Celebrating 20 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index I > Category: Integrated

Integrated Quotes (10 quotes)

A scientist's accomplishments are equal to the integral of his ability integrated over the hours of his effort.
J. O. Hirschfelder, in essay on Eyring, 'A Forecast for Theoretical Chemistry', Journal of Chemical Education, 1966, 45, 457.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (153)  |  Accomplishment (94)  |  Effort (227)  |  Hour (186)  |  Integral (26)  |  Scientist (825)

Each species has evolved a special set of solutions to the general problems that all organisms must face. By the fact of its existence, a species demonstrates that its members are able to carry out adequately a series of general functions. … These general functions offer a framework within which one can integrate one’s view of biology and focus one’s research. Such a view helps one to avoid becoming lost in a morass of unstructured detail—even though the ways in which different species perform these functions may differ widely. A few obvious examples will suffice. Organisms must remain functionally integrated. They must obtain materials from their environments, and process and release energy from these materials. … They must differentiate and grow, and they must reproduce. By focusing one’s questions on one or another of these obligatory and universal capacities, one can ensure that one’s research will not be trivial and that it will have some chance of achieving broad general applicability.
In 'Integrative Biology: An Organismic Biologist’s Point of View', Integrative and Comparative Biology (2005), 45, 331.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (67)  |  Adequately (3)  |  All (4107)  |  Applicability (6)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Biology (216)  |  Broad (27)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Carry (127)  |  Chance (239)  |  Demonstrate (77)  |  Detail (146)  |  Differ (85)  |  Different (577)  |  Differentiate (19)  |  Energy (346)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolution (593)  |  Example (94)  |  Existence (460)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1212)  |  Focus (35)  |  Framework (31)  |  Function (229)  |  General (511)  |  Grow (238)  |  Help (106)  |  Integrate (7)  |  Lose (159)  |  Material (353)  |  Member (41)  |  Morass (2)  |  Must (1526)  |  Obligatory (3)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Offer (141)  |  Organism (220)  |  Perform (121)  |  Problem (679)  |  Process (423)  |  Question (622)  |  Release (27)  |  Remain (349)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Research (677)  |  Series (149)  |  Set (394)  |  Solution (269)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Special (184)  |  Species (402)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Universal (189)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1216)  |  Widely (9)  |  Will (2354)

I see the whole of humankind becoming a single, integrated organism. … I look upon each of us as I would an individual cell in the organism, each of us playing his or her respective role.
From interview with James Reston, Jr., in Pamela Weintraub (ed.), The Omni Interviews (1984), 109. Previously published in magazine, Omni (May 1982).
Science quotes on:  |  Becoming (96)  |  Cell (138)  |  Humankind (11)  |  Individual (404)  |  Look (582)  |  Organism (220)  |  Playing (42)  |  Role (85)  |  See (1082)  |  Single (354)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Whole (738)

In essence, science is a perpetual search for an intelligent and integrated comprehension of the world we live in.
In Matthew M. Radmanesh, Cracking the Code of Our Physical Universe (2006), 248.
Science quotes on:  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Essence (82)  |  Integrate (7)  |  Integration (19)  |  Intelligence (213)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Live (629)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Science (3880)  |  Search (162)  |  World (1778)

It is the intact and functioning organism on which natural selection operates. Organisms are therefore the central element of concern to the biologist who aspires to a broad and integrated understanding of biology.
From 'Interspecific comparison as a tool for ecological physiologists', collected in M.E. Feder, A.F. Bennett, W.W. Burggren, and R.B. Huey, (eds.), New Directions in Ecological Physiology (1987), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspire (13)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Biology (216)  |  Broad (27)  |  Central (80)  |  Concern (228)  |  Element (310)  |  Function (229)  |  Intact (8)  |  Integrate (7)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Operate (17)  |  Organism (220)  |  Selection (128)  |  Understand (607)  |  Understanding (514)

Science develops best when its concepts and conclusions are integrated into the broader human culture and its concerns for ultimate meaning and value. Scientists cannot, therefore, hold themselves entirely aloof from the sorts of issues dealt with by philosophers and theologians. By devoting to these issues something of the energy and care they give to their research in science, they can help others realize more fully the human potentialities of their discoveries. They can also come to appreciate for themselves that these discoveries cannot be a genuine substitute for knowledge of the truly ultimate.
In Letter (1 Jun 1988) to Father George V. Coyne, Director of the Vatican Observatory. On vatican.va website.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Best (459)  |  Care (186)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conclusion (255)  |  Culture (143)  |  Develop (268)  |  Energy (346)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Human (1470)  |  Human Culture (10)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Meaning (235)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosopher (259)  |  Realize (147)  |  Research (677)  |  Science (3880)  |  Science And Religion (310)  |  Scientist (825)  |  Something (719)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theologian (22)  |  Truly (116)  |  Ultimate (146)  |  Value (368)

Science is intimately integrated with the whole social structure and cultural tradition. They mutually support one other—only in certain types of society can science flourish, and conversely without a continuous and healthy development and application of science such a society cannot function properly.
The Social System (1951, 1977), Chap. 8, 111. As a functionalist, Parsons argued that social practices had to be studied in terms of their function in maintaining society.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Certain (550)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Culture (143)  |  Development (424)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Flourishing (6)  |  Function (229)  |  Health (193)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Integration (19)  |  Mutual (53)  |  Other (2236)  |  Science (3880)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (325)  |  Structure (346)  |  Support (147)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Type (167)  |  Whole (738)

The human senses (above all, that of hearing) do not possess one set of constant parameters, to be measured independently, one at a time. It is even questionable whether the various 'senses' are to be regarded as separate, independent detectors. The human organism is one integrated whole, stimulated into response by physical signals; it is not to be thought of as a box, carrying various independent pairs of terminals labeled 'ears', 'eyes', 'nose', et cetera.
On Human Communication: A Review, A Survey and a Criticism (1957), 127-8.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Box (22)  |  Constant (144)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ear (68)  |  Eye (423)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Human (1470)  |  Independently (24)  |  Organism (220)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possess (156)  |  Regard (304)  |  Response (53)  |  Sense (770)  |  Separate (143)  |  Set (394)  |  Signal (27)  |  Thought (954)  |  Time (1877)  |  Various (200)  |  Whole (738)

These changes—the more rapid pulse, the deeper breathing, the increase of sugar in the blood, the secretion from the adrenal glands—were very diverse and seemed unrelated. Then, one wakeful night, after a considerable collection of these changes had been disclosed, the idea flashed through my mind that they could be nicely integrated if conceived as bodily preparations for supreme effort in flight or in fighting. Further investigation added to the collection and confirmed the general scheme suggested by the hunch.
The Way of an Investigator: A Scientist's Experiences in Medical Research (1945), 59-60.
Science quotes on:  |  Adrenaline (5)  |  Blood (134)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Change (595)  |  Collection (64)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Effort (227)  |  Flash (49)  |  Flight (98)  |  General (511)  |  Gland (14)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (845)  |  Increase (211)  |  Investigation (231)  |  Mind (1339)  |  More (2559)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Pulse (20)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Scientific Method (176)  |  Sugar (23)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Through (849)

Those of us who were familiar with the state of inorganic chemistry in universities twenty to thirty years ago will recall that at that time it was widely regarded as a dull and uninteresting part of the undergraduate course. Usually, it was taught almost entirely in the early years of the course and then chiefly as a collection of largely unconnected facts. On the whole, students concluded that, apart from some relationships dependent upon the Periodic table, there was no system in inorganic chemistry comparable with that to be found in organic chemistry, and none of the rigour and logic which characterised physical chemistry. It was widely believed that the opportunities for research in inorganic chemistry were few, and that in any case the problems were dull and uninspiring; as a result, relatively few people specialized in the subject... So long as inorganic chemistry is regarded as, in years gone by, as consisting simply of the preparations and analysis of elements and compounds, its lack of appeal is only to be expected. The stage is now past and for the purpose of our discussion we shall define inorganic chemistry today as the integrated study of the formation, composition, structure and reactions of the chemical elements and compounds, excepting most of those of carbon.
Inaugural Lecture delivered at University College, London (1 Mar 1956). In The Renaissance of Inorganic Chemistry (1956), 4-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (234)  |  Appeal (45)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (355)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Collection (64)  |  Composition (84)  |  Compound (113)  |  Course (408)  |  Discussion (73)  |  Dull (54)  |  Early (186)  |  Element (310)  |  Expect (201)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Fact (1212)  |  Facts (553)  |  Few (13)  |  Formation (96)  |  Inorganic Chemistry (4)  |  Lack (119)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (789)  |  Most (1729)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Past (337)  |  People (1005)  |  Periodic Table (17)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Chemistry (6)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Problem (679)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Recall (10)  |  Regard (304)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Research (677)  |  Result (678)  |  Rigour (21)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Stage (143)  |  State (491)  |  Structure (346)  |  Student (301)  |  Study (656)  |  Subject (522)  |  System (537)  |  Table (104)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Unconnected (10)  |  Undergraduate (15)  |  Uninteresting (9)  |  University (121)  |  Usually (176)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2354)  |  Year (932)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton


by Ian Ellis
who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.