Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, ... finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell ... whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Traveler

Traveler Quotes (18 quotes)

The Redwoods

Here, sown by the Creator's hand,
In serried ranks, the Redwoods stand;
No other clime is honored so,
No other lands their glory know.

The greatest of Earth's living forms,
Tall conquerors that laugh at storms;
Their challenge still unanswered rings,
Through fifty centuries of kings.

The nations that with them were young,
Rich empires, with their forts far-flung,
Lie buried now—their splendor gone;
But these proud monarchs still live on.

So shall they live, when ends our day,
When our crude citadels decay;
For brief the years allotted man,
But infinite perennials' span.

This is their temple, vaulted high,
And here we pause with reverent eye,
With silent tongue and awe-struck soul;
For here we sense life's proper goal;

To be like these, straight, true and fine,
To make our world, like theirs, a shrine;
Sink down, oh traveler, on your knees,
God stands before you in these trees.
In The Record: Volumes 60-61 (1938), 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Citadel (4)  |  Conqueror (4)  |  Creator (40)  |  Glory (44)  |  Greatest (53)  |  King (23)  |  Poem (85)  |  Rank (19)  |  Redwood (8)  |  Shrine (6)  |  Sow (10)  |  Splendor (8)  |  Storm (19)  |  Tall (8)  |  Temple (22)  |  Tree (143)

An ocean traveller has even more vividly the impression that the ocean is made of waves than that it is made of water.
Gifford Lecture at the University of Edinburgh (Mar 1927). In The Nature of the Physical World (1929, reprint 2005), 242.
Science quotes on:  |  Impression (51)  |  Made (14)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Vivid (16)  |  Water (244)  |  Wave (55)

Every leaf and twig was this morning covered with a sparkling ice armor; even the grasses in exposed fields were hung with innumerable diamond pendants, which jingled merrily when brushed by the foot of the traveler. It was literally the wreck of jewels and the crash of gems.
(21 Jan 1838). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: I: 1837-1846 (1906), 224.
Science quotes on:  |  Armor (3)  |  Cover (23)  |  Crash (8)  |  Diamond (15)  |  Field (119)  |  Foot (39)  |  Gem (9)  |  Grass (30)  |  Ice (29)  |  Innumerable (17)  |  Jewel (6)  |  Leaf (43)  |  Morning (31)  |  Pendant (2)  |  Sparkle (2)  |  Twig (7)  |  Wreck (7)

Exact science and its practical movements are no checks on the greatest poet, but always his encouragement and support … The sailor and traveller, the anatomist, chemist, astronomer, geologist, phrenologist, spiritualist, mathematician, historian and lexicographer are not poets, but they are the lawgivers of poets and their construction underlies the structure of every perfect poem.
In Walt Whitman and William Michael Rossetti (ed.), 'Preface to the First Edition of Leaves of Grass', Poems By Walt Whitman (1868), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomist (14)  |  Astronomer (50)  |  Check (16)  |  Chemist (79)  |  Construction (69)  |  Encouragement (17)  |  Geologist (42)  |  Greatest (53)  |  Historian (30)  |  Love (164)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Movement (65)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Poem (85)  |  Poet (59)  |  Practical (93)  |  Sailor (9)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Structure (191)  |  Support (63)

He who is only a traveler learns things at second-hand and by the halves, and is poor authority. We are most interested when science reports what those men already know practically or instinctively, for that alone is a true humanity.
In 'Higher Laws', in Walden: Or, Life in the Woods (1854, 1899), 239.
Science quotes on:  |  Authority (50)  |  Half (35)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Instinct (50)  |  Interesting (38)  |  Poor (46)  |  Practical (93)  |  Report (31)  |  Science (1699)

I am the most travelled of all my contemporaries; I have extended my field of enquiry wider than anybody else, I have seen more countries and climes, and have heard more speeches of learned men. No one has surpassed me in the composition of lines, according to demonstration, not even the Egyptian knotters of ropes, or geometers.
In Alan L. Mackay, A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (1992, 1994), 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Contemporary (22)  |  Country (121)  |  Demonstration (51)  |  Egypt (18)  |  Enquiry (75)  |  Extension (20)  |  Field (119)  |  Geometer (6)  |  Hearing (27)  |  Knot (4)  |  Learning (174)  |  Line (44)  |  Rope (3)  |  Seeing (48)  |  Speech (40)  |  Surpassing (7)

I am truly a ‘lone traveler’ and have never belonged to my country, my home, my friends, or even my immediate family, with my whole heart; in the face of all these ties, I have never lost a sense of distance and a need for solitude.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (33)  |  Country (121)  |  Distance (54)  |  Face (69)  |  Family (37)  |  Friend (63)  |  Heart (110)  |  Home (58)  |  Immediate (27)  |  Lose (53)  |  Need (211)  |  Sense (240)  |  Solitude (10)  |  Tie (21)  |  Truly (19)  |  Whole (122)

If the Easter pilgrims in Piazza San Pietro were to represent the carriers in a metal, then an insulator would resemble the Antarctic with one solitary traveller. In the abundance of carriers there is an enormous gap between conductors and insulators.
Speech, presenting the 1956 Nobel Prize in Physics to William Shockley, John Bardeen and Walter Houser Brattain. In Nobel Lectures: Physics 1942-1962 (1964), 315-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (15)  |  Antarctic (5)  |  Carrier (5)  |  Conductor (8)  |  Easter (3)  |  Enormous (33)  |  Gap (20)  |  Insulator (2)  |  Metal (38)  |  Pilgrim (2)  |  Representation (27)  |  Resemblance (18)  |  Solitary (13)

If we are correct in understanding how evolution actually works, and provided we can survive the complications of war, environmental degradation, and possible contact with interstellar planetary travelers, we will look exactly the same as we do now. We won’t change at all. The species is now so widely dispersed that it is not going to evolve, except by gradualism.
In Pamela Weintraub, The Omni Interviews (1984), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Alien (25)  |  Complication (20)  |  Contact (24)  |  Degradation (12)  |  Environment (138)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Gradual (18)  |  Interstellar (4)  |  Planetary (5)  |  Survive (28)  |  Understand (189)  |  War (144)

If we knew all the laws of Nature, we should need only one fact or the description of one actual phenomenon to infer all the particular results at that point. Now we know only a few laws, and our result is vitiated, not, of course, by any confusion or irregularity in Nature, but by our ignorance of essential elements in the calculation. Our notions of law and harmony are commonly confined to those instances which we detect, but the harmony which results from a far greater number of seemingly conflicting, but really concurring, laws which we have not detected, is still more wonderful. The particular laws are as our points of view, as to the traveler, a mountain outline varies with every step, and it has an infinite number of profiles, though absolutely but one form. Even when cleft or bored through, it is not comprehended in its entireness.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (24)  |  Actual (34)  |  Bored (2)  |  Calculation (67)  |  Commonly (7)  |  Comprehend (19)  |  Concur (2)  |  Confine (9)  |  Conflict (49)  |  Confusion (34)  |  Description (72)  |  Detect (9)  |  Element (129)  |  Essential (87)  |  Fact (609)  |  Far (77)  |  Form (210)  |  Great (300)  |  Harmony (55)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Infer (10)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Instance (18)  |  Irregularity (10)  |  Know (321)  |  Law (418)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Need (211)  |  Notion (32)  |  Number (179)  |  Of Course (11)  |  Outline (6)  |  Particular (54)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Point (72)  |  Really (50)  |  Result (250)  |  Seemingly (7)  |  Step (67)  |  Vary (14)  |  View (115)  |  Wonderful (37)

In India we have clear evidence that administrative statistics had reached a high state of organization before 300 B.C. In the Arthasastra of Kautilya … the duties of the Gopa, the village accountant, [include] “by setting up boundaries to villages, by numbering plots of grounds as cultivated, uncultivated, plains, wet lands, gardens, vegetable gardens, fences (vαta), forests altars, temples of gods, irrigation works, cremation grounds, feeding houses (sattra), places where water is freely supplied to travellers (prapα), places of pilgrimage, pasture grounds and roads, and thereby fixing the boundaries of various villages, of fields, of forests, and of roads, he shall register gifts, sales, charities, and remission of taxes regarding fields.”
Editorial, introducing the new statistics journal of the Indian Statistical Institute, Sankhayā (1933), 1, No. 1. Also reprinted in Sankhyā: The Indian Journal of Statistics (Feb 2003), 65, No. 1, viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Accountant (2)  |  Administration (8)  |  Altar (6)  |  Boundary (27)  |  Charity (8)  |  Clear (52)  |  Cremation (2)  |  Cultivated (7)  |  Duty (51)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Fence (7)  |  Field (119)  |  Fix (10)  |  Forest (88)  |  Garden (23)  |  Gift (47)  |  God (454)  |  Ground (63)  |  India (15)  |  Irrigation (6)  |  Land (83)  |  Number (179)  |  Organization (79)  |  Pasture (11)  |  Pilgrimage (2)  |  Place (111)  |  Plain (24)  |  Plot (9)  |  Register (9)  |  Remission (2)  |  Road (47)  |  Sale (3)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Tax (19)  |  Temple (22)  |  Uncultivated (2)  |  Various (25)  |  Vegetable (19)  |  Village (6)  |  Water (244)  |  Wet (5)

In [David] Douglas's success in life ... his great activity, undaunted courage, singular abstemiousness, and energetic zeal, at once pointed him out as an individual eminently calculated to do himself credit as a scientific traveler.
In 'Extracts from A Brief Memoir of the Life of David Douglas' (1834), in W.F. Wilson (ed.), David Douglas, Botanist at Hawaii (1919), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Calculate (15)  |  Courage (39)  |  Credit (16)  |  Eminently (2)  |  Energetic (5)  |  Great (300)  |  Individual (177)  |  Life (917)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Singular (3)  |  Success (202)  |  Zeal (7)

Men have been talking now for a week at the post office about the age of the great elm, as a matter interesting but impossible to be determined. The very choppers and travelers have stood upon its prostrate trunk and speculated upon its age, as if it were a profound mystery. I stooped and read its years to them (127 at nine and a half feet), but they heard me as the wind that once sighed through its branches. They still surmised that it might be two hundred years old, but they never stooped to read the inscription. Truly they love darkness rather than light. One said it was probably one hundred and fifty, for he had heard somebody say that for fifty years the elm grew, for fifty it stood still, and for fifty it was dying. (Wonder what portion of his career he stood still!) Truly all men are not men of science. They dwell within an integument of prejudice thicker than the bark of the cork-tree, but it is valuable chiefly to stop bottles with. Tied to their buoyant prejudices, they keep themselves afloat when honest swimmers sink.
(26 Jan 1856). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: VIII: November 1, 1855-August 15, 1856 (1906), 145-146.
Science quotes on:  |  Afloat (2)  |  Age (137)  |  Bark (4)  |  Bottle (13)  |  Buoyant (2)  |  Cork (2)  |  Dwell (8)  |  Elm (4)  |  Forestry (11)  |  Great (300)  |  Honest (26)  |  Integument (3)  |  Men Of Science (97)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Prejudice (58)  |  Sink (15)  |  Speculation (77)  |  Swimmer (2)  |  Trunk (10)

See with what entire freedom the whaleman takes his handful of lamps—often but old bottles and vials, though. ... He burns, too, the purest of oil. ... It is sweet as early grass butter in April. He goes and hunts for his oil, so as to be sure of its freshness and genuineness, even as the traveler on the prairie hunts up his own supper of game.
[Describing the whale oil lamps that provided copious illumination for the whalemen throughout their ship, which contrasts with the darkness endured by sailors on merchant ships.]
In Moby-Dick (1851, 1892), 401.
Science quotes on:  |  April (4)  |  Bottle (13)  |  Burning (17)  |  Butter (5)  |  Energy (185)  |  Freedom (76)  |  Freshness (5)  |  Game (45)  |  Grass (30)  |  Hunting (7)  |  Illumination (12)  |  Lamp (12)  |  Oil (37)  |  Prairie (3)  |  Purity (13)  |  Supper (4)  |  Sweetness (8)  |  Vial (3)  |  Whale (21)

The number of travellers by gigs, the outside of coaches, and on horseback, have, since the introduction of railways, been prodigiously diminished; and as, in addition, the members of the medical faculty having lent their aid to run down the use of water-proof (apparently having found it decided enemy against their best friends colds and catarrhs), the use of the article [the Macintosh] in the form of cloaks, etc., has of late become comparatively extinct.
A Biographical Memoir of the late Charles Macintosh Esq FRS (1847), 89.
Science quotes on:  |  Catarrh (2)  |  Cloak (3)  |  Coach (4)  |  Cold (38)  |  Diminish (7)  |  Enemy (52)  |  Extinct (7)  |  Friend (63)  |  Horseback (3)  |  Introduction (31)  |  Macintosh (3)  |  Outside (37)  |  Physician (232)  |  Railway (13)

The traveler was active; he went strenuously in search of people, of adventure, of experience. The tourist is passive; he expects interesting things to happen to him. He goes “sight-seeing.”
The Image: A Guide to Pseudo-Events in America (1961, 2012), 85. https://books.google.com/books?isbn=0307819167 Daniel J. Boorstin - 2012
Science quotes on:  |  Active (17)  |  Adventure (36)  |  Expect (27)  |  Experience (268)  |  Happen (63)  |  Interesting (38)  |  Passive (5)  |  Search (85)  |  Sight-Seeing (2)  |  Strenuous (3)  |  Tourist (5)

We are all travelers who are journeying … not knowing where the next day of our life is going to take us. We have no understanding of the surprises that are in store for us. Steadily we will know, understand and decipher and then it will all start to make sense. Until then keep travelling.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Decipher (2)  |  Journey (19)  |  Know (321)  |  Life (917)  |  Sense (240)  |  Start (68)  |  Steadily (4)  |  Surprise (44)  |  Travel (40)  |  Understand (189)

When I observe the luminous progress and expansion of natural science in modern times, I seem to myself like a traveller going eastwards at dawn, and gazing at the growing light with joy, but also with impatience; looking forward with longing to the advent of the full and final light, but, nevertheless, having to turn away his eyes when the sun appeared, unable to bear the splendour he had awaited with so much desire.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 197-198.
Science quotes on:  |  Advent (4)  |  Await (2)  |  Bear (28)  |  Dawn (10)  |  Desire (101)  |  East (10)  |  Expansion (25)  |  Gaze (12)  |  Growing (15)  |  Impatience (11)  |  Joy (61)  |  Light (246)  |  Luminous (9)  |  Modern (104)  |  Natural Science (62)  |  Observe (48)  |  Progress (317)  |  Splendor (8)  |  Turn (72)  |  Unable (12)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.