4)  |  Easily (35)  |  Easy (102)  |  Effort (144)  |  Emotion (78)  |  Enable (46)  |  End (195)  |  Failure (138)  |  False (99)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Feel (167)  |  Fight (44)  |  Give (201)  |  Grasp (60)  |  Immense (42)  |  Inspire (51)  |  Issue (42)  |  Kepler (4)  |  Kindred (6)  |  Labor (73)  |  Life (1131)  |  Maintain (33)  |  Materialistic (2)  |  Mentality (5)  |  Mind (760)  |  Motive (33)  |  Newton (10)  |  Nobl (4)  |  Notion (59)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Ours (4)  |  People (390)  |  Persecute (4)  |  Pioneer (27)  |  Practical (133)  |  Principle (292)  |  Profoundly (13)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Rationality (16)  |  Reality (190)  |  Realization (37)  |  Realize (90)  |  Reflection (60)  |  Religious (49)  |  Remain (113)  |  Remote (42)  |  Research (590)  |  Result (389)  |  Reveal (52)  |  Say (228)  |  Scatter (6)  |  Science (2067)  |  Scientific (236)  |  See (369)  |  Serious (52)  |  Show (93)  |  Similar (35)  |  Skeptical (11)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Spend (43)  |  Spirit (154)  |  Spite (13)  |  Strength (81)  |  Strong (72)  |  Surround (29)  |  Theoretical Science (4)  |  True (208)  |  Understand (340)  |  Universe (686)  |  Unjustly (2)  |  Vivid (17)  |  Wide (28)  |  Work (635)  |  Worker (30)  |  World (898)  |  Year (299)  |  Yearn (10)

Knowledge once gained casts a faint light beyond its own immediate boundaries. There is no discovery so limited as not to illuminate something beyond itself.
In 'On the Methods and Tendencies of Physical Investigation', Scientific Addresses (1870), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (105)  |  Boundary (38)  |  Cast (25)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Faint (9)  |  Gain (70)  |  Illumination (12)  |  Itself (7)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Light (347)  |  Limited (18)

Mathematics, among all school subjects, is especially adapted to further clearness, definite brevity and precision in expression, although it offers no exercise in flights of rhetoric. This is due in the first place to the logical rigour with which it develops thought, avoiding every departure from the shortest, most direct way, never allowing empty phrases to enter. Other subjects excel in the development of expression in other respects: translation from foreign languages into the mother tongue gives exercise in finding the proper word for the given foreign word and gives knowledge of laws of syntax, the study of poetry and prose furnish fit patterns for connected presentation and elegant form of expression, composition is to exercise the pupil in a like presentation of his own or borrowed thoughtsand their development, the natural sciences teach description of natural objects, apparatus and processes, as well as the statement of laws on the grounds of immediate sense-perception. But all these aids for exercise in the use of the mother tongue, each in its way valuable and indispensable, do not guarantee, in the same manner as mathematical training, the exclusion of words whose concepts, if not entirely wanting, are not sufficiently clear. They do not furnish in the same measure that which the mathematician demands particularly as regards precision of expression.
In Anleitung zum mathematischen Unterricht in höheren Schulen (1906), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (28)  |  Aid (42)  |  Allow (44)  |  Apparatus (37)  |  Avoid (55)  |  Borrow (16)  |  Brevity (7)  |  Clarity (41)  |  Clear (98)  |  Composition (60)  |  Concept (146)  |  Connect (33)  |  Demand (76)  |  Departure (9)  |  Description (84)  |  Development (289)  |  Direct (84)  |  Due (20)  |  Elegant (16)  |  Empty (40)  |  Enter (32)  |  Entirely (33)  |  Excel (4)  |  Exclusion (13)  |  Expression (110)  |  Find (408)  |  First (314)  |  Fit (48)  |  Foreign (26)  |  Form (314)  |  Furnish (42)  |  Give (201)  |  Ground (90)  |  Guarantee (21)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Language (228)  |  Law (515)  |  Logical (55)  |  Manner (57)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Measure (104)  |  Mother Tongue (3)  |  Natural (173)  |  Natural Science (90)  |  Object (175)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Pattern (79)  |  Perception (64)  |  Phrase (29)  |  Place (175)  |  Poetry (124)  |  Precision (52)  |  Presentation (18)  |  Process (267)  |  Proper (38)  |  Prose (11)  |  Pupil (36)  |  Regard (95)  |  Respect (86)  |  Rhetoric (8)  |  Rigour (16)  |  Same (156)  |  School (119)  |  Sense (321)  |  Short (51)  |  Statement (76)  |  Study (476)  |  Subject (240)  |  Sufficiently (9)  |  Syntax (2)  |  Teach (188)  |  Thought (546)  |  Training (66)  |  Translation (15)  |  Value (242)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Want (176)  |  Word (302)

Miss Stevens’s work is characterized by its precision, and by a caution that seldom ventures far from the immediate observation. Her contributions are models of brevity—a brevity amounting at times almost to meagerness.
In obituary, 'The Scientific Work of Miss N.M. Steves', Science (11 Oct 1912), 36, No. 928, 470.
Science quotes on:  |  Brevity (7)  |  Caution (21)  |  Characterized (2)  |  Contribution (60)  |  Model (81)  |  Observation (450)  |  Precision (52)  |  Seldom (30)  |  Nettie Maria Stevens (4)  |  Time (595)  |  Venture (18)  |  Work (635)

Natural selection produces systems that function no better than necessary. It results in ad hoc adaptive solutions to immediate problems. Whatever enhances fitness is selected. The product of natural selection is not perfection but adequacy, not final answers but limited, short-term solutions.
In 'The role of natural history in contemporary biology', BioScience (1986), 36, 325.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptive (3)  |  Adequacy (9)  |  Answer (249)  |  Better (192)  |  Enhance (9)  |  Final (50)  |  Fitness (9)  |  Function (131)  |  Limit (126)  |  Natural Selection (90)  |  Necessary (154)  |  Perfection (89)  |  Problem (497)  |  Produce (102)  |  Product (82)  |  Result (389)  |  Select (12)  |  Short-Term (3)  |  Solution (216)  |  System (191)

Newton has shown us that a law is only a necessary relation between the present state of the world and its immediately subsequent state. All the other laws since discovered are nothing else; they are in sum, differential equations.
In Henri Poincaré and George Bruce Halsted (trans.), The Value of Science: Essential Writings of Henri Poincare (1907), 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Differential Equation (13)  |  Discover (199)  |  Law Of Nature (64)  |  Necessary (154)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Present (176)  |  Relation (154)  |  State (137)  |  Subsequent (19)  |  Sum (41)  |  World (898)

No school subject so readily furnishes tasks whose purpose can be made so clear, so immediate and so appealing to the sober second-thought of the immature learner as the right sort of elementary school mathematics.
In Arithmetic in Public Education (1909), 8. As quoted and cited in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Appeal (45)  |  Clear (98)  |  Elementary School (2)  |  Furnish (42)  |  Immature (4)  |  Learner (10)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Right (197)  |  School (119)  |  Sober (9)  |  Sort (49)  |  Subject (240)  |  Task (83)  |  Thought (546)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)

Now it came to me: … the independence of the gravitational acceleration from the nature of the falling substance, may be expressed as follows: In a gravitational field (of small spatial extension) things behave as they do in a space free of gravitation. … This happened in 1908. Why were another seven years required for the construction of the general theory of relativity? The main reason lies in the fact that it is not so easy to free oneself from the idea that coordinates must have an immediate metrical meaning.
In Paul Arthur Schilpp, 'Autobiographical Notes', Albert Einstein: Philosopher-Scientist (1949), 65-67.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceleration (9)  |  Construction (83)  |  Coordinate (5)  |  Fact (733)  |  Fall (120)  |  Field (171)  |  Free (92)  |  General (160)  |  Gravity (100)  |  Idea (580)  |  Independence (34)  |  Meaning (113)  |  Metrical (3)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Reason (471)  |  Relativity (56)  |  Theory (696)  |  Year (299)

Overemphasis on the competitive system and premature specialization on the ground of immediate usefulness kill the spirit on which all cultural life depends.
From interview with Benjamin Fine, 'Einstein Stresses Critical Thinking', New York Times (5 Oct 1952), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Competitive (8)  |  Cultural (23)  |  Depend (90)  |  Education (347)  |  Kill (52)  |  Life (1131)  |  Premature (20)  |  Specialization (17)  |  Specialized (8)  |  Spirit (154)  |  System (191)  |  Usefulness (77)

Poetry is not the proper antithesis to prose, but to science…. The proper and immediate object of science is the acquirement, or communication, of truth; the proper and immediate object of poetry is the communication of immediate pleasure.
From 'Definition of Poetry' (1811), in Henry Nelson Coleridge (ed.), The Literary Remains of Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1836), Vol. 2, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquirement (3)  |  Antithesis (7)  |  Communication (76)  |  Object (175)  |  Pleasure (133)  |  Poetry (124)  |  Prose (11)  |  Science (2067)  |  Truth (928)

Post-operatively the transplanted kidney functioned immediately with a dramatic improvement in the patient’s renal and cardiopulmonary status. This spectacular success was a clear demonstration that organ transplantation could be life-saving. In a way, it was spying into the future because we had achieved our long-term goal by bypassing, but not solving, the issue of biological incompatibility.
Referring to the pioneering first kidney transplant. It was well-matched since it was between twins. In Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1990). Printed in Tore Frängsmyr and Jan Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1981-1990 (1993).
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (150)  |  Biological (35)  |  Demonstration (86)  |  Dramatic (8)  |  Function (131)  |  Future (287)  |  Goal (100)  |  Improvement (74)  |  Incompatibility (3)  |  Issue (42)  |  Kidney (14)  |  Long-Term (9)  |  Operation (121)  |  Organ (64)  |  Patient (125)  |  Renal (4)  |  Solving (6)  |  Spectacular (10)  |  Status (20)  |  Success (250)  |  Transplant (9)  |  Transplantation (4)

Proof that a given condition always precedes or accompanies a phenomenon does not warrant concluding with certainty that a given condition is the immediate cause of that phenomenon. It must still be established that when this condition is removed, the phenomen will no longer appear.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (22)  |  Appearance (85)  |  Cause (285)  |  Certainty (131)  |  Conclusion (160)  |  Condition (163)  |  Establishing (7)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Preceding (8)  |  Proof (245)  |  Remove (26)  |  Warrant (3)

Science, in the immediate, produces knowledge and, indirectly, means of action. It leads to methodical action if definite goals are set up in advance. For the function of setting up goals and passing statements of value transcends its domain. While it is true that science, to the extent of its grasp of causative connections, may reach important conclusions as to the compatibility and incompatibility of goals and evaluations, the independent and fundamental definitions regarding goals and values remain beyond science’s reach.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (185)  |  Advance (165)  |  Beyond (105)  |  Compatibility (4)  |  Conclusion (160)  |  Connection (111)  |  Definite (43)  |  Definition (192)  |  Domain (42)  |  Evaluation (7)  |  Extent (51)  |  Function (131)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  Goal (100)  |  Grasp (60)  |  Important (205)  |  Incompatibility (3)  |  Independent (67)  |  Indirectly (7)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Lead (160)  |  Means (176)  |  Methodical (7)  |  Pass (93)  |  Produce (102)  |  Reach (121)  |  Regard (95)  |  Remain (113)  |  Science (2067)  |  Set (99)  |  Statement (76)  |  Transcend (17)  |  True (208)  |  Value (242)

Suddenly there was an enormous explosion, like a violent volcano. The nuclear reactions had led to overheating in the underground burial grounds. The explosion poured radioactive dust and materials high up into the sky. It was just the wrong weather for such a tragedy. Strong winds blew the radioactive clouds hundreds of miles away. It was difficult to gauge the extent of the disaster immediately, and no evacuation plan was put into operation right away. Many villages and towns were only ordered to evacuate when the symptoms of radiation sickness were already quite apparent. Tens of thousands of people were affected, hundreds dying, though the real figures have never been made public. The large area, where the accident happened, is still considered dangerous and is closed to the public.
'Two Decades of Dissidence', New Scientist (4 Nov 1976), 72, No. 72, 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (66)  |  Affected (3)  |  Apparent (39)  |  Area (29)  |  Atomic Energy (21)  |  Burial (7)  |  Closed (11)  |  Cloud (69)  |  Considered (12)  |  Dangerous (60)  |  Die (82)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Disaster (41)  |  Dust (49)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Explosion (27)  |  Extent (51)  |  Gauge (2)  |  Ground (90)  |  Happened (2)  |  Heat (100)  |  Hundred (64)  |  Mile (39)  |  Nuclear (27)  |  Operation (121)  |  People (390)  |  Plan (87)  |  Public (94)  |  Radiation (25)  |  Radioactive (8)  |  Reaction (62)  |  Real (149)  |  Sickness (22)  |  Sky (124)  |  Strong (72)  |  Sudden (34)  |  Symptom (18)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Total (36)  |  Town (27)  |  Tragedy (22)  |  Underground (6)  |  Village (7)  |  Violent (17)  |  Volcano (39)  |  Weather (32)  |  Wind (80)  |  Wrong (139)

That the main results of the astronomer’s work are not so immediately practical does not detract from their value. They are, I venture to think, the more to be prized on that account. Astronomy has profoundly influenced the thought of the race. In fact, it has been the keystone in the arch of the sciences under which we have marched out from the darkness of the fifteenth and preceding centuries to the comparative light of to-day.
In 'The Nature of the Astronomer’s Work', North American Review (Jun 1908), 187, No. 631, 915.
Science quotes on:  |  15th Century (5)  |  Arch (7)  |  Astronomer (68)  |  Astronomy (204)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Darkness (43)  |  Detract (2)  |  Influence (140)  |  Keystone (3)  |  Light (347)  |  March (23)  |  Practical (133)  |  Prize (13)  |  Profound (59)  |  Race (104)  |  Research (590)  |  Result (389)  |  Science (2067)  |  Thought (546)  |  Value (242)

The biologist can push it back to the original protist, and the chemist can push it back to the crystal, but none of them touch the real question of why or how the thing began at all. The astronomer goes back untold million of years and ends in gas and emptiness, and then the mathematician sweeps the whole cosmos into unreality and leaves one with mind as the only thing of which we have any immediate apprehension. Cogito ergo sum, ergo omnia esse videntur. All this bother, and we are no further than Descartes. Have you noticed that the astronomers and mathematicians are much the most cheerful people of the lot? I suppose that perpetually contemplating things on so vast a scale makes them feel either that it doesn’t matter a hoot anyway, or that anything so large and elaborate must have some sense in it somewhere.
As co-author with Robert Eustace, The Documents in the Case (1930), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Apprehension (16)  |  Astronomer (68)  |  Begin (108)  |  Biologist (41)  |  Cheerful (6)  |  Chemist (89)  |  Cogito Ergo Sum (4)  |  Contemplate (17)  |  Cosmos (52)  |  Crystal (53)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Elaborate (21)  |  Emptiness (10)  |  End (195)  |  Gas (50)  |  Large (130)  |  Leave (128)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Million (111)  |  Mind (760)  |  Perpetual (21)  |  Protist (2)  |  Question (404)  |  Scale (63)  |  Sense (321)  |  Sweep (13)  |  Unreality (3)  |  Vast (89)  |  Whole (192)  |  Year (299)

The great truths with which it [mathematics] deals, are clothed with austere grandeur, far above all purposes of immediate convenience or profit. It is in them that our limited understandings approach nearest to the conception of that absolute and infinite, towards which in most other things they aspire in vain. In the pure mathematics we contemplate absolute truths, which existed in the divine mind before the morning stars sang together, and which will continue to exist there, when the last of their radiant host shall have fallen from heaven. They existed not merely in metaphysical possibility, but in the actual contemplation of the supreme reason. The pen of inspiration, ranging all nature and life for imagery to set forth the Creator’s power and wisdom, finds them best symbolized in the skill of the surveyor. "He meted out heaven as with a span;" and an ancient sage, neither falsely nor irreverently, ventured to say, that “God is a geometer”.
In Orations and Speeches (1870), Vol. 3, 614.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (98)  |  Actual (48)  |  Ancient (106)  |  Approach (54)  |  Aspire (8)  |  Austere (5)  |  Best (173)  |  Conception (92)  |  Contemplate (17)  |  Contemplation (52)  |  Continue (65)  |  Convenience (34)  |  Creator (55)  |  Deal (49)  |  Divine (61)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Exist (148)  |  Fall (120)  |  Falsely (2)  |  Find (408)  |  Forth (13)  |  Geometer (24)  |  God (535)  |  Grandeur (21)  |  Great (534)  |  Heaven (153)  |  Host (16)  |  Imagery (3)  |  In Vain (9)  |  Infinite (130)  |  Inspiration (61)  |  Irreverent (2)  |  Life (1131)  |  Limit (126)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Merely (82)  |  Metaphysical (11)  |  Mind (760)  |  Morning (43)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Pen (12)  |  Possibility (116)  |  Power (366)  |  Profit (39)  |  Pure Mathematics (65)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Radiant (10)  |  Range (57)  |  Reason (471)  |  Sage (15)  |  Say (228)  |  Set (99)  |  Sing (25)  |  Skill (66)  |  Span (5)  |  Star (336)  |  Supreme (37)  |  Surveyor (4)  |  Symbolize (6)  |  Together (79)  |  Truth (928)  |  Understanding (325)  |  Venture (18)  |  Wisdom (182)

The hybridoma technology was a by-product of basic research. Its success in practical applications is to a large extent the result of unexpected and unpredictable properties of the method. It thus represents another clear-cut example of the enormous practical impact of an investment in research which might not have been considered commercially worthwhile, or of immediate medical relevance. It resulted from esoteric speculations, for curiosity’s sake, only motivated by a desire to understand nature.
From Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1984), collected in Tore Frängsmyr and Jan Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures in Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 267-268.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (170)  |  Basic (66)  |  Basic Research (10)  |  By-Product (6)  |  Clear-Cut (7)  |  Commercial (26)  |  Curiosity (106)  |  Desire (142)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Esoteric (2)  |  Example (94)  |  Hybridoma (2)  |  Impact (26)  |  Investment (11)  |  Medical (24)  |  Method (239)  |  Motivation (26)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Practical (133)  |  Property (126)  |  Relevance (14)  |  Research (590)  |  Result (389)  |  Sake (23)  |  Speculation (104)  |  Success (250)  |  Technology (222)  |  Understanding (325)  |  Unexpected (36)  |  Unpredictable (10)  |  Worthwhile (11)

The immediate object of all art is either pleasure or utility: the immediate object of all science is solely truth.
Lecture (19 Mar 1858) at the Royal Institution, 'The Influence Of Women On The Progress Of Knowledge', collected in The Miscellaneous and Posthumous Works of Henry Thomas Buckle (1872), Vol. 1, 4. Published in Frazier’s Magazine (Apr 1858).
Science quotes on:  |  Art (294)  |  Object (175)  |  Pleasure (133)  |  Science (2067)  |  Science And Art (181)  |  Solely (9)  |  Truth (928)  |  Utility (33)

The incessant call in this country for practical results and the confounding of mechanical inventions with scientific discoveries has a very prejudicial influence on science. … A single scientific principle may include a thousand applications and is therefore though if not of immediate use of vastly more importance even in a practical view.
Presidential address to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (22 Aug 1850),The Papers of Joseph Henry, Vol. 8, 101-102.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (170)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Importance (218)  |  Influence (140)  |  Invention (324)  |  Mechanical (50)  |  Practical (133)  |  Principle (292)  |  Result (389)  |  View (171)

The preservation of a few samples of undeveloped territory is one of the most clamant issues before us today. Just a few more years of hesitation and the only trace of that wilderness which has exerted such a fundamental influence in molding American character will lie in the musty pages of pioneer books. … To avoid this catastrophe demands immediate action.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (185)  |  American (46)  |  Avoid (55)  |  Book (257)  |  Catastrophe (21)  |  Character (118)  |  Conservation (143)  |  Demand (76)  |  Exert (14)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  Hesitation (9)  |  Influence (140)  |  Issue (42)  |  Lie (115)  |  Mold (26)  |  Musty (2)  |  Page (30)  |  Pioneer (27)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Sample (12)  |  Territory (16)  |  Today (117)  |  Trace (53)  |  Undeveloped (4)  |  Wilderness (39)  |  Year (299)

The responsibility for maintaining the composition of the blood in respect to other constituents devolves largely upon the kidneys. It is no exaggeration to say that the composition of the blood is determined not by what the mouth ingests but by what the kidneys keep; they are the master chemists of our internal environment, which, so to speak, they synthesize in reverse. When, among other duties, they excrete the ashes of our body fires, or remove from the blood the infinite variety of foreign substances which are constantly being absorbed from our indiscriminate gastrointestinal tracts, these excretory operations are incidental to the major task of keeping our internal environment in an ideal, balanced state. Our glands, our muscles, our bones, our tendons, even our brains, are called upon to do only one kind of physiological work, while our kidneys are called upon to perform an innumerable variety of operations. Bones can break, muscles can atrophy, glands can loaf, even the brain can go to sleep, without immediately endangering our survival, but when the kidneys fail to manufacture the proper kind of blood neither bone, muscle, gland nor brain can carry on.
'The Evolution of the Kidney', Lectures on the Kidney (1943), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorption (9)  |  Ash (19)  |  Atrophy (6)  |  Balance (55)  |  Blood (104)  |  Body (247)  |  Bone (63)  |  Brain (213)  |  Break (54)  |  Chemist (89)  |  Composition (60)  |  Condition (163)  |  Constant (58)  |  Constituent (16)  |  Determined (9)  |  Environment (181)  |  Exaggeration (11)  |  Excretion (4)  |  Failure (138)  |  Fire (133)  |  Foreign (26)  |  Gland (8)  |  Ideal (72)  |  Incidental (12)  |  Indiscriminate (2)  |  Infinite (130)  |  Innumerable (23)  |  Internal (25)  |  Keep (100)  |  Kidney (14)  |  Loaf (3)  |  Major (32)  |  Manufacturing (23)  |  Master (98)  |  Mouth (21)  |  Muscle (35)  |  Operation (121)  |  Performance (33)  |  Proper (38)  |  Removal (11)  |  Responsibility (55)  |  Reverse (21)  |  Sleep (58)  |  State (137)  |  Substance (87)  |  Survival (61)  |  Synthesis (44)  |  Task (83)  |  Tract (5)  |  Variety (71)

The science of constructing a commonwealth, or renovating it, or reforming it, is, like every other experimental science, not to be taught a priori. Nor is it a short experience that can instruct us in that practical science, because the real effects of moral causes are not always immediate.
Reflections on the Revolution in France, p. 53, ed. Pocock (1790).
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (22)  |  Cause (285)  |  Commonwealth (4)  |  Construct (41)  |  Effect (166)  |  Experience (342)  |  Experimental (20)  |  Instruction (73)  |  Moral (124)  |  Practical (133)  |  Real (149)  |  Reform (14)  |  Renovate (3)  |  Science (2067)  |  Short (51)  |  Teach (188)

To him who devotes his life to science, nothing can give more happiness than increasing the number of discoveries, but his cup of joy is full when the results of his studies immediately find practical applications.
As quoted in René J. Dubos, Louis Pasteur, Free Lance of Science (1960, 1986), 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (170)  |  Devote (35)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Find (408)  |  Full (63)  |  Happiness (94)  |  Increase (146)  |  Joy (88)  |  Life (1131)  |  Practical (133)  |  Result (389)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Study (476)

Today it is no longer questioned that the principles of the analysts are the more far-reaching. Indeed, the synthesists lack two things in order to engage in a general theory of algebraic configurations: these are on the one hand a definition of imaginary elements, on the other an interpretation of general algebraic concepts. Both of these have subsequently been developed in synthetic form, but to do this the essential principle of synthetic geometry had to be set aside. This principle which manifests itself so brilliantly in the theory of linear forms and the forms of the second degree, is the possibility of immediate proof by means of visualized constructions.
In Riemannsche Flächen (1906), Bd. 1, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (104)  |  Analyst (8)  |  Brilliant (28)  |  Concept (146)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Construction (83)  |  Definition (192)  |  Develop (107)  |  Element (162)  |  Engage (25)  |  Essential (117)  |  Far-Reaching (8)  |  Form (314)  |  General (160)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Imaginary (16)  |  Interpretation (70)  |  Linear (4)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Means (176)  |  Possibility (116)  |  Principle (292)  |  Proof (245)  |  Question (404)  |  Set Aside (4)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subsequent (19)  |  Synthetic (16)  |  Theory (696)  |  Today (117)  |  Visualize (8)

We all know, from what we experience with and within ourselves, that our conscious acts spring from our desires and our fears. Intuition tells us that that is true also of our fellows and of the higher animals. We all try to escape pain and death, while we seek what is pleasant. We are all ruled in what we do by impulses; and these impulses are so organized that our actions in general serve for our self preservation and that of the race. Hunger, love, pain, fear are some of those inner forces which rule the individual’s instinct for self preservation. At the same time, as social beings, we are moved in the relations with our fellow beings by such feelings as sympathy, pride, hate, need for power, pity, and so on. All these primary impulses, not easily described in words, are the springs of man’s actions. All such action would cease if those powerful elemental forces were to cease stirring within us. Though our conduct seems so very different from that of the higher animals, the primary instincts are much alike in them and in us. The most evident difference springs from the important part which is played in man by a relatively strong power of imagination and by the capacity to think, aided as it is by language and other symbolical devices. Thought is the organizing factor in man, intersected between the causal primary instincts and the resulting actions. In that way imagination and intelligence enter into our existence in the part of servants of the primary instincts. But their intervention makes our acts to serve ever less merely the immediate claims of our instincts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Act (117)  |  Action (185)  |  Aid (42)  |  Alike (22)  |  Animal (359)  |  Capacity (64)  |  Causal (7)  |  Cease (39)  |  Claim (71)  |  Conduct (31)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Death (302)  |  Describe (57)  |  Desire (142)  |  Device (28)  |  Difference (246)  |  Different (186)  |  Easily (35)  |  Elemental (3)  |  Enter (32)  |  Escape (47)  |  Evident (29)  |  Existence (299)  |  Experience (342)  |  Factor (46)  |  Fear (142)  |  Feelings (14)  |  Fellow (37)  |  Force (249)  |  General (160)  |  Hate (38)  |  High (153)  |  Hunger (14)  |  Imagination (275)  |  Important (205)  |  Impulse (33)  |  Individual (221)  |  Inner (39)  |  Instinct (66)  |  Intelligence (168)  |  Intersect (5)  |  Intervention (12)  |  Intuition (57)  |  Know (556)  |  Language (228)  |  Less (102)  |  Love (224)  |  Merely (82)  |  Move (94)  |  Need (287)  |  Organize (20)  |  Ourselves (51)  |  Pain (101)  |  Part (222)  |  Pity (13)  |  Play (112)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Power (366)  |  Powerful (68)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Pride (64)  |  Primary (41)  |  Race (104)  |  Relation (154)  |  Relatively (7)  |  Result (389)  |  Rule (177)  |  Same (156)  |  Seek (107)  |  Seem (143)  |  Self (47)  |  Servant (18)  |  Serve (58)  |  Social (108)  |  Spring (71)  |  Stir (14)  |  Strong (72)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Sympathy (24)  |  Tell (110)  |  Think (347)  |  Thought (546)  |  Time (595)  |  True (208)  |  Try (141)  |  Word (302)

We build our personalities laboriously and through many years, and we cannot order fundamental changes just because we might value their utility; no button reading ‘positive attitude’ protrudes from our hearts, and no finger can coerce positivity into immediate action by a single and painless pressing.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (185)  |  Attitude (59)  |  Build (117)  |  Button (4)  |  Change (364)  |  Coerce (2)  |  Finger (44)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  Heart (139)  |  Order (242)  |  Painless (2)  |  Personality (47)  |  Positive (44)  |  Press (21)  |  Read (145)  |  Single (120)  |  Utility (33)  |  Value (242)  |  Year (299)

We shall therefore say that a program has common sense if it automatically deduces for itself a sufficient wide class of immediate consequences of anything it is told and what it already knows. ... Our ultimate objective is to make programs that learn from their experience as effectively as humans do.
'Programs with Common Sense', (probably the first paper on AI), delivered to the Teddington Conference on the Mechanization of Thought Processes (Dec 1958). Printed in National Physical Laboratory, Mechanisation of Thought Processes: Proceedings of a Symposium Held at the National Physical Laboratory on 24th, 25th, 26th and 27th November 1958 (1959), 78. Also Summary in John McCarthy and Vladimir Lifschitz (ed.), Formalizing Common Sense: Papers by John McCarthy (1990), 9-10.
Science quotes on:  |  Artificial Intelligence (8)  |  Automatic (16)  |  Class (84)  |  Common Sense (126)  |  Deduction (69)  |  Definition (192)  |  Effective (30)  |  Experience (342)  |  Human (550)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Learn (288)  |  Make (25)  |  Objective (66)  |  Sufficient (42)  |  Ultimate (84)  |  Wide (28)

We should stop the non-scientific, pseudo-scientific, and anti-scientific nonsense emanating from the right wing, and start demanding immediate action to reduce global warming and prevent catastrophic climate change that may be on our horizon now. We must not let the [Bush] Administration distort science and rewrite and manipulate scientific reports in other areas. We must not let it turn the Environmental Protection Agency into the Environmental Pollution Agency.
Address to National Press Club, Washington, DC (12 Jan 2005). In Bill Adler (ed.), The Wit and Wisdom of Ted Kennedy (2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Action (185)  |  Administration (11)  |  Agency (14)  |  George W. Bush (19)  |  Catastrophe (21)  |  Climate Change (60)  |  Demand (76)  |  Distortion (10)  |  Environment (181)  |  Global Warming (26)  |  Horizon (29)  |  Let (61)  |  Manipulation (14)  |  Non-Scientific (4)  |  Nonsense (41)  |  Pollution (43)  |  Prevention (30)  |  Protection (25)  |  Pseudoscience (16)  |  Reduction (41)  |  Report (37)  |  Rewrite (3)  |  Science (2067)  |  Scientific (236)  |  Start (97)  |  Stop (76)  |  Turn (118)

When Cayley had reached his most advanced generalizations he proceeded to establish them directly by some method or other, though he seldom gave the clue by which they had first been obtained: a proceeding which does not tend to make his papers easy reading. …
His literary style is direct, simple and clear. His legal training had an influence, not merely upon his mode of arrangement but also upon his expression; the result is that his papers are severe and present a curious contrast to the luxuriant enthusiasm which pervades so many of Sylvester’s papers. He used to prepare his work for publication as soon as he carried his investigations in any subject far enough for his immediate purpose. … A paper once written out was promptly sent for publication; this practice he maintained throughout life. … The consequence is that he has left few arrears of unfinished or unpublished papers; his work has been given by himself to the world.
In Proceedings of London Royal Society (1895), 58, 23-24.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (165)  |  Arrangement (60)  |  Arrears (2)  |  Carry (59)  |  Arthur Cayley (17)  |  Clear (98)  |  Clue (16)  |  Consequence (114)  |  Contrast (29)  |  Curious (43)  |  Direct (84)  |  Directly (22)  |  Easy (102)  |  Enthusiasm (43)  |  Establish (56)  |  Expression (110)  |  Far (154)  |  First (314)  |  Generalization (41)  |  Give (201)  |  Influence (140)  |  Investigation (176)  |  Leave (128)  |  Legal (8)  |  Life (1131)  |  Literary (12)  |  Maintain (33)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Merely (82)  |  Method (239)  |  Mode (40)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Paper (83)  |  Pervade (10)  |  Practice (94)  |  Prepare (35)  |  Present (176)  |  Proceed (42)  |  Prompt (6)  |  Publication (91)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Reach (121)  |  Read (145)  |  Result (389)  |  Seldom (30)  |  Send (22)  |  Severe (16)  |  Simple (178)  |  Soon (34)  |  Style (22)  |  Subject (240)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Tend (36)  |  Training (66)  |  Unfinished (4)  |  Unpublished (2)  |  Work (635)  |  World (898)  |  Write (154)

Whoever, in the pursuit of science, seeks after immediate practical utility, may generally rest assured that he will seek in vain.
Academical Discourse (22 Nov 1862) delivered at Heidelberg. Collected in Hermann von Helmholtz, Edmund Atkinson (trans.), Popular Lectures on Scientific Subjects: First Series (1883), 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Practical (133)  |  Pursuit (79)  |  Science (2067)  |  Seek (107)  |  Utility (33)  |  Vain (30)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.