Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I have no satisfaction in formulas unless I feel their arithmetical magnitude.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Solve

Solve Quotes (130 quotes)
Solver Quotes


Quod est, Nullum non problema solvere.
There is no problem that cannot be solved.
In The New Algebra.
Science quotes on:  |  Problem (676)

A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it.
Anonymous
Widely found on the web as an Einstein quote, but Webmaster has not yet found a primary source. Can you help? It is probably yet another example of a “wise” quote to which Einstein’s name has been falsely attributed. For authentic quotes see Albert Einstein Quotes on Problem.
Science quotes on:  |  Avoid (116)  |  Clever (38)  |  Person (363)  |  Problem (676)  |  Wise (131)

A good deal of my research in physics has consisted in not setting out to solve some particular problem, but simply examining mathematical quantities of a kind that physicists use and trying to fit them together in an interesting way, regardless of any application that the work may have. It is simply a search for pretty mathematics. It may turn out later to have an application. Then one has good luck. At age 78.
International Journal of Theoretical Physics (1982), 21, 603. In A. Pais, 'Playing With Equations, the Dirac Way'. Behram N. Kursunoglu (Ed.) and Eugene Paul Wigner (Ed.), Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac: Reminiscences about a Great Physicist (1990), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Application (242)  |  Consist (223)  |  Deal (188)  |  Equation (132)  |  Fit (134)  |  Good (889)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Kind (557)  |  Luck (42)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Problem (676)  |  Research (664)  |  Search (162)  |  Setting (44)  |  Together (387)  |  Trying (144)  |  Turn (447)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

A great discovery solves a great problem, but there is a grain of discovery in the solution of any problem. Your problem may be modest, but if it challenges your curiosity and brings into play your inventive faculties, and if you solve it by your own means, you may experience the tension and enjoy the triumph of discovery.
From Preface to the first printing, reprinted in How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Challenge (85)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Experience (467)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Grain (50)  |  Great (1574)  |  Invention (369)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Modest (15)  |  Problem (676)  |  Solution (267)  |  Tension (24)  |  Triumph (73)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
In Time Enough for Love: The Lives of Lazarus Long (1973), 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Act (272)  |  Alone (311)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Balance (77)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bone (95)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Butcher (9)  |  Change (593)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Computer (127)  |  Cooking (11)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Death (388)  |  Design (195)  |  Diaper (2)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Equation (132)  |  Fight (44)  |  Gallant (2)  |  Hog (4)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Insect (77)  |  Invasion (8)  |  Manure (8)  |  Meal (18)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Pitch (17)  |  Plan (117)  |  Problem (676)  |  Program (52)  |  Set (394)  |  Ship (62)  |  Solution (267)  |  Sonnet (4)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Wall (67)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

A man is flying in a hot air balloon and realizes he is lost. He reduces height, spots a man down below and asks,“Excuse me, can you help me? I promised to return the balloon to its owner, but I don’t know where I am.”
The man below says: “You are in a hot air balloon, hovering approximately 350 feet above mean sea level and 30 feet above this field. You are between 40 and 42 degrees north latitude, and between 58 and 60 degrees west longitude.”
“You must be an engineer,” says the balloonist.
“I am,” replies the man.“How did you know?”
“Well,” says the balloonist, “everything you have told me is technically correct, but I have no idea what to make of your information, and the fact is I am still lost.”
The man below says, “You must be a manager.”
“I am,” replies the balloonist,“but how did you know?”
“Well,” says the engineer,“you don’t know where you are, or where you are going. You have made a promise which you have no idea how to keep, and you expect me to solve your problem.The fact is you are in the exact same position you were in before we met, but now it is somehow my fault.”
Anonymous
In Jon Fripp, Michael Fripp and Deborah Fripp, Speaking of Science (2000), 199.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Ask (411)  |  Balloon (15)  |  Correct (86)  |  Degree (276)  |  Down (456)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Everything (476)  |  Excuse (25)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fault (54)  |  Field (364)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Help (105)  |  Hot (60)  |  Hover (8)  |  Hovering (5)  |  Idea (843)  |  Information (166)  |  Joke (83)  |  Know (1518)  |  Latitude (4)  |  Longitude (6)  |  Lost (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manager (6)  |  Mean (809)  |  Must (1526)  |  Problem (676)  |  Promise (67)  |  Realize (147)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Return (124)  |  Say (984)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sea Level (5)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Still (613)

A plain, reasonable working man supposes, in the old way which is also the common-sense way, that if there are people who spend their lives in study, whom he feeds and keeps while they think for him—then no doubt these men are engaged in studying things men need to know; and he expects of science that it will solve for him the questions on which his welfare, and that of all men, depends. He expects science to tell him how he ought to live: how to treat his family, his neighbours and the men of other tribes, how to restrain his passions, what to believe in and what not to believe in, and much else. And what does our science say to him on these matters?
It triumphantly tells him: how many million miles it is from the earth to the sun; at what rate light travels through space; how many million vibrations of ether per second are caused by light, and how many vibrations of air by sound; it tells of the chemical components of the Milky Way, of a new element—helium—of micro-organisms and their excrements, of the points on the hand at which electricity collects, of X rays, and similar things.
“But I don't want any of those things,” says a plain and reasonable man—“I want to know how to live.”
In 'Modern Science', Essays and Letters (1903), 221-222.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Component (48)  |  Depend (228)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Earth (996)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Element (310)  |  Ether (35)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Family (94)  |  Helium (11)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Micro-Organism (3)  |  Milky Way (26)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passion (114)  |  People (1005)  |  Point (580)  |  Question (621)  |  Ray (114)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sound (183)  |  Space (500)  |  Speed Of Light (17)  |  Spend (95)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Sun (385)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Travel (114)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Vibration (20)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)  |  Welfare (25)  |  Will (2355)  |  X-ray (37)

A teacher of mathematics has a great opportunity. If he fills his allotted time with drilling his students in routine operations he kills their interest, hampers their intellectual development, and misuses his opportunity. But if he challenges the curiosity of his students by setting them problems proportionate to their knowledge, and helps them to solve their problems with stimulating questions, he may give them a taste for, and some means of, independent thinking.
In How to Solve It (1948), Preface.
Science quotes on:  |  Challenge (85)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Development (422)  |  Drill (11)  |  Fill (61)  |  Give (202)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hamper (4)  |  Help (105)  |  Independent (67)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Interest (386)  |  Kill (100)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Misuse (13)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proportionate (4)  |  Question (621)  |  Routine (25)  |  Setting (44)  |  Stimulate (18)  |  Student (300)  |  Taste (90)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)

All stable processes we shall predict. All unstable processes we shall control.
Describing John von Neumann's aspiration for the application of computers sufficiently large to solve the problems of meteorology, despite the sensitivity of the weather to small perturbations.
Infinite in All Directions (2004), 182. Dyson wrote his recollection of a talk given by Neumann at Princeton around 1950. The words are not a direct quotation, merely Dyson's description of Neumann's idea.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Computer (127)  |  Control (167)  |  Large (394)  |  Meteorology (33)  |  Perturbation (7)  |  Predict (79)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Sensitivity (10)  |  Small (477)  |  Stable (30)  |  Unstable (8)  |  Weather (44)

Almost everyone... seems to be quite sure that the differences between the methodologies of history and of the natural sciences are vast. For, we are assured, it is well known that in the natural sciences we start from observation and proceed by induction to theory. And is it not obvious that in history we proceed very differently? Yes, I agree that we proceed very differently. But we do so in the natural sciences as well.
In both we start from myths—from traditional prejudices, beset with error—and from these we proceed by criticism: by the critical elimination of errors. In both the role of evidence is, in the main, to correct our mistakes, our prejudices, our tentative theories—that is, to play a part in the critical discussion, in the elimination of error. By correcting our mistakes, we raise new problems. And in order to solve these problems, we invent conjectures, that is, tentative theories, which we submit to critical discussion, directed towards the elimination of error.
The Myth of the Framework: In Defence of Science and Rationality (1993), 140.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Correction (40)  |  Critical (66)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Difference (337)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Elimination (25)  |  Error (321)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Evidence (248)  |  History (673)  |  Induction (77)  |  Known (454)  |  Methodology (12)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Myth (56)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Order (632)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Role (86)  |  Science (3879)  |  Start (221)  |  Tentative (16)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Vast (177)

An expert problem solver must be endowed with two incompatible qualities, a restless imagination and a patient pertinacity.
From In Mathematical Circles (1969).
Science quotes on:  |  Endow (14)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Expert (65)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Incompatible (4)  |  Must (1526)  |  Patient (199)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Problem (676)  |  Quality (135)  |  Restless (11)  |  Two (937)

As Herschel ruminated long ago, particles moving in mutual gravitational interaction are, as we human investigators see it forever solving differential equations which, if written out in full, might circle the earth.
In Forbidden Knowledge: And Other Essays on the Philosophy of Cognition (2012), 55.John Herschel. Rescher was not quoting, but restating from John Herschel, 'On Atoms', Familiar Lectures on Scientific Subjects (1867, 1872), 458. (Previously published in Fortnightly Review)
Science quotes on:  |  Circle (110)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Earth (996)  |  Equation (132)  |  Forever (103)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Sir John Herschel (23)  |  Human (1468)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Long (790)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Particle (194)  |  See (1081)

As the sun eclipses the stars by his brilliancy, so the man of knowledge will eclipse the fame of others in assemblies of the people if he proposes algebraic problems, and still more if he solves them.
In Florian Cajori, History of Mathematics (1893), 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  Assembly (13)  |  Brilliancy (3)  |  Eclipse (23)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Fame (50)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Problem (676)  |  Propose (23)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Still (613)  |  Sun (385)  |  Will (2355)

At the present time there exist problems beyond our ability to solve, not because of theoretical difficulties, but because of insufficient means of mechanical computation.
In 'Proposed Automatic Calculating Machine' (1937). As quoted in I. Bernard Cohen, Gregory W. Welch (eds.), Makin' Numbers: Howard Aiken and the Computer (1999), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Computation (24)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Exist (443)  |  Insufficient (9)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Theoretical (22)  |  Time (1877)

Clean water is a great example of something that depends on energy. And if you solve the water problem, you solve the food problem.
In Lecture (2003) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratories in Golden, Colorado, as quoted in obituary, Barnaby J. Feder, 'Richard E. Smalley, 62, Dies; Chemistry Nobel Winner:', New York Times (29 Oct 2005), Late Edition (East Coast), C16.
Science quotes on:  |  Clean (50)  |  Depend (228)  |  Energy (344)  |  Example (94)  |  Food (199)  |  Great (1574)  |  Problem (676)  |  Something (719)  |  Water (481)

Consider a cow. A cow doesn’t have the problem-solving skill of a chimpanzee, which has discovered how to get termites out of the ground by putting a stick into a hole. Evolution has developed the brain’s ability to solve puzzles, and at the same time has produced in our brain a pleasure of solving problems.
In John Tierney, 'For Decades, Puzzling People With Mathematics', New York Times (20 Oct 2009), D2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Brain (270)  |  Chimpanzee (13)  |  Consider (416)  |  Cow (39)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hole (16)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Problem (676)  |  Problem-Solving (3)  |  Produced (187)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Skill (109)  |  Solution (267)  |  Stick (24)  |  Termite (7)  |  Time (1877)

Dad [Walter C. Alvarez] … advised me to sit every few months in my reading chair for an entire evening, close my eyes and try to think of new problems to solve. I took his advice very seriously and have been glad ever since that he did.
In Alvarez: Adventures of a Physicist (1987), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  Chair (24)  |  Entirety (6)  |  Evening (12)  |  Eye (419)  |  Father (110)  |  Gladness (5)  |  Month (88)  |  New (1216)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reading (133)  |  Seriousness (10)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Solution (267)  |  Think (1086)  |  Try (283)

Dad, how do soldiers killing each other solve the world’s problems?
Calvin and Hobbes
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Dad (4)  |  Do (1908)  |  Kill (100)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (676)  |  Soldier (26)  |  World (1774)

Daniel Bernoulli used to tell two little adventures, which he said had given him more pleasure than all the other honours he had received. Travelling with a learned stranger, who, being pleased with his conversation, asked his name; “I am Daniel Bernoulli,” answered he with great modesty; “and I,” said the stranger (who thought he meant to laugh at him) “am Isaac Newton.” Another time, having to dine with the celebrated Koenig, the mathematician, who boasted, with some degree of self-complacency, of a difficult problem he had solved with much trouble, Bernoulli went on doing the honours of his table, and when they went to drink coffee he presented Koenig with a solution of the problem more elegant than his own.
In A Philosophical and Mathematical Dictionary (1815), 1, 226.
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (56)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Being (1278)  |  Daniel Bernoulli (5)  |  Boast (22)  |  Celebrate (19)  |  Coffee (19)  |  Complacent (6)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Degree (276)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Dine (5)  |  Doing (280)  |  Drink (53)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Great (1574)  |  Honour (56)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Modesty (17)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pleased (3)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Self (267)  |  Solution (267)  |  Stranger (15)  |  Table (104)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Travel (114)  |  Travelling (17)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Two (937)

Each problem that I solved became a rule which served afterwards to solve other problems.
In Discours de la Méthode (1637), collected in Œuvres, vol. VI, 20-21. As translated and cited in epigraph, George Polya, Mathematical Discovery (1981), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (676)  |  Rule (294)  |  Serve (59)

Edward [Teller] isn’t the cloistered kind of scientist. He gets his ideas in conversation and develops them by trying them out on people. We were coming back from Europe on the Ile de France and I was standing in the ship’s nightclub when he came up and said, 'Freddie, I think I have an idea.’ It was something he’d just thought of about magnetohydrodynamics. I was a bachelor then and I’d located several good-looking girls on the ship, but I knew what I had to do, so I disappeared and started working on the calculations. I’d get something finished and start prowling on the deck again when Edward would turn up out of the night and we’d walk the deck together while he talked and I was the brick wall he was bouncing these things off of. By the end of the trip we had a paper. He’d had the ideas, and I’d done some solving of equations. But he insisted that we sign in alphabetical order, which put my name first.
As quoted in Robert Coughlan, 'Dr. Edward Teller’s Magnificent Obsession', Life (6 Sep 1954), 61-62.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Back (390)  |  Bounce (2)  |  Brick (18)  |  Brick Wall (2)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Coming (114)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Develop (268)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Equation (132)  |  Finish (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Girl (37)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Insist (20)  |  Kind (557)  |  Looking (189)  |  Name (333)  |  Order (632)  |  Paper (182)  |  People (1005)  |  Reclusive (2)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Ship (62)  |  Something (719)  |  Start (221)  |  Edward Teller (44)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Together (387)  |  Trying (144)  |  Turn (447)  |  Walk (124)  |  Wall (67)

Electronic calculators can solve problems which the man who made them cannot solve but no government-subsidized commission of engineers and physicists could create a worm.
In 'March', The Twelve Seasons: A Perpetual Calendar for the Country (1949), 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Calculator (9)  |  Commission (3)  |  Create (235)  |  Electronic (12)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Government (110)  |  Man (2251)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Problem (676)  |  Worm (42)

Enlist a great mathematician and a distinguished Grecian; your problem will be solved. Such men can teach in a dwelling-house as well as in a palace. Part of the apparatus they will bring; part we will furnish.
Advice given to the Trustees of Johns Hopkins University on the choice of a professorial staff. In Report of the President of Johns Hopkins University (1888), 29. As quoted and cited in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 122.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Bring (90)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Dwelling (11)  |  Enlist (2)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grecian (2)  |  House (140)  |  Johns Hopkins (7)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Palace (8)  |  Part (222)  |  Problem (676)  |  Professor (128)  |  Teach (277)  |  University (121)  |  Will (2355)

Everybody’s a mad scientist, and life is their lab. We’re all trying to experiment to find a way to live, to solve problems, to fend off madness and chaos.
In David Chronenberg and Chris Rodley (ed.), Chronenberg on Chronenberg (1992), 7. As cited in Carl Royer, B Lee Cooper, The Spectacle of Isolation in Horror Films: Dark Parades (2013), 55.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Find (998)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Mad (53)  |  Madness (33)  |  Problem (676)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Solution (267)  |  Trying (144)  |  Way (1217)

Everything in nature is a puzzle until it finds its solution in man, who solves it in some way with God, and so completes the circle of creation.
The Appeal to Life (1891), 315.
Science quotes on:  |  Circle (110)  |  Complete (204)  |  Creation (327)  |  Everything (476)  |  Find (998)  |  God (757)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Solution (267)  |  Way (1217)

For me, the first challenge for computing science is to discover how to maintain order in a finite, but very large, discrete universe that is intricately intertwined. And a second, but not less important challenge is how to mould what you have achieved in solving the first problem, into a teachable discipline: it does not suffice to hone your own intellect (that will join you in your grave), you must teach others how to hone theirs. The more you concentrate on these two challenges, the clearer you will see that they are only two sides of the same coin: teaching yourself is discovering what is teachable.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Clear (100)  |  Coin (12)  |  Compute (18)  |  Concentrate (26)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discrete (11)  |  Finite (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Grave (52)  |  Hone (3)  |  Important (209)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intertwine (4)  |  Join (26)  |  Large (394)  |  Less (103)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mold (33)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (676)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Second (62)  |  See (1081)  |  Side (233)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teachable (2)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Theirs (3)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

Forces of nature act in a mysterious manner. We can but solve the mystery by deducing the unknown result from the known results of similar events.
In The Words of Gandhi (2001), 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Event (216)  |  Force (487)  |  Known (454)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Result (677)  |  Similar (36)  |  Solution (267)  |  Unknown (182)

He [Lord Bacon] appears to have been utterly ignorant of the discoveries which had just been made by Kepler’s calculations … he does not say a word about Napier’s Logarithms, which had been published only nine years before and reprinted more than once in the interval. He complained that no considerable advance had been made in Geometry beyond Euclid, without taking any notice of what had been done by Archimedes and Apollonius. He saw the importance of determining accurately the specific gravities of different substances, and himself attempted to form a table of them by a rude process of his own, without knowing of the more scientific though still imperfect methods previously employed by Archimedes, Ghetaldus and Porta. He speaks of the εὕρηκα of Archimedes in a manner which implies that he did not clearly appreciate either the problem to be solved or the principles upon which the solution depended. In reviewing the progress of Mechanics, he makes no mention either of Archimedes, or Stevinus, Galileo, Guldinus, or Ghetaldus. He makes no allusion to the theory of Equilibrium. He observes that a ball of one pound weight will fall nearly as fast through the air as a ball of two, without alluding to the theory of acceleration of falling bodies, which had been made known by Galileo more than thirty years before. He proposed an inquiry with regard to the lever,—namely, whether in a balance with arms of different length but equal weight the distance from the fulcrum has any effect upon the inclination—though the theory of the lever was as well understood in his own time as it is now. … He speaks of the poles of the earth as fixed, in a manner which seems to imply that he was not acquainted with the precession of the equinoxes; and in another place, of the north pole being above and the south pole below, as a reason why in our hemisphere the north winds predominate over the south.
From Spedding’s 'Preface' to De Interpretations Naturae Proœmium, in The Works of Francis Bacon (1857), Vol. 3, 511-512. [Note: the Greek word “εὕρηκα” is “Eureka” —Webmaster.]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acceleration (12)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Advance (280)  |  Air (347)  |  Apollonius (6)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Balance (77)  |  Ball (62)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Body (537)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Complain (8)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Depend (228)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Employ (113)  |  Equal (83)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Equinox (5)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Eureka (11)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fast (45)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Form (959)  |  Fulcrum (3)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Hemisphere (5)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Known (454)  |  Length (23)  |  Lever (13)  |  Logarithm (12)  |  Lord (93)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mention (82)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  John Napier (3)  |  Nearly (137)  |  North Pole (5)  |  North Wind (2)  |  Notice (77)  |  Observe (168)  |  Pole (46)  |  Pound (14)  |  Precession (4)  |  Predominate (7)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regard (305)  |  Saw (160)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Solution (267)  |  South (38)  |  South Pole (3)  |  Speak (232)  |  Specific (95)  |  Specific Gravity (2)  |  Still (613)  |  Substance (248)  |  Table (104)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Weight (134)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)

I believe that, as men occupied with the study and treatment of disease, we cannot have too strong a conviction that the problems presented to us are physical problems, which perhaps we may never solve, but still admitting of solution only in one way, namely, by regarding them as part of an unbroken series, running up from the lowest elementary conditions of matter to the highest composition of organic structure.
From Address (7 Aug 1868), the Hunterian Oration, 'Clinical Observation in Relation to medicine in Modern Times' delivered to a meeting of the British Medical Association, Oxford. Collected in Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Composition (84)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Disease (328)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Matter (798)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Organic (158)  |  Part (222)  |  Physical (508)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Running (61)  |  Series (149)  |  Solution (267)  |  Still (613)  |  Strong (174)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Unbroken (10)  |  Way (1217)

I can’t recall a single problem in my life, of any sort, that I ever started on that I didn't solve, or prove that I couldn’t solve it. I never let up, until I had done everything that I could think of, no matter how absurd it might seem as a means to the end I was after.
As quoted in French Strother, 'The Modern Profession of Inventing', World's Work and Play (Jul 1905), 6, No. 32, 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  End (590)  |  Everything (476)  |  Life (1795)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Never (1087)  |  Problem (676)  |  Prove (250)  |  Recall (10)  |  Seem (145)  |  Single (353)  |  Start (221)  |  Think (1086)

I do not think words alone will solve humanity’s present problems. The sound of bombs drowns out men’s voices. In times of peace I have great faith in the communication of ideas among thinking men, but today, with brute force dominating so many millions of lives, I fear that the appeal to man’s intellect is fast becoming virtually meaningless.
In 'I Am an American' (22 Jun 1940), Einstein Archives 29-092. Excerpted in David E. Rowe and Robert J. Schulmann, Einstein on Politics: His Private Thoughts and Public Stands on Nationalism, Zionism, War, Peace, and the Bomb (2007), 470. It was during a radio broadcast for the Immigration and Naturalization Service, interviewed by a State Department Official. Einstein spoke following an examination on his application for American citizenship in Trenton, New Jersey. The attack on Pearl Harbor and America’s declaration of war on Japan was still over a year in the future.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alone (311)  |  Appeal (45)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Bomb (18)  |  Brute (28)  |  Brute Force (4)  |  Communication (94)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drown (12)  |  Faith (203)  |  Fear (197)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaningless (17)  |  Million (114)  |  Peace (108)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Sound (183)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Voice (52)  |  War (225)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

I have been able to solve a few problems of mathematical physics on which the greatest mathematicians since Euler have struggled in vain … But the pride I might have held in my conclusions was perceptibly lessened by the fact that I knew that the solution of these problems had almost always come to me as the gradual generalization of favorable examples, by a series of fortunate conjectures, after many errors. I am fain to compare myself with a wanderer on the mountains who, not knowing the path, climbs slowly and painfully upwards and often has to retrace his steps because he can go no further—then, whether by taking thought or from luck, discovers a new track that leads him on a little till at length when he reaches the summit he finds to his shame that there is a royal road by which he might have ascended, had he only the wits to find the right approach to it. In my works, I naturally said nothing about my mistake to the reader, but only described the made track by which he may now reach the same heights without difficulty.
(1891) As quoted in translation in Leo Koenigsberger and Frances A. Welby (trans.), Hermann von Helmholtz (1906), 180-181.
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (108)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Compare (69)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discover (553)  |  Error (321)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Favorable (24)  |  Find (998)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Lead (384)  |  Little (707)  |  Luck (42)  |  Mathematical Physics (11)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Myself (212)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Path (144)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Pride (78)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reach (281)  |  Right (452)  |  Royal (57)  |  Series (149)  |  Solution (267)  |  Step (231)  |  Summit (25)  |  Thought (953)  |  Track (38)  |  Upward (43)  |  Vain (83)  |  Wit (59)  |  Work (1351)

I recall my own emotions: I had just been initiated into the mysteries of the complex number. I remember my bewilderment: here were magnitudes patently impossible and yet susceptible of manipulations which lead to concrete results. It was a feeling of dissatisfaction, of restlessness, a desire to fill these illusory creatures, these empty symbols, with substance. Then I was taught to interpret these beings in a concrete geometrical way. There came then an immediate feeling of relief, as though I had solved an enigma, as though a ghost which had been causing me apprehension turned out to be no ghost at all, but a familiar part of my environment.
In Tobias Dantzig and Joseph Mazur (ed.), 'The Two Realities', Number: The Language of Science (1930, ed. by Joseph Mazur 2007), 254.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bewilderment (8)  |  Cause (541)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complex Number (3)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Creature (233)  |  Desire (204)  |  Dissatisfaction (10)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Empty (80)  |  Enigma (14)  |  Environment (216)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fill (61)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Ghost (36)  |  Illusory (2)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Initiate (13)  |  Interpret (19)  |  Lead (384)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Manipulation (19)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Number (699)  |  Patently (4)  |  Recall (10)  |  Relief (30)  |  Remember (179)  |  Restless (11)  |  Restlessness (7)  |  Result (677)  |  Substance (248)  |  Susceptible (8)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Teach (277)  |  Turn (447)  |  Turn Out (9)  |  Way (1217)

I should not like to leave an impression that all structural problems can be settled by X-ray analysis or that all crystal structures are easy to solve. I seem to have spent much more of my life not solving structures than solving them.
In 'X-ray Analysis of Complicated Molecules', Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1964). In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1942-1962 (1964), 88.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Easy (204)  |  Impression (114)  |  Life (1795)  |  More (2559)  |  Problem (676)  |  Ray (114)  |  Settle (19)  |  Settled (34)  |  Spent (85)  |  Structural (29)  |  Structure (344)  |  X-ray (37)  |  X-ray Crystallography (12)

I think that our cooperative conservation approaches get people to sit down and grapple with problem solving.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (108)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Cooperative (3)  |  Down (456)  |  Grapple (10)  |  People (1005)  |  Problem (676)  |  Sit (48)  |  Think (1086)

If I have succeeded in discovering any truths in the sciences…, I can declare that they are but the consequences and results of five or six principal difficulties which I have surmounted, and my encounters with which I reckoned as battles in which victory declared for me.
In Discours de la Méthode (1637), as translated by J. Veitch, A Discourse on Method (1912), 53. Also seen translated as, “If I found any new truths in the sciences…, I can say that they follow from, or depend on, five or six principal problems which I succeeded in solving and which I regard as so many battles where the fortunes of war were on my side.”
Science quotes on:  |  Battle (34)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Declare (45)  |  Declared (24)  |  Discover (553)  |  Principal (63)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Victory (39)

If there is a problem you can’t solve, then there is an easier problem you can solve: find it.
Quoted in Preface, How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), xxi.
Science quotes on:  |  Easier (53)  |  Find (998)  |  Problem (676)  |  Solution (267)

If we want to solve a problem that we have never solved before, we must leave the door to the unknown ajar.
In 'The Value of Science,' What Do You Care What Other People Think? (1988, 2001), 247. Collected in The Pleasure of Finding Things Out (2000), 149.
Science quotes on:  |  Door (93)  |  Learning (274)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Problem (676)  |  Solution (267)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Want (497)

If you ask me whether science has solved, or is likely to solve, the problem of this universe, I must shake my head in doubt. We have been talking of matter and force; but whence came matter, and whence came force? You remember the first Napoleon’s question, when the savans who accompanied him to Egypt discussed in his presence the problem of the universe, and solved it to their apparent satisfaction. He looked aloft to the starry heavens, and said—“It is all very well, gentlemen, but who made all these!” That question still remains unanswered, and science makes no attempt to answer it.
Lecture 'On Matter and Force', to nearly 3,000 working men, at the Dundee Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (Sep 1867), reported in 'Dundee Meeting, 1867', Chemical News and Journal of Physical Science (Nov 1867)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accompany (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Aloft (5)  |  Answer (366)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Emperor Napoléon Bonaparte (19)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Egypt (29)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Head (81)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Look (582)  |  Make (25)  |  Matter (798)  |  Must (1526)  |  Napoleon (16)  |  Presence (63)  |  Problem (676)  |  Question (621)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remember (179)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shake (41)  |  Star (427)  |  Still (613)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)  |  Unanswered (8)  |  Universe (857)

If you know how to make chemical or electrical energy out of solar energy the way plants do it—without going through a heat engine—that is certainly a trick. And I’m sure we can do it. It’s just a question of how long it will take to solve the technical question.
As quoted in 'Melvin Calvin and Photosynthesis', Science [email protected], 2, No. 11.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Do (1908)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Energy (344)  |  Engine (98)  |  Heat (174)  |  Heat Engine (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Long (790)  |  Plant (294)  |  Question (621)  |  Solar (8)  |  Solar Energy (20)  |  Technology (257)  |  Through (849)  |  Trick (35)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

In 1735 the solving of an astronomical problem, proposed by the Academy, for which several eminent mathematicians had demanded several months’ time, was achieved in three days by Euler with aid of improved methods of his own. … With still superior methods this same problem was solved by the illustrious Gauss in one hour.
In History of Mathematics (1897), 248.
Science quotes on:  |  Academy (35)  |  Achieve (66)  |  Aid (97)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Demand (123)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Hour (186)  |  Illustrious (10)  |  Improve (58)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Month (88)  |  Problem (676)  |  Propose (23)  |  Same (157)  |  Several (32)  |  Still (613)  |  Superior (81)  |  Time (1877)

In fact a favourite problem of [Tyndall] is—Given the molecular forces in a mutton chop, deduce Hamlet or Faust therefrom. He is confident that the Physics of the Future will solve this easily.
Letter to Herbert Spencer (3 Aug 1861). In L. Huxley, The Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley (1900), Vol. 1, 249.
Science quotes on:  |  Chop (7)  |  Confident (25)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Force (487)  |  Future (429)  |  Hamlet (7)  |  Literature (103)  |  Mutton (4)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Problem (676)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  John Tyndall (48)  |  Will (2355)

In general the position as regards all such new calculi is this That one cannot accomplish by them anything that could not be accomplished without them. However, the advantage is, that, provided such a calculus corresponds to the inmost nature of frequent needs, anyone who masters it thoroughly is able—without the unconscious inspiration of genius which no one can command—to solve the respective problems, yea, to solve them mechanically in complicated cases in which, without such aid, even genius becomes powerless. Such is the case with the invention of general algebra, with the differential calculus, and in a more limited region with Lagrange’s calculus of variations, with my calculus of congruences, and with Möbius’s calculus. Such conceptions unite, as it were, into an organic whole countless problems which otherwise would remain isolated and require for their separate solution more or less application of inventive genius.
Letter (15 May 1843) to Schumacher, collected in Carl Friedrich Gauss Werke (1866), Vol. 8, 298, as translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath's Quotation-book (1914), 197-198. From the original German, “Überhaupt verhält es sich mit allen solchen neuen Calculs so, dass man durch sie nichts leisten kann, was nicht auch ohne sie zu leisten wäre; der Vortheil ist aber der, dass, wenn ein solcher Calcul dem innersten Wesen vielfach vorkommender Bedürfnisse correspondirt, jeder, der sich ihn ganz angeeignet hat, auch ohne die gleichsam unbewussten Inspirationen des Genies, die niemand erzwingen kann, die dahin gehörigen Aufgaben lösen, ja selbst in so verwickelten Fällen gleichsam mechanisch lösen kann, wo ohne eine solche Hülfe auch das Genie ohnmächtig wird. So ist es mit der Erfindung der Buchstabenrechnung überhaupt; so mit der Differentialrechnung gewesen; so ist es auch (wenn auch in partielleren Sphären) mit Lagranges Variationsrechnung, mit meiner Congruenzenrechnung und mit Möbius' Calcul. Es werden durch solche Conceptionen unzählige Aufgaben, die sonst vereinzelt stehen, und jedesmal neue Efforts (kleinere oder grössere) des Erfindungsgeistes erfordern, gleichsam zu einem organischen Reiche.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Aid (97)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Become (815)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Command (58)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Conception (154)  |  Congruence (3)  |  Countless (36)  |  Differential Calculus (10)  |  Frequent (23)  |  General (511)  |  Genius (284)  |  Inmost (2)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Invention (369)  |  Inventive (8)  |  Isolate (22)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematics As A Language (20)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  August Möbius (2)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Organic (158)  |  Position (77)  |  Powerless (6)  |  Problem (676)  |  Regard (305)  |  Region (36)  |  Remain (349)  |  Require (219)  |  Respective (2)  |  Separate (143)  |  Solution (267)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Unconscious (22)  |  Unite (42)  |  Variation (90)  |  Whole (738)

In presenting a mathematical argument the great thing is to give the educated reader the chance to catch on at once to the momentary point and take details for granted: his successive mouthfuls should be such as can be swallowed at sight; in case of accidents, or in case he wishes for once to check in detail, he should have only a clearly circumscribed little problem to solve (e.g. to check an identity: two trivialities omitted can add up to an impasse). The unpractised writer, even after the dawn of a conscience, gives him no such chance; before he can spot the point he has to tease his way through a maze of symbols of which not the tiniest suffix can be skipped.
In A Mathematician's Miscellany (1953). Reissued as Béla Bollobás (ed.), Littlewood’s Miscellany (1986), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Argument (138)  |  Chance (239)  |  Conscience (50)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Detail (146)  |  Educated (12)  |  Grant (73)  |  Great (1574)  |  Identity (19)  |  Impasse (2)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reader (40)  |  Sight (132)  |  Successive (73)  |  Suffix (2)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  Way (1217)  |  Writer (86)

In the next twenty centuries … humanity may begin to understand its most baffling mystery—where are we going? The earth is, in fact, traveling many thousands of miles per hour in the direction of the constellation Hercules—to some unknown destination in the cosmos. Man must understand his universe in order to understand his destiny. Mystery, however, is a very necessary ingredient in our lives. Mystery creates wonder and wonder is the basis for man’s desire to understand. Who knows what mysteries will be solved in our lifetime, and what new riddles will become the challenge of the new generation? Science has not mastered prophesy. We predict too much for the next year yet far too little for the next ten. Responding to challenges is one of democracy’s great strengths. Our successes in space can be used in the next decade in the solution of many of our planet’s problems.
In a speech to a Joint Meeting of the Two Houses of Congress to Receive the Apollo 11 Astronauts (16 Sep 1969), in the Congressional Record.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Baffling (5)  |  Basis (173)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Century (310)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Constellation (17)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Create (235)  |  Decade (59)  |  Democracy (33)  |  Desire (204)  |  Destination (14)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Direction (175)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Generation (242)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hercules (9)  |  Hour (186)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Ingredient (15)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lifetime (31)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Order (632)  |  Planet (356)  |  Predict (79)  |  Problem (676)  |  Prophesy (10)  |  Respond (12)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solution (267)  |  Space (500)  |  Strength (126)  |  Success (302)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Travel (114)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Year (933)

In the search for truth there are certain questions that are not important. Of what material is the universe constructed? Is the universe eternal? Are there limits or not to the universe? ... If a man were to postpone his search and practice for Enlightenment until such questions were solved, he would die before he found the path.
Budha
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (550)  |  Construct (124)  |  Die (86)  |  Enlightenment (20)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Find (998)  |  Importance (286)  |  Important (209)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Path (144)  |  Postpone (5)  |  Practice (204)  |  Question (621)  |  Search (162)  |  Solution (267)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)

Indeed, the aim of teaching [mathematics] should be rather to strengthen his [the pupil’s] faculties, and to supply a method of reasoning applicable to other subjects, than to furnish him with an instrument for solving practical problems.
In John Perry (ed.), Discussion on the Teaching of Mathematics (1901), 84. The discussion took place on 14 Sep 1901 at the British Association at Glasgow, during a joint meeting of the mathematics and physics sections with the education section. The proceedings began with an address by John Perry. Magnus spoke in the Discussion that followed.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aim (165)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Other (2236)  |  Practical (200)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  Subject (521)  |  Supply (93)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)

Intellectuals solve problems, geniuses prevent them.
Anonymous
Widely found on the web as an Einstein quote, but Webmaster has not yet found a primary source. Can you help? It is probably yet another example of a “wise” quote to which Einstein’s name has been falsely attributed. For authentic quotes see Albert Einstein Quotes on Problem.
Science quotes on:  |  Genius (284)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Problem (676)

Investigation may be likened to the long months of pregnancy, and solving a problem to the day of birth. To investigate a problem is, indeed, to solve it.
In Winberg Chai, The Foreign Relations of the People's Republic of China (1972), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Birth (147)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Long (790)  |  Month (88)  |  Pregnancy (9)  |  Problem (676)  |  Solution (267)

It is grindingly, creakingly, crashingly obvious that, if Darwinism were really a theory of chance, it couldn’t work. You don't need to be a mathematician or physicist to calculate that an eye or a haemoglobin molecule would take from here to infinity to self-assemble by sheer higgledy-piggledy luck. Far from being a difficulty peculiar to Darwinism, the astronomic improbability of eyes and knees, enzymes and elbow joints and all the other living wonders is precisely the problem that any theory of life must solve, and that Darwinism uniquely does solve. It solves it by breaking the improbability up into small, manageable parts, smearing out the luck needed, going round the back of Mount Improbable and crawling up the gentle slopes, inch by million-year inch. Only God would essay the mad task of leaping up the precipice in a single bound.
In Climbing Mount Improbable (1996), 67-8.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Assemble (13)  |  Back (390)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bound (119)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Chance (239)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Elbow (3)  |  Enzyme (17)  |  Essay (27)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  God (757)  |  Haemoglobin (4)  |  Improbability (11)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Joint (31)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Luck (42)  |  Mad (53)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Mount (42)  |  Must (1526)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Problem (676)  |  Self (267)  |  Single (353)  |  Slope (9)  |  Small (477)  |  Task (147)  |  Theory (970)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

It is not failure but success that is forcing man off this earth. It is not sickness but the triumph of health... Our capacity to survive has expanded beyond the capacity of Earth to support us. The pains we are feeling are growing pains. We can solve growth problems in direct proportion to our capacity to find new worlds... If man stays on Earth, his extinction is sure even if he lasts till the sun expands and destroys him... It is no longer reasonable to assume that the meaning of life lies on this earth alone. If Earth is all there is for man, we are reaching the foreseeable end of man.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Assume (38)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Direct (225)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Expand (53)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Failure (161)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Foreseeable (3)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Growth (187)  |  Health (193)  |  Last (426)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  New (1216)  |  New Worlds (5)  |  Pain (136)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Stay (25)  |  Success (302)  |  Sun (385)  |  Support (147)  |  Survive (79)  |  Triumph (73)  |  World (1774)

It is science alone that can solve the problems of hunger and poverty, of insanitation and literacy, of superstition and tradition, of vast resources running to waste, of a rich country inhabited by starving people. ... The future belongs to science and to those who make friends with science.
Address to the Indian Institute of Science, Proceedings of the National Institute of Science of India (1960), 27, 564, cited in Mary Midgley, The myths We live By (2004), 14., x. In Vinoth Ramachandra, Subverting Global Myths: Theology and the Public Issues Shaping our World (2008), 172.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Belong (162)  |  Country (251)  |  Friend (168)  |  Future (429)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Inhabit (16)  |  Insanitation (2)  |  Literacy (10)  |  People (1005)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Problem (676)  |  Resource (63)  |  Rich (62)  |  Run (174)  |  Running (61)  |  Science (3879)  |  Starvation (13)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Vast (177)  |  Waste (101)

It is science alone that can solve the problems of hunger and poverty, of insanitation and illiteracy, of superstition and deadening custom and tradition, of vast resources running to waste, of a rich country inhabited by starving people… Who indeed could afford to ignore science today? At every turn we have to seek its aid … the future belongs to science and those who make friends with science.
From address to the Indian Science Congress (26 Dec 1937). As cited in M.J. Vinod and Meena Deshpande, Contemporary Political Theory (2013), 507. An earlier, longer version of the quote is in Atma Ram, 'The Making of Optical Glass in India: Its Lessons for Industrial Development', Proceedings of the National Institute of Sciences of India (1961), 27, 564-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Alone (311)  |  Belong (162)  |  Country (251)  |  Custom (42)  |  Friend (168)  |  Future (429)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Illiteracy (7)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Insanitation (2)  |  People (1005)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Problem (676)  |  Resource (63)  |  Running (61)  |  Sanitation (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Today (314)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Turn (447)  |  Vast (177)  |  Waste (101)  |  Wealth (94)

It is the man not the method that solves the problem.
In 'Present Problems of Algebra and Analysis', Congress of Arts and Sciences: Universal Exposition, St. Louis, 1904 (1905), Vol. 1, 530.
Science quotes on:  |  Man (2251)  |  Method (505)  |  Problem (676)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)

I’ve been very involved in science literacy because it’s critically important in our world today. … As a public, we’re asked to vote on issues, we’re asked to accept explanations, we’re asked to figure out what to do with our own health care, and you can’t do that unless you have some level of science literacy. Science literacy isn’t about figuring out how to solve equations like E=MC². Rather, it’s about being able to read an article in the newspaper about the environment, about health care and figuring out how to vote on it. It’s about being able to prepare nutritious meals. It’s about being able to think your way through the day.
As quoted in 'Then & Now: Dr. Mae Jemison' (19 Jun 2005) on CNN web site.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Article (22)  |  Ask (411)  |  Being (1278)  |  Care (186)  |  Citizenship (6)  |  Do (1908)  |  Environment (216)  |  Equation (132)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Figure (160)  |  Health (193)  |  Health Care (9)  |  Involved (90)  |  Literacy (10)  |  Meal (18)  |  Newspaper (32)  |  Nutrition (23)  |  Read (287)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Literacy (5)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Through (849)  |  Today (314)  |  Vote (16)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

Man is born, not to solve the problems of the universe, but to find out where the problem applies, and then to restrain himself within the limits of the comprehensible.
Wed. 12 Oct 1825. Johann Peter Eckermann, Conversations with Goethe, ed. J. K. Moorhead and trans. J. Oxenford (1971), 120.
Science quotes on:  |  Find (998)  |  Himself (461)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Problem (676)  |  Universe (857)

Man is not born to solve the problem of the universe, but to find out where the problem begins and then restrain himself within the limits of the comprehensible.
The Homiletic Review, Vol. 83-84 (1922), Vol. 84, 290.
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (260)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Find (998)  |  Himself (461)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Problem (676)  |  Research (664)  |  Universe (857)

Mankind always takes up only such problems as it can solve; since, looking at the matter more closely, we will always find that the problem itself arises only when the material conditions necessary for its solution already exist or are at least in the process of formation.
Karl Marx
In Karl Marx and N.I. Stone (trans.), A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy (1904), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Arise (158)  |  Condition (356)  |  Exist (443)  |  Find (998)  |  Formation (96)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Solution (267)  |  Will (2355)

Many people are shrinking from the future and from participation in the movement toward a new, expanded reality. And, like homesick travelers abroad, they are focusing their anxieties on home. The reasons are not far to seek. We are at a turning point in human history... We could turn our attention to the problems that going to the moon certainly will not solve ... But I think this would be fatal to our future... A society that no longer moves forward does not merely stagnate; it begins to die.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abroad (18)  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Attention (190)  |  Begin (260)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Die (86)  |  Expand (53)  |  Far (154)  |  Fatal (12)  |  Focus (35)  |  Forward (102)  |  Future (429)  |  History (673)  |  Home (170)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human History (5)  |  Long (790)  |  Merely (316)  |  Moon (237)  |  Move (216)  |  Movement (155)  |  New (1216)  |  Participation (15)  |  People (1005)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reason (744)  |  Seek (213)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Society (326)  |  Stagnate (3)  |  Think (1086)  |  Toward (45)  |  Traveler (30)  |  Turn (447)  |  Turning Point (8)  |  Will (2355)

Mars is the next frontier, what the Wild West was, what America was 500 years ago. It’s time to strike out anew. Mars is where the action is for the next thousand years. The characteristic of human nature, and perhaps our simian branch of the family, is curiosity and exploration. When we stop doing that, we won’t be humans anymore. I’ve seen far more in my lifetime than I ever dreamed. Many of our problems on Earth can only be solved by space technology. The next step is in space. It’s inevitable.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  America (127)  |  Anew (18)  |  Anymore (5)  |  Branch (150)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Doing (280)  |  Dream (208)  |  Earth (996)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Family (94)  |  Far (154)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Lifetime (31)  |  Mars (44)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Next (236)  |  Problem (676)  |  See (1081)  |  Simian (2)  |  Space (500)  |  Step (231)  |  Stop (80)  |  Strike (68)  |  Technology (257)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wild (87)  |  Wild West (2)  |  Year (933)

Molecular genetics, our latest wonder, has taught us to spell out the connectivity of the tree of life in such palpable detail that we may say in plain words, “This riddle of life has been solved.”
From Nobel Lecture (10 Dec 1969), 'A Physicist's Renewed Look at Biology – Twenty Years Later.' in Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1963-1970 (1972), 405.
Science quotes on:  |  Connectivity (2)  |  Detail (146)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Life (1795)  |  Molecular Genetics (3)  |  Palpable (8)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Say (984)  |  Tree (246)  |  Tree Of Life (10)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Word (619)

My life as a surgeon-scientist, combining humanity and science, has been fantastically rewarding. In our daily patients we witness human nature in the raw–fear, despair, courage, understanding, hope, resignation, heroism. If alert, we can detect new problems to solve, new paths to investigate.
In Tore Frängsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 565.
Science quotes on:  |  Alert (13)  |  Courage (69)  |  Daily (87)  |  Despair (40)  |  Detect (44)  |  Fear (197)  |  Heroism (7)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Life (1795)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Path (144)  |  Patient (199)  |  Problem (676)  |  Raw (28)  |  Resignation (3)  |  Rewarding (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Witness (54)

Never depend upon institutions or government to solve any problem. All social movements are founded by, guided by, motivated and seen through by the passion of individuals.
As quoted, without citation, in David Suzuki and Holly Dressel , From Naked Ape to Superspecies: Humanity and the Global Eco-Crisis (1999, 2009), 347.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Depend (228)  |  Founded (20)  |  Government (110)  |  Guide (97)  |  Individual (404)  |  Institution (69)  |  Motivated (14)  |  Movement (155)  |  Never (1087)  |  Passion (114)  |  Problem (676)  |  Social (252)  |  Through (849)

No scientist is admired for failing in the attempt to solve problems that lie beyond his competence. … Good scientists study the most important problems they think they can solve. It is, after all, their professional business to solve problems, not merely to grapple with them.
The Art of the Soluble: Creativity and Originality in Science (1967), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Business (149)  |  Competence (11)  |  Failure (161)  |  Good (889)  |  Grapple (10)  |  Grappling (2)  |  Importance (286)  |  Lie (364)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  Problem (676)  |  Professional (70)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Solution (267)  |  Study (653)  |  Think (1086)

One is always a long way from solving a problem until one actually has the answer.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actually (27)  |  Answer (366)  |  Long (790)  |  Problem (676)  |  Way (1217)

One never knows how hard a problem is until it has been solved. You don’t necessarily know that you will succeed if you work harder or longer.
From interview with Neil A. Campbell, in 'Crossing the Boundaries of Science', BioScience (Dec 1986), 36, No. 11, 739.
Science quotes on:  |  Hard (243)  |  Know (1518)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Never (1087)  |  Problem (676)  |  Research (664)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Work Hard (12)

Part of the charm in solving a differential equation is in the feeling that we are getting something for nothing. So little information appears to go into the solution that there is a sense of surprise over the extensive results that are derived.
Co-author with Jules Alphonse Larrivee, Mathematics and Computers (1957), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Charm (51)  |  Derived (5)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Equation (132)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Information (166)  |  Little (707)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Result (677)  |  Sense (770)  |  Solution (267)  |  Something (719)  |  Surprise (86)

Physics is becoming so unbelievably complex that it is taking longer and longer to train a physicist. It is taking so long, in fact, to train a physicist to the place where he understands the nature of physical problems that he is already too old to solve them.
As quoted by Colin Pittendrigh (1971). In George C. Beakley, Ernest G. Chilton, Introduction to Engineering Design and Graphics (1973), 40
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Already (222)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Education (378)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Long (790)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Old (481)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Problem (676)  |  Solution (267)  |  Train (114)  |  Understand (606)

Probably the most important skill that children learn is how to learn. … Too often we give children answers to remember rather than problems to solve. This is a mistake.
In 'Observing the Brain Through a Cat's Eyes', Saturday Review World (1974), 2, 132.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Importance (286)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Most (1731)  |  Problem (676)  |  Remember (179)  |  Remembering (7)  |  Skill (109)  |  Solving (6)

Religious leaders and men of science have the same ideals; they want to understand and explain the universe of which they are part; they both earnestly desire to solve, if a solution be ever possible, that great riddle: Why are we here?
Concerning Man's Origin (1927), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Desire (204)  |  Explain (322)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Leader (43)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Origin Of Man (9)  |  Possible (552)  |  Religious (126)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Solution (267)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  Want (497)  |  Why (491)

Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve. Music and art are, to an extent, also attempts to solve or at least express the mystery. But to my mind the more we progress with either the more we are brought into harmony with all nature itself. And that is one of the great services of science to the individual.
In Max Planck and James Vincent Murphy (trans.), Where is Science Going?, (1932), Epilogue, 217.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Art (657)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Express (186)  |  Extent (139)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Individual (404)  |  Last (426)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Music (129)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Part (222)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Service (110)  |  Solution (267)  |  Trying (144)  |  Ultimate (144)

Science has not solved problems, only shifted the points of problems.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shift (44)

Science is a dynamic undertaking directed to lowering the degree of the empiricism involved in solving problems; or, if you prefer, science is a process of fabricating a web of interconnected concepts and conceptual schemes arising from experiments and ob
Modern Science and Modern Man, p. 62, New York (1952).
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (158)  |  Arising (22)  |  Concept (221)  |  Conceptual (10)  |  Degree (276)  |  Direct (225)  |  Dynamic (14)  |  Empiricism (21)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fabricate (6)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  Lowering (4)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Science (3879)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Undertaking (16)  |  Web (16)

Science is a game—but a game with reality, a game with sharpened knives … If a man cuts a picture carefully into 1000 pieces, you solve the puzzle when you reassemble the pieces into a picture; in the success or failure, both your intelligences compete. In the presentation of a scientific problem, the other player is the good Lord. He has not only set the problem but also has devised the rules of the game—but they are not completely known, half of them are left for you to discover or to deduce. The experiment is the tempered blade which you wield with success against the spirits of darkness—or which defeats you shamefully. The uncertainty is how many of the rules God himself has permanently ordained, and how many apparently are caused by your own mental inertia, while the solution generally becomes possible only through freedom from its limitations.
Quoted in Walter Moore, Schrödinger: Life and Thought (1989), 348.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Become (815)  |  Blade (11)  |  Both (493)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Competition (39)  |  Completely (135)  |  Cut (114)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Failure (161)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Game (101)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Himself (461)  |  Inertia (14)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Knife (23)  |  Known (454)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Lord (93)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Ordain (4)  |  Other (2236)  |  Picture (143)  |  Piece (38)  |  Possible (552)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Problem (676)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Reality (261)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Set (394)  |  Sharp (14)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Success (302)  |  Through (849)  |  Uncertainty (56)

Science is always wrong; … Science can never solve one problem without creating ten more problems.
Speech at the Einstein Dinner, Savoy Hotel, London (28 Oct 1930). Reproduced in George Bernard Shaw and Warren Sylvester Smith (ed.), The Religious Speeches of George Bernard Shaw (1963), 83. This is part of a longer quote, comparing science and religion, which begins, “We call the one side…,” which can be found elsewhere on the page of George Bernard Shaw Quotations on this website.
Science quotes on:  |  Create (235)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Problem (676)  |  Science (3879)  |  Wrong (234)

Science, in the very act of solving problems, creates more of them.
In Universities: American, English, German (1930), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Create (235)  |  More (2559)  |  Problem (676)  |  Science (3879)

Solving big problems is easier than solving little problems.
Quoted as “Mr Page likes to say” in 'Enlightenment Man', Technology Quarterly (4 Dec 2008).
Science quotes on:  |  Big (48)  |  Easier (53)  |  Little (707)  |  Problem (676)

Some mathematics problems look simple, and you try them for a year or so, and then you try them for a hundred years, and it turns out that they're extremely hard to solve. There's no reason why these problems shouldn't be easy, and yet they turn out to be extremely intricate. [Fermat's] Last Theorem is the most beautiful example of this.
From interview for PBS website on the NOVA program, 'The Proof'.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Easy (204)  |  Example (94)  |  Extremely (16)  |  Fermat’s Last Theorem (3)  |  Pierre de Fermat (15)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Last (426)  |  Look (582)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reason (744)  |  Simple (406)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Try (283)  |  Turn (447)  |  Turns Out (4)  |  Why (491)  |  Year (933)

Suppose [an] imaginary physicist, the student of Niels Bohr, is shown an experiment in which a virus particle enters a bacterial cell and 20 minutes later the bacterial cell is lysed and 100 virus particles are liberated. He will say: “How come, one particle has become 100 particles of the same kind in 20 minutes? That is very interesting. Let us find out how it happens! How does the particle get in to the bacterium? How does it multiply? Does it multiply like a bacterium, growing and dividing, or does it multiply by an entirely different mechanism ? Does it have to be inside the bacterium to do this multiplying, or can we squash the bacterium and have the multiplication go on as before? Is this multiplying a trick of organic chemistry which the organic chemists have not yet discovered ? Let us find out. This is so simple a phenomenon that the answers cannot be hard to find. In a few months we will know. All we have to do is to study how conditions will influence the multiplication. We will do a few experiments at different temperatures, in different media, with different viruses, and we will know. Perhaps we may have to break into the bacteria at intermediate stages between infection and lysis. Anyhow, the experiments only take a few hours each, so the whole problem can not take long to solve.”
[Eight years later] he has not got anywhere in solving the problem he set out to solve. But [he may say to you] “Well, I made a slight mistake. I could not do it in a few months. Perhaps it will take a few decades, and perhaps it will take the help of a few dozen other people. But listen to what I have found, perhaps you will be interested to join me.”
From 'Experiments with Bacterial Viruses (Bacteriophages)', Harvey Lecture (1946), 41, 161-162. As cited in Robert Olby, The Path of the Double Helix: The Discovery of DNA (1974, 1994), 237.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Become (815)  |  Break (99)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Condition (356)  |  Decade (59)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Divide (75)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enter (141)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Find (998)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Happen (274)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hour (186)  |  Infection (27)  |  Influence (222)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Listen (73)  |  Long (790)  |  Lysis (4)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Media (13)  |  Minute (125)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Month (88)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  People (1005)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Problem (676)  |  Say (984)  |  Set (394)  |  Simple (406)  |  Squash (4)  |  Stage (143)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Trick (35)  |  Virus (27)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

That mathematics “do not cultivate the power of generalization,”; … will be admitted by no person of competent knowledge, except in a very qualified sense. The generalizations of mathematics, are, no doubt, a different thing from the generalizations of physical science; but in the difficulty of seizing them, and the mental tension they require, they are no contemptible preparation for the most arduous efforts of the scientific mind. Even the fundamental notions of the higher mathematics, from those of the differential calculus upwards are products of a very high abstraction. … To perceive the mathematical laws common to the results of many mathematical operations, even in so simple a case as that of the binomial theorem, involves a vigorous exercise of the same faculty which gave us Kepler’s laws, and rose through those laws to the theory of universal gravitation. Every process of what has been called Universal Geometry—the great creation of Descartes and his successors, in which a single train of reasoning solves whole classes of problems at once, and others common to large groups of them—is a practical lesson in the management of wide generalizations, and abstraction of the points of agreement from those of difference among objects of great and confusing diversity, to which the purely inductive sciences cannot furnish many superior. Even so elementary an operation as that of abstracting from the particular configuration of the triangles or other figures, and the relative situation of the particular lines or points, in the diagram which aids the apprehension of a common geometrical demonstration, is a very useful, and far from being always an easy, exercise of the faculty of generalization so strangely imagined to have no place or part in the processes of mathematics.
In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy (1878), 612-13.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Admit (45)  |  Agreement (53)  |  Aid (97)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Arduous (3)  |  Being (1278)  |  Binomial (6)  |  Binomial Theorem (5)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Call (769)  |  Case (99)  |  Class (164)  |  Common (436)  |  Competent (20)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Confuse (19)  |  Contemptible (8)  |  Creation (327)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Differential Calculus (10)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Far (154)  |  Figure (160)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Great (1574)  |  Group (78)  |  High (362)  |  Higher Mathematics (6)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Involve (90)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Line (91)  |  Management (21)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Notion (113)  |  Object (422)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Particular (76)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Person (363)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Place (177)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Practical (200)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Product (160)  |  Purely (109)  |  Qualified (12)  |  Qualify (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Relative (39)  |  Require (219)  |  Result (677)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rose (34)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Mind (13)  |  Seize (15)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Single (353)  |  Situation (113)  |  Strangely (5)  |  Successor (14)  |  Superior (81)  |  Tension (24)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Train (114)  |  Triangle (18)  |  Universal (189)  |  Upward (43)  |  Upwards (6)  |  Useful (250)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)

The architect does not demand things which cannot be found or made ready without great expense. For example: it is not everywhere that there is plenty of pitsand, rubble, fir, clear fir, and marble… Where there is no pitsand, we must use the kinds washed up by rivers or by the sea… and other problems we must solve in similar ways.
Vitruvius
In De Architectura, Book 1, Chap 2, Sec. 8. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Architect (29)  |  Demand (123)  |  Economy (55)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Expense (16)  |  Great (1574)  |  Kind (557)  |  Marble (20)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (676)  |  River (119)  |  Sand (62)  |  Sea (308)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Use (766)  |  Wash (21)  |  Way (1217)

Theodore Roosevelt quote “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem” + ducks on water background
background by OZinOH (CC by SA 2.0) (source)
The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.
'Our National Inland Waterways Policy', Address to the Deep Waterway Convention, Memphis, Tennessee, 4 Oct 1907. In American Waterways (1908), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Little (707)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Resource (22)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (676)  |  Will (2355)

The economic and technological triumphs of the past few years have not solved as many problems as we thought they would, and, in fact, have brought us new problems we did not foresee.
In 'Henry Ford on What’s Wrong With the U.S.', U.S. News & World Report (1966), 60, 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Bring (90)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economy (55)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Foresee (19)  |  New (1216)  |  Past (337)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Problem (676)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Thought (953)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Year (933)

The efforts of the great philosopher [Newton] were always superhuman; the questions which he did not solve were incapable of solution in his time
In 'Eulogy on Laplace', Smithsonian Report (1874), 133.
Science quotes on:  |  Effort (227)  |  Great (1574)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Question (621)  |  Solution (267)  |  Superhuman (5)  |  Time (1877)

The equation of animal and vegetable life is too complicated a problem for human intelligence to solve, and we can never know how wide a circle of disturbance we produce in the harmonies of nature when we throw the smallest pebble into the ocean of organic life.
Man and Nature, (1864), 103.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Circle (110)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Equation (132)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Life (2)  |  Pebble (25)  |  Problem (676)  |  Solution (267)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Wide (96)

The Excellence of Modern Geometry is in nothing more evident, than in those full and adequate Solutions it gives to Problems; representing all possible Cases in one view, and in one general Theorem many times comprehending whole Sciences; which deduced at length into Propositions, and demonstrated after the manner of the Ancients, might well become the subjects of large Treatises: For whatsoever Theorem solves the most complicated Problem of the kind, does with a due Reduction reach all the subordinate Cases.
In 'An Instance of the Excellence of Modern Algebra, etc', Philosophical Transactions, 1694, 960.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Become (815)  |  Case (99)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Due (141)  |  Evident (91)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Full (66)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  Kind (557)  |  Large (394)  |  Length (23)  |  Manner (58)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Possible (552)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Represent (155)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subordinate (9)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  View (488)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Whole (738)

The future mathematician ... should solve problems, choose the problems which are in his line, meditate upon their solution, and invent new problems. By this means, and by all other means, he should endeavor to make his first important discovery: he should discover his likes and dislikes, his taste, his own line.
How to Solve it: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (1957), 206.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Career (75)  |  Choose (112)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Dislike (15)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  Like (22)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (676)  |  Solution (267)  |  Taste (90)

The green pre-human earth is the mystery we were chosen to solve, a guide to the birthplace of our spirit.
In Diversity of Life (1992).
Science quotes on:  |  Chosen (48)  |  Earth (996)  |  Green (63)  |  Guide (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Spirit (265)

The history of mathematics may be instructive as well as agreeable; it may not only remind us of what we have, but may also teach us to increase our store. Says De Morgan, “The early history of the mind of men with regards to mathematics leads us to point out our own errors; and in this respect it is well to pay attention to the history of mathematics.” It warns us against hasty conclusions; it points out the importance of a good notation upon the progress of the science; it discourages excessive specialization on the part of the investigator, by showing how apparently distinct branches have been found to possess unexpected connecting links; it saves the student from wasting time and energy upon problems which were, perhaps, solved long since; it discourages him from attacking an unsolved problem by the same method which has led other mathematicians to failure; it teaches that fortifications can be taken by other ways than by direct attack, that when repulsed from a direct assault it is well to reconnoiter and occupy the surrounding ground and to discover the secret paths by which the apparently unconquerable position can be taken.
In History of Mathematics (1897), 1-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Agreeable (18)  |  Apparently (20)  |  Assault (12)  |  Attack (84)  |  Attention (190)  |  Branch (150)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Connect (125)  |  Augustus De Morgan (45)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discourage (13)  |  Discover (553)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Early (185)  |  Energy (344)  |  Error (321)  |  Excessive (23)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Fortification (6)  |  Good (889)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hasty (6)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Mathematics (7)  |  Importance (286)  |  Increase (210)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Lead (384)  |  Link (43)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Notation (27)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Path (144)  |  Pay (43)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Out (8)  |  Position (77)  |  Possess (156)  |  Problem (676)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reconnoitre (2)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remind (13)  |  Repulse (2)  |  Respect (207)  |  Save (118)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Secret (194)  |  Show (346)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Store (48)  |  Student (300)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Surround (30)  |  Teach (277)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unconquerable (3)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Unsolved (15)  |  Warn (5)  |  Waste (101)  |  Way (1217)

The human race believes in not taking its problems seriously enough to solve them.
In The Decline and Fall of Science (1976), 170.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Enough (340)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Problem (676)  |  Race (268)  |  Serious (91)

The ideal engineer is a composite ... He is not a scientist, he is not a mathematician, he is not a sociologist or a writer; but he may use the knowledge and techniques of any or all of these disciplines in solving engineering problems.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Composite (4)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Problem (676)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sociologist (3)  |  Technique (80)  |  Use (766)  |  Writer (86)

The mechanist is intimately convinced that a precise knowledge of the chemical constitution, structure, and properties of the various organelles of a cell will solve biological problems. This will come in a few centuries. For the time being, the biologist has to face such concepts as orienting forces or morphogenetic fields. Owing to the scarcity of chemical data and to the complexity of life, and despite the progresses of biochemistry, the biologist is still threatened with vertigo.
Problems of Morphogenesis in Ciliates: The Kinetosomes in Development, Reproduction and Evolution (1950), 92-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Cell (138)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Concept (221)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Data (156)  |  Face (212)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mechanist (3)  |  Owing (39)  |  Precise (68)  |  Problem (676)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Time (1877)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2355)

The method of inquiry which all our ingenious Theorists of the Earth have pursued is certainly erroneous. They first form an hypothesis to solve the phenomena, but in fact the Phenomena are always used as a prop to the hypothesis.
Instead therefore of attempting to cut the gordian knot by Hypothetical analysis, we shall follow the synthetic method of inquiry and content ourselves with endeavouring to establish facts rather than attempt solutions and try by experiments how far that method may leave us thro' the mazes of this subject
Introduction to his lecture course. In Robert Jameson, edited by H. W. Scott, Lectures on Geology, (1966), 27. In Patrick Wyse Jackson, Four Centuries of Geological Travel (2007), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Cut (114)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Geology (220)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Knot (11)  |  Method (505)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Subject (521)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Theory (970)  |  Try (283)

The most direct, and in a sense the most important, problem which our conscious knowledge of Nature should enable us to solve is the anticipation of future events, so that we may arrange our present affairs in accordance with such anticipation. As a basis for the solution of this problem we always make use of our knowledge of events which have already occurred, obtained by chance observation or by prearranged experiment.
In Heinrich Hertz, D.E. Jones (trans.) and J.T. Walley (trans.), 'Introduction', The Principles of Mechanics (1899), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Arrange (30)  |  Basis (173)  |  Chance (239)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Direct (225)  |  Enable (119)  |  Event (216)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Future (429)  |  Important (209)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Sense (770)  |  Solution (267)  |  Use (766)

The mystery of life is certainly the most persistent problem ever placed before the thought of man. There is no doubt that from the time humanity began to think it has occupied itself with the problem of its origin and its future which undoubtedly is the problem of life. The inability of science to solve it is absolute. This would be truly frightening were it not for faith.
Address (10 Sep 1934) to the International Congress of Electro-Radio Biology, Venice. In Associated Press, 'Life a Closed Book, Declares Marconi', New York Times (11 Sep 1934), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Faith (203)  |  Frightening (3)  |  Future (429)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Inability (10)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Life (36)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Problem (676)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Solution (267)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truly (116)

The origin of a science is usually to be sought for not in any systematic treatise, but in the investigation and solution of some particular problem. This is especially the case in the ordinary history of the great improvements in any department of mathematical science. Some problem, mathematical or physical, is proposed, which is found to be insoluble by known methods. This condition of insolubility may arise from one of two causes: Either there exists no machinery powerful enough to effect the required reduction, or the workmen are not sufficiently expert to employ their tools in the performance of an entirely new piece of work. The problem proposed is, however, finally solved, and in its solution some new principle, or new application of old principles, is necessarily introduced. If a principle is brought to light it is soon found that in its application it is not necessarily limited to the particular question which occasioned its discovery, and it is then stated in an abstract form and applied to problems of gradually increasing generality.
Other principles, similar in their nature, are added, and the original principle itself receives such modifications and extensions as are from time to time deemed necessary. The same is true of new applications of old principles; the application is first thought to be merely confined to a particular problem, but it is soon recognized that this problem is but one, and generally a very simple one, out of a large class, to which the same process of investigation and solution are applicable. The result in both of these cases is the same. A time comes when these several problems, solutions, and principles are grouped together and found to produce an entirely new and consistent method; a nomenclature and uniform system of notation is adopted, and the principles of the new method become entitled to rank as a distinct science.
In A Treatise on Projections (1880), Introduction, xi. Published as United States Coast and Geodetic Survey, Treasury Department Document, No. 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Add (40)  |  Adopt (19)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Arise (158)  |  Become (815)  |  Both (493)  |  Bring (90)  |  Case (99)  |  Cause (541)  |  Class (164)  |  Condition (356)  |  Confine (26)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Deem (6)  |  Department (92)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Effect (393)  |  Employ (113)  |  Enough (340)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Entitle (3)  |  Especially (31)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expert (65)  |  Extension (59)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Generality (45)  |  Generally (15)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Great (1574)  |  Group (78)  |  History (673)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Increase (210)  |  Insoluble (15)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Large (394)  |  Light (607)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Modification (55)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Notation (27)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Old (481)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Origin (239)  |  Original (58)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particular (76)  |  Performance (48)  |  Physical (508)  |  Piece (38)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Produce (104)  |  Propose (23)  |  Question (621)  |  Rank (67)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Result (677)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Several (32)  |  Similar (36)  |  Simple (406)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Soon (186)  |  State (491)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Sufficiently (9)  |  System (537)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Tool (117)  |  Treatise (44)  |  True (212)  |  Two (937)  |  Uniform (18)  |  Usually (176)  |  Work (1351)  |  Workman (13)

The prize is such an extraordinary honor. It might seem unfair, however, to reward a person for having so much pleasure over the years, asking the maize plant to solve specific problems and then watching its responses.
Quoted in the New York Times, 11 Oct 1983.
Science quotes on:  |  Asking (73)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Honor (54)  |  Maize (4)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Person (363)  |  Plant (294)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Problem (676)  |  Response (53)  |  Reward (68)  |  Specific (95)  |  Year (933)

The problems of the world cannot possibly be solved by skeptics or cynics whose horizons are limited by the obvious realities. We need men who can dream of things that never were.
From Address (Jun 1963) to the Irish Parliament, Dublin, as collected in Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: John F. Kennedy (1964), 537.
Science quotes on:  |  Cynic (6)  |  Dream (208)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Need (290)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Possible (552)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reality (261)  |  Skeptic (8)  |  Thing (1915)  |  World (1774)

The real achievement in discoveries … is seeing an analogy where no one saw one before. … The essence of discovery is that unlikely marriage of … previously unrelated forms of reference or universes of discourse, whose union will solve the previously insoluble problem.
In Act of Creation (1964), 201.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Discourse (18)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Essence (82)  |  Form (959)  |  Insoluble (15)  |  Marriage (39)  |  Problem (676)  |  Saw (160)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Solution (267)  |  Union (51)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unlikely (13)  |  Unrelated (6)  |  Will (2355)

The release of atomic energy has not created a new problem. It has merely made more urgent the necessity of solving an existing one … I do not believe that civilization will be wiped out in a war fought with the atomic bomb. Perhaps two thirds of the people of the Earth would be killed.
In interview with Raymond Swing, 'Einstein on the Atomic Bomb' Atlantic Monthly, (Nov 1945), 176, No. 5, 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Atomic Energy (24)  |  Belief (578)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Create (235)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Energy (344)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fight (44)  |  Kill (100)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessity (191)  |  New (1216)  |  People (1005)  |  Problem (676)  |  Release (27)  |  Two (937)  |  Urgent (13)  |  War (225)  |  Will (2355)

The successes of the differential equation paradigm were impressive and extensive. Many problems, including basic and important ones, led to equations that could be solved. A process of self-selection set in, whereby equations that could not be solved were automatically of less interest than those that could.
In Does God Play Dice? The Mathematics of Chaos (1989, 1997), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Automatic (16)  |  Basic (138)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Equation (132)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Important (209)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Interest (386)  |  Less (103)  |  Paradigm (14)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Selection (128)  |  Self (267)  |  Set (394)  |  Success (302)

The traditional mathematics professor of the popular legend is absentminded. He usually appears in public with a lost umbrella in each hand. He prefers to face a blackboard and to turn his back on the class. He writes a, he says b, he means c, but it should be d. Some of his sayings are handed down from generation to generation:
“In order to solve this differential equation you look at it till a solution occurs to you.”
“This principle is so perfectly general that no particular application of it is possible.”
“Geometry is the science of correct reasoning on incorrect figures.”
“My method to overcome a difficulty is to go round it.”
“What is the difference between method and device? A method is a device which you used twice.”
In How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Absent-Minded (4)  |  Application (242)  |  Back (390)  |  Blackboard (11)  |  Class (164)  |  Correct (86)  |  Device (70)  |  Difference (337)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Down (456)  |  Equation (132)  |  Face (212)  |  Figure (160)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Generation (242)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Handed Down (2)  |  Incorrect (6)  |  Legend (17)  |  Look (582)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Occur (150)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Order (632)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Overcoming (3)  |  Particular (76)  |  Popular (29)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Principle (507)  |  Professor (128)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Say (984)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solution (267)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Turn (447)  |  Twice (17)  |  Umbrella (2)  |  Using (6)  |  Usually (176)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

The United States pledges before you—and therefore before the world—its determination to help solve the fearful atomic dilemma—to devote its entire heart and mind to find the way by which the miraculous inventiveness of man shall not be dedicated to his death, but consecrated to his life.
From address to the General Assembly of the United Nations (8 Dec 1953).
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic (5)  |  Consecrate (3)  |  Death (388)  |  Dedicated (19)  |  Determination (78)  |  Devote (35)  |  Dilemma (11)  |  Entire (47)  |  Fearful (7)  |  Find (998)  |  Heart (229)  |  Help (105)  |  Inventiveness (7)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Miraculous (11)  |  Pledge (4)  |  State (491)  |  United States (31)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

The universe is governed by science. But science tells us that we can’t solve the equations, directly in the abstract. We need to use the effective theory of Darwinian natural selection of those societies most likely to survive. We assign them higher value.
[Answer to question: What is the value in knowing “Why are we here?”]
'Stephen Hawking: "There is no heaven; it’s a fairy story"', interview in newspaper The Guardian (15 May 2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Answer (366)  |  Assignment (12)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Directly (22)  |  Effective (59)  |  Equation (132)  |  Govern (64)  |  Governing (20)  |  Higher (37)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Likely (34)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Need (290)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Selection (128)  |  Society (326)  |  Solution (267)  |  Survival (94)  |  Survive (79)  |  Tell (340)  |  Theory (970)  |  Universe (857)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Why (491)

The way to solve the conflict between human values and technological needs is not to run away from technology, that’s impossible. The way to resolve the conflict is to break down the barriers of dualistic thought that prevent a real understanding of what technology is—not an exploitation of nature, but a fusion of nature and the human spirit into a new kind of creation that transcends both.
In Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (1974).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Barrier (32)  |  Both (493)  |  Break (99)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Creation (327)  |  Down (456)  |  Exploitation (14)  |  Fusion (16)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Kind (557)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Run (174)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Thought (953)  |  Transcend (26)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Value (365)  |  Way (1217)

There are children playing in the street who could solve some of my top problems in physics, because they have modes of sensory perception that I lost long ago.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Long (790)  |  Long Ago (10)  |  Lose (159)  |  Mode (41)  |  Perception (97)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Play (112)  |  Playing (42)  |  Problem (676)  |  Sensory (16)  |  Street (23)  |  Top (96)

There are still psychologists who, in a basic misunderstanding, think that gestalt theory tends to underestimate the role of past experience. Gestalt theory tries to differentiate between and-summative aggregates, on the one hand, and gestalten, structures, on the other, both in sub-wholes and in the total field, and to develop appropriate scientific tools for investigating the latter. It opposes the dogmatic application to all cases of what is adequate only for piecemeal aggregates. The question is whether an approach in piecemeal terms, through blind connections, is or is not adequate to interpret actual thought processes and the role of the past experience as well. Past experience has to be considered thoroughly, but it is ambiguous in itself; so long as it is taken in piecemeal, blind terms it is not the magic key to solve all problems.
In Productive Thinking (1959), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Adequate (46)  |  Aggregate (23)  |  All (4108)  |  Ambiguous (13)  |  Application (242)  |  Approach (108)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Basic (138)  |  Blind (95)  |  Both (493)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consider (416)  |  Develop (268)  |  Differentiate (19)  |  Dogmatic (7)  |  Experience (467)  |  Field (364)  |  Gestalt (3)  |  Interpret (19)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Key (50)  |  Long (790)  |  Magic (86)  |  Misunderstanding (12)  |  Oppose (24)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Piecemeal (3)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Psychologist (15)  |  Question (621)  |  Role (86)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Tend (124)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Tool (117)  |  Total (94)  |  Try (283)  |  Underestimate (7)  |  Whole (738)

There is no area in our minds reserved for superstition, such as the Greeks had in their mythology; and superstition, under cover of an abstract vocabulary, has revenged itself by invading the entire realm of thought. Our science is like a store filled with the most subtle intellectual devices for solving the most complex problems, and yet we are almost incapable of applying the elementary principles of rational thought. In every sphere, we seem to have lost the very elements of intelligence: the ideas of limit, measure, degree, proportion, relation, comparison, contingency, interdependence, interrelation of means and ends. To keep to the social level, our political universe is peopled exclusively by myths and monsters; all it contains is absolutes and abstract entities. This is illustrated by all the words of our political and social vocabulary: nation, security, capitalism, communism, fascism, order, authority, property, democracy. We never use them in phrases such as: There is democracy to the extent that… or: There is capitalism in so far as… The use of expressions like “to the extent that” is beyond our intellectual capacity. Each of these words seems to represent for us an absolute reality, unaffected by conditions, or an absolute objective, independent of methods of action, or an absolute evil; and at the same time we make all these words mean, successively or simultaneously, anything whatsoever. Our lives are lived, in actual fact, among changing, varying realities, subject to the casual play of external necessities, and modifying themselves according to specific conditions within specific limits; and yet we act and strive and sacrifice ourselves and others by reference to fixed and isolated abstractions which cannot possibly be related either to one another or to any concrete facts. In this so-called age of technicians, the only battles we know how to fight are battles against windmills.
From 'The Power of Words', collected in Siân Miles (ed.), Simone Weil: An Anthology (2000), 222-223.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Actual (117)  |  Against (332)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Apply (160)  |  Area (31)  |  Authority (95)  |  Battle (34)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Call (769)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Capitalism (10)  |  Casual (7)  |  Change (593)  |  Communism (11)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Complex (188)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Condition (356)  |  Contain (68)  |  Contingency (11)  |  Cover (37)  |  Degree (276)  |  Democracy (33)  |  Device (70)  |  Element (310)  |  Elementary (96)  |  End (590)  |  Entire (47)  |  Entity (35)  |  Evil (116)  |  Exclusively (10)  |  Expression (175)  |  Extent (139)  |  External (57)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Far (154)  |  Fascism (4)  |  Fight (44)  |  Fill (61)  |  Fix (25)  |  Greek (107)  |  Idea (843)  |  Illustrate (10)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Independent (67)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Interdependence (4)  |  Interrelation (8)  |  Invade (5)  |  Isolate (22)  |  Keep (101)  |  Know (1518)  |  Level (67)  |  Limit (280)  |  Live (628)  |  Lose (159)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Measure (232)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modify (15)  |  Monster (31)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myth (56)  |  Mythology (18)  |  Nation (193)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Never (1087)  |  Objective (91)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  P (2)  |  People (1005)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Play (112)  |  Political (121)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Property (168)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reality (261)  |  Realm (85)  |  Reference (33)  |  Relate (21)  |  Relation (157)  |  Represent (155)  |  Reserve (24)  |  Revenge (10)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Security (47)  |  Seem (145)  |  Simultaneous (22)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Social (252)  |  Specific (95)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Store (48)  |  Strive (46)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subtle (35)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Technician (9)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unaffected (6)  |  Universe (857)  |  Use (766)  |  Vary (27)  |  Vocabulary (8)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Windmill (4)  |  Word (619)

These machines [used in the defense of the Syracusans against the Romans under Marcellus] he [Archimedes] had designed and contrived, not as matters of any importance, but as mere amusements in geometry; in compliance with king Hiero’s desire and request, some time before, that he should reduce to practice some part of his admirable speculation in science, and by accommodating the theoretic truth to sensation and ordinary use, bring it more within the appreciation of people in general. Eudoxus and Archytas had been the first originators of this far-famed and highly-prized art of mechanics, which they employed as an elegant illustration of geometrical truths, and as means of sustaining experimentally, to the satisfaction of the senses, conclusions too intricate for proof by words and diagrams. As, for example, to solve the problem, so often required in constructing geometrical figures, given the two extremes, to find the two mean lines of a proportion, both these mathematicians had recourse to the aid of instruments, adapting to their purpose certain curves and sections of lines. But what with Plato’s indignation at it, and his invectives against it as the mere corruption and annihilation of the one good of geometry,—which was thus shamefully turning its back upon the unembodied objects of pure intelligence to recur to sensation, and to ask help (not to be obtained without base supervisions and depravation) from matter; so it was that mechanics came to be separated from geometry, and, repudiated and neglected by philosophers, took its place as a military art.
Plutarch
In John Dryden (trans.), Life of Marcellus.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accommodate (15)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Admirable (19)  |  Against (332)  |  Aid (97)  |  Amusement (33)  |  Annihilation (14)  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Art (657)  |  Ask (411)  |  Back (390)  |  Base (117)  |  Both (493)  |  Bring (90)  |  Certain (550)  |  Compliance (7)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Construct (124)  |  Contrive (10)  |  Corruption (15)  |  Curve (49)  |  Defense (23)  |  Design (195)  |  Desire (204)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Embody (16)  |  Employ (113)  |  Example (94)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Good (889)  |  Help (105)  |  Hiero (2)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Importance (286)  |  Indignation (4)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Invective (2)  |  King (35)  |  Line (91)  |  Machine (257)  |  Marcellus (2)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mere (84)  |  Military (40)  |  More (2559)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Neglected (23)  |  Object (422)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Originator (6)  |  Part (222)  |  People (1005)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Place (177)  |  Plato (76)  |  Practice (204)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proof (287)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Pure (291)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Recourse (12)  |  Recur (4)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Repudiate (7)  |  Request (7)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Roman (36)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Section (11)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Sense (770)  |  Separate (143)  |  Shameful (3)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Supervision (4)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Syracuse (5)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Word (619)

Think of a single problem confronting the world today. Disease, poverty, global warming… If the problem is going to be solved, it is science that is going to solve it. Scientists tend to be unappreciated in the world at large, but you can hardly overstate the importance of the work they do. If anyone ever cures cancer, it will be a guy with a science degree. Or a woman with a science degree.
Quoted in Max Davidson, 'Bill Bryson: Have faith, science can solve our problems', Daily Telegraph (26 Sep 2010)
Science quotes on:  |  Cancer (55)  |  Cure (122)  |  Degree (276)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Global (35)  |  Global Warming (27)  |  Importance (286)  |  Large (394)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Problem (676)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Degree (2)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Single (353)  |  Solution (267)  |  Tend (124)  |  Think (1086)  |  Today (314)  |  Warming (23)  |  Will (2355)  |  Woman (151)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

This conviction of the solvability of every mathematical problem is a powerful incentive to the worker. We hear within us the perpetual call: There is the problem. Seek its solution. You can find it by pure reason, for in mathematics there is no ignorabimus!
Ignorabimus as used here, means “we will not know” (which is slightly different from ignoramus meaning present ignorance, “we do not know”). In Lecture (1900), 'Mathematische Probleme' (Mathematical Problems), to the International Congress of Mathematicians, Paris. From the original German reprinted in David Hilbert: Gesammelte Abhandlungen (Collected Treatises, 1970), Vol. 3, 298, “Diese Überzeugung von der Lösbarkeit eines jeden mathematischer Problems ist uns ein kräftiger Ansporn während der Arbeit ; wir hören in uns den steten Zuruf: Da ist das Problem, suche die Lösung. Du kannst sie durch reines Denken finden; denn in der Mathematik gibt es kein Ignorabimus. English version as translated by Dr. Maby Winton Newson for Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society (1902), 8, 437-479. The address was first published in Göttinger Nachrichten is Nachrichten von der Königl. Gesellschaft der Wiss. zu Göttingen (1900), 253-297; and Archiv der Mathematik und Physik (1901), 3, No. 1, 44-63.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Find (998)  |  Hear (139)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Incentive (9)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reason (744)  |  Seek (213)  |  Solution (267)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Worker (31)

Though science can cause problems, it is not by ignorance that we will solve them.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Problem (676)  |  Science (3879)  |  Will (2355)

Through the naturalist’s eyes, a sparrow can be as interesting as a bird of paradise, the behaviour of a mouse as interesting as that of a tiger, and a humble lizard as fascinating as a crocodile. … Our planet is beautifully intricate, brimming over with enigmas to be solved and riddles to be unravelled.
In The Amateur Naturalist (1989), 7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Bird (149)  |  Bird Of Paradise (2)  |  Brimming (4)  |  Crocodile (14)  |  Enigma (14)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Humble (50)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Lizard (7)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Paradise (13)  |  Planet (356)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Sparrow (6)  |  Through (849)  |  Tiger (7)  |  Unravel (14)

To my knowledge there are no written accounts of Fermi’s contributions to the [first atomic bomb] testing problems, nor would it be easy to reconstruct them in detail. This, however, was one of those occasions in which Fermi’s dominion over all physics, one of his most startling characteristics, came into its own. The problems involved in the Trinity test ranged from hydrodynamics to nuclear physics, from optics to thermodynamics, from geophysics to nuclear chemistry. Often they were closely interrelated, and to solve one’it was necessary to understand all the others. Even though the purpose was grim and terrifying, it was one of the greatest physics experiments of all time. Fermi completely immersed himself in the task. At the time of the test he was one of the very few persons (or perhaps the only one) who understood all the technical ramifications.
In Enrico Fermi: Physicist (1970), 145
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Completely (135)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Detail (146)  |  Dominion (11)  |  Easy (204)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Enrico Fermi (19)  |  First (1283)  |  Geophysics (4)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Grim (5)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hydrodynamics (5)  |  Involved (90)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Physics (5)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Optics (23)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Problem (676)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Ramification (7)  |  Startling (15)  |  Task (147)  |  Terror (30)  |  Test (211)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trinity (9)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)

To solve a problem is to create new problems, new knowledge immediately reveals new areas of ignorance, and the need for new experiments. At least, in the field of fast reactions, the experiments do not take very long to perform.
From Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1967), 'Flash Photolysis and Some of its Applications.' In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1963-1970 (1972), 261.
Science quotes on:  |  Create (235)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fast (45)  |  Field (364)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Long (790)  |  New (1216)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Solution (267)

To solve a problem means to reduce it to something simpler than itself.
In 'On Groups', Prelude to Mathematics (1955), 203.
Science quotes on:  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Simple (406)  |  Something (719)

Train yourselves. Don’t wait to be fed knowledge out of a book. Get out and seek it. Make explorations. Do your own research work. Train your hands and your mind. Become curious. Invent your own problems and solve them. You can see things going on all about you. Inquire into them. Seek out answers to your own questions. There are many phenomena going on in nature the explanation of which cannot be found in books. Find out why these phenomena take place. Information a boy gets by himself is enormously more valuable than that which is taught to him in school.
In 'Dr. Irving Langmuir', Boys' Life (Jul 1941), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Become (815)  |  Book (392)  |  Boy (94)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Curious (91)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Find (998)  |  Finding (30)  |  Hand (143)  |  Himself (461)  |  Information (166)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Invention (369)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learning (274)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Problem (676)  |  Question (621)  |  Research (664)  |  School (219)  |  See (1081)  |  Seek (213)  |  Solution (267)  |  Student (300)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Train (114)  |  Value (365)  |  Why (491)  |  Work (1351)

Watson and I had been often discussing the problem, the ways you could go wrong solving problems of this sort, the techniques you have to use, and in particular, such rather curious things as you mustn’t pay too much attention to the all the experimental evidence, some of it may be wrong, for example.
From Transcript of BBC TV program, The Prizewinners (1962).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attention (190)  |  Curious (91)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Problem (676)  |  Technique (80)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Use (766)  |  James Watson (33)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wrong (234)

We call the one side [of humanity] religion, and we call the other science. Religion is always right. ... Science is always wrong; it is the very artifice of men. Science can never solve one problem without raising ten more problems.
Speech at the Einstein Dinner, Savoy Hotel, London (28 Oct 1930). Reproduced in George Bernard Shaw and Warren Sylvester Smith (ed.), The Religious Speeches of George Bernard Shaw (1963), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Artifice (4)  |  Call (769)  |  Humanity (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (676)  |  Religion (361)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Side (233)  |  Solution (267)  |  Wrong (234)

We called the new [fourth] quark the “charmed quark” because we were pleased, and fascinated by the symmetry it brought to the subnuclear world. “Charm” also means a “a magical device to avert evil,” and in 1970 it was realized that the old three quark theory ran into very serious problems. ... As if by magic the existence of the charmed quark would [solve those problems].
From asppearance in the BBC-TV program written by Nigel Calder, 'The Key to the Universe,' (27 Jan 1977). As cited in Arthur Lewis Caso, 'The Production of New Scientific Terms', American Speech (Summer 1980), 55, No. 2, 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Avert (4)  |  Bringing (10)  |  Call (769)  |  Charm (51)  |  Device (70)  |  Evil (116)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Magic (86)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Particle (194)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Problem (676)  |  Quark (7)  |  Serious (91)  |  Solution (267)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Theory (970)  |  World (1774)

We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Create (235)  |  Kind (557)  |  Problem (676)  |  Same (157)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)

What can I say of the perpetual motion machine that is my husband? What makes Francis run? It is a mysterious and propelling force which, injected into all mankind, would solve all the problems that plague this day and age.
Describing her husband, opthalmologist Francis Heed Adler.
Investigative Ophthalmology (Feb 1968), 7 No. 1, 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Francis Heed Adler (2)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Biography (240)  |  Force (487)  |  Heed (12)  |  Injection (9)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Motion (310)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Perpetual Motion (14)  |  Plague (41)  |  Problem (676)  |  Run (174)  |  Say (984)

While knowledge can create problems, it is not through ignorance that we can solve them.
In Asimov's New Guide to Science (1984), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Create (235)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Problem (676)  |  Solution (267)  |  Through (849)

Why is it so easy to acquire the solutions of past problems and so difficult to solve current ones
(Attributed ??) This quote is often seen, but without a citation, even on the official Marshall McLuhan website. If you known a primary print source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Current (118)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Easy (204)  |  Past (337)  |  Problem (676)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Why (491)

Will it be possible to solve these problems? It is certain that nobody has thus far observed the transformation of dead into living matter, and for this reason we cannot form a definite plan for the solution of this problem of transformation. But we see that plants and animals during their growth continually transform dead into living matter, and that the chemical processes in living matter do not differ in principle from those in dead matter. There is, therefore, no reason to predict that abiogenesis is impossible, and I believe that it can only help science if the younger investigators realize that experimental abiogenesis is the goal of biology.
The Dynamics of Living Matter (1906), 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Biology (216)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Death (388)  |  Decay (53)  |  Definite (110)  |  Differ (85)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Form (959)  |  Goal (145)  |  Growth (187)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Observed (149)  |  Plan (117)  |  Plant (294)  |  Possible (552)  |  Predict (79)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Realize (147)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Solution (267)  |  Transform (73)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Will (2355)  |  Younger (21)

Ye daring ones! Ye venturers and adventurers, and whoever of you have embarked with cunning sails on unexplored seas! Ye enjoyers of enigmas! Solve unto me the enigma that I then beheld, interpret for me the vision of the loneliest one. ... O my brethren, I heard a laughter which was no human laughter.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adventurer (3)  |  Brother (43)  |  Cunning (16)  |  Dare (50)  |  Daring (17)  |  Embark (7)  |  Enigma (14)  |  Hear (139)  |  Human (1468)  |  Interpret (19)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Sail (36)  |  Sea (308)  |  Unexplored (14)  |  Unto (8)  |  Vision (123)  |  Whoever (42)

[Certain students] suppose that because science has penetrated the structure of the atom it can solve all the problems of the universe. ... They are known in every ... college as the most insufferable, cocksure know-it-alls. If you want to talk to them about poetry, they are likely to reply that the "emotive response" to poetry is only a conditioned reflex .... If they go on to be professional scientists, their sharp corners are rubbed down, but they undergo no fundamental change. They most decidedly are not set apart from the others by their intellectual integrity and faith, and their patient humility in front of the facts of nature.... They are uneducated, in the fullest sense of the word, and they certainly are no advertisement for the claims of science teachers.
In Science is a Sacred Cow (1950), 18-19.
Science quotes on:  |  Advertisement (13)  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Change (593)  |  Claim (146)  |  Cocksure (2)  |  College (66)  |  Condition (356)  |  Corner (57)  |  Down (456)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Faith (203)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Humility (28)  |  Insufferable (2)  |  Integrity (17)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patience (56)  |  Patient (199)  |  Pentration (2)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Problem (676)  |  Profession (99)  |  Professional (70)  |  Reflex (14)  |  Reply (56)  |  Response (53)  |  Rub (4)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sense Of The Word (5)  |  Set (394)  |  Solution (267)  |  Structure (344)  |  Student (300)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Uneducated (9)  |  Universe (857)  |  Want (497)  |  Word (619)

[On solving problems:] The first thing you do is scream.
As quoted in Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  First (1283)  |  Problem (676)  |  Scream (6)  |  Thing (1915)

[Using a hand calculator and writing things down longhand] I was able to solve this problem because I don’t have a computer. I know what I am doing every step, and the steps go slowly enough that I can think.
As quoted in Charles Petit, 'The Curious Quester', The San Francisco Chronicle. Reprinted in The Courier-Journal (3 Mar 1991), Magazine, 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Calculator (9)  |  Computer (127)  |  Doing (280)  |  Down (456)  |  Enough (340)  |  Know (1518)  |  Problem (676)  |  Slow (101)  |  Step (231)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

~~[Reinterpretation]~~ The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them.
Yet another of the Einstein-like quotes in common circulation for which there appears to be no known source in the given wording. There are also a number of variations on the the theme. It resembles an authentic quote, “A new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move toward higher levels,” from a longer discussion, in 'Atomic Education Urged by Einstein', New York Times (25 May 1946), 13. Other reinterpretations, not in exactly Einstein’s wording, include: “No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created it.” “The world will not evolve past its current state of crisis by using the same thinking that created the situation.” “The significant problems we have cannot be solved at the same level of thinking with which we created them.” “The world we have made, as a result of the level of thinking we have done thus far, creates problems we cannot solve at the same level of thinking at which we created them.” For more context, see the authentic quote that begins, “Our world faces a crisis as yet unperceived…,” on the Albert Einstein Quotes page on this website.
Science quotes on:  |  Create (235)  |  Face (212)  |  Level (67)  |  Problem (676)  |  Same (157)  |  Significant (74)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.