Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “God does not care about our mathematical difficulties. He integrates empirically.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index H > Category: Hearing

Hearing Quotes (49 quotes)

Question: A hollow indiarubber ball full of air is suspended on one arm of a balance and weighed in air. The whole is then covered by the receiver of an air pump. Explain what will happen as the air in the receiver is exhausted.
Answer: The ball would expand and entirely fill the vessell, driving out all before it. The balance being of greater density than the rest would be the last to go, but in the end its inertia would be overcome and all would be expelled, and there would be a perfect vacuum. The ball would then burst, but you would not be aware of the fact on account of the loudness of a sound varying with the density of the place in which it is generated, and not on that in which it is heard.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 181, Question 21. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Air (347)  |  Air Pump (2)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arm (81)  |  Awareness (36)  |  Balance (77)  |  Ball (62)  |  Being (1278)  |  Burst (39)  |  Cover (37)  |  Density (25)  |  Drive (55)  |  Driving (28)  |  End (590)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Examination (98)  |  Exhaustion (16)  |  Expand (53)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Expulsion (2)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Generation (242)  |  Greater (288)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Hollow (4)  |  Howler (15)  |  Inertia (14)  |  Last (426)  |  Loudness (3)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Overcoming (3)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Place (177)  |  Question (621)  |  Receiver (5)  |  Rest (280)  |  Sound (183)  |  Suspend (9)  |  Vacuum (39)  |  Varying (2)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Weighing (2)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

Question: Explain how to determine the time of vibration of a given tuning-fork, and state what apparatus you would require for the purpose.
Answer: For this determination I should require an accurate watch beating seconds, and a sensitive ear. I mount the fork on a suitable stand, and then, as the second hand of my watch passes the figure 60 on the dial, I draw the bow neatly across one of its prongs. I wait. I listen intently. The throbbing air particles are receiving the pulsations; the beating prongs are giving up their original force; and slowly yet surely the sound dies away. Still I can hear it, but faintly and with close attention; and now only by pressing the bones of my head against its prongs. Finally the last trace disappears. I look at the time and leave the room, having determined the time of vibration of the common “pitch” fork. This process deteriorates the fork considerably, hence a different operation must be performed on a fork which is only lent.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 176-7, Question 4. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Against (332)  |  Air (347)  |  Answer (366)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Attention (190)  |  Beat (41)  |  Bone (95)  |  Bow (14)  |  Close (69)  |  Common (436)  |  Deterioration (10)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Dial (9)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Ear (68)  |  Examination (98)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Faint (9)  |  Figure (160)  |  Force (487)  |  Head (81)  |  Hear (139)  |  Howler (15)  |  Last (426)  |  Leaving (10)  |  Listen (73)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mount (42)  |  Mounting (2)  |  Must (1526)  |  Operation (213)  |  Original (58)  |  Particle (194)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Pitch (17)  |  Process (423)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Require (219)  |  Room (40)  |  Second (62)  |  Sensitivity (10)  |  Slow (101)  |  Sound (183)  |  Stand (274)  |  State (491)  |  Still (613)  |  Sure (14)  |  Surely (101)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Tuning Fork (2)  |  Vibration (20)  |  Watch (109)

After the discovery of spectral analysis no one trained in physics could doubt the problem of the atom would be solved when physicists had learned to understand the language of spectra. So manifold was the enormous amount of material that has been accumulated in sixty years of spectroscopic research that it seemed at first beyond the possibility of disentanglement. An almost greater enlightenment has resulted from the seven years of Röntgen spectroscopy, inasmuch as it has attacked the problem of the atom at its very root, and illuminates the interior. What we are nowadays hearing of the language of spectra is a true 'music of the spheres' in order and harmony that becomes ever more perfect in spite of the manifold variety. The theory of spectral lines will bear the name of Bohr for all time. But yet another name will be permanently associated with it, that of Planck. All integral laws of spectral lines and of atomic theory spring originally from the quantum theory. It is the mysterious organon on which Nature plays her music of the spectra, and according to the rhythm of which she regulates the structure of the atoms and nuclei.
Atombau und Spektrallinien (1919), viii, Atomic Structure and Spectral Lines, trans. Henry L. Brose (1923), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Theory (15)  |  Attack (84)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Niels Bohr (54)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Enlightenment (20)  |  First (1283)  |  Greater (288)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Integral (26)  |  Interior (32)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Material (353)  |  More (2559)  |  Music (129)  |  Music Of The Spheres (3)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Order (632)  |  Organon (2)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Max Planck (64)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Problem (676)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Wilhelm Röntgen (8)  |  Root (120)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spectral Analysis (4)  |  Spectral Line (5)  |  Spectroscopy (11)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Spite (55)  |  Spring (133)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Train (114)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Variety (132)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

ARCHIMEDES. On hearing his name, shout “Eureka!” Or else: “Give me a fulcrum and I will move the world”. There is also Archimedes’ screw, but you are not expected to know what that is.
The Dictionary of Accepted Ideas (1881), trans. Jaques Barzun (1968), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Eureka (11)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fulcrum (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Move (216)  |  Name (333)  |  Quip (80)  |  Screw (17)  |  Shout (25)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

As great Pythagoras of yore,
Standing beside the blacksmith’s door,
And hearing the hammers, as they smote
The anvils with a different note,
Stole from the varying tones, that hung
Vibrant on every iron tongue,
The secret of the sounding wire.
And formed the seven-chorded lyre.
From poem 'Evangeline: A Tale of Acadie' (1847), as collected in The Poetical Works of H.W. Longfellow (1855), 132.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anvil (3)  |  Blacksmith (5)  |  Chord (4)  |  Different (577)  |  Door (93)  |  Form (959)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hammer (25)  |  Iron (96)  |  Note (34)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Secret (194)  |  Sound (183)  |  Standing (11)  |  Tone (22)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Vibrant (2)  |  Wire (35)

At lunch Francis [Crick] winged into the Eagle to tell everyone within hearing distance that we had found the secret of life.
Purported remark made at The Eagle pub (28 Feb 1953), near the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge, to celebrate the fact that they, Crick and Watson, had unravelled the structure of DNA. Stated by James Watson in The Double Helix: A Personal Account of the Discovery of the Structure of DNA (1968, 1998), 197. However Francis Crick, in What Mad Pursuit (1990), 77, writes that was “according to Jim,” but “of that I have no recollection.” Nevertheless, some quote collections report this incident with a direct quote as “We have discovered the secret of life!”
Science quotes on:  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Biology (216)  |  Francis Crick (62)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distance (161)  |  DNA (77)  |  Eagle (19)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lunch (6)  |  Secret (194)  |  Tell (340)  |  Wing (75)

Five per cent vision is better than no vision at all. Five per cent hearing is better than no hearing at all. Five per cent flight efficiency is better than no flight at all. It is thoroughly believable that every organ or apparatus that we actually see is the product of a smooth trajectory through animal space, a trajectory in which every intermediate stage assisted survival and reproduction.
[Rebutting the Creationist assertion that fully developed organs could not have arisen 'by chance.']
The Blind Watchmaker (1986, 1996) 90-91.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Believable (3)  |  Better (486)  |  Chance (239)  |  Creationist (16)  |  Develop (268)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Flight (98)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Organ (115)  |  Product (160)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  See (1081)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Space (500)  |  Stage (143)  |  Survival (94)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Through (849)  |  Trajectory (5)  |  Vision (123)

I am the most travelled of all my contemporaries; I have extended my field of enquiry wider than anybody else, I have seen more countries and climes, and have heard more speeches of learned men. No one has surpassed me in the composition of lines, according to demonstration, not even the Egyptian knotters of ropes, or geometers.
In Alan L. Mackay, A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (1992, 1994), 71.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Composition (84)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Country (251)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extension (59)  |  Field (364)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Knot (11)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Line (91)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Rope (7)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Speech (61)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Surpassing (12)  |  Traveler (30)

I can assure you, reader, that in a very few hours, even during the first day, you will learn more natural philosophy about things contained in this book, than you could learn in fifty years by reading the theories and opinions of the ancient philosophers. Enemies of science will scoff at the astrologers: saying, where is the ladder on which they have climbed to heaven, to know the foundation of the stars? But in this respect I am exempt from such scoffing; for in proving my written reason, I satisfy sight, hearing, and touch: for this reason, defamers will have no power over me: as you will see when you come to see me in my little Academy.
The Admirable Discourses (1580), trans. Aurele La Rocque (1957), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Academy (35)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Assurance (17)  |  Astrologer (10)  |  Book (392)  |  Climb (35)  |  Contain (68)  |  Day (42)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Exemption (3)  |  Fifty (15)  |  First (1283)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hour (186)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Ladder (16)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Little (707)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Power (746)  |  Proof (287)  |  Reader (40)  |  Reading (133)  |  Reason (744)  |  Respect (207)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scoff (7)  |  See (1081)  |  Sight (132)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Touch (141)  |  Will (2355)  |  Writing (189)  |  Year (933)

I had made up my mind to find that for which I was searching even if it required the remainder of my life. After innumerable failures I finally uncovered the principle for which I was searching, and I was astounded at its simplicity. I was still more astounded to discover the principle I had revealed not only beneficial in the construction of a mechanical hearing aid but it served as well as means of sending the sound of the voice over a wire. Another discovery which came out of my investigation was the fact that when a man gives his order to produce a definite result and stands by that order it seems to have the effect of giving him what might be termed a second sight which enables him to see right through ordinary problems. What this power is I cannot say; all I know is that it exists and it becomes available only when a man is in that state of mind in which he knows exactly what he wants and is fully determined not to quit until he finds it.
As quoted, without citation, in Mack R. Douglas, Making a Habit of Success: How to Make a Habit of Succeeding, How to Win With High Self-Esteem (1966, 1994), 38. Note: Webmaster is dubious of a quote which seems to appear in only one source, without a citation, decades after Bell’s death. If you know a primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Astound (7)  |  Available (78)  |  Become (815)  |  Construction (112)  |  Definite (110)  |  Determined (9)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enable (119)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Order (632)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Remainder (7)  |  Required (108)  |  Result (677)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Right (452)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Sight (132)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Sound (183)  |  Stand (274)  |  State (491)  |  Still (613)  |  Term (349)  |  Through (849)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Want (497)  |  Wire (35)

I have heard articulate speech produced by sunlight I have heard a ray of the sun laugh and cough and sing! … I have been able to hear a shadow, and I have even perceived by ear the passage of a cloud across the sun's disk.
Letter to his father (26 Feb 1880), describing his photophone research. Transcript with Bell Papers, Library of Congress.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Articulate (7)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Cough (8)  |  Ear (68)  |  Hear (139)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Passage (50)  |  Perceived (4)  |  Produced (187)  |  Ray (114)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Sing (26)  |  Speech (61)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunlight (23)

I heard what was said of the universe,
Heard it and heard it of several thousand years;
It is middling well as far as it goes—but is that all?
'Song of Myself', Leaves of Grass (1867), 77.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Middling (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Universe (857)  |  Year (933)

I never got tired of watching the radar echo from an aircraft as it first appeared as a tiny blip in the noise on the cathode-ray tube, and then grew slowly into a big deflection as the aircraft came nearer. This strange new power to “see” things at great distances, through clouds or darkness, was a magical extension of our senses. It gave me the same thrill that I felt in the early days of radio when I first heard a voice coming out of a horn...
In Boffin: A Personal Story of the Early Days of Radar, Radio Astronomy and Quantum Optics (1991), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Aircraft (8)  |  Blip (2)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Coming (114)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Deflection (2)  |  Distance (161)  |  Early (185)  |  Early Days (3)  |  Echo (11)  |  Extension (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  Horn (18)  |  Magic (86)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Noise (37)  |  Power (746)  |  Radar (8)  |  Radio (50)  |  Ray (114)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Strange (157)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thrill (22)  |  Through (849)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Voice (52)  |  Watching (10)

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured and far away.
In Walden: Or, Life in the Woods (1854, 1906), 358.
Science quotes on:  |  Companion (19)  |  Different (577)  |  Drummer (3)  |  Eccentric (11)  |  Far (154)  |  Hear (139)  |  Keep (101)  |  Man (2251)  |  Measure (232)  |  Music (129)  |  Pace (14)  |  Step (231)

If Louis Pasteur were to come out of his grave because he heard that the cure for cancer still had not been found, NIH would tell him, “Of course we'll give you assistance. Now write up exactly what you will be doing during the three years of your grant.” Pasteur would say, “Thank you very much,” and would go back to his grave. Why? Because research means going into the unknown. If you know what you are going to do in science, then you are stupid! This is like telling Michelangelo or Renoir that he must tell you in advance how many reds and how many blues he will buy, and exactly how he will put those colors together.
Interview for Saturday Evening Post (Jan/Feb 1981), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Assistance (20)  |  Back (390)  |  Blue (56)  |  Buonarroti_Michelangelo (2)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Color (137)  |  Course (409)  |  Cure (122)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Finding (30)  |  Giving (11)  |  Grant (73)  |  Grave (52)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Paint (22)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Red (35)  |  Research (664)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Still (613)  |  Stupid (35)  |  Stupidity (39)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thank You (8)  |  Together (387)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)  |  Year (933)  |  Years (5)

If this is what the McCarran Act means in practice, it seems to us a form of organized cultural suicide.
In a letter co-signed with his Princeton University physics professor colleagues, Walker Bleakney and Milton G. White, protesting that Nobel Prize-winning, Cambridge professor, Dirac having been invited for a year's visit to Princeton, had been denied a visa by the U.S. State Department under section 212A of the Immigration and Naturalization Act (McCarran Act). Quoting a report in Physics Today, this regulation includes 'categories of undesireables ranging from vagrants to stowaways.' The real reason remains unclear, but was perhaps related to Dirac's prior science-related visits to Russia. Robert Oppenheimer's security clearance had recently been revoked, and this was the era of McCarthy's rabid anti-Communism hearings.
'Letters to the Times: Denial of Visa to Physicist Seen as Loss to American Science'. New York Times (3 Jun 1954), 26. In A. Pais, 'Playing With Equations, the Dirac Way'. Behram N. Kursunoglu (Ed.) and Eugene Paul Wigner (Ed.), Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac: Reminiscences about a Great Physicist (1990), 108.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Communism (11)  |  Department (92)  |  Paul A. M. Dirac (44)  |  Era (51)  |  Form (959)  |  Include (90)  |  Letter (109)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Practice (204)  |  Professor (128)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Remain (349)  |  Science (3879)  |  Security (47)  |  State (491)  |  Suicide (23)  |  Today (314)  |  University (121)  |  Vagrant (5)  |  White (127)  |  Winning (19)  |  Year (933)

In every enterprise … the mind is always reasoning, and, even when we seem to act without a motive, an instinctive logic still directs the mind. Only we are not aware of it, because we begin by reasoning before we know or say that we are reasoning, just as we begin by speaking before we observe that we are speaking, and just as we begin by seeing and hearing before we know what we see or what we hear.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 146.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Begin (260)  |  Direct (225)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Hear (139)  |  Know (1518)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motive (59)  |  Observe (168)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Still (613)

In our popular discussions, unwise ideas must have a hearing as well as wise ones, dangerous ideas as well as safe.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Hear (139)  |  Idea (843)  |  Must (1526)  |  Popular (29)  |  Safe (54)  |  Unwise (4)  |  Wise (131)

In Winter, [the Antarctic] is perhaps the dreariest of places. Our base, Little America, lay in a bowl of ice, near the edge of the Ross Ice Barrier. The temperature fell as low as 72 degrees below zero. One could actually hear one's breath freeze.
In 'Hoover Presents Special Medal to Byrd...', New York Times (21 Jun 1930), 1.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  America (127)  |  Antarctic (6)  |  Barrier (32)  |  Base (117)  |  Bowl (3)  |  Breath (59)  |  Coldness (2)  |  Degree (276)  |  Dreariness (3)  |  Edge (47)  |  Freezing (16)  |  Hear (139)  |  Ice (54)  |  Little (707)  |  Low (80)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Winter (44)  |  Zero (37)

Is no one inspired by our present picture of the universe? This value of science remains unsung by singers: you are reduced to hearing not a song or poem, but an evening lecture about it. This is not yet a scientific age.
Perhaps one of the reasons for this silence is that you have to know how to read music. For instance, the scientific article may say, “The radioactive phosphorus content of the cerebrum of the rat decreases to one-half in a period of two weeks.” Now what does that mean?
It means that phosphorus that is in the brain of a rat—and also in mine, and yours—is not the same phosphorus as it was two weeks ago. It means the atoms that are in the brain are being replaced: the ones that were there before have gone away.
So what is this mind of ours: what are these atoms with consciousness? Last week’s potatoes! They now can remember what was going on in my mind a year ago—a mind which has long ago been replaced. To note that the thing I call my individuality is only a pattern or dance, that is what it means when one discovers how long it takes for the atoms of the brain to be replaced by other atoms. The atoms come into my brain, dance a dance, and then go out—there are always new atoms, but always doing the same dance, remembering what the dance was yesterday.
'What do You Care What Other People Think?' Further Adventures of a Curious Character (1988), 244.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Atom (355)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brain (270)  |  Call (769)  |  Cerebrum (10)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Dance (32)  |  Discover (553)  |  Doing (280)  |  Individuality (22)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Long (790)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mine (76)  |  Music (129)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Period (198)  |  Phosphorus (16)  |  Picture (143)  |  Poem (96)  |  Present (619)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Rat (37)  |  Read (287)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remember (179)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Silence (56)  |  Song (37)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unsung (4)  |  Value (365)  |  Week (70)  |  Year (933)  |  Yesterday (36)

It is only those who know a little of nature, who fancy they know much. I have heard a young man say, after hearing a few popular chemical lectures, and seeing a few bottle and squirt experiments: Oh, water—water is only oxygen and hydrogen!—as if he knew all about it. While the true chemist would smile sadly enough at the the youth's hasty conceit, and say in his heart: 'Well, he is a lucky fellow.'
'Thoughts in a Gravel Pit', a lecture delivered at the Mechanics' Institute, Odiham (1857). The Works of Charles Kingsley (1880), 284.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Conceit (15)  |  Enough (340)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Heart (229)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Say (984)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Smile (31)  |  Water (481)  |  Young (227)  |  Youth (101)

It is the nature of an hypothesis, when once a man has conceived it, that it assimilates every thing to itself, as proper nourishment; and, from the first moment of your begetting it, it generally grows the stronger by every thing you see, hear, read, or understand.
The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy Gentleman (1759-67), Penguin edition (1997), 121-122.
Science quotes on:  |  Assimilation (13)  |  Conception (154)  |  First (1283)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growth (187)  |  Hear (139)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moment (253)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Proper (144)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  See (1081)  |  Strength (126)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

It is … a sign of the times—though our brothers of physics and chemistry may smile to hear me say so—that biology is now a science in which theories can be devised: theories which lead to predictions and predictions which sometimes turn out to be correct. These facts confirm me in a belief I hold most passionately—that biology is the heir of all the sciences.
From Nobel Banquet speech (10 Dec 1960).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Biology (216)  |  Brother (43)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Confirmation (22)  |  Correct (86)  |  Devised (3)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Hear (139)  |  Heir (12)  |  Lead (384)  |  Leading (17)  |  Most (1731)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Say (984)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sign (58)  |  Smile (31)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)

Laughter that occurs during tickling of the axillary region and the soles of the feet, as well as the laughter that occurs when seeing comical things or when hearing comical things, has no practical diagnostic significance.
As quoted in Fred Rosner, The Medical Legacy of Moses Maimonides (1998), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Occur (150)  |  Practical (200)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Significance (113)  |  Sole (49)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tickling (2)

Let him who so wishes take pleasure in boring us with all the wonders of nature: let one spend his life observing insects, another counting the tiny bones in the hearing membrane of certain fish, even in measuring, if you will, how far a flea can jump, not to mention so many other wretched objects of study; for myself, who am curious only about philosophy, who am sorry only not to be able to extend its horizons, active nature will always be my sole point of view; I love to see it from afar, in its breadth and its entirety, and not in specifics or in little details, which, although to some extent necessary in all the sciences, are generally the mark of little genius among those who devote themselves to them.
'L'Homme Plante', in Oeuvres Philosophiques de La Mettrie (1796), Vol. 2, 70-1. Jacques Roger, The Life Sciences in Eighteenth-Century French Thought, edited by Keith R. Benson and trans. Robert Ellrich (1997), 377.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  All (4108)  |  Bone (95)  |  Boring (7)  |  Breadth (15)  |  Certain (550)  |  Counting (26)  |  Curious (91)  |  Detail (146)  |  Ear (68)  |  Entirety (6)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fish (120)  |  Flea (11)  |  Genius (284)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Insect (77)  |  Jump (29)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Love (309)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Mention (82)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Sole (49)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Specific (95)  |  Spend (95)  |  Study (653)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Tiny (72)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Wretched (8)

LITTRÉ. Snicker on hearing his name: “the gentleman who thinks we are descended from the apes.”
The Dictionary of Accepted Ideas (1881), trans. Jaques Barzun (1968), 59.
Science quotes on:  |  Ape (53)  |  Descend (47)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Name (333)  |  Quip (80)  |  Think (1086)

Most people today still believe, perhaps unconsciously, in the heliocentric universe. ... Every newspaper in the land has a section on astrology, yet few have anything at all on astronomy.
[Realizing that his plasma universe may take a long time to penetrate the popular consciousness. When addressing a number of physicists with the first half of the quote, the groups was at first incredulous, but nodded agreement upon hearing the remainder of the quote.]
Quoted in Anthony L. Peratt, 'Dean of the Plasma Dissidents', Washington Times, supplement: The World and I (May 1988),196.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Astrology (43)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Belief (578)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  First (1283)  |  Heliocentric (3)  |  Long (790)  |  Most (1731)  |  Newspaper (32)  |  Number (699)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  People (1005)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Plasma (8)  |  Quote (42)  |  Remainder (7)  |  Still (613)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Unconscious (22)  |  Universe (857)

Music may be called the sister of painting, for she is dependent upon hearing, the sense which comes second and her harmony is composed of the union of proportional parts sounded simultaneously, rising and falling in one or more harmonic rhythms.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Compose (17)  |  Dependent (24)  |  Fall (230)  |  Harmonic (4)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Hear (139)  |  More (2559)  |  Music (129)  |  Painting (44)  |  Part (222)  |  Proportional (4)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rising (44)  |  Second (62)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simultaneous (22)  |  Sister (8)  |  Sound (183)  |  Union (51)

My son, all my life I have loved this science so deeply that I can now hear my heart beat for joy.
Commenting about Pasteur's accomplishment of separating two asymmetric forms of tartaric acid crystals.
Quoted in Ralph Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 152.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Acid (83)  |  All (4108)  |  Beat (41)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Form (959)  |  Hear (139)  |  Heart (229)  |  Joy (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Love (309)  |  Science (3879)  |  Two (937)

Of all the constituents of the human body, bone is the hardest, the driest, the earthiest, and the coldest; and, excepting only the teeth, it is devoid of sensation. God, the great Creator of all things, formed its substance to this specification with good reason, intending it to be like a foundation for the whole body; for in the fabric of the human body bones perform the same function as do walls and beams in houses, poles in tents, and keels and ribs in boats.
Bones Differentiated by Function
Some bones, by reason of their strength, form as it were props for the body; these include the tibia, the femur, the spinal vertebrae, and most of the bony framework. Others are like bastions, defense walls, and ramparts, affording natural protection to other parts; examples are the skull, the spines and transverse processes of the vertebrae, the breast bone, the ribs. Others stand in front of the joints between certain bones, to ensure that the joint does not move too loosely or bend to too acute an angle. This is the function of the tiny bones, likened by the professors of anatomy to the size of a sesame seed, which are attached to the second internode of the thumb, the first internode of the other four fingers and the first internodes of the five toes. The teeth, on the other hand, serve specifically to cut, crush, pound and grind our food, and similarly the two ossicles in the organ of hearing perform a specifically auditory function.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem: (1543), Book I, 1, as translated by William Frank Richardson, in 'Nature of Bone; Function of Bones', On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book I: The Bones and Cartilages (1998), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Acute (7)  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Angle (20)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Auditory (2)  |  Bastion (3)  |  Beam (24)  |  Bend (12)  |  Boat (16)  |  Body (537)  |  Bone (95)  |  Breast (9)  |  Certain (550)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Creator (91)  |  Crush (18)  |  Cut (114)  |  Defense (23)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Do (1908)  |  Driest (2)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Exception (73)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Finger (44)  |  First (1283)  |  Food (199)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Framework (31)  |  Function (228)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grind (11)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hardest (3)  |  House (140)  |  Human (1468)  |  Include (90)  |  Joint (31)  |  Keel (4)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Natural (796)  |  Organ (115)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Pole (46)  |  Pound (14)  |  Process (423)  |  Professor (128)  |  Prop (6)  |  Protection (36)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rib (6)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Serve (59)  |  Sesame (2)  |  Size (60)  |  Skull (5)  |  Specification (7)  |  Spine (9)  |  Stand (274)  |  Strength (126)  |  Substance (248)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Tent (11)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thumb (17)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Toe (7)  |  Transverse (2)  |  Two (937)  |  Vertebra (4)  |  Wall (67)  |  Whole (738)

Oh, my dear Kepler, how I wish that we could have one hearty laugh together. Here, at Padua, is the principal professor of philosophy, whom I have repeatedly and urgently requested to look at the moon and planets through my glass, [telescope] which he pertinaciously refuses to do. Why are you not here? what shouts of laughter we should have at this glorious folly! and to hear the professor of philosophy at Pisa laboring before the grand duke with logical arguments, as if with magical incantations, to charm the new planets out of the sky.
From Letter to Johannes Kepler. As translated in John Elliot Drinkwater Bethune, Life of Galileo Galilei: With Illustrations of the Advancement of Experimental Philosophy (1832), 92-93.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Charm (51)  |  Do (1908)  |  Folly (43)  |  Glass (92)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Hear (139)  |  Hearty (3)  |  Incantation (5)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Logic (287)  |  Look (582)  |  Magic (86)  |  Moon (237)  |  New (1216)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Planet (356)  |  Principal (63)  |  Professor (128)  |  Refusal (22)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Repeated (5)  |  Request (7)  |  Shout (25)  |  Sky (161)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Through (849)  |  Together (387)  |  Urgent (13)  |  Why (491)  |  Wish (212)

On hearing the news [of being awarded a Nobel Prize], a friend who knows me only too well, sent me this laconic message: 'Blood, toil, sweat and tears always were a good mixture'.
Nobel Banquet Speech (10 Dec 1962).
Science quotes on:  |  Award (13)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Friend (168)  |  Good (889)  |  Know (1518)  |  Message (49)  |  Mixture (41)  |  New (1216)  |  News (36)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Sweat (15)  |  Tear (42)  |  Tears (2)  |  Toil (25)

Physics is very muddled again at the moment; it is much too hard for me anyway, and I wish I were a movie comedian or something like that and had never heard anything about physics.
Letter to R. Kronig (21 May 1925). Quoted in R. Kronig, 'The Turning Point', in M. Fierz and V. F. Weisskopf (eds.), Theoretical Physics in the Twentieth Century. A Memorial Volume to Wolfgang Pauli (1960),as trans. in M. Klein, Letters on Wave Mechanics, x.
Science quotes on:  |  Hard (243)  |  Moment (253)  |  Movie (16)  |  Never (1087)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Something (719)  |  Wish (212)

Scientists who dislike constraints on research like to remark that a truly great research worker needs only three pieces of equipment: a pencil, a piece of paper and a brain. But they quote this maxim more often at academic banquets than at budget hearings.
In Dr. N Sreedharan, Quotations of Wit and Wisdom (2007), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Constraint (13)  |  Dislike (15)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Genius (284)  |  Great (1574)  |  Money (170)  |  More (2559)  |  Paper (182)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Quote (42)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Truly (116)

The forests in his strength rejoice;
Hark! on the evening breeze,
As once of old, the Lord God's voice
Is heard among the trees.
In Greenland and Other Poems (1819), 175.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Breeze (6)  |  Evening (12)  |  Forest (150)  |  God (757)  |  Lord (93)  |  Old (481)  |  Rejoicing (2)  |  Strength (126)  |  Tree (246)  |  Voice (52)

The human senses (above all, that of hearing) do not possess one set of constant parameters, to be measured independently, one at a time. It is even questionable whether the various 'senses' are to be regarded as separate, independent detectors. The human organism is one integrated whole, stimulated into response by physical signals; it is not to be thought of as a box, carrying various independent pairs of terminals labeled 'ears', 'eyes', 'nose', et cetera.
On Human Communication: A Review, A Survey and a Criticism (1957), 127-8.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Box (22)  |  Constant (144)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ear (68)  |  Eye (419)  |  Human (1468)  |  Independently (24)  |  Integrated (10)  |  Organism (220)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possess (156)  |  Regard (305)  |  Response (53)  |  Sense (770)  |  Separate (143)  |  Set (394)  |  Signal (27)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Various (200)  |  Whole (738)

The products of the senses, especially those of sight, hearing, and touch, form the basis of all the higher thought processes. Hence the importance of developing accurate sense concepts. … The purpose of objective thinking is to enable the mind to think without the help of objects.
As quoted in William W. Speer, Primary Arithmetic (1896), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  All (4108)  |  Basis (173)  |  Concept (221)  |  Develop (268)  |  Education (378)  |  Enable (119)  |  Form (959)  |  Hear (139)  |  Help (105)  |  Importance (286)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Object (422)  |  Objective (91)  |  Process (423)  |  Product (160)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sight (132)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Touch (141)

The science and technology which have advanced man safely into space have brought about startling medical advances for man on earth. Out of space research have come new knowledge, techniques and instruments which have enabled some bedridden invalids to walk, the totally deaf to hear, the voiceless to talk, and, in the foreseeable future, may even make it possible for the blind to “see.”
'From Outer Space—Advances For Medicine on Earth', contributed in Lillian Levy, Space, Its Impact on Man and Society (1965, reprinted 1973), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Blind (95)  |  Deaf (4)  |  Earth (996)  |  Foreseeable (3)  |  Future (429)  |  Hear (139)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Invalid (2)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Medicine (378)  |  New (1216)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Technology (45)  |  See (1081)  |  Space (500)  |  Startling (15)  |  Talk (100)  |  Technique (80)  |  Technology (257)  |  Voice (52)  |  Walk (124)

The sun … is a body of great size and power, the ruler, not only of the seasons and of the different climates, but also of the stars themselves and of the heavens. When we consider his operations, we must regard him as the life, or rather the mind of the universe, the chief regulator and the God of nature; he also lends his light to the other stars. He is the most illustrious and excellent, beholding all things and hearing all things.
In The Natural History of Pliny (1855), Vol. 1, 20.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Body (537)  |  Chief (97)  |  Climate (97)  |  Consider (416)  |  Different (577)  |  Excellent (28)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Illustrious (10)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Regard (305)  |  Regulator (3)  |  Ruler (21)  |  Season (47)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Universe (857)

The ultimate test of man's conscience may be his willingness to sacrifice something today for future generations whose words of thanks will not be heard.
Former governor of Wisconsin, Founder of Earth Day.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Conscience (50)  |  Future (429)  |  Generation (242)  |  Man (2251)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Something (719)  |  Test (211)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thanks (26)  |  Today (314)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willingness (10)  |  Word (619)

The whole apparatus of using loyalty-security hearings for working off personal political spite has been firmly established as a part of our “way of life” and I do not see anything happening yet to loosen the hold of this machinery on us.
In letter to Linus Pauling (8 Sep 1955). Cited on Oregon State University Library web site.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Do (1908)  |  Establishing (7)  |  Happening (58)  |  Hold (95)  |  Life (1795)  |  Loyalty (9)  |  Machinery (56)  |  McCarthy_Joseph (2)  |  Personal (67)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  Security (47)  |  See (1081)  |  Spite (55)  |  Way (1217)  |  Way Of Life (12)  |  Whole (738)

They think that differential equations are not reality. Hearing some colleagues speak, it’s as though theoretical physics was just playing house with plastic building blocks. This absurd idea has gained currency, and now people seem to feel that theoretical physicists are little more than dreamers locked away ivory towers. They think our games, our little houses, bear no relation to their everyday worries, their interests, their problems, or their welfare. But I’m going to tell you something, and I want you to take it as a ground rule for this course. From now on I will be filling this board with equations. … And when I'm done, I want you to do the following: look at those numbers, all those little numbers and Greek letters on the board, and repeat to yourselves, “This is reality,” repeat it over and over.
Zig Zag, trans. Lisa Dillman (2008), 63.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurd (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Bear (159)  |  Board (12)  |  Building (156)  |  Building Block (8)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Course (409)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dreamer (13)  |  Equation (132)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Feel (367)  |  Gain (145)  |  Game (101)  |  Greek (107)  |  Ground (217)  |  House (140)  |  Idea (843)  |  Interest (386)  |  Ivory Tower (5)  |  Letter (109)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  More (2559)  |  Number (699)  |  People (1005)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Plastic (28)  |  Playing (42)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reality (261)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Rule (294)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Tell (340)  |  Theoretical Physicist (19)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tower (42)  |  Want (497)  |  Welfare (25)  |  Will (2355)  |  Worry (33)

Things of which there is sight, hearing, apprehension, these I prefer.
Heraclitus, fr. 55. Trans. R. W. Sharples.
Science quotes on:  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Observation (555)  |  Sight (132)  |  Thing (1915)

Through seven figures come sensations for a man; there is hearing for sounds, sight for the visible, nostril for smell, tongue for pleasant or unpleasant tastes, mouth for speech, body for touch, passages outwards and inwards for hot or cold breath. Through these come knowledge or lack of it.
Regimen, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1931), Vol. 4, 261.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Breath (59)  |  Cold (112)  |  Figure (160)  |  Hot (60)  |  Inward (6)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lack (119)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Nostril (4)  |  Passage (50)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sight (132)  |  Smell (27)  |  Sound (183)  |  Speech (61)  |  Taste (90)  |  Through (849)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Touch (141)  |  Unpleasant (12)  |  Visible (84)

To ask what qualities distinguish good from routine scientific research is to address a question that should be of central concern to every scientist. We can make the question more tractable by rephrasing it, “What attributes are shared by the scientific works which have contributed importantly to our understanding of the physical world—in this case the world of living things?” Two of the most widely accepted characteristics of good scientific work are generality of application and originality of conception. . These qualities are easy to point out in the works of others and, of course extremely difficult to achieve in one’s own research. At first hearing novelty and generality appear to be mutually exclusive, but they really are not. They just have different frames of reference. Novelty has a human frame of reference; generality has a biological frame of reference. Consider, for example, Darwinian Natural Selection. It offers a mechanism so widely applicable as to be almost coexistent with reproduction, so universal as to be almost axiomatic, and so innovative that it shook, and continues to shake, man’s perception of causality.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 230.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Achieve (66)  |  Address (12)  |  Appear (118)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Application (242)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Axiomatic (2)  |  Biological (137)  |  Case (99)  |  Causality (11)  |  Central (80)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Conception (154)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consider (416)  |  Continue (165)  |  Contribute (27)  |  Course (409)  |  Darwinian (9)  |  Different (577)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Easy (204)  |  Example (94)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Extremely (16)  |  First (1283)  |  Frame (26)  |  Frame of Reference (5)  |  Generality (45)  |  Good (889)  |  Hear (139)  |  Human (1468)  |  Importantly (3)  |  Innovative (2)  |  Living (491)  |  Living Things (5)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mutually (7)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Offer (141)  |  Originality (19)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perception (97)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical World (28)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Out (8)  |  Quality (135)  |  Question (621)  |  Really (78)  |  Reference (33)  |  Rephrase (2)  |  Rephrasing (2)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Research (664)  |  Routine (25)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Selection (128)  |  Shake (41)  |  Share (75)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universal (189)  |  Widely (9)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Touch is the most fundamental sense. A baby experiences it, all over, before he is born and long before he learns to use sight, hearing, or taste, and no human ever ceases to need it.
In Time Enough for Love: The Lives of Lazarus Long (1973), 366.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Baby (28)  |  Birth (147)  |  Cease (79)  |  Ceasing (2)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Human (1468)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Long (790)  |  Most (1731)  |  Need (290)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sight (132)  |  Taste (90)  |  Touch (141)  |  Use (766)

Voice is a flowing breath of air, perceptible to the hearing by contact. It moves in an endless number of circular rounds, like the innumerably increasing circular waves which appear when a stone is thrown into smooth water, and which keep on spreading indefinitely from the centre.
Vitruvius
In De Architectura, Book 5, Chap 1, Sec. 6. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 138.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Breath (59)  |  Centre (28)  |  Circle (110)  |  Circular (19)  |  Contact (65)  |  Endless (56)  |  Flow (83)  |  Indefinitely (10)  |  Move (216)  |  Number (699)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spread (83)  |  Stone (162)  |  Throw (43)  |  Voice (52)  |  Water (481)  |  Wave (107)

We have an A-bomb … What more do you want, mermaids?
From testimony on 21 Apr 1954, In the Matter of J. Robert Oppenheimer: Transcript of Hearing Before Personnel Security Board, Washington, D.C., April 12, 1954, through May 5, 1954 (1954), 468. Rabi was objecting to the suspension of the security clearance of Robert Oppenheimer (his friend) stressing the “real positive record” and “tremendous achievement” and more that already documented his loyalty.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Do (1908)  |  Mermaid (5)  |  More (2559)  |  J. Robert Oppenheimer (39)  |  Security (47)  |  Want (497)

Where a body is in motion, there exists space and time, the simplest sentient creature in this world would thus be a measure of them. Our hearing, and perhaps our seeing too, consists of a counting of oscillations.
Aphorism 54 in Notebook D (1773-1775), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Consist (223)  |  Count (105)  |  Counting (26)  |  Creature (233)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Motion (310)  |  Oscillation (13)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sentient (7)  |  Sight (132)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  World (1774)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.