Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Scheme

Scheme Quotes (20 quotes)

As an empiricist I continue to think of the conceptual scheme of science as a tool, ultimately, for predicting future experience in the light of past experience. Physical objects are conceptually imported into the situation as convenient intermediaries-not by definition in terms of experience, but simply as irreducible posits comparable, epistemologically, to the gods of Homer. For my part I do, qua lay physicist, believe in physical objects and not in Homer's gods; and I consider it a scientific error to believe otherwise. But in point of epistemological footing the physical objects and the gods differ only in degree and not in kind. Both sorts of entities enter our conception only as cultural posits. The myth of physical objects is epistemologically superior to most in that it has proved more efficacious than other myths as a device for working a manageable structure into the flux of experience.
From A Logical Point of View (1953), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Concept (102)  |  Culture (85)  |  Definition (152)  |  Degree (48)  |  Difference (208)  |  Empiricist (3)  |  Entity (23)  |  Epistemology (7)  |  Error (230)  |  Experience (268)  |  Flux (8)  |  Footing (2)  |  Future (229)  |  God (454)  |  Homer (7)  |  Import (3)  |  Kind (99)  |  Myth (43)  |  Object (110)  |  Otherwise (16)  |  Physical (94)  |  Posit (2)  |  Prediction (67)  |  Science (1699)  |  Situation (41)  |  Structure (191)  |  Term (87)  |  Tool (70)

But, as we consider the totality of similarly broad and fundamental aspects of life, we cannot defend division by two as a natural principle of objective order. Indeed, the ‘stuff’ of the universe often strikes our senses as complex and shaded continua, admittedly with faster and slower moments, and bigger and smaller steps, along the way. Nature does not dictate dualities, trinities, quarterings, or any ‘objective’ basis for human taxonomies; most of our chosen schemes, and our designated numbers of categories, record human choices from a cornucopia of possibilities offered by natural variation from place to place, and permitted by the flexibility of our mental capacities. How many seasons (if we wish to divide by seasons at all) does a year contain? How many stages shall we recognize in a human life?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admittedly (2)  |  Aspect (37)  |  Basis (60)  |  Big (33)  |  Broad (18)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Category (10)  |  Choice (64)  |  Choose (35)  |  Complex (78)  |  Consider (45)  |  Contain (37)  |  Continua (3)  |  Defend (20)  |  Designation (10)  |  Dictate (9)  |  Divide (24)  |  Division (27)  |  Fast (24)  |  Flexibility (5)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Human (445)  |  Human Life (25)  |  Life (917)  |  Mental (57)  |  Moment (61)  |  Natural (128)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Number (179)  |  Objective (49)  |  Offer (16)  |  Often (69)  |  Order (167)  |  Permit (20)  |  Place (111)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Principle (228)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Record (56)  |  Season (24)  |  Sense (240)  |  Shade (12)  |  Similarly (3)  |  Slow (36)  |  Small (97)  |  Stage (39)  |  Step (67)  |  Strike (21)  |  Stuff (15)  |  Taxonomy (16)  |  Totality (9)  |  Universe (563)  |  Variation (50)  |  Wish (62)  |  Year (214)

Can any thoughtful person admit for a moment that, in a society so constituted that these overwhelming contrasts of luxury and privation are looked upon as necessities, and are treated by the Legislature as matters with which it has practically nothing do, there is the smallest probability that we can deal successfully with such tremendous social problems as those which involve the marriage tie and the family relation as a means of promoting the physical and moral advancement of the race? What a mockery to still further whiten the sepulchre of society, in which is hidden ‘all manner of corruption,’ with schemes for the moral and physical advancement of the race!
In 'Human Selection', Fortnightly Review (1890),48, 330.
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (22)  |  Advancement (36)  |  Constituted (5)  |  Contrast (16)  |  Corruption (9)  |  Deal (25)  |  Family (37)  |  Further (6)  |  Hidden (34)  |  Involve (27)  |  Legislature (3)  |  Luxury (12)  |  Manner (35)  |  Marriage (31)  |  Matter (270)  |  Mean (63)  |  Mockery (2)  |  Moment (61)  |  Moral (100)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Overwhelming (18)  |  Person (114)  |  Physical (94)  |  Practically (9)  |  Privation (4)  |  Probability (83)  |  Problem (362)  |  Promoting (7)  |  Race (76)  |  Relation (96)  |  Sepulchre (3)  |  Smallest (6)  |  Social (93)  |  Society (188)  |  Successfully (2)  |  Thoughtful (10)  |  Tie (21)  |  Treated (2)  |  Tremendous (11)

For the first time I saw a medley of haphazard facts fall into line and order. All the jumbles and recipes and Hotchpotch of the inorganic chemistry of my boyhood seemed to fit into the scheme before my eyes-as though one were standing beside a jungle and it suddenly transformed itself into a Dutch garden. “But it’s true,” I said to myself “It’s very beautiful. And it’s true.”
How the Periodic Table was explained in a first-term university lecture to the central character in the novel by C.P. Snow, The Search (1935), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Boyhood (3)  |  Enlightenment (11)  |  Fact (609)  |  Garden (23)  |  Haphazard (3)  |  Inorganic Chemistry (4)  |  Jumble (4)  |  Jungle (13)  |  Order (167)  |  Periodic Table (13)  |  Recipe (7)

Half a century ago Oswald (1910) distinguished classicists and romanticists among the scientific investigators: the former being inclined to design schemes and to use consistently the deductions from working hypotheses; the latter being more fit for intuitive discoveries of functional relations between phenomena and therefore more able to open up new fields of study. Examples of both character types are Werner and Hutton. Werner was a real classicist. At the end of the eighteenth century he postulated the theory of “neptunism,” according to which all rocks including granites, were deposited in primeval seas. It was an artificial scheme, but, as a classification system, it worked quite satisfactorily at the time. Hutton, his contemporary and opponent, was more a romanticist. His concept of “plutonism” supposed continually recurrent circuits of matter, which like gigantic paddle wheels raise material from various depths of the earth and carry it off again. This is a very flexible system which opens the mind to accept the possible occurrence in the course of time of a great variety of interrelated plutonic and tectonic processes.
In 'The Scientific Character of Geology', The Journal of Geology (Jul 1961), 69, No. 4, 456-7.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (17)  |  Artificial (26)  |  Carry (35)  |  Circuit (12)  |  Classicist (2)  |  Classification (79)  |  Concept (102)  |  Consistently (4)  |  Contemporary (22)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Deposit (9)  |  Depth (32)  |  Design (92)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  Earth (487)  |  Field (119)  |  Flexible (3)  |  Functional (5)  |  Granite (6)  |  James Hutton (20)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Inclination (20)  |  Intuition (39)  |  Investigator (28)  |  Matter (270)  |  Opponent (10)  |  Wilhelm Ostwald (5)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Primeval (8)  |  Process (201)  |  Raise (20)  |  Recurrent (2)  |  Relation (96)  |  Rock (107)  |  Satisfactory (9)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Sea (143)  |  Study (331)  |  Suppose (29)  |  System (141)  |  Variety (53)  |  Abraham Werner (4)  |  Working (20)

I am more of a sponge than an inventor. I absorb ideas from every source. I take half-matured schemes for mechanical development and make them practical. I am a sort of middleman between the long-haired and impractical inventor and the hard-headed businessman who measures all things in terms of dollars and cents. My principal business is giving commercial value to the brilliant but misdirected ideas of others.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (11)  |  Brilliant (14)  |  Business (71)  |  Businessman (3)  |  Cent (5)  |  Commercial (25)  |  Development (228)  |  Dollar (19)  |  Give (117)  |  Hard-Headed (2)  |  Idea (440)  |  Inventor (49)  |  Measure (70)  |  Mechanical (31)  |  Misdirect (2)  |  Practical (93)  |  Principal (15)  |  Sort (32)  |  Source (71)  |  Sponge (9)  |  Term (87)  |  Value (180)

I do not see any reason to assume that the heuristic significance of the principle of general relativity is restricted to gravitation and that the rest of physics can be dealt with separately on the basis of special relativity, with the hope that later on the whole may be fitted consistently into a general relativistic scheme. I do not think that such an attitude, although historically understandable, can be objectively justified. The comparative smallness of what we know today as gravitational effects is not a conclusive reason for ignoring the principle of general relativity in theoretical investigations of a fundamental character. In other words, I do not believe that it is justifiable to ask: What would physics look like without gravitation?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (99)  |  Assume (19)  |  Attitude (47)  |  Basis (60)  |  Belief (400)  |  Character (82)  |  Comparative (8)  |  Consistently (4)  |  Deal (25)  |  Effect (133)  |  Fit (31)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  General (92)  |  General Relativity (5)  |  Gravitation (27)  |  Historically (2)  |  Hope (129)  |  Ignore (22)  |  In Other Words (4)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Justify (19)  |  Know (321)  |  Late (28)  |  Objectively (5)  |  Physics (301)  |  Principle (228)  |  Reason (330)  |  Relativistic (2)  |  Rest (64)  |  Restrict (8)  |  See (197)  |  Significance (60)  |  Smallness (4)  |  Special Relativity (3)  |  Theoretical (10)  |  Think (205)  |  Today (86)  |  Understandable (4)  |  Whole (122)

I don't really care how time is reckoned so long as there is some agreement about it, but I object to being told that I am saving daylight when my reason tells me that I am doing nothing of the kind. I even object to the implication that I am wasting something valuable if I stay in bed after the sun has risen. As an admirer of moonlight I resent the bossy insistence of those who want to reduce my time for enjoying it. At the back of the Daylight Saving scheme I detect the bony, blue-fingered hand of Puritanism, eager to push people into bed earlier, and get them up earlier, to make them healthy, wealthy and wise in spite of themselves.
In The Diary of Samuel Marchbanks (1947), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirer (4)  |  Agreement (29)  |  Bed (20)  |  Blue (30)  |  Care (73)  |  Daylight Saving Time (9)  |  Detection (12)  |  Eager (7)  |  Earlier (8)  |  Enjoyment (27)  |  Finger (38)  |  Hand (103)  |  Healthy (17)  |  Insistence (9)  |  Moonlight (2)  |  Object (110)  |  Reason (330)  |  Reckoning (4)  |  Reduction (35)  |  Resent (4)  |  Sunrise (7)  |  Value (180)  |  Waste (57)  |  Wealthy (4)  |  Wise (43)

I strongly reject any conceptual scheme that places our options on a line, and holds that the only alternative to a pair of extreme positions lies somewhere between them. More fruitful perspectives often require that we step off the line to a site outside the dichotomy.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alternative (22)  |  Conceptual (8)  |  Dichotomy (4)  |  Extreme (36)  |  Fruitful (31)  |  Hold (56)  |  Lie (80)  |  Line (44)  |  Often (69)  |  Option (5)  |  Outside (37)  |  Pair (10)  |  Perspective (15)  |  Place (111)  |  Position (54)  |  Reject (21)  |  Require (33)  |  Site (11)  |  Step (67)  |  Strongly (6)

It is not therefore the business of philosophy, in our present situation in the universe, to attempt to take in at once, in one view, the whole scheme of nature; but to extend, with great care and circumspection, our knowledge, by just steps, from sensible things, as far as our observations or reasonings from them will carry us, in our enquiries concerning either the greater motions and operations of nature, or her more subtile and hidden works. In this way Sir Isaac Newton proceeded in his discoveries.
An Account of Sir Isaac Newton's Philosophical Discoveries, in Four Books (1748), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (94)  |  Business (71)  |  Care (73)  |  Circumspection (2)  |  Concern (76)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Enquiry (75)  |  Extend (20)  |  Hidden (34)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Motion (127)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (258)  |  Observation (418)  |  Operation (96)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Sensible (22)  |  Situation (41)  |  Step (67)  |  Subtle (26)  |  Universe (563)  |  View (115)

It was to Hofmeister, working as a young man, an amateur and enthusiast, in the early morning hours of summer months, before business, at Leipzig in the years before 1851, that the vision first appeared of a common type of Life-Cycle, running through Mosses and Ferns to Gymnosperms and Flowering Plants, linking the whole series in one scheme of reproduction and life-history.
(1919). As quoted in E.J.H. Corner, The Life of Plants (1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Amateur (18)  |  Common (92)  |  Enthusiast (4)  |  Fern (4)  |  Flower (65)  |  Wilhelm Hofmeister (2)  |  Life Cycle (3)  |  Life History (2)  |  Moss (8)  |  Plant (173)  |  Reproduction (57)  |  Vision (55)

Let us now discuss the extent of the mathematical quality in Nature. According to the mechanistic scheme of physics or to its relativistic modification, one needs for the complete description of the universe not merely a complete system of equations of motion, but also a complete set of initial conditions, and it is only to the former of these that mathematical theories apply. The latter are considered to be not amenable to theoretical treatment and to be determinable only from observation.
From Lecture delivered on presentation of the James Scott prize, (6 Feb 1939), 'The Relation Between Mathematics And Physics', printed in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1938-1939), 59, Part 2, 125.
Science quotes on:  |  Amenable (2)  |  Apply (38)  |  Complete (43)  |  Condition (119)  |  Description (72)  |  Determine (45)  |  Initial (13)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Mechanistic (2)  |  Modification (31)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Observation (418)  |  Physics (301)  |  Quality (65)  |  Relativistic (2)  |  Set (56)  |  System (141)  |  Theory (582)  |  Treatment (88)  |  Universe (563)

One of the petty ideas of philosophers is to elaborate a classification, a hierarchy of sciences. They all try it, and they are generally so fond of their favorite scheme that they are prone to attach an absurd importance to it. We must not let ourselves be misled by this. Classifications are always artificial; none more than this, however. There is nothing of value to get out of a classification of science; it dissembles more beauty and order than it can possibly reveal.
In 'The Teaching of the History of Science', The Scientific Monthly (Sep 1918), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (20)  |  Artificial (26)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Classification (79)  |  Elaborate (13)  |  Favorite (18)  |  Fondness (7)  |  Hierarchy (11)  |  Idea (440)  |  Importance (183)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Petty (5)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Reveal (32)  |  Science (1699)  |  Value (180)

Science is a dynamic undertaking directed to lowering the degree of the empiricism involved in solving problems; or, if you prefer, science is a process of fabricating a web of interconnected concepts and conceptual schemes arising from experiments and ob
Modern Science and Modern Man, p. 62, New York (1952).
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (32)  |  Concept (102)  |  Conceptual (8)  |  Degree (48)  |  Direct (44)  |  Dynamic (11)  |  Empiricism (16)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Fabricate (3)  |  Involve (27)  |  Lowering (4)  |  Prefer (18)  |  Problem (362)  |  Process (201)  |  Science (1699)  |  Solve (41)  |  Undertake (14)  |  Web (11)

Technocrats are turning us into daredevils. The haphazard gambles they are imposing on us too often jeopardize our safety for goals that do not advance the human cause but undermine it. By staking our lives on their schemes, decision makers are not meeting the mandate of a democratic society; they are betraying it. They are not ennobling us; they are victimizing us. And, in acquiescing to risks that have resulted in irreversible damage to the environment, we ourselves are not only forfeiting our own rights as citizens. We are, in turn, victimizing the ultimate nonvolunteers: the defenseless, voiceless—voteless—children of the future.
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquiesce (2)  |  Advance (123)  |  Betray (7)  |  Cause (231)  |  Children (20)  |  Citizen (23)  |  Damage (18)  |  Decision (58)  |  Defenseless (3)  |  Democratic (7)  |  Ennoble (5)  |  Environment (138)  |  Forfeit (2)  |  Future (229)  |  Gamble (3)  |  Goal (81)  |  Human (445)  |  Impose (17)  |  Irreversible (5)  |  Live (186)  |  Maker (10)  |  Often (69)  |  Result (250)  |  Right (144)  |  Risk (29)  |  Safety (39)  |  Society (188)  |  Stake (14)  |  Ultimate (61)  |  Undermine (5)  |  Volunteer (6)  |  Vote (11)

The mathematician is entirely free, within the limits of his imagination, to construct what worlds he pleases. What he is to imagine is a matter for his own caprice; he is not thereby discovering the fundamental principles of the universe nor becoming acquainted with the ideas of God. If he can find, in experience, sets of entities which obey the same logical scheme as his mathematical entities, then he has applied his mathematics to the external world; he has created a branch of science.
Aspects of Science: Second Series (1926), 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (13)  |  Applied Mathematics (10)  |  Branch (61)  |  Caprice (2)  |  Construction (69)  |  Creation (211)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Entity (23)  |  Experience (268)  |  External (45)  |  Freedom (76)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  God (454)  |  Idea (440)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Limit (86)  |  Logic (187)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Principle (228)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Set (56)  |  Universe (563)  |  World (667)

The plain fact is that education is itself a form of propaganda–a deliberate scheme to outfit the pupil, not with the capacity to weigh ideas, but with a simple appetite for gulping ideas readymade. The aim is to make ‘good’ citizens, which is to say, docile and uninquisitive citizens.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (58)  |  Appetite (6)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Citizen (23)  |  Deliberate (10)  |  Docile (2)  |  Education (280)  |  Fact (609)  |  Form (210)  |  Good (228)  |  Gulp (3)  |  Idea (440)  |  Plain (24)  |  Propaganda (6)  |  Pupil (16)  |  Say (126)  |  Simple (111)  |  Weigh (9)

We should first look at the evidence that DNA itself is not the direct template that orders amino acid sequences. Instead, the genetic information of DNA is transferred to another class of molecules which then serve as the protein templates. These intermediate templates are molecules of ribonucleic acid (RNA), large polymeric molecules chemically very similar to DNA. Their relation to DNA and protein is usually summarized by the central dogma, a How scheme for genetic information first proposed some twenty years ago.
In Molecular Biology of the Gene (1965), 281-282.
Science quotes on:  |  Amino Acid (11)  |  Biochemistry (46)  |  Class (64)  |  DNA (67)  |  Dogma (25)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Genetic (11)  |  Information (102)  |  Intermediate (16)  |  Large (82)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Order (167)  |  Polymer (3)  |  Protein (43)  |  RNA (3)  |  Sequence (32)  |  Summarize (7)  |  Template (3)  |  Transfer (8)

You may object that by speaking of simplicity and beauty I am introducing aesthetic criteria of truth, and I frankly admit that I am strongly attracted by the simplicity and beauty of mathematical schemes which nature presents us. You must have felt this too: the almost frightening simplicity and wholeness of the relationship, which nature suddenly spreads out before us.
Letter to Albert Einstein. In Ian Stewart, Why Beauty is Truth (), 278.
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (26)  |  Attract (15)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Criteria (6)  |  Frightening (3)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Spread (19)  |  Truth (750)

[There is] some mathematical quality in Nature, a quality which the casual observer of Nature would not suspect, but which nevertheless plays an important role in Nature’s scheme.
From Lecture delivered on presentation of the James Scott prize, (6 Feb 1939), 'The Relation Between Mathematics And Physics', printed in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1938-1939), 59, Part 2, 122.
Science quotes on:  |  Casual (6)  |  Important (124)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Observer (33)  |  Quality (65)  |  Role (35)  |  Science And Mathematics (8)  |  Suspect (12)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.