Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, ... finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell ... whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Change

Change Quotes (593 quotes)

From thus meditating on the great similarity of the structure of the warm-blooded animals, and at the same time of the great changes they undergo both before and after their nativity; and by considering in how minute a portion of time many of the changes of animals above described have been produced; would it be too bold to imagine that, in the great length of time since the earth began to exist, perhaps millions of ages before the commencement of the history of mankind would it be too bold to imagine that all warm-blooded animals have arisen from one living filament, which THE GREAT FIRST CAUSE endued with animality, with the power of acquiring new parts, attended with new propensities, directed by irritations, sensations, volitions and associations, and thus possessing the faculty of continuing to improve by its own inherent activity, and of delivering down these improvements by generation to its posterity, world without end!
Zoonomia, Or, The Laws of Organic Life, in three parts (1803), Vol. 1, 397.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Association (46)  |  Attend (65)  |  Blood (134)  |  Bold (22)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Commencement (14)  |  Direct (225)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Filament (4)  |  First (1283)  |  Generation (242)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Mankind (13)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Living (491)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Minute (125)  |  New (1216)  |  Portion (84)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Power (746)  |  Produced (187)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Small (477)  |  Structure (344)  |  Time (1877)  |  Volition (3)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warm-Blooded (3)  |  World (1774)

(1) I have told you more than I know about osteoporosis. (2) What I have told you is subject to change without notice. (3) I hope I raised more questions than I have given answers. (4) In any case, as usual, a lot more work is necessary.
Conclusion of one of his papers.
In Barry G. Firkin, Judith A. Whitworth, Dictionary of Medical Eponyms (1996), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Hope (299)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lot (151)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Notice (77)  |  Paper (182)  |  Publication (101)  |  Question (621)  |  Subject (521)  |  Work (1351)

...travel is more than the seeing of sights; it is a change that goes on, deep and permanent, in the ideas of living.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Deep (233)  |  Idea (843)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  More (2559)  |  Permanent (64)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sight (132)  |  Travel (114)

Air Chief Marshal Harris [objecting to a change in strategy recommended by statisticians]: Are we fighting this war with weapons or the slide rule?
Churchill [after puffing on his cigar]: That's a good idea. Let's try the slide rule.
During World War II, Britain lost the advantage when enemy U-boats began listening in to the aircraft radar, were forewarned, and would dive. U-boat sinkings fell to zero. Physicist Patrick S. Blackett with his Operational Research colleagues came up with a solution. Concentrate sufficient aircraft in certain areas, causing the subs to dive so frequently their air supply and batteries were exhausted, forcing them to remain on the surface and be vulnerable to attack. The strategy required diverting several squadrons from Bomber Command to Coastal Command. “Bomber” Harris voiced his objection to Churchill, who made the right choice, proved by successful results. As described by R.V. Jones, 'Churchill and Science', in Robert Blake and Wm. Roger Louis (eds.), Churchill (1996), 437.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Patrick M.S. Blackett (9)  |  Chief (97)  |  Fighting (2)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Rule (294)  |  Slide Rule (2)  |  Statistician (27)  |  Strategy (13)  |  Try (283)  |  War (225)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)

Bei solchen chemischen Untersuchungen, die man zersetzende oder zergliedernde nennt, kommt es zunächst darauf an, zu ermitteln, mit welchen Stoffen man es zu thun hat, oder um chemisch zu reden, welche Stoffe in einem bestimmten Gemenge oder Gemisch enthalten sind. Hierzu bedient man sich sogenannter gegenwirkender Mittel, d. h. Stoffe, die bestimmte Eigenschaften und Eigenthümlichkeiten besitzen und die man aus Ueberlieferung oder eigner Erfahrung genau kennt, so daß die Veränderungen, welche sie bewirken oder erleiden, gleichsam die Sprache sind, mit der sie reden und dadurch dem Forscher anzeigen, daß der und der bestimmte Stoff in der fraglichen Mischung enthalten sei.
In the case of chemical investigations known as decompositions or analyses, it is first important to determine exactly what ingredients you are dealing with, or chemically speaking, what substances are contained in a given mixture or composite. For this purpose we use reagents, i.e., substances that possess certain properties and characteristics, which we well know from references or personal experience, such that the changes which they bring about or undergo, so to say the language that they speak thereby inform the researcher that this or that specific substance is present in the mixture in question.
From Zur Farben-Chemie Musterbilder für Freunde des Schönen und zum Gebrauch für Zeichner, Maler, Verzierer und Zeugdrucker [On Colour Chemistry...] (1850), Introduction. Translation tweaked by Webmaster from version in Herbert and W. Roesky and Klaud Möckel, translated from the original German by T.N. Mitchell and W.E. Russey, Chemical Curiosities: Spectacular Experiments and Inspired Quotes (1996), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Certain (550)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Composite (4)  |  Contain (68)  |  Decomposition (18)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Experience (467)  |  First (1283)  |  Inform (47)  |  Ingredient (15)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Language (293)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Personal (67)  |  Possess (156)  |  Present (619)  |  Property (168)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Reagent (8)  |  Reference (33)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Say (984)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Specific (95)  |  Substance (248)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Use (766)

Changements arrivées dans le globe: Quand on a vu de ses yeux une montagne s’avancer dans une plaine, c’est-à-dire un immense rocher de cette montagne se détacher et couvrir des champs, un château tout entier enfoncé dans la terre, un fleuve englouti qui sort ensuite de son abîme, des marques indubitables qu’un vaste amas d’eau inondait autrefois un pays habité aujourd’hui, et cent vestiges d’autres révolutions, on est alors plus disposé à croire les grands changements qui ont altéré la face du monde, que ne l’est une dame de Paris qui sait seulement que la place où est bâtie sa maison était autrefois un champ labourable. Mais une dame de Naples, qui a vu sous terre les ruines d’Herculanum, est encore moins asservie au préjugé qui nous fait croire que tout a toujours été comme il est aujourd’hui.
Changes That Have Occurred in the Globe: When we have seen with our own eyes a mountain progressing into a plain; that is to say, an immense boulder separating from this mountain and covering the fields; an entire castle broken into pieces over the ground; a river swallowed up which then bursts out from its abyss; clear marks of a vast amount of water having once flooded regions now inhabited, and a hundred vestiges of other transformations, then we are much more willing to believe that great changes altered the face of the earth, than a Parisian lady who knows only that the place where her house was built was once a cultivated field. However, a lady from Naples who has seen the buried ruins of Herculaneum, is much less subject to the bias which leads us to believe that everything has always been as it is today.
From article 'Changements arrivées dans le globe', in Dictionnaire philosophique (1764), collected in Œuvres Complètes de Voltaire (1878), Vol. 2, 427-428. Translated by Ian Ellis.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abyss (29)  |  Alter (62)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Altered (32)  |  Amount (151)  |  Belief (578)  |  Bias (20)  |  Boulder (8)  |  Breaking (3)  |  Broken (56)  |  Built (7)  |  Buried (2)  |  Burst (39)  |  Castle (5)  |  Country (251)  |  Cover (37)  |  Covering (14)  |  Dire (6)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Earth (996)  |  Entire (47)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Everything (476)  |  Eye (419)  |  Face (212)  |  Field (364)  |  Flood (50)  |  Geologic History (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Herculaneum (4)  |  House (140)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inhabitation (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lady (11)  |  Land (115)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mark (43)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Move (216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paris (11)  |  Place (177)  |  Plain (33)  |  Plus (43)  |  River (119)  |  Rock (161)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Say (984)  |  Sinking (6)  |  Subject (521)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Today (314)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vestige (11)  |  Water (481)  |  Willing (44)

Dauer in Wechsel.
Duration in change.
Favourite expression.
Science quotes on:  |  French Saying (67)

Discovery always carries an honorific connotation. It is the stamp of approval on a finding of lasting value. Many laws and theories have come and gone in the history of science, but they are not spoken of as discoveries. Kepler is said to have discovered the laws of planetary motion named after him, but no the many other 'laws' which he formulated. ... Theories are especially precarious, as this century profoundly testifies. World views can and do often change. Despite these difficulties, it is still true that to count as a discovery a finding must be of at least relatively permanent value, as shown by its inclusion in the generally accepted body of scientific knowledge.
Discovery in the Physical Sciences (1969). In Rodney P. Carlisle, Scientific American Inventions and Discoveries (2004), 179.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Approval (10)  |  Body (537)  |  Century (310)  |  Count (105)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Kepler_Johann (2)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Motion (310)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Planet (356)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Precarious (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Still (613)  |  Theory (970)  |  Value (365)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

[On the propulsive force of rockets] One part of fire takes up as much space as ten parts of air, and one part of air takes up the space of ten parts of water, and one part of water as much as ten parts of earth. Now powder is earth, consisting of the four elementary principles, and when the sulfur conducts the fire into the dryest part of the powder, fire, and air increase … the other elements also gird themselves for battle with each other and the rage of battle is changed by their heat and moisture into a strong wind.
In De La Pirotechnia (1540). From the 1943 English translation, as given in Willy Ley, Rockets: The Future of Travel Beyond the Stratosphere (1944), 64. Though Birinuccio provided the first insight into what propels a rocket, the “strong wind” blowing downward, he did not explain why that should cause the rocket to rise upward, as Issac Newton would do with his Third Law of Motion, nearly a century and a half later.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Battle (34)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Fire (189)  |  Force (487)  |  Heat (174)  |  Increase (210)  |  Moisture (20)  |  Other (2236)  |  Powder (9)  |  Principle (507)  |  Propulsion (10)  |  Rage (9)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Space (500)  |  Strong (174)  |  Sulfur (5)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Water (481)  |  Wind (128)

“Pieces” almost always appear 'as parts' in whole processes. ... To sever a “'part” from the organized whole in which it occurs—whether it itself be a subsidiary whole or an “element”—is a very real process usually involving alterations in that “part”. Modifications of a part frequently involve changes elsewhere in the whole itself. Nor is the nature of these alterations arbitrary, for they too are determined by whole-conditions.
From 'Untersuchungen zur Lehre von der Gestalt, I', Psychol. Forsch. (1922), 1, 47-58. As translated in 'The General Theoretical Situation' (1922), collected in W. D. Ellis (ed.), A Source Book of Gestalt Psychology (1938, 1967), Vol. 2, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (30)  |  Appear (118)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Condition (356)  |  Determine (144)  |  Element (310)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Involve (90)  |  Modification (55)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occur (150)  |  Organized (9)  |  Part (222)  |  Piece (38)  |  Process (423)  |  Real (149)  |  Sever (2)  |  Subsidiary (5)  |  Usually (176)  |  Whole (738)

A ... hypothesis may be suggested, which supposes the word 'beginning' as applied by Moses in the first of the Book of Genesis, to express an undefined period of time which was antecedent to the last great change that affected the surface of the earth, and to the creation of its present animal and vegetable inhabitants; during which period a long series of operations and revolutions may have been going on, which, as they are wholly unconnected with the history of the human race, are passed over in silence by the sacred historian, whose only concern with them was largely to state, that the matter of the universe is not eternal and self-existent but was originally created by the power of the Almighty.
Vindiciae Geologicae (1820), 31-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Almighty (23)  |  Animal (617)  |  Applied (177)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Book (392)  |  Concern (228)  |  Creation (327)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Express (186)  |  First (1283)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Geology (220)  |  Great (1574)  |  Historian (54)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Last (426)  |  Long (790)  |  Matter (798)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Pass (238)  |  Period (198)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Race (268)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Self (267)  |  Series (149)  |  Silence (56)  |  State (491)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unconnected (10)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Word (619)

A chemical compound once formed would persist for ever, if no alteration took place in surrounding conditions. But to the student of Life the aspect of nature is reversed. Here, incessant, and, so far as we know, spontaneous change is the rule, rest the exception—the anomaly to be accounted for. Living things have no inertia and tend to no equilibrium.
From Address (22 Jul 1854) delivered at St. Martin’s Hall, published as a pamphlet (1854), 7, and collected in 'Educational Value of Natural History Sciences', Lay Sermons, Addresses, and Reviews (1870), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Anomaly (11)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Biology (216)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Compound (113)  |  Condition (356)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Exception (73)  |  Forever (103)  |  Form (959)  |  Inertia (14)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Persist (11)  |  Rest (280)  |  Rule (294)  |  Spontaneous (27)  |  Student (300)  |  Tend (124)  |  Thing (1915)

A comparison between the triplets tentatively deduced by these methods with the changes in amino acid sequence produced by mutation shows a fair measure of agreement.
In Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1962). Collected in Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1942-1962 (1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Agreement (53)  |  Amino Acid (11)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Measure (232)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mutation (37)  |  Produced (187)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Show (346)  |  Triplet (2)

A distinguished writer [Siméon Denis Poisson] has thus stated the fundamental definitions of the science:
“The probability of an event is the reason we have to believe that it has taken place, or that it will take place.”
“The measure of the probability of an event is the ratio of the number of cases favourable to that event, to the total number of cases favourable or contrary, and all equally possible” (equally like to happen).
From these definitions it follows that the word probability, in its mathematical acceptation, has reference to the state of our knowledge of the circumstances under which an event may happen or fail. With the degree of information which we possess concerning the circumstances of an event, the reason we have to think that it will occur, or, to use a single term, our expectation of it, will vary. Probability is expectation founded upon partial knowledge. A perfect acquaintance with all the circumstances affecting the occurrence of an event would change expectation into certainty, and leave neither room nor demand for a theory of probabilities.
An Investigation of the Laws of Thought (1854), 243-244. The Poisson quote is footnoted as from Recherches sur la Probabilité des Jugemens.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  All (4108)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Definition (221)  |  Degree (276)  |  Demand (123)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Equally (130)  |  Event (216)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Fail (185)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Happen (274)  |  Information (166)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Measure (232)  |  Number (699)  |  Occur (150)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Siméon-Denis Poisson (7)  |  Possess (156)  |  Possible (552)  |  Probability (130)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Single (353)  |  State (491)  |  Term (349)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Total (94)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Writer (86)

A great ball of fire about a mile in diameter, changing colors as it kept shooting upward, from deep purple to orange, expanding, growing bigger, rising as it was expanding, an elemental force freed from its bonds after being chained for billions of years.
On the first atomic explosion in New Mexico, 16 Jul 1945.
From 'Drama of the Atomic Bomb Found Climax in July 16 Test', in New York Times (26 Sep 1945). This was the first of a series of articles by Laurence, who was the only civilian witness of the first bomb test. He was on a flight to see the dropping of a bomb on Nagasaki. Laurence, science writer for the NYT, had been requested for service to the War Department to explain the atomic bomb to the lay public.
Science quotes on:  |  Ball (62)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bigger (5)  |  Billion (95)  |  Bond (45)  |  Chained (2)  |  Color (137)  |  Deep (233)  |  Diameter (28)  |  Elemental (3)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Growing (98)  |  Mile (39)  |  New (1216)  |  Orange (14)  |  Purple (3)  |  Rising (44)  |  Shooting (6)  |  Upward (43)  |  Year (933)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
In Time Enough for Love: The Lives of Lazarus Long (1973), 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Act (272)  |  Alone (311)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Balance (77)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bone (95)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Butcher (9)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Computer (127)  |  Cooking (11)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Death (388)  |  Design (195)  |  Diaper (2)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Equation (132)  |  Fight (44)  |  Gallant (2)  |  Hog (4)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Insect (77)  |  Invasion (8)  |  Manure (8)  |  Meal (18)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Pitch (17)  |  Plan (117)  |  Problem (676)  |  Program (52)  |  Set (394)  |  Ship (62)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Sonnet (4)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Wall (67)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

A man with a conviction is a hard man to change. Tell him you disagree and he turns away. Show him facts or figures and he questions your sources. Appeal to logic and he fails to see your point.
First sentences in When Prophecy Fails (1956), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Appeal (45)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Disagree (11)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fail (185)  |  Figure (160)  |  Hard (243)  |  Logic (287)  |  Man (2251)  |  Point (580)  |  Question (621)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Source (93)  |  Tell (340)  |  Turn (447)

A scientist is a man who changes his beliefs according to reality; a theist is a man who changes reality to match his beliefs.
In Dave Lane, Isn’t Religion Weird? Quotations for Atheists (2008), 10, with no citation. If you know the primary source, please contact Webmaster, who has meanwhile only tentatively assumed that the quote comes from Volker Braun the German playwright (but has confirmed it is not from Volker Braun the physicist).
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Belief (578)  |  Man (2251)  |  Match (29)  |  Reality (261)  |  Scientist (820)

A single ray of light from a distant star falling upon the eye of a tyrant in bygone times, may have altered the course of his life, may have changed the destiny of nations, may have transformed the surface of the globe, so intricate, so inconceivably com
http://web.archive.org/web/20070109161311/http://www.knowprose.com/node/12961
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (62)  |  Altered (32)  |  Bygone (4)  |  Course (409)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Distant (33)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fall (230)  |  Globe (47)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Nation (193)  |  Ray (114)  |  Single (353)  |  Star (427)  |  Surface (209)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transform (73)  |  Tyrant (9)

A sound Physics of the Earth should include all the primary considerations of the earth's atmosphere, of the characteristics and continual changes of the earth's external crust, and finally of the origin and development of living organisms. These considerations naturally divide the physics of the earth into three essential parts, the first being a theory of the atmosphere, or Meteorology, the second, a theory of the earth's external crust, or Hydrogeology, and the third, a theory of living organisms, or Biology.
Hydrogéologie (1802), trans. A. V. Carozzi (1964), 18.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biology (216)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Continual (43)  |  Crust (38)  |  Development (422)  |  Divide (75)  |  Earth (996)  |  Essential (199)  |  First (1283)  |  Geology (220)  |  Include (90)  |  Living (491)  |  Meteorology (33)  |  Organism (220)  |  Origin (239)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Primary (80)  |  Sound (183)  |  Theory (970)

A State without the means of some change is without the means of its conservation.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Conservation (168)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  State (491)

A weapon is a device for making your enemy change his mind.
The Vor Game (1900)
Science quotes on:  |  Device (70)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Making (300)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Weapon (92)

A word is not a crystal, transparent and unchanged, it is the skin of a living thought and may vary greatly in color and content according to the circumstances and the time in which it is used.
In Towne v. Eisner (1918), 245 U.S. 425. As quoted in Richard A. Posner (ed.), The Essential Holmes: Selections from the Letters, Speeches, Judicial Opinions, and Other Writings of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. (1992), 287.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Color (137)  |  Content (69)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Living (491)  |  Skin (47)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transparent (16)  |  Vary (27)  |  Word (619)

A “pacifist male” is a contradiction in terms. Most self-described “pacifists” are not pacific; they simply assume false colors. When the wind changes, they hoist the Jolly Roger.
In 'From the Notebooks of Lazarus Long', Time Enough for Love: The Lives of Lazarus Long (1973), 258.
Science quotes on:  |  Assume (38)  |  Color (137)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Describe (128)  |  False (100)  |  Male (26)  |  Most (1731)  |  Pacifist (2)  |  Self (267)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Wind (128)

Above, far above the prejudices and passions of men soar the laws of nature. Eternal and immutable, they are the expression of the creative power they represent what is, what must be, what otherwise could not be. Man can come to understand the: he is incapable of changing them.
In Cours d’economie Politique (1896-97)
Science quotes on:  |  Creative (137)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Expression (175)  |  Far (154)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Passion (114)  |  Power (746)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Represent (155)  |  Soar (23)  |  Understand (606)

According to my derivative hypothesis, a change takes place first in the structure of the animal, and this, when sufficiently advanced, may lead to modifications of habits… . “Derivation” holds that every species changes, in time, by virtue of inherent tendencies thereto. “Natural Selection” holds that no such change can take place without the influence of altered external circumstances educing or selecting such change… . The hypothesis of “natural selection” totters on the extension of a conjectural condition, explanatory of extinction to the majority of organisms, and not known or observed to apply to the origin of any species.
In On the Anatomy of Vertebrates (1868), Vol. 3, 808.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Alter (62)  |  Altered (32)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apply (160)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Derivation (13)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extension (59)  |  External (57)  |  Extinction (74)  |  First (1283)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Known (454)  |  Lead (384)  |  Majority (66)  |  Modification (55)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Observed (149)  |  Organism (220)  |  Origin (239)  |  Selection (128)  |  Species (401)  |  Structure (344)  |  Time (1877)  |  Virtue (109)

Adrenalin does not excite sympathetic ganglia when applied to them directly, as does nicotine. Its effective action is localised at the periphery. The existence upon plain muscle of a peripheral nervous network, that degenerates only after section of both the constrictor and inhibitory nerves entering it, and not after section of either alone, has been described. I find that even after such complete denervation, whether of three days' or ten months' duration, the plain muscle of the dilatator pupillae will respond to adrenalin, and that with greater rapidity and longer persistence than does the iris whose nervous relations are uninjured. Therefore it cannot be that adrenalin excites any structure derived from, and dependent for its persistence on, the peripheral neurone. But since adrenalin does not evoke any reaction from muscle that has at no time of its life been innervated by the sympathetic, the point at which the stimulus of the chemical excitant is received, and transformed into what may cause the change of tension of the muscle fibre, is perhaps a mechanism developed out of the muscle cell in response to its union with the synapsing sympathetic fibre, the function of which is to receive and transform the nervous impulse. Adrenalin might then be the chemical stimulant liberated on each occasion when the impulse arrives at the periphery.
'On the Action of Adrenalin', Proceedings of the Physiological Society, 21 May 1904, in The Journal of Physiology 1904, 31, xxi.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Adrenaline (5)  |  Alone (311)  |  Applied (177)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Complete (204)  |  Develop (268)  |  Effective (59)  |  Evoke (12)  |  Existence (456)  |  Find (998)  |  Function (228)  |  Greater (288)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Month (88)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Network (21)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Point (580)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Receive (114)  |  Response (53)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Structure (344)  |  Sympathetic (10)  |  Tension (24)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transform (73)  |  Union (51)  |  Will (2355)

Alike in the external and the internal worlds, the man of science sees himself in the midst of perpetual changes of which he can discover neither the beginning nor the end.
In First Principles (1864, 1898), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Discover (553)  |  End (590)  |  External (57)  |  Himself (461)  |  Internal (66)  |  Man (2251)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  World (1774)

All change is relative. The universe is expanding relatively to our common material standards; our material standards are shrinking relatively to the size of the universe. The theory of the “expanding universe” might also be called the theory of the “shrinking atom”. …
:Let us then take the whole universe as our standard of constancy, and adopt the view of a cosmic being whose body is composed of intergalactic spaces and swells as they swell. Or rather we must now say it keeps the same size, for he will not admit that it is he who has changed. Watching us for a few thousand million years, he sees us shrinking; atoms, animals, planets, even the galaxies, all shrink alike; only the intergalactic spaces remain the same. The earth spirals round the sun in an ever-decreasing orbit. It would be absurd to treat its changing revolution as a constant unit of time. The cosmic being will naturally relate his units of length and time so that the velocity of light remains constant. Our years will then decrease in geometrical progression in the cosmic scale of time. On that scale man’s life is becoming briefer; his threescore years and ten are an ever-decreasing allowance. Owing to the property of geometrical progressions an infinite number of our years will add up to a finite cosmic time; so that what we should call the end of eternity is an ordinary finite date in the cosmic calendar. But on that date the universe has expanded to infinity in our reckoning, and we have shrunk to nothing in the reckoning of the cosmic being.
We walk the stage of life, performers of a drama for the benefit of the cosmic spectator. As the scenes proceed he notices that the actors are growing smaller and the action quicker. When the last act opens the curtain rises on midget actors rushing through their parts at frantic speed. Smaller and smaller. Faster and faster. One last microscopic blurr of intense agitation. And then nothing.
In The Expanding Universe (1933) , 90-92.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurd (59)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Agitation (9)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Allowance (6)  |  Animal (617)  |  Atom (355)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Body (537)  |  Calendar (9)  |  Call (769)  |  Common (436)  |  Constancy (12)  |  Constant (144)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Drama (21)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Expand (53)  |  Faster (50)  |  Finite (59)  |  Galaxies (29)  |  Growing (98)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notice (77)  |  Number (699)  |  Open (274)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Owing (39)  |  Planet (356)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Progression (23)  |  Property (168)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Remain (349)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Rise (166)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Scene (36)  |  See (1081)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Space (500)  |  Speed (65)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Stage (143)  |  Sun (385)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Velocity (48)  |  View (488)  |  Walk (124)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

All frescoes are as high finished as miniatures or enamels, and they are known to be unchangeable; but oil, being a body itself, will drink or absorb very little colour, and changing yellow, and at length brown, destroys every colour it is mixed with, especially every delicate colour. It turns every permanent white to a yellow and brown putty, and has compelled the use of that destroyer of colour, white lead, which, when its protecting oil is evaporated, will become lead again. This is an awful thing to say to oil painters ; they may call it madness, but it is true. All the genuine old little pictures, called cabinet pictures, are in fresco and not in oil. Oil was not used except by blundering ignorance till after Vandyke’s time ; but the art of fresco painting being lost, oil became a fetter to genius and a dungeon to art.
In 'Opinions', The Poems: With Specimens of the Prose Writings of William Blake (1885), 276-277.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blunder (21)  |  Body (537)  |  Brown (23)  |  Call (769)  |  Color (137)  |  Compel (30)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Drink (53)  |  Evaporate (5)  |  Finish (59)  |  Genius (284)  |  Genuine (52)  |  High (362)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Known (454)  |  Lead (384)  |  Little (707)  |  Madness (33)  |  Miniature (7)  |  Oil (59)  |  Old (481)  |  Painter (29)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Picture (143)  |  Putty (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unchangeable (11)  |  Use (766)  |  White (127)  |  Will (2355)  |  Yellow (30)

All interpretations made by a scientist are hypotheses, and all hypotheses are tentative. They must forever be tested and they must be revised if found to be unsatisfactory. Hence, a change of mind in a scientist, and particularly in a great scientist, is not only not a sign of weakness but rather evidence for continuing attention to the respective problem and an ability to test the hypothesis again and again.
The Growth of Biological Thought: Diversity, Evolution and Inheritance (1982), 831.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  All (4108)  |  Attention (190)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Forever (103)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Problem (676)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Revise (6)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sign (58)  |  Tentative (16)  |  Test (211)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Unsatisfactory (3)  |  Weakness (48)

All parts of the material universe are in constant motion and though some of the changes may appear to be cyclical, nothing ever exactly returns, so far as human experience extends, to precisely the same condition.
Address (Jul 1874) at the grave of Joseph Priestley, in Joseph Henry and Arthur P. Molella, et al. (eds.), A Scientist in American Life: Essays and Lectures of Joseph Henry (1980), 119.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constant (144)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extend (128)  |  Human (1468)  |  Material (353)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Return (124)  |  Universe (857)

All scientific theories are provisional and may be changed, but ... on the whole, they are accepted from Washington to Moscow because of their practical success. Where religion has opposed the findings of science, it has almost always had to retreat.
Essay 'Science Will Never Give Us the Answers to All Our Questions', collected in Henry Margenau, and Roy Abraham Varghese (eds.), Cosmos, Bios, Theos (1992), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Accepted (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Findings (5)  |  Moscow (4)  |  Opposed (3)  |  Practical (200)  |  Provisional (7)  |  Religion (361)  |  Retreat (11)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Theory (24)  |  Success (302)  |  Theory (970)  |  Washington (5)  |  Whole (738)

All the life of the universe may be regarded as manifestations of energy masquerading in various forms, and all the changes in the universe as energy running about from one of these forms to the other, but always without altering the total amount.
In The Universe Around Us (1929, 1934), 114-115. Also in David Dietz, 'Cultural Values of Physics', Annual Report of the Report of the Board of Regents of The Smithsonian Institution: 1940 (1941), quoted on p.149 and cited in footnote 10 on p.154.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alter (62)  |  Amount (151)  |  Energy (344)  |  Form (959)  |  Life (1795)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Masquerade (3)  |  Other (2236)  |  Regard (305)  |  Running (61)  |  Total (94)  |  Universe (857)  |  Various (200)

All the more recent work on alkaptonuria has... strengthened the belief that the homogentisic acid excreted is derived from tyrosin, but why alkaptonuric individuals pass the benzene ring of their tyrosin unbroken and how and where the peculiar chemical change from tyrosin to homogentisic acid is brought about, remain unsolved problems.
'The Incidence of Alkaptonuria: A Study in Chemical Individuality', The Lancet, 1902, 2, 1616.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Benzene (7)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Change (8)  |  Individual (404)  |  More (2559)  |  Pass (238)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Problem (676)  |  Recent (77)  |  Remain (349)  |  Unsolved (15)  |  Why (491)  |  Work (1351)

All things on the earth are the result of chemical combination. The operation by which the commingling of molecules and the interchange of atoms take place we can imitate in our laboratories; but in nature they proceed by slow degrees, and, in general, in our hands they are distinguished by suddenness of action. In nature chemical power is distributed over a long period of time, and the process of change is scarcely to be observed. By acts we concentrate chemical force, and expend it in producing a change which occupies but a few hours at most.
In chapter 'Chemical Forces', The Poetry of Science: Or, Studies of the Physical Phenomena of Nature (1848), 235-236. Charles Dicken used this quote, with his own sub-head of 'Relative Importance Of Time To Man And Nature', to conclude his review of the book, published in The Examiner (1848).
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Combination (144)  |  Concentrate (26)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Degree (276)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Earth (996)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  Hour (186)  |  Imitate (17)  |  Interchange (4)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Long (790)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observed (149)  |  Operation (213)  |  Period (198)  |  Place (177)  |  Power (746)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Process (423)  |  Producing (6)  |  Result (677)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Slow (101)  |  Suddenness (6)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)

Almost always the men who achieve these fundamental inventions of a new paradigm have been either very young or very new to the field whose paradigm they change.
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962), 89-90.
Science quotes on:  |  Field (364)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Invention (369)  |  New (1216)  |  Paradigm (14)  |  Young (227)  |  Youth (101)

Although a physical law may never admit of a perfectly abrupt change, there is no limit to the approach which it may make to abruptness.
In The Principles of Science: A Treatise on Logic and Scientific Method (1874), Vols. 1-2, 273.
Science quotes on:  |  Abrupt (6)  |  Admit (45)  |  Approach (108)  |  Law (894)  |  Limit (280)  |  Never (1087)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Law (14)

Although few expressions are more commonly used in writing about science than “science revolution,” there is a continuing debate as to the propriety of applying the concept and term “revolution” to scientific change. There is, furthermore, a wide difference of opinion as to what may constitute a revolution. And although almost all historians would agree that a genuine alteration of an exceptionally radical nature (the Scientific Revolution) occurred in the sciences at some time between the late fifteenth (or early sixteenth) century and the end of the seventeenth century, the question of exactly when this revolution occurred arouses as much scholarly disagreement as the cognate question of precisely what it was.
The Newtonian Revolution (1980), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  15th Century (5)  |  16th Century (3)  |  17th Century (16)  |  All (4108)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Arouse (12)  |  Century (310)  |  Cognate (2)  |  Concept (221)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Debate (38)  |  Difference (337)  |  Disagreement (14)  |  Early (185)  |  End (590)  |  Exceptional (18)  |  Expression (175)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Historian (54)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Late (118)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occurred (2)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Propriety (6)  |  Question (621)  |  Radical (25)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Revolution (12)  |  Term (349)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wide (96)  |  Writing (189)

Although species may be discrete, they have no immutable essence. Variation is the raw material of evolutionary change. It represents the fundamental reality of nature, not an accident about a created norm. Variation is primary; essences are illusory. Species must be defined as ranges of irreducible variation.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Create (235)  |  Define (49)  |  Discrete (11)  |  Essence (82)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Illusory (2)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Irreducible (7)  |  Material (353)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Norm (5)  |  Primary (80)  |  Range (99)  |  Raw (28)  |  Reality (261)  |  Represent (155)  |  Species (401)  |  Variation (90)

Amid all the revolutions of the globe, the economy of Nature has been uniform, ... and her laws are the only things that have resisted the general movement. The rivers and the rocks, the seas and the continents, have been changed in all their parts; but the laws which direct those changes, and the rules to which they are subject, have remained invariably the same.
Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802) collected in The Works of John Playfair (1822), Vol. 1, 415
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Continent (76)  |  Direct (225)  |  General (511)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Invariance (4)  |  Law (894)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Remain (349)  |  Revolution (129)  |  River (119)  |  Rock (161)  |  Rule (294)  |  Sea (308)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)

Among the authorities it is generally agreed that the Earth is at rest in the middle of the universe, and they regard it as inconceivable and even ridiculous to hold the opposite opinion. However, if we consider it more closely the question will be seen to be still unsettled, and so decidedly not to be despised. For every apparent change in respect of position is due to motion of the object observed, or of the observer, or indeed to an unequal change of both.
'Book One. Chapter V. Whether Circular Motion is Proper to the Earth, and of its Place', in Copernicus: On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres (1543), trans. A. M. Duncan (1976), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparent (84)  |  Both (493)  |  Consider (416)  |  Due (141)  |  Earth (996)  |  Indeed (324)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Object (422)  |  Observed (149)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Question (621)  |  Regard (305)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rest (280)  |  Ridiculous (24)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Still (613)  |  Unequal (12)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unsettled (3)  |  Will (2355)

Among the multitude of animals which scamper, fly, burrow and swim around us, man is the only one who is not locked into his environment. His imagination, his reason, his emotional subtlety and toughness, make it possible for him not to accept the environment, but to change it. And that series of inventions, by which man from age to age has remade his environment, is a different kind of evolution—not biological, but cultural evolution. I call that brilliant sequence of cultural peaks The Ascent of Man. I use the word ascent with a precise meaning. Man is distinguished from other animals by his imaginative gifts. He makes plans, inventions, new discoveries, by putting different talents together; and his discoveries become more subtle and penetrating, as he learns to combine his talents in more complex and intimate ways. So the great discoveries of different ages and different cultures, in technique, in science, in the arts, express in their progression a richer and more intricate conjunction of human faculties, an ascending trellis of his gifts.
The Ascent of Man (1973), 19-20.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Age (499)  |  Animal (617)  |  Art (657)  |  Ascent Of Man (6)  |  Become (815)  |  Biological (137)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Call (769)  |  Combine (57)  |  Complex (188)  |  Conjunction (10)  |  Culture (143)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Express (186)  |  Fly (146)  |  Gift (104)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Invention (369)  |  Kind (557)  |  Learn (629)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Multitude (47)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plan (117)  |  Possible (552)  |  Precise (68)  |  Progression (23)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Series (149)  |  Subtlety (19)  |  Swim (30)  |  Talent (94)  |  Technique (80)  |  Together (387)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

Among the older records, we find chapter after chapter of which we can read the characters, and make out their meaning: and as we approach the period of man’s creation, our book becomes more clear, and nature seems to speak to us in language so like our own, that we easily comprehend it. But just as we begin to enter on the history of physical changes going on before our eyes, and in which we ourselves bear a part, our chronicle seems to fail us—a leaf has been torn out from nature's record, and the succession of events is almost hidden from our eyes.
Letter 1 to William Wordsworth. Quoted in the appendix to W. Wordsworth, A Complete Guide to the Lakes, Comprising Minute Direction for the Tourist, with Mr Wordsworth's Description of the Scenery of the County and Three Letters upon the Geology of the Lake District (1842), 14.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Approach (108)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Book (392)  |  Chapter (11)  |  Character (243)  |  Chronicle (6)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Creation (327)  |  Enter (141)  |  Event (216)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Hidden (42)  |  History (673)  |  Language (293)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Old (481)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Period (198)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Change (5)  |  Read (287)  |  Record (154)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Succession (77)  |  Tear (42)  |  Torn (17)

Among those whom I could never pursuade to rank themselves with idlers, and who speak with indignation of my morning sleeps and nocturnal rambles, one passes the day in catching spiders, that he may count their eyes with a microscope; another exhibits the dust of a marigold separated from the flower with a dexterity worthy of Leuwenhoweck himself. Some turn the wheel of electricity; some suspend rings to a lodestone, and find that what they did yesterday, they can do again to-day.—Some register the changes of the wind, and die fully convinced that the wind is changeable.—There are men yet more profound, who have heard that two colorless liquors may produce a color by union, and that two cold bodies will grow hot of they are mingled: they mingle them, and produce the effect expected, say it is strange, and mingle them again.
In Tryon Edwards, A Dictionary of Thoughts (1908), 243.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Cold (112)  |  Color (137)  |  Count (105)  |  Dexterity (7)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dust (64)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Entomologist (6)  |  Expect (200)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Eye (419)  |  Find (998)  |  Flower (106)  |  Grow (238)  |  Heat (174)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hot (60)  |  Idleness (13)  |  Indignation (4)  |  Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (17)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Lodestone (7)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Meteorology (33)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Mingle (9)  |  More (2559)  |  Morning (94)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observation (555)  |  Persuade (11)  |  Physics (533)  |  Pollen (6)  |  Profound (104)  |  Ramble (3)  |  Rank (67)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Register (21)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Research (664)  |  Say (984)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Speak (232)  |  Spider (14)  |  Strange (157)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Union (51)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  Yesterday (36)

Anaximenes ... said that infinite air was the principle, from which the things that are becoming, and that are, and that shall be, and gods and things divine, all come into being, and the rest from its products. The form of air is of this kind: whenever it is most equable it is invisible to sight, but is revealed by the cold and the hot and the damp and by movement. It is always in motion; for things that change do not change unless there be movement. Through becoming denser or finer it has different appearances; for when it is dissolved into what is finer it becomes fire, while winds, again, are air that is becoming condensed, and cloud is produced from air by felting. When it is condensed still more, water is produced; with a further degree of condensation earth is produced, and when condensed as far as possible, stones. The result is that the most influential components of the generation are opposites, hot and cold.
Hippolytus, Refutation, 1.7.1. In G. S. Kirk, J. E. Raven and M. Schofield (eds.), The Presocratic Philosophers: A Critical History with a Selection of Texts (1983), p. 145.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Anaximander (5)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Cold (112)  |  Component (48)  |  Condensation (12)  |  Degree (276)  |  Different (577)  |  Divine (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fire (189)  |  Form (959)  |  Generation (242)  |  God (757)  |  Hot (60)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Kind (557)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Movement (155)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Possible (552)  |  Principle (507)  |  Produced (187)  |  Product (160)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Sight (132)  |  Still (613)  |  Stone (162)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Water (481)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Wind (128)

And by the influence of heat, light, and electrical powers, there is a constant series of changes [in animal and vegetal substances]; matter assumes new forms, the destruction of one order of beings tends to the conservation of another, solution and consolidation, decay and renovation, are connected, and whilst the parts of the system, continue in a state of fluctuation and change, the order and harmony of the whole remain unalterable.
The Elements of Agricultural Chemistry (1813), in J. Davy (ed.) The Collected Works of Sir Humphry Davy(1839-40), Vol 7, 182.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Connect (125)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Consolidation (4)  |  Constant (144)  |  Continue (165)  |  Decay (53)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Fluctuation (14)  |  Form (959)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Heat (174)  |  Influence (222)  |  Light (607)  |  Matter (798)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Power (746)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Remain (349)  |  Series (149)  |  Solution (267)  |  State (491)  |  Substance (248)  |  System (537)  |  Tend (124)  |  Vegetal (2)  |  Whole (738)

And what a science Natural History will be, when we are in our graves, when all the laws of change are thought one of the most important parts of Natural History.
From Letter (1856) to J.D. Hooker, collected in in Francis Darwin, The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1896), 439. [Darwin was contemplating natural history as the synthesis of evolution (change) and forces of the environment.]
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Grave (52)  |  History (673)  |  Important (209)  |  Law (894)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thought (953)  |  Will (2355)

Animals generally seem naturally disposed to … intercourse at about the same period of the year, and that is when winter is changing into summer…. In the human species, the male experiences more under sexual excitement in winter, and the female in summer.
Aristotle
In The Works of Aristotle: Historia Animalium (350 BC), (The History of Animals), Book V, Part 8, 542a20 translated in William David Ross and John Alexander Smith (eds.), D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson (trans.), (1910), Vol. 4, 27-28
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Experience (467)  |  Female (50)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intercourse (4)  |  Male (26)  |  More (2559)  |  Period (198)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Sexual (26)  |  Sexuality (11)  |  Species (401)  |  Summer (54)  |  Winter (44)  |  Year (933)

Animals, even plants, lie to each other all the time, and we could restrict the research to them, putting off the real truth about ourselves for the several centuries we need to catch our breath. What is it that enables certain flowers to resemble nubile insects, or opossums to play dead, or female fireflies to change the code of their flashes in order to attract, and then eat, males of a different species?
In Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony(1984), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Breath (59)  |  Century (310)  |  Certain (550)  |  Code (31)  |  Death (388)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Eat (104)  |  Eating (45)  |  Enable (119)  |  Enabling (7)  |  Female (50)  |  Firefly (7)  |  Flash (49)  |  Flower (106)  |  Insect (77)  |  Lie (364)  |  Lying (55)  |  Male (26)  |  Opossum (3)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Plant (294)  |  Put Off (2)  |  Reality (261)  |  Research (664)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Resembling (2)  |  Restriction (11)  |  Species (401)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)

Anthropology has reached that point of development where the careful investigation of facts shakes our firm belief in the far-reaching theories that have been built up. The complexity of each phenomenon dawns on our minds, and makes us desirous of proceeding more cautiously. Heretofore we have seen the features common to all human thought. Now we begin to see their differences. We recognize that these are no less important than their similarities, and the value of detailed studies becomes apparent. Our aim has not changed, but our method must change. We are still searching for the laws that govern the growth of human culture, of human thought; but we recognize the fact that before we seek for what is common to all culture, we must analyze each culture by careful and exact methods, as the geologist analyzes the succession and order of deposits, as the biologist examines the forms of living matter. We see that the growth of human culture manifests itself in the growth of each special culture. Thus we have come to understand that before we can build up the theory of the growth of all human culture, we must know the growth of cultures that we find here and there among the most primitive tribes of the Arctic, of the deserts of Australia, and of the impenetrable forests of South America; and the progress of the civilization of antiquity and of our own times. We must, so far as we can, reconstruct the actual history of mankind, before we can hope to discover the laws underlying that history.
The Jesup North Pacific Expedition: Memoir of the American Museum of Natural History (1898), Vol. 1, 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  America (127)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Arctic (10)  |  Australia (8)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Belief (578)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Build (204)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Common (436)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Culture (143)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Desert (56)  |  Desirous (2)  |  Detail (146)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discover (553)  |  Examine (78)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (998)  |  Firm (47)  |  Forest (150)  |  Form (959)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Govern (64)  |  Growth (187)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Mankind (13)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Culture (10)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Living (491)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Matter (798)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Point (580)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reach (281)  |  Recognize (125)  |  See (1081)  |  Seek (213)  |  Shake (41)  |  South (38)  |  South America (6)  |  Special (184)  |  Still (613)  |  Succession (77)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Underlying (30)  |  Understand (606)  |  Value (365)

Apart from the hostile influence of man, the organic and the inorganic world are … bound together by such mutual relations and adaptations as secure, if not the absolute permanence and equilibrium of both … at least a very slow and gradual succession of changes in those conditions. But man is everywhere a disturbing agent. Wherever he plants his foot, the harmonies of nature are turned to discords.
In Man and Nature, (1864), 35-36.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Agent (70)  |  Both (493)  |  Bound (119)  |  Condition (356)  |  Discord (10)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Influence (222)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organic (158)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Plant (294)  |  Slow (101)  |  Succession (77)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  Wherever (51)  |  World (1774)

As a result of the phenomenally rapid change and growth of physics, the men and women who did their great work one or two generations ago may be our distant predecessors in terms of the state of the field, but they are our close neighbors in terms of time and tastes. This may be an unprecedented state of affairs among professionals; one can perhaps be forgiven if one characterizes it epigrammatically with a disastrously mixed metaphor; in the sciences, we are now uniquely privileged to sit side-by-side with the giants on whose shoulders we stand.
In 'On the Recent Past of Physics', American Journal of Physics (1961), 29, 807.
Science quotes on:  |  Field (364)  |  Generation (242)  |  Giant (67)  |  Great (1574)  |  Growth (187)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Professional (70)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Side (233)  |  Stand (274)  |  State (491)  |  Taste (90)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Unprecedented (11)  |  Work (1351)

As a scientist, I am hostile to fundamentalist religion because it actively debauches the scientific enterprise. It teaches us not to change our minds, and not to want to know exciting things that are available to be known. It subverts science and saps the intellect.
In The God Delusion (2007), 321. As cited in John C. Weaver and John David Weaver, Christianity and Science (1973, 1984), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Available (78)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Fundamentalist (4)  |  Hostile (8)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Subvert (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Want (497)

As far as the meaning of life in general, or in the abstract, as far as I can see, there is none. If all of life were suddenly to disappear from earth and anywhere else it may exist, or if none had ever formed in the first place, I think the Universe would continue to exist without perceptible change. However, it is always possible for an individual to invest his own life with meaning that he can find significant. He can so order his life that he may find as much beauty and wisdom in it as he can, and spread as much of that to others as possible.
In a book proposal for The Meaning of Life edited by Hugh S. Moorhead, 1989.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Continue (165)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Earth (996)  |  Exist (443)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Individual (404)  |  Invest (18)  |  Life (1795)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  See (1081)  |  Significant (74)  |  Spread (83)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Think (1086)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wisdom (221)

As for the formation of matter, it is never the product of sudden events, but always the outcome of gradual change.
In On Equilibrium (1929), trans. Yang Jing­Yi, 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Event (216)  |  Formation (96)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Matter (798)  |  Never (1087)  |  Outcome (13)  |  Product (160)  |  Sudden (67)

As geologists, we learn that it is not only the present condition of the globe that has been suited to the accommodation of myriads of living creatures, but that many former states also have been equally adapted to the organization and habits of prior races of beings. The disposition of the seas, continents, and islands, and the climates have varied; so it appears that the species have been changed, and yet they have all been so modelled, on types analogous to those of existing plants and animals, as to indicate throughout a perfect harmony of design and unity of purpose. To assume that the evidence of the beginning or end of so vast a scheme lies within the reach of our philosophical inquiries, or even of our speculations, appears to us inconsistent with a just estimate of the relations which subsist between the finite powers of man and the attributes of an Infinite and Eternal Being.
Concluding remark, Principles of Geology(1833), Vol. 3, 384-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Accommodation (9)  |  Adapt (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Climate (97)  |  Condition (356)  |  Continent (76)  |  Creature (233)  |  Design (195)  |  Disposition (42)  |  End (590)  |  Equally (130)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Finite (59)  |  Former (137)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Habit (168)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Island (46)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lie (364)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Organization (114)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Race (268)  |  Reach (281)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Sea (308)  |  Species (401)  |  Speculation (126)  |  State (491)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Type (167)  |  Unity (78)  |  Vast (177)

As the human fetus develops, its changing form seems to retrace the whole of human evolution from the time we were cosmic dust to the time we were single-celled organisms in the primordial sea to the time we were four-legged, land-dwelling reptiles and beyond, to our current status as large­brained, bipedal mammals. Thus, humans seem to be the sum total of experience since the beginning of the cosmos.
From interview with James Reston, Jr., in Pamela Weintraub (ed.), The Omni Interviews (1984), 99. Previously published in magazine, Omni (May 1982).
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (305)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bipedal (3)  |  Brain (270)  |  Cell (138)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Current (118)  |  Develop (268)  |  Dust (64)  |  Dwelling (11)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fetus (2)  |  Form (959)  |  Human (1468)  |  Land (115)  |  Large (394)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Organism (220)  |  Primordial (10)  |  Reptile (29)  |  Retrace (3)  |  Sea (308)  |  Single (353)  |  Status (35)  |  Sum (102)  |  Time (1877)  |  Total (94)  |  Whole (738)

As the world of science has grown in size and in power, its deepest problems have changed from the epistemological to the social.
Scientific Knowledge and its Social Problems (1971), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Epistemology (8)  |  Power (746)  |  Problem (676)  |  Science (3879)  |  Size (60)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  World (1774)

At last gleams of light have come, and I am almost convinced (quite contrary to opinion I started with) that species are not (it is like confessing a murder) immutable. Heaven forfend me from Lamarck nonsense of a “tendency to progression”, “adaptations from the slow willing of animals”, &c! But the conclusions I am led to are not widely different from his; though the means of change are wholly so. I think I have found out (here’s presumption!) the simple way by which species become exquisitely adapted to various ends.
Letter to Sir Joseph Hooker (11 Jan 1844). In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of His Published Letters (1892), 173-174.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Animal (617)  |  Become (815)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Different (577)  |  End (590)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Jean-Baptiste Lamarck (24)  |  Last (426)  |  Light (607)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Presumption (15)  |  Progression (23)  |  Simple (406)  |  Slow (101)  |  Species (401)  |  Start (221)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Think (1086)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Willing (44)

Attempts have been made from a study of the changes produced by mutation to obtain the relative order of the bases within various triplets, but my own view is that these are premature until there is more extensive and more reliable data on the composition of the triplets.
In Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1962). Collected in Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1942-1962 (1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Base (117)  |  Composition (84)  |  Data (156)  |  Extensive (33)  |  More (2559)  |  Mutation (37)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Order (632)  |  Premature (20)  |  Produced (187)  |  Relative (39)  |  Study (653)  |  Triplet (2)  |  Various (200)  |  View (488)

Bacteria are highly adaptable. They frequently change both morphologically and functionally. Their virulence is also an essentially fluctuating property, that increases or diminishes according to the conditions to which the pathogenic organism is subjected.
In Studies in Immunity (1909), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Adaptability (7)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Both (493)  |  Condition (356)  |  Decrease (15)  |  Essential (199)  |  Fluctuation (14)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Function (228)  |  Increase (210)  |  Morphology (22)  |  Organism (220)  |  Pathogen (5)  |  Property (168)  |  Subject (521)  |  Virulence (3)

Bankers regard research as most dangerous a thing that makes banking hazardous due to the rapid changes it brings about in industry.
Address (1927), quoted in U.S. National Resources Committee Technology and Planning, Washington 1937, 5-6. Also U.S. Government Report, Technological Trends (1937), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Due (141)  |  Industry (137)  |  Money (170)  |  Most (1731)  |  Regard (305)  |  Research (664)  |  Thing (1915)

Biological evolution is a system of constant divergence without subsequent joining of branches. Lineages, once distinct, are separate forever. In human history, transmission across lineages is, perhaps, the major source of cultural change. Europeans learned about corn and potatoes from Native Americans and gave them smallpox in return.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Biological (137)  |  Branch (150)  |  Constant (144)  |  Corn (19)  |  Cultural (25)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Divergence (6)  |  European (5)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Forever (103)  |  Give (202)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Join (26)  |  Joining (11)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Lineage (3)  |  Major (84)  |  Native (38)  |  Native American (4)  |  Potato (10)  |  Return (124)  |  Separate (143)  |  Smallpox (14)  |  Source (93)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  System (537)  |  Transmission (34)

Biologists have long attempted by chemical means to induce in higher organisms predictable and specific changes which thereafter could be transmitted in series as hereditary characters. Among microorganisms the most striking example of inheritable and specific alterations in cell structure and function that can be experimentally induced and are reproducible under well defined and adequately controlled conditions is the transformation of specific types of Pneumococcus.
Oswald T. Avery (1877-1955), Colin Macleod (1909-72) and Maclyn McCarty (1911-2005), 'Studies on the Chemical Nature of the Substance Inducing Transformation of Pneumococcal Types', Journal of Experimental Medicine 1944, 79, 137.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (30)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Condition (356)  |  Function (228)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Induce (22)  |  Long (790)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Micro-Organism (3)  |  Microorganism (28)  |  Most (1731)  |  Organism (220)  |  Reproducible (7)  |  Series (149)  |  Specific (95)  |  Striking (48)  |  Structure (344)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Type (167)

Biology is a science of three dimensions. The first is the study of each species across all levels of biological organization, molecule to cell to organism to population to ecosystem. The second dimension is the diversity of all species in the biosphere. The third dimension is the history of each species in turn, comprising both its genetic evolution and the environmental change that drove the evolution. Biology, by growing in all three dimensions, is progressing toward unification and will continue to do so.
In 'Systematics and the Future of Biology', Systematics and the Origin of Species: on Ernst Mayr's 100th anniversary, Volume 102, Issues 22-26 (2005), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Biosphere (13)  |  Both (493)  |  Cell (138)  |  Continue (165)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ecosystem (24)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  First (1283)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Growing (98)  |  Growth (187)  |  History (673)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Organism (220)  |  Organization (114)  |  Population (110)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Species (401)  |  Study (653)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unification (11)  |  Will (2355)

Birds ... are sensitive indicators of the environment, a sort of “ecological litmus paper,” ... The observation and recording of bird populations over time lead inevitably to environmental awareness and can signal impending changes.
In Peterson Field Guide to Birds of North America (2008), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Awareness (36)  |  Bird (149)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Environment (216)  |  Impending (4)  |  Indicator (6)  |  Lead (384)  |  Observation (555)  |  Paper (182)  |  Population (110)  |  Recording (13)  |  Sensitive (14)  |  Signal (27)  |  Sort (49)  |  Time (1877)

Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. Without books the development of civilization would have been impossible. They are engines of change, windows on the world, “lighthouses,” (as a poet said), “erected in the sea of time.”
In Authors League Bulletin (1979). As city in Charles Francis (ed.), Wisdom Well Said (2009), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Carrier (5)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Crippled (2)  |  Development (422)  |  Dumb (11)  |  Engine (98)  |  History (673)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Lighthouse (6)  |  Literature (103)  |  Poet (83)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Silence (56)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Window (58)  |  World (1774)

Building goes on briskly at the therapeutic Tower of Babel; what one recommends another condemns; what one gives in large doses another scarce dares to prescribe in small doses; and what one vaunts as a novelty another thinks not worth rescuing from merited oblivion. All is confusion, contradiction, inconceivable chaos. Every country, every place, almost every doctor, have their own pet remedies, without which they imagine their patients can not be cured; and all this changes every year, aye every mouth.
Weekly Medical Gazette, of Vienna
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Babel (3)  |  Briskly (2)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Country (251)  |  Cure (122)  |  Dare (50)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Dose (16)  |  Give (202)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Inconceivable (12)  |  Large (394)  |  Merit (50)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Oblivion (10)  |  Patient (199)  |  Pet (8)  |  Place (177)  |  Prescribe (10)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Rescue (13)  |  Scarce (10)  |  Small (477)  |  Therapeutic (2)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tower (42)  |  Worth (169)  |  Year (933)

But I canna change the laws of physics, Captain!
Scotty
chief engineer aboard the U.S.S. Enterprise, to Captain James T. Kirk on Star Trek.
Science quotes on:  |  Captain (14)  |  Law (894)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)

But I should be very sorry if an interpretation founded on a most conjectural scientific hypothesis were to get fastened to the text in Genesis... The rate of change of scientific hypothesis is naturally much more rapid than that of Biblical interpretations, so that if an interpretation is founded on such an hypothesis, it may help to keep the hypothesis above ground long after it ought to be buried and forgotten.
Letter to Rev. C. J. Ellicott, Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol (22 Nov 1876). Quoted in Lewis Campbell and William Garnett, The Life of James Clerk Maxwell (1882), 394.
Science quotes on:  |  Bible (91)  |  Bury (16)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Found (11)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Long (790)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sorry (30)

But I think that in the repeated and almost entire changes of organic types in the successive formations of the earth—in the absence of mammalia in the older, and their very rare appearance (and then in forms entirely. unknown to us) in the newer secondary groups—in the diffusion of warm-blooded quadrupeds (frequently of unknown genera) through the older tertiary systems—in their great abundance (and frequently of known genera) in the upper portions of the same series—and, lastly, in the recent appearance of man on the surface of the earth (now universally admitted—in one word, from all these facts combined, we have a series of proofs the most emphatic and convincing,—that the existing order of nature is not the last of an uninterrupted succession of mere physical events derived from laws now in daily operation: but on the contrary, that the approach to the present system of things has been gradual, and that there has been a progressive development of organic structure subservient to the purposes of life.
'Address to the Geological Society, delivered on the Evening of the 18th of February 1831', Proceedings of the Geological Society (1834), 1, 305-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (18)  |  Abundance (25)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Approach (108)  |  Blood (134)  |  Combination (144)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Convincing (9)  |  Daily (87)  |  Development (422)  |  Diffusion (13)  |  Earth (996)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  Event (216)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Genus (25)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Great (1574)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Operation (213)  |  Order (632)  |  Organic (158)  |  Physical (508)  |  Portion (84)  |  Present (619)  |  Progression (23)  |  Proof (287)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quadruped (4)  |  Rare (89)  |  Recent (77)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Secondary (14)  |  Series (149)  |  Structure (344)  |  Subservience (3)  |  Succession (77)  |  Successive (73)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  System (537)  |  Tertiary (4)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Type (167)  |  Uninterrupted (7)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warm-Blooded (3)  |  Word (619)

But if any skillful minister of nature shall apply force to matter, and by design torture and vex it, in order to [effect] its annihilation, it, on the contrary being brought under this necessity, changes and transforms itself into a strange variety of shapes and appearances; for nothing but the power of the Creator can annihilate, or truly destroy it.
As quoted in M.J. Gorton, 'The Weather', Popular Science News (1889), 23, No. 8, 115.
Science quotes on:  |  Annihilate (9)  |  Annihilation (14)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Apply (160)  |  Being (1278)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Creator (91)  |  Design (195)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Effect (393)  |  Force (487)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Order (632)  |  Power (746)  |  Skillful (14)  |  Strange (157)  |  Torture (29)  |  Transform (73)  |  Truly (116)  |  Variety (132)  |  Vex (9)

But science is the great instrument of social change, all the greater because its object is not change but knowledge, and its silent appropriation of this dominant function, amid the din of political and religious strife, is the most vital of all the revolutions which have marked the development of modern civilisation.
Decadence: Henry Sidgwick Memorial Lecture (1908), 55-6.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Appropriation (5)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Development (422)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Function (228)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Marked (55)  |  Modern (385)  |  Most (1731)  |  Object (422)  |  Political (121)  |  Religious (126)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Science (3879)  |  Social (252)  |  Vital (85)

But the whole vital process of the earth takes place so gradually and in periods of time which are so immense compared with the length of our life, that these changes are not observed, and before their course can be recorded from beginning to end whole nations perish and are destroyed.
Aristotle
Meteorology, 351b, 8-13. In Jonathan Barnes (ed.), The Complete Works of Aristotle (1984), Vol. I, 573.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (305)  |  Course (409)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Immense (86)  |  Life (1795)  |  Nation (193)  |  Observed (149)  |  Period (198)  |  Perish (50)  |  Process (423)  |  Record (154)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vital (85)  |  Whole (738)

By teaching us how to cultivate each ferment in its purity—in other words, by teaching us how to rear the individual organism apart from all others,—Pasteur has enabled us to avoid all these errors. And where this isolation of a particular organism has been duly effected it grows and multiplies indefinitely, but no change of it into another organism is ever observed. In Pasteur’s researches the Bacterium remained a Bacterium, the Vibrio a Vibrio, the Penicillium a Penicillium, and the Torula a Torula. Sow any of these in a state of purity in an appropriate liquid; you get it, and it alone, in the subsequent crop. In like manner, sow smallpox in the human body, your crop is smallpox. Sow there scarlatina, and your crop is scarlatina. Sow typhoid virus, your crop is typhoid—cholera, your crop is cholera. The disease bears as constant a relation to its contagium as the microscopic organisms just enumerated do to their germs, or indeed as a thistle does to its seed.
In 'Fermentation, and its Bearings on Surgery and Medicine', Essays on the Floating­Matter of the Air in Relation to Putrefaction and Infection (1881), 264.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Bear (159)  |  Body (537)  |  Cholera (3)  |  Constant (144)  |  Crop (25)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enabled (3)  |  Enumerated (3)  |  Error (321)  |  Ferment (5)  |  Germ (53)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growth (187)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Individual (404)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particular (76)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Penicillium (3)  |  Purity (14)  |  Remain (349)  |  Research (664)  |  Scarlet Fever (2)  |  Seed (93)  |  Smallpox (14)  |  State (491)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thistle (5)  |  Typhoid (7)  |  Virus (27)  |  Word (619)

Cellular pathology is not an end if one cannot see any alteration in the cell. Chemistry brings the clarification of living processes nearer than does anatomy. Each anatomical change must have been preceded by a chemical one.
Attributed in H. Coper and H. Herken, Deutsche Medizini Wochenschrift (18 Oct 1963), 88, No. 42, 2035, in the original German, “Nach der Überlieferung durch His soll Virchow geäußert haben: ‘Die Zellular-pathologie ist nicht am Ende, wenn man an einer Zelle keine Veränderungen mehr sehen kann. Die Chemie steht der Erklärung der Lebensvorgänge näher als die Anatomie. Jede anatomische Verände-rung setzt notwendig eine chemische voraus.’” As translated in Angel Pentschew,'Morphology and morphogenesis of lead encephalopathy', Acta Neuropathologica (Sep 1965) 5, No. 2, 133-160, as cited in I. Arthur Michaelson and Mitchell W. Sauerhoff, 'Animal Models of Human Disease: Severe and Mild Lead Encephalopathy in the Neonatal Rat', Environmental Health Perspectives (May 1974), 7, 204 & 223 footnote. Note: Although given in quotation marks in the original German text, the subject quote is almost definitely NOT verbatim, but only a paraphrase of Virchow’s teachings. The German text introduces the subject quote with, “Nach der Überlieferung durch His soll Virchow geäußert haben:…” which means, “According to tradition Virchow is said to have expressed:…” (using Google translate). However, it is useful as a succinct statement to the effect of what Virchow might say to summarize his doctrine.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (30)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Cell (138)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Clarification (7)  |  End (590)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Precede (23)  |  Process (423)  |  See (1081)

Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or the present are certain to miss the future.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (550)  |  Future (429)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Miss (51)  |  Past (337)  |  Present (619)

Change requires experimentation. But no problem can be solved by the same consciousness that created it. Our job is to dream—and to make those dreams happen.
In interview article, 'Designing For The Future', Newsweek (15 May 2005).
Science quotes on:  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Creation (327)  |  Dream (208)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Happen (274)  |  Job (82)  |  Problem (676)  |  Require (219)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Solution (267)

Changes, cyclic or otherwise, within the solar system or within our galaxy, would seem to be the easy and incontrovertible solution for everything that I have found remarkable in the stratigraphical record.
In The Nature of the Stratigraphical Record (1973), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Cycle (40)  |  Cyclic (3)  |  Easy (204)  |  Everything (476)  |  Galaxy (51)  |  Incontrovertible (8)  |  Record (154)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Solution (267)  |  Stratigraphy (7)  |  System (537)

Chemistry is one of those branches of human knowledge which has built itself upon methods and instruments by which truth can presumably be determined. It has survived and grown because all its precepts and principles can be re-tested at any time and anywhere. So long as it remained the mysterious alchemy by which a few devotees, by devious and dubious means, presumed to change baser metals into gold, it did not flourish, but when it dealt with the fact that 56 g. of fine iron, when heated with 32 g. of flowers of sulfur, generated extra heat and gave exactly 88 g. of an entirely new substance, then additional steps could be taken by anyone. Scientific research in chemistry, since the birth of the balance and the thermometer, has been a steady growth of test and observation. It has disclosed a finite number of elementary reagents composing an infinite universe, and it is devoted to their inter-reaction for the benefit of mankind.
Address upon receiving the Perkin Medal Award, 'The Big Things in Chemistry', The Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (Feb 1921), 13, No. 2, 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemy (30)  |  All (4108)  |  Balance (77)  |  Base (117)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Birth (147)  |  Branch (150)  |  Building (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Determination (78)  |  Devious (2)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Element (310)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Finite (59)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Flourishing (6)  |  Flower (106)  |  Gold (97)  |  Growth (187)  |  Heat (174)  |  Human (1468)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Inter (11)  |  Iron (96)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Long (790)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Metal (84)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Mystery (177)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Observation (555)  |  Precept (10)  |  Presumption (15)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Reagent (8)  |  Remain (349)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Steady (44)  |  Step (231)  |  Stoichiometry (2)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sulfur (5)  |  Sulphur (18)  |  Survival (94)  |  Test (211)  |  Thermometer (11)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)

Chemistry is the study of material transformations. Yet a knowledge of the rate, or time dependence, of chemical change is of critical importance for the successful synthesis of new materials and for the utilization of the energy generated by a reaction. During the past century it has become clear that all macroscopic chemical processes consist of many elementary chemical reactions that are themselves simply a series of encounters between atomic or molecular species. In order to understand the time dependence of chemical reactions, chemical kineticists have traditionally focused on sorting out all of the elementary chemical reactions involved in a macroscopic chemical process and determining their respective rates.
'Molecular Beam Studies of Elementary Chemical Processes', Nobel Lecture, 8 Dec 1986. In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1981-1990 (1992), 320.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Century (310)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Change (8)  |  Chemical Reaction (16)  |  Chemical Reactions (13)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Consist (223)  |  Critical (66)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Energy (344)  |  Focus (35)  |  Importance (286)  |  Involved (90)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Past (337)  |  Process (423)  |  Rate (29)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Series (149)  |  Species (401)  |  Study (653)  |  Successful (123)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Understand (606)  |  Utilization (15)

Chemists have made of phlogiston a vague principle which is not at all rigorously defined, and which, in consequence, adapts itself to all explanations in which it is wished it shall enter; sometimes it is free fire, sometimes it is fire combined with the earthy element; sometimes it passes through the pores of vessels, sometimes they are impenetrable to it; it explains both the causticity and non-causticity, transparency and opacity, colours and absence of colours. It is a veritable Proteus which changes its form every instant. It is time to conduct chemistry to a more rigorous mode of reasoning ... to distinguish fact and observation from what is systematic and hypothetical.
'Réflexions sur le phlogistique', Mémoires de l'Académie des Sciences, 1783, 505-38. Reprinted in Oeuvres de Lavoisier (1864), Vol. 2, 640, trans. M. P. Crosland.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Both (493)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Definition (221)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Element (310)  |  Enter (141)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fire (189)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Instant (45)  |  More (2559)  |  Observation (555)  |  Phlogiston (9)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transparency (7)  |  Vague (47)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Wish (212)

Chief Seattle, of the Indians that inhabited the Seattle area, wrote a wonderful paper that has to do with putting oneself in tune with the universe. He said, “Why should I lament the disappearance of my people! All things end, and the white man will find this out also.” And this goes for the universe. One can be at peace with that. This doesn’t mean that one shouldn’t participate in efforts to correct the situation. But underlying the effort to change must be an “at peace.” To win a dog sled race is great. To lose is okay too.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Area (31)  |  Chief (97)  |  Correct (86)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dog (70)  |  Effort (227)  |  End (590)  |  Find (998)  |  Great (1574)  |  Indian (27)  |  Inhabit (16)  |  Lament (11)  |  Lose (159)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Must (1526)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Paper (182)  |  Participate (8)  |  Peace (108)  |  People (1005)  |  Race (268)  |  Say (984)  |  Situation (113)  |  Sled (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tune (19)  |  Underlying (30)  |  Universe (857)  |  White (127)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Win (52)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Write (230)

Chymistry. … An art whereby sensible bodies contained in vessels … are so changed, by means of certain instruments, and principally fire, that their several powers and virtues are thereby discovered, with a view to philosophy or medicine.
An antiquated definition, as quoted in Samuel Johnson, entry for 'Chymistry' in Dictionary of the English Language (1785). Also in The Quarterly Journal of Science, Literature, and the Arts (1821), 284, wherein a letter writer (only identified as “C”) points out that this definition still appeared in the, then, latest Rev. Mr. Todd’s Edition of Johnson’s Dictionary, and that it showed “very little improvement of scientific words.” The letter included examples of better definitions by Black and by Davy. (See their pages on this website.)
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Body (537)  |  Certain (550)  |  Contain (68)  |  Definition (221)  |  Discover (553)  |  Fire (189)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Power (746)  |  Several (32)  |  Vessel (63)  |  View (488)  |  Virtue (109)

Civilization has made the peasantry its pack animal. The bourgeoisie in the long run only changed the form of the pack.
In History of the Russian Revolution (1933), Vol. 3, Chap. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Form (959)  |  In The Long Run (2)  |  Long (790)  |  Pack (5)  |  Run (174)

Climate change threatens every corner of our country, every sector of our economy and the health and future of every child. We are already seeing its impacts and we know the poorest and most vulnerable people in the United States and around the world will suffer most of all.
In Hillary Clinton, 'Hillary Clinton: America Must Lead at Paris Climate Talks', Time (29 Nov 2015).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Child (307)  |  Climate (97)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Corner (57)  |  Country (251)  |  Economy (55)  |  Future (429)  |  Health (193)  |  Impact (42)  |  Know (1518)  |  Most (1731)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Poorest (2)  |  Sector (6)  |  Seeing (142)  |  State (491)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Threat (30)  |  Threaten (32)  |  United States (31)  |  Vulnerable (5)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Concerning the alchemist, Mamugnano, no one harbors doubts any longer about his daily experiments in changing quicksilver into gold. It was realized that his craft did not go beyond one pound of quicksilver… . Thus the belief is now held that his allegations to produce a number of millions have been a great fraud.
Anonymous
'Further Successes by Bragadini. From Vienna on the 26th day of January 1590'. As quoted in George Tennyson Matthews (ed.) News and Rumor in Renaissance Europe: The Fugger Newsletters (1959), 179. A handwritten collection of news reports (1568-1604) by the powerful banking and merchant house of Fugger in Ausburg.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemist (22)  |  Belief (578)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Daily (87)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fraud (15)  |  Gold (97)  |  Great (1574)  |  Mamugnano (2)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Million (114)  |  Minerology (4)  |  Number (699)  |  Produce (104)  |  Quicksilver (7)

Considered from the standpoint of chemistry, living bodies appear to us as laboratories of chemical processes, for they undergo perpetual changes in their material substrate. They draw materials from the outside world and combine them with the mass of their liquid and solid parts.
In 'Allgemeine Betrachtungen der orgauischen Korper', Physiologie des Menschen (1830), Vol. 1, 34. Trans. in Kenneth L. Caneva, Robert Mayer and the Conservation of Energy (1993), 7I.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Body (537)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Combine (57)  |  Consider (416)  |  Considered (12)  |  Draw (137)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Living (491)  |  Mass (157)  |  Material (353)  |  Outside (141)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Process (423)  |  Solid (116)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Substrate (2)  |  Undergo (14)  |  World (1774)

Constant, or free, life is the third form of life; it belongs to the most highly organized animals. In it, life is not suspended in any circumstance, it unrolls along a constant course, apparently indifferent to the variations in the cosmic environment, or to the changes in the material conditions that surround the animal. Organs, apparatus, and tissues function in an apparently uniform manner, without their activity undergoing those considerable variations exhibited by animals with an oscillating life. This because in reality the internal environment that envelops the organs, the tissues, and the elements of the tissues does not change; the variations in the atmosphere stop there, so that it is true to say that physical conditions of the environment are constant in the higher animals; it is enveloped in an invariable medium, which acts as an atmosphere of its own in the constantly changing cosmic environment. It is an organism that has placed itself in a hot-house. Thus the perpetual changes in the cosmic environment do not touch it; it is not chained to them, it is free and independent.
Lectures on the Phenomena of Life Common to Animals and Plants (1878), trans. Hebbel E. Hoff, Roger Guillemin and Lucienne Guillemin (1974), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Activity (210)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Belong (162)  |  Body (537)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Condition (356)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Constant (144)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Course (409)  |  Do (1908)  |  Element (310)  |  Environment (216)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Function (228)  |  Hot (60)  |  House (140)  |  Internal (66)  |  Life (1795)  |  Material (353)  |  Most (1731)  |  Organ (115)  |  Organism (220)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Physical (508)  |  Reality (261)  |  Say (984)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Touch (141)  |  Variation (90)

Differences between individuals are the raw materials for evolutionary change and for the evolution of adaptations, yet of course most physiologists treat these differences as noise that is to be filtered out. From the standpoint of physiological ecology, the traditional emphasis of physiologists on central tendencies rather than on variance has some unhappy consequences. Variation is not just noise; it is also the stuff of evolution and a central attribute of living systems. The physiological differences between individuals in the same species or population, and also the patterns of variation in different groups, must not be ignored.
From 'Interspecific comparison as a tool for ecological physiologists', collected in M.E. Feder, A.F. Bennett, W.W. Burggren, and R.B. Huey, (eds.), New Directions in Ecological Physiology (1987), 32-33,
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Central (80)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Course (409)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Filter (9)  |  Group (78)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Individual (404)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Material (353)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Noise (37)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Population (110)  |  Raw (28)  |  Same (157)  |  Species (401)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Stuff (21)  |  System (537)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Traditional (15)  |  Treat (35)  |  Unhappy (16)  |  Variance (12)  |  Variation (90)

Disease may be defined as “A change produced in living things in consequence of which they are no longer in harmony with their environment.”
In Disease and its Causes (1913), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Consequence (203)  |  Definition (221)  |  Disease (328)  |  Environment (216)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Produced (187)  |  Thing (1915)

Dissection … teaches us that the body of man is made up of certain kinds of material, so differing from each other in optical and other physical characters and so built up together as to give the body certain structural features. Chemical examination further teaches us that these kinds of material are composed of various chemical substances, a large number of which have this characteristic that they possess a considerable amount of potential energy capable of being set free, rendered actual, by oxidation or some other chemical change. Thus the body as a whole may, from a chemical point of view, be considered as a mass of various chemical substances, representing altogether a considerable capital of potential energy.
From Introduction to A Text Book of Physiology (1876, 1891), Book 1, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Altogether (9)  |  Amount (151)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Capable (168)  |  Capital (15)  |  Certain (550)  |  Character (243)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Change (8)  |  Compose (17)  |  Consider (416)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Energy (344)  |  Examination (98)  |  Free (232)  |  Kind (557)  |  Large (394)  |  Made (14)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mass (157)  |  Material (353)  |  Number (699)  |  Optical (11)  |  Other (2236)  |  Oxidation (7)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Possess (156)  |  Potential (69)  |  Potential Energy (5)  |  Render (93)  |  Represent (155)  |  Set (394)  |  Structural (29)  |  Substance (248)  |  Together (387)  |  Various (200)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)

Each new machine or technique, in a sense, changes all existing machines and techniques, by permitting us to put them together into new combinations. The number of possible combinations rises exponentially as the number of new machines or techniques rises
Future Shock (1970).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Combination (144)  |  Exist (443)  |  Exponentially (2)  |  Machine (257)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Permit (58)  |  Possible (552)  |  Rise (166)  |  Sense (770)  |  Technique (80)  |  Together (387)

Education is a mechanism for inducing change and for providing the means of accommodation and adjustment to change. At the same time, as an institution, education is given the responsibility for insuring the preservation and transfer and therefore, the continuity of society’s knowledge, skills, and values.
As quoted by Luther H. Evans and George E. Arnstein (eds.), in Automation and the Challenge to Education: Proceedings of a Symposium (1962).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accommodation (9)  |  Adjustment (20)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Education (378)  |  Induce (22)  |  Institution (69)  |  Insure (4)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Provide (69)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Skill (109)  |  Society (326)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Value (365)

Engineering is not merely knowing and being knowledgeable, like a walking encyclopedia; engineering is not merely analysis; engineering is not merely the possession of the capacity to get elegant solutions to non-existent engineering problems; engineering is practicing the art of the organizing forces of technological change ... Engineers operate at the interface between science and society.
In Bert Scalzo, et al., Database Benchmarking: Practical Methods for Oracle & SQL Server (2007), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Art (657)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Force (487)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Merely (316)  |  Possession (65)  |  Problem (676)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Society (23)  |  Society (326)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)

Euclidean mathematics assumes the completeness and invariability of mathematical forms; these forms it describes with appropriate accuracy and enumerates their inherent and related properties with perfect clearness, order, and completeness, that is, Euclidean mathematics operates on forms after the manner that anatomy operates on the dead body and its members. On the other hand, the mathematics of variable magnitudes—function theory or analysis—considers mathematical forms in their genesis. By writing the equation of the parabola, we express its law of generation, the law according to which the variable point moves. The path, produced before the eyes of the student by a point moving in accordance to this law, is the parabola.
If, then, Euclidean mathematics treats space and number forms after the manner in which anatomy treats the dead body, modern mathematics deals, as it were, with the living body, with growing and changing forms, and thus furnishes an insight, not only into nature as she is and appears, but also into nature as she generates and creates,—reveals her transition steps and in so doing creates a mind for and understanding of the laws of becoming. Thus modern mathematics bears the same relation to Euclidean mathematics that physiology or biology … bears to anatomy.
In Die Mathematik die Fackelträgerin einer neuen Zeit (1889), 38. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 112-113.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Accordance (10)  |  According (237)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Appear (118)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Biology (216)  |  Body (537)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Consider (416)  |  Create (235)  |  Dead (59)  |  Deal (188)  |  Describe (128)  |  Doing (280)  |  Enumerate (3)  |  Equation (132)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Express (186)  |  Eye (419)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Generate (16)  |  Generation (242)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Insight (102)  |  Invariability (5)  |  Law (894)  |  Living (491)  |  Living Body (3)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Member (41)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Operate (17)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parabola (2)  |  Path (144)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Point (580)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Property (168)  |  Relate (21)  |  Relation (157)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Same (157)  |  Space (500)  |  Step (231)  |  Student (300)  |  Theory (970)  |  Transition (26)  |  Treat (35)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Variable (34)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

Even a god cannot change the past.
Agathon
As loosely translated from a quote by Aristotle: “Hence Agathon is right in saying ‘This only is denied even to God, The power to make what has been done undone.’”. As quoted by Aristotle in Nicomachean Ethics, Book 6, Chap. 2, translation by H. Rackham (1934). Also seen as “The one thing which even God cannot do is to make undone what has been done,” in Susan Ratcliffe (ed.), Oxford Treasury of Sayings and Quotations (2011), 329.
Science quotes on:  |  God (757)  |  Past (337)

Even in Europe a change has sensibly taken place in the mind of man. Science has liberated the ideas of those who read and reflect, and the American example has kindled feelings of right in the people. An insurrection has consequently begun of science talents and courage against rank and birth, which have fallen into contempt. It has failed in its first effort, because the mobs of the cities, the instrument used for its accomplishment, debased by ignorance, poverty and vice, could not be restrained to rational action. But the world will soon recover from the panic of this first catastrophe.
Letter to John Adams (Monticello, 1813). In Thomas Jefferson and John P. Foley (ed.), The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia (1900), 49. From Paul Leicester Ford (ed.), The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (1892-99). Vol 4, 439.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Action (327)  |  Against (332)  |  America (127)  |  Birth (147)  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Courage (69)  |  Effort (227)  |  Fail (185)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  First (1283)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mob (9)  |  People (1005)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Rank (67)  |  Rational (90)  |  Read (287)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Soon (186)  |  Talent (94)  |  Vice (40)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Even in the dark times between experimental breakthroughs, there always continues a steady evolution of theoretical ideas, leading almost imperceptibly to changes in previous beliefs.
In Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1989), 'Conceptual Foundations of the Unified Theory of Weak and Electromagnetic Interactions.'
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Breakthrough (15)  |  Continue (165)  |  Dark (140)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imperceptible (8)  |  Previous (12)  |  Steady (44)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)

Even the taking of medicine serves to make time go on with less heaviness. I have a sort of genius for physic and always had great entertainment in observing the changes of the human body and the effects produced by diet, labor, rest, and physical operations.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Diet (54)  |  Effect (393)  |  Entertainment (18)  |  Genius (284)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Labor (107)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Produced (187)  |  Rest (280)  |  Time (1877)

Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed.
The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1687), 3rd edition (1726), trans. I. Bernard Cohen and Anne Whitman (1999), Axioms, or Laws of Motion, Law 1, 416.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Force (487)  |  Forward (102)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Law Of Motion (14)  |  Rest (280)  |  State (491)  |  Straight (73)

Every creature has its own food, and an appropriate alchemist with the task of dividing it ... The alchemist takes the food and changes it into a tincture which he sends through the body to become blood and flesh. This alchemist dwells in the stomach where he cooks and works. The man eats a piece of meat, in which is both bad and good. When the meat reaches the stomach, there is the alchemist who divides it. What does not belong to health he casts away to a special place, and sends the good wherever it is needed. That is the Creator's decree... That is the virtue and power of the alchemist in man.
Volumen Medicinae Paramirum (c. 1520), in Paracelsus: Essential Readings, edited by Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke (1990), 50-1.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alchemist (22)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Bad (180)  |  Become (815)  |  Belong (162)  |  Blood (134)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Cast (66)  |  Cook (17)  |  Creator (91)  |  Creature (233)  |  Decree (8)  |  Digestion (28)  |  Divide (75)  |  Division (65)  |  Eat (104)  |  Excretion (7)  |  Flesh (27)  |  Food (199)  |  Good (889)  |  Health (193)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meat (16)  |  Power (746)  |  Special (184)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Task (147)  |  Through (849)  |  Tincture (5)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Work (1351)

Every living language, like the perspiring bodies of living creatures, is in perpetual motion and alteration; some words go off, and become obsolete; others are taken in, and by degrees grow into common use; or the same word is inverted to a new sense and notion, which in tract of time makes as observable a change in the air and features of a language as age makes in the lines and mien of a face.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Air (347)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Become (815)  |  Common (436)  |  Creature (233)  |  Degree (276)  |  Face (212)  |  Grow (238)  |  Language (293)  |  Living (491)  |  Motion (310)  |  New (1216)  |  Notion (113)  |  Observable (21)  |  Obsolete (15)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Perpetual Motion (14)  |  Perspire (2)  |  Sense (770)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Word (619)

Every scientist is an agent of cultural change. He may not be a champion of change; he may even resist it, as scholars of the past resisted the new truths of historical geology, biological evolution, unitary chemistry, and non-Euclidean geometry. But to the extent that he is a true professional, the scientist is inescapably an agent of change. His tools are the instruments of change—skepticism, the challenge to establish authority, criticism, rationality, and individuality.
In Science in Russian Culture: A History to 1860 (1963).
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (70)  |  Authority (95)  |  Biological (137)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Extent (139)  |  Geology (220)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Historical (70)  |  Individuality (22)  |  Instrument (144)  |  New (1216)  |  Non-Euclidean (7)  |  Past (337)  |  Professional (70)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Skepticism (28)  |  Tool (117)  |  Truth (1057)

Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Everyone (34)  |  Himself (461)  |  Think (1086)  |  World (1774)

Evolution is a theory of organic change, but it does not imply, as many people assume, that ceaseless flux is the irreducible state of nature and that structure is but a temporary incarnation of the moment. Change is more often a rapid transition between stable states than a continuous transformation at slow and steady rates. We live in a world of structure and legitimate distinction. Species are the units of nature’s morphology.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Assume (38)  |  Ceaseless (6)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Flux (21)  |  Imply (17)  |  Incarnation (3)  |  Irreducible (7)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  Live (628)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Morphology (22)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Often (106)  |  Organic (158)  |  People (1005)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Rate (29)  |  Slow (101)  |  Species (401)  |  Stable (30)  |  State (491)  |  Steady (44)  |  Structure (344)  |  Temporary (23)  |  Theory (970)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Transition (26)  |  Unit (33)  |  World (1774)

Faced with a new mutation in an organism, or a fundamental change in its living conditions, the biologist is frequently in no position whatever to predict its future prospects. He has to wait and see. For instance, the hairy mammoth seems to have been an admirable animal, intelligent and well-accoutered. Now that it is extinct, we try to understand why it failed. I doubt that any biologist thinks he could have predicted that failure. Fitness and survival are by nature estimates of past performance.
In Scientific American (Sep 1958). As cited in '50, 100 & 150 years ago', Scientific American (Sep 2008), 299, No. 3, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (19)  |  Animal (617)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Condition (356)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Extinct (21)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fitness (9)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Future (429)  |  Hairy (2)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mammoth (9)  |  Mutation (37)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Organism (220)  |  Past (337)  |  Performance (48)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Prospect (30)  |  See (1081)  |  Survival (94)  |  Think (1086)  |  Try (283)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Why (491)

Faced with the choice between changing one's mind and proving that there is no need to do so, almost everyone gets busy with the proof.
A Contemporary Guide to Economics, Peace, and Laughter (1971), 50.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Choice (110)  |  Do (1908)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Proof (287)

Finally, I aim at giving denominations to things, as agreeable to truth as possible. I am not ignorant that words, like money, possess an ideal value, and that great danger of confusion may be apprehended from a change of names; in the mean time it cannot be denied that chemistry, like the other sciences, was formerly filled with improper names. In different branches of knowledge, we see those matters long since reformed: why then should chemistry, which examines the real nature of things, still adopt vague names, which suggest false ideas, and favour strongly of ignorance and imposition? Besides, there is little doubt but that many corrections may be made without any inconvenience.
Physical and Chemical Essays (1784), Vol. I, xxxvii.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreeable (18)  |  Aim (165)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Correction (40)  |  Danger (115)  |  Denomination (6)  |  Different (577)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Error (321)  |  Examine (78)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Money (170)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Things (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possess (156)  |  Possible (552)  |  Reform (22)  |  Reformed (4)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Still (613)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vague (47)  |  Value (365)  |  Why (491)  |  Word (619)

First follow Nature, and your judgment frame
By her just standard, which is still the same:
Unerring nature, still divinely bright,
One clear, unchanged, and universal light,
Life, force, and beauty must to all impart,
At once the source, and end, and test of art.
#039;Essay On Criticism#039;, Miscellaneous Poems and Translations: by Several Hands (1720), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Bright (79)  |  Clear (100)  |  End (590)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Force (487)  |  Frame (26)  |  Impart (23)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Source (93)  |  Standard (57)  |  Still (613)  |  Test (211)  |  Unerring (4)  |  Universal (189)

Fish farming, even with conventional techniques, changes fish within a few generations from an animal like a wild buffalo or a wildebeest to the equivalent of a domestic cow.
In The End of the Line: How Overfishing is Changing the World and what We Eat (2004), 312.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Aquaculture (5)  |  Buffalo (7)  |  Conventional (30)  |  Cow (39)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fish Farming (2)  |  Generation (242)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Salmon (7)  |  Technique (80)  |  Wild (87)  |  Wildebeest (2)

For a stone, when it is examined, will be found a mountain in miniature. The fineness of Nature’s work is so great, that, into a single block, a foot or two in diameter, she can compress as many changes of form and structure, on a small scale, as she needs for her mountains on a large one; and, taking moss for forests, and grains of crystal for crags, the surface of a stone, in by far the plurality of instances, is more interesting than the surface of an ordinary hill; more fantastic in form and incomparably richer in colour—the last quality being, in fact, so noble in most stones of good birth (that is to say, fallen from the crystalline mountain ranges).
Modern Painters, 4, Containing part 5 of Mountain Beauty (1860), 311.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Being (1278)  |  Birth (147)  |  Block (12)  |  Color (137)  |  Compression (6)  |  Crag (4)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Diameter (28)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fantastic (20)  |  Forest (150)  |  Form (959)  |  Good (889)  |  Grain (50)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hill (20)  |  Instance (33)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Large (394)  |  Last (426)  |  Miniature (7)  |  More (2559)  |  Moss (10)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Noble (90)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Plurality (5)  |  Quality (135)  |  Range (99)  |  Richness (14)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Single (353)  |  Small (477)  |  Stone (162)  |  Structure (344)  |  Surface (209)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

For many centuries chemists labored to change lead into precious gold, and eventually found that precious uranium turned to lead without any human effort at all.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov and Jason A. Shulman (eds.), Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemist (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Century (310)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Effort (227)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Find (998)  |  Gold (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Labor (107)  |  Lead (384)  |  Precious (41)  |  Transmutation (22)  |  Turn (447)  |  Uranium (20)

For mathematics, in a wilderness of tragedy and change, is a creature of the mind, born to the cry of humanity in search of an invariant reality, immutable in substance, unalterable with time.
In The American Mathematical Monthly (1949), 56, 19. Excerpted in John Ewing (ed,), A Century of Mathematics: Through the Eyes of the Monthly (1996), 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (159)  |  Creature (233)  |  Cry (29)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Invariant (10)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Reality (261)  |  Search (162)  |  Substance (248)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tragedy (29)  |  Unalterable (7)  |  Wilderness (45)

For nothing is fixed, forever and forever and forever, it is not fixed; the earth is always shifting, the light is always changing, the sea does not cease to grind down rock. Generations do not cease to be born, and we are responsible to them because we are the only witnesses they have. The sea rises, the light fails, lovers cling to each other, and children cling to us. The moment we cease to hold each other, the sea engulfs us and the light goes out.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (159)  |  Cease (79)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Cling (6)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fail (185)  |  Fix (25)  |  Forever (103)  |  Generation (242)  |  Grind (11)  |  Hold (95)  |  Light (607)  |  Lover (11)  |  Moment (253)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rock (161)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shift (44)  |  Witness (54)

For ourselves, we may take as a basic assumption, clear from a survey of particular cases, that natural things are some or all of them subject to change.
Aristotle
In 'Physics', Book 1, Chapter 2, 185a13, as translated by William Charlton, Physics: Books I and II (1983), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Basic (138)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Law (41)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Subject (521)  |  Survey (33)  |  Thing (1915)

For several years this great man [Isaac Newton] was intensely occupied in endeavoring to discover a way of changing the base metals into gold. … There were periods when his furnace fires were not allowed to go out for six weeks; he and his secretary sitting up alternate nights to replenish them.
In 'Sir Isaac Newton', People’s Book of Biography: Or, Short Lives of the Most Interesting Persons of All Ages and Countries (1868), 256.
Science quotes on:  |  Alternate (3)  |  Base (117)  |  Base Metal (2)  |  Discover (553)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Fire (189)  |  Furnace (12)  |  Gold (97)  |  Great (1574)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Metal (84)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Night (120)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Period (198)  |  Secretary (2)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Way (1217)  |  Week (70)  |  Year (933)

For the philosopher, order is the entirety of repetitions manifested, in the form of types or of laws, by perceived objects. Order is an intelligible relation. For the biologist, order is a sequence in space and time. However, according to Plato, all things arise out of their opposites. Order was born of the original disorder, and the long evolution responsible for the present biological order necessarily had to engender disorder.
An organism is a molecular society, and biological order is a kind of social order. Social order is opposed to revolution, which is an abrupt change of order, and to anarchy, which is the absence of order.
I am presenting here today both revolution and anarchy, for which I am fortunately not the only one responsible. However, anarchy cannot survive and prosper except in an ordered society, and revolution becomes sooner or later the new order. Viruses have not failed to follow the general law. They are strict parasites which, born of disorder, have created a very remarkable new order to ensure their own perpetuation.
'Interaction Among Virus, Cell, and Organism', Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1965). In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1963-1970 (1972), 174.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Anarchy (6)  |  Arise (158)  |  Become (815)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Both (493)  |  Cell (138)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Entirety (6)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fail (185)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Kind (557)  |  Law (894)  |  Long (790)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  New (1216)  |  Object (422)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Order (632)  |  Organism (220)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Perpetuation (4)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Plato (76)  |  Present (619)  |  Prosper (6)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Order (7)  |  Society (326)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Survive (79)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Type (167)  |  Virus (27)

For the sake of our children and our future, we must do more to combat climate change. Now, it’s true that no single event makes a trend. But the fact is the 12 hottest years on record have all come in the last 15. Heat waves, droughts, wildfires, floods—all are now more frequent and more intense. We can choose to believe that Superstorm Sandy, and the most severe drought in decades, and the worst wildfires some states have ever seen were all just a freak coincidence. Or we can choose to believe in the overwhelming judgment of science—and act before it’s too late.
From second State of the Union Address (12 Feb 2013) at the U.S. Capitol.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Children (200)  |  Choose (112)  |  Climate (97)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Coincidence (19)  |  Combat (15)  |  Decade (59)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drought (13)  |  Event (216)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Flood (50)  |  Freak (4)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Future (429)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hottest (2)  |  Intense (20)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Last (426)  |  Late (118)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Record (154)  |  Sake (58)  |  Sandy (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Severe (16)  |  Single (353)  |  State (491)  |  Trend (22)  |  Wave (107)  |  Worst (57)  |  Year (933)

For those who have seen the Earth from space, and for the hundreds and perhaps thousands more who will, the experience most certainly changes your perspective. The things that we share in our world are far more valuable than those which divide us.
As quoted, without citation, in Jeffrey O. Bennett, The Cosmic Perspective (1999), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainly (185)  |  Divide (75)  |  Earth (996)  |  Experience (467)  |  Hundred (229)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Perspective (28)  |  See (1081)  |  Share (75)  |  Space (500)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

For, dear me, why abandon a belief
Merely because it ceases to be true.
Cling to it long enough, and not a doubt
It will turn true again, for so it goes.
Most of the change we think we see in life
Is due to truths being in and out of favour.
'The Black Cottage'. In Edward Connery Latham (ed.), The Poetry of Robert Frost (1971), 77.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Cease (79)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Due (141)  |  Enough (340)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  See (1081)  |  Think (1086)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turn (447)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

Forgiveness does not change the past, but it does enlarge the future.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Forgiveness (2)  |  Future (429)  |  Past (337)

Fortunately Nature herself seems to have prepared for us the means of supplying that want which arises from the impossibility of making certain experiments on living bodies. The different classes of animals exhibit almost all the possible combinations of organs: we find them united, two and two, three and three, and in all proportions; while at the same time it may be said that there is no organ of which some class or some genus is not deprived. A careful examination of the effects which result from these unions and privations is therefore sufficient to enable us to form probable conclusions respecting the nature and use of each organ, or form of organ. In the same manner we may proceed to ascertain the use of the different parts of the same organ, and to discover those which are essential, and separate them from those which are only accessory. It is sufficient to trace the organ through all the classes which possess it, and to examine what parts constantly exist, and what change is produced in the respective functions of the organ, by the absence of those parts which are wanting in certain classes.
Letter to Jean Claude Mertrud. In Lectures on Comparative Anatomy (1802), Vol. I, xxiii--xxiv.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arise (158)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Certain (550)  |  Class (164)  |  Classification (97)  |  Combination (144)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enable (119)  |  Essential (199)  |  Examination (98)  |  Examine (78)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  Genus (25)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Living (491)  |  Making (300)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organ (115)  |  Possess (156)  |  Possible (552)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Produced (187)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Result (677)  |  Separate (143)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Two (937)  |  Union (51)  |  Use (766)  |  Want (497)

Forward, forward let us range,
Let the great world spin for ever down the ringing grooves of change.
'Locksley Hall' (1842), collected in Alfred Tennyson and William James Rolfe (ed.) The Poetic and Dramatic Works of Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1898), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Down (456)  |  Forward (102)  |  Great (1574)  |  Groove (3)  |  Range (99)  |  Spin (26)  |  World (1774)

Gases are distinguished from other forms of matter, not only by their power of indefinite expansion so as to fill any vessel, however large, and by the great effect heat has in dilating them, but by the uniformity and simplicity of the laws which regulate these changes.
Theory of Heat (1904), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Effect (393)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Form (959)  |  Gas (83)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heat (174)  |  Indefinite (20)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Matter (798)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Vessel (63)

Genuine religion has its root deep down in the heart of humanity and in the reality of things. It is not surprising that by our methods we fail to grasp it: the actions of the Deity make no appeal to any special sense, only a universal appeal; and our methods are, as we know, incompetent to detect complete uniformity. There is a principle of Relativity here, and unless we encounter flaw or jar or change, nothing in us responds; we are deaf and blind therefore to the Immanent Grandeur, unless we have insight enough to recognise in the woven fabric of existence, flowing steadily from the loom in an infinite progress towards perfection, the ever-growing garment of a transcendent God.
Continuity: The Presidential Address to the British Association (1913), 92-93.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Blind (95)  |  Complete (204)  |  Deep (233)  |  Deity (22)  |  Detect (44)  |  Down (456)  |  Enough (340)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Fail (185)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Garment (13)  |  Genuine (52)  |  God (757)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Growing (98)  |  Heart (229)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Insight (102)  |  Know (1518)  |  Loom (20)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Principle (507)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reality (261)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Religion (361)  |  Root (120)  |  Sense (770)  |  Special (184)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Universal (189)

Geologists have usually had recourse for the explanation of these changes to the supposition of sundry violent and extraordinary catastrophes, cataclysms, or general revolutions having occurred in the physical state of the earth's surface.
As the idea imparted by the term Cataclysm, Catastrophe, or Revolution, is extremely vague, and may comprehend any thing you choose to imagine, it answers for the time very well as an explanation; that is, it stops further inquiry. But it also has had the disadvantage of effectually stopping the advance of science, by involving it in obscurity and confusion.
Considerations on Volcanoes (1825), iv.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Advancement (62)  |  Answer (366)  |  Cataclysm (2)  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Choose (112)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Disadvantage (10)  |  Earth (996)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  General (511)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Impart (23)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Physical (508)  |  Recourse (12)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Science (3879)  |  State (491)  |  Stop (80)  |  Sundry (4)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Surface (209)  |  Term (349)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Usually (176)  |  Vague (47)  |  Vagueness (15)  |  Violence (34)

Geology is the science which investigates the successive changes that have taken place in the organic and inorganic kingdoms of nature; it enquires into the causes of these changes, and the influence which they have exerted in modifying the surface and external structure of our planet.
Principles of Geology (1830-3), Vol. 1, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Exert (39)  |  Geology (220)  |  Influence (222)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nomencalture (4)  |  Organic (158)  |  Planet (356)  |  Science (3879)  |  Structure (344)  |  Successive (73)  |  Surface (209)

Global nuclear war could have a major impact on climate—manifested by significant surface darkening over many weeks, subfreezing land temperatures persisting for up to several months, large perturbations in global circulation patterns, and dramatic changes in local weather and precipitation rates—a harsh “nuclear winter” in any season. [Co-author with Carl Sagan]
In 'Nuclear Winter: Global Consequences of Multiple Nuclear Explosions', Science (1983), 222, 1290.
Science quotes on:  |  Author (167)  |  Circulation (24)  |  Climate (97)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Dark (140)  |  Dramatic (17)  |  Freezing (16)  |  Global (35)  |  Harsh (8)  |  Impact (42)  |  Large (394)  |  Major (84)  |  Month (88)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Winter (3)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Persisting (2)  |  Perturbation (7)  |  Precipitation (7)  |  Carl Sagan (118)  |  Season (47)  |  Significant (74)  |  Surface (209)  |  Temperature (79)  |  War (225)  |  Weather (44)  |  Week (70)  |  Winter (44)

Gyroscope, n.: A wheel or disk mounted to spin rapidly about an axis and also free to rotate about one or both of two axes perpendicular to each other and the axis of spin so that a rotation of one of the two mutually perpendicular axes results from application of torque to the other when the wheel is spinning and so that the entire apparatus offers considerable opposition depending on the angular momentum to any torque that would change the direction of the axis of spin.
Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary (8th Ed., 1973), 513. (Webmaster comments: A definition which is perfectly easy to understand. Right?)
Science quotes on:  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Application (242)  |  Axis (9)  |  Both (493)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Definition (221)  |  Direction (175)  |  Free (232)  |  Momentum (9)  |  Mount (42)  |  Offer (141)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Other (2236)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Result (677)  |  Rotate (8)  |  Rotation (12)  |  Spin (26)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Two (937)  |  Wheel (50)

Have the changes which lead us from one geologic state to another been, on a long average uniform in their intensity, or have they consisted of epochs of paroxysmal and catastrophic action, interposed between periods of comparative tranquillity? These two opinions will probably for some time divide the geological world into two sects, which may perhaps be designated as the Uniformitarians and the Catastrophists.
In 'Review of Charles Lyell's Principles of Geology', Quarterly Review (1832), 47, 126.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Average (82)  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Catastrophic (9)  |  Consist (223)  |  Divide (75)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Geology (220)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Lead (384)  |  Long (790)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Period (198)  |  Sect (4)  |  State (491)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Uniformitarian (4)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Have you ever observed a humming-bird moving about in an aerial dance among the flowers—a living prismatic gem that changes its colour with every change of position— … its exquisite form, its changeful splendour, its swift motions and intervals of aërial suspension, it is a creature of such fairy-like loveliness as to mock all description.
In Green Mansions: A Romance of the Tropical Forest (1916),
Science quotes on:  |  Aerial (10)  |  All (4108)  |  Bird (149)  |  Color (137)  |  Creature (233)  |  Dance (32)  |  Description (84)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Fairy (9)  |  Flower (106)  |  Form (959)  |  Gem (16)  |  Humming (5)  |  Hummingbird (4)  |  Interval (13)  |  Living (491)  |  Loveliness (6)  |  Mock (7)  |  Motion (310)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Position (77)  |  Prismatic (2)  |  Splendor (17)  |  Splendour (8)  |  Suspension (7)  |  Swift (12)

Heat can never pass from a colder to a warmer body without some other change, connected therewith, occurring at the same time.
'On a Modified Form of the Second Fundamental Theorem in the Mechanical Theory of Heat', Philosophical Magazine, 1856, 12, 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Connect (125)  |  Heat (174)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Time (1877)

Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round heads in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They’re not fond of rules. You can quote them. Disagree with them. Glorify or vilify them. But the only thing you can’t do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.
In Apple Computer newspaper advertisement (1997) as quoted and cited in Tad Lathrop and Jim Pettigrew, This Business of Music Marketing and Promotion (1999), 55.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Crazy (26)  |  Differently (4)  |  Disagree (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fond (12)  |  Forward (102)  |  Genius (284)  |  Glorify (6)  |  Head (81)  |  Hole (16)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Misfit (3)  |  People (1005)  |  Push (62)  |  Quote (42)  |  Race (268)  |  Rebel (7)  |  Round (26)  |  Rule (294)  |  See (1081)  |  Square (70)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Troublemaker (2)  |  Vilify (2)  |  World (1774)

How greatly would the heroes and statesmen of antiquity have despised the labours of that man who devoted his life to investigate the properties of the magnet! Little could they anticipate that this humble mineral was destined to change the very form and condition of human society in every quarter of the globe.
In 'Observations on the Study of Mineralogy', The Philosophical Magazine and Journal (Jul 1819), 54, 46. Slightly edited and used by Joseph Henry in 'Introductory Lecture on Chemistry' (Jan-Mar 1832), The Papers of Joseph Henry, Vol. 1, 396.
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Condition (356)  |  Contemptible (8)  |  Destined (42)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Form (959)  |  Globe (47)  |  Hero (42)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Society (13)  |  Humble (50)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Labour (98)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Magnet (20)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Property (168)  |  Society (326)  |  Statesman (19)

How many and how curious problems concern the commonest of the sea-snails creeping over the wet sea-weed! In how many points of view may its history be considered! There are its origin and development, the mystery of its generation, the phenomena of its growth, all concerning each apparently insignificant individual; there is the history of the species, the value of its distinctive marks, the features which link it with the higher and lower creatures, the reason why it takes its stand where we place it in the scale of creation, the course of its distribution, the causes of its diffusion, its antiquity or novelty, the mystery (deepest of mysteries) of its first appearance, the changes of the outline of continents and of oceans which have taken place since its advent, and their influence on its own wanderings.
On the Natural History of European Seas. In George Wilson and Archibald Geikie, Memoir of Edward Forbes F.R.S. (1861), 547-8.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Cause (541)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consider (416)  |  Continent (76)  |  Course (409)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creature (233)  |  Curious (91)  |  Development (422)  |  Diffusion (13)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Evolution (590)  |  First (1283)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Generation (242)  |  Growth (187)  |  History (673)  |  Individual (404)  |  Influence (222)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Origin (239)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reason (744)  |  Scale (121)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sea-Snail (2)  |  Snail (10)  |  Species (401)  |  Stand (274)  |  Value (365)  |  View (488)  |  Weed (18)  |  Why (491)

How much has happened in these fifty years—a period more remarkable than any, I will venture to say, in the annals of mankind. I am not thinking of the rise and fall of Empires, the change of dynasties, the establishment of Governments. I am thinking of those revolutions of science which have had much more effect than any political causes, which have changed the position and prospects of mankind more than all the conquests and all the codes and all the legislators that ever lived.
Banquet speech, Glasgow. In Nature (27 Nov 1873), 9, 71.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Annal (3)  |  Cause (541)  |  Code (31)  |  Conquest (28)  |  Dynasty (7)  |  Effect (393)  |  Empire (14)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Fall (230)  |  Government (110)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Legislator (4)  |  Mankind (339)  |  More (2559)  |  Period (198)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  Position (77)  |  Prospect (30)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Rise (166)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

However, the small probability of a similar encounter [of the earth with a comet], can become very great in adding up over a huge sequence of centuries. It is easy to picture to oneself the effects of this impact upon the Earth. The axis and the motion of rotation changed; the seas abandoning their old position to throw themselves toward the new equator; a large part of men and animals drowned in this universal deluge, or destroyed by the violent tremor imparted to the terrestrial globe.
Exposition du Système du Monde, 2nd edition (1799), 208, trans. Ivor Grattan-Guinness.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Axis (9)  |  Become (815)  |  Century (310)  |  Comet (54)  |  Deluge (14)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Drown (12)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Encounter (22)  |  Equator (6)  |  Globe (47)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impact (42)  |  Impart (23)  |  Large (394)  |  Man (2251)  |  Motion (310)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Picture (143)  |  Probability (130)  |  Rotation (12)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Small (477)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Tremor (2)  |  Universal (189)

Humans are allergic to change. They love to say, “We’ve always done it this way.” I try to fight that. That’s why I have a clock on my wall that runs counter-clockwise.
As quoted, without citation, by Kurt W. Beyer, 'Grace Murray Hopper', in Joseph J. Thomas, Leadership Embodied: The Secrets to Success of the Most Effective Navy and Marine Corps Leaders (2005), 160.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Allergy (2)  |  Clock (47)  |  Fight (44)  |  Human (1468)  |  Love (309)  |  Run (174)  |  Say (984)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Try (283)  |  Wall (67)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)

I am afraid all we can do is to accept the paradox and try to accommodate ourselves to it, as we have done to so many paradoxes lately in modern physical theories. We shall have to get accustomed to the idea that the change of the quantity R, commonly called the 'radius of the universe', and the evolutionary changes of stars and stellar systems are two different processes, going on side by side without any apparent connection between them. After all the 'universe' is an hypothesis, like the atom, and must be allowed the freedom to have properties and to do things which would be contradictory and impossible for a finite material structure.
Kosmos (1932), 133.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Acceptance (52)  |  Accommodate (15)  |  Accommodation (9)  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Afraid (21)  |  All (4108)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Atom (355)  |  Call (769)  |  Connection (162)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Finite (59)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Material (353)  |  Modern (385)  |  Must (1526)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Physical (508)  |  Process (423)  |  Property (168)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Radius (4)  |  Side (233)  |  Side By Side (2)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stellar (4)  |  Structure (344)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Try (283)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)

I am not pleading with you to make changes, I am telling you you have got to make them—not because I say so, but because old Father Time will take care of you if you don’t change. Consequently, you need a procurement department for new ideas.
As quoted in book review, T.A. Boyd, 'Charles F. Kettering: Prophet of Progress', Science (30 Jan 1959), 256.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (186)  |  Department (92)  |  Father (110)  |  Idea (843)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Plead (3)  |  Say (984)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)

I am the daughter of earth and water, And the nursling of the sky;
I pass through the pores of the ocean and shores;
I change, but I cannot die.
For after the rain when with never a stain,
The pavilion of Heaven is bare,
And the winds and sunbeams with their convex gleams,
Build up the blue dome of air,
I silently laugh at my own cenotaph, And out of the caverns of rain,
Like a child from the womb, like a ghost from the tomb,
I arise and unbuild it again.
The Cloud (1820). In K. Raine (ed.), Shelley (1974), 289.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Arise (158)  |  Bare (33)  |  Build (204)  |  Cavern (9)  |  Cenotaph (2)  |  Child (307)  |  Convex (6)  |  Daughter (29)  |  Die (86)  |  Dome (8)  |  Earth (996)  |  Ghost (36)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Pass (238)  |  Pore (7)  |  Rain (62)  |  Shore (24)  |  Sky (161)  |  Stain (9)  |  Through (849)  |  Tomb (15)  |  Water (481)  |  Wind (128)  |  Womb (24)

I believe that life can go on forever. It takes a million years to evolve a new species, ten million for a new genus, one hundred million for a class, a billion for a phylum—and that’s usually as far as your imagination goes. In a billion years, it seems, intelligent life might be as different from humans as humans are from insects. But what would happen in another ten billion years? It’s utterly impossible to conceive of ourselves changing as drastically as that, over and over again. All you can say is, on that kind of time scale the material form that life would take is completely open. To change from a human being to a cloud may seem a big order, but it’s the kind of change you’d expect over billions of years.
Quoted in Omni (1986), 8, 38.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Billion (95)  |  Class (164)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Completely (135)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Different (577)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expect (200)  |  Forever (103)  |  Form (959)  |  Genus (25)  |  Happen (274)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Insect (77)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Material (353)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Order (632)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Species (401)  |  Time (1877)  |  Usually (176)  |  Year (933)

I call that part of the human body irritable, which becomes shorter upon being touched; very irritable if it contracts upon a slight touch, and the contrary if by a violent touch it contracts but little. I call that a sensible part of the human body, which upon being touched transmits the impression of it to the soul; and in brutes, in whom the existence of a soul is not so clear, I call those parts sensible, the Irritation of which occasions evident signs of pain and disquiet in the animal. On the contrary, I call that insensible, which being burnt, tore, pricked, or cut till it is quite destroyed, occasions no sign of pain nor convulsion, nor any sort of change in the situation of the body.
'A Treatise on the Sensible and Irritable Parts of Animals' (Read 1752). Trans. 1755 and reprinted in Bulletin of the Institute of the History of Medicine, 1936, 4(2), 658-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Brute (28)  |  Call (769)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Cut (114)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Evident (91)  |  Existence (456)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impression (114)  |  Little (707)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Pain (136)  |  Situation (113)  |  Soul (226)  |  Touch (141)

I can’t change the direction of the wind, but I can adjust my sails to always reach my destination.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adjust (8)  |  Destination (14)  |  Direction (175)  |  Reach (281)  |  Sail (36)  |  Wind (128)

I do not think that, practically or morally, we can defend a policy of saving every distinctive local population of organisms. I can cite a good rationale for the preservation of species, for each species is a unique and separate natural object that, once lost, can never be reconstituted. But subspecies are distinctive local populations of species with broader geographic range. Subspecies are dynamic, interbreedable, and constantly changing: what then are we saving by declaring them all inviolate?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Broad (27)  |  Cite (8)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Declare (45)  |  Defend (30)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dynamic (14)  |  Geographic (10)  |  Good (889)  |  Local (19)  |  Lose (159)  |  Morally (2)  |  Natural (796)  |  Never (1087)  |  Object (422)  |  Organism (220)  |  Policy (24)  |  Population (110)  |  Practically (10)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Range (99)  |  Rationale (7)  |  Reconstitute (2)  |  Save (118)  |  Separate (143)  |  Species (401)  |  Subspecies (2)  |  Think (1086)  |  Unique (67)

I find in the domestic duck that the bones of the wing weigh less and the bones of the leg more, in proportion to the whole skeleton, than do the same bones in the wild duck; and this change may be safely attributed to the domestic duck flying much less, and walking more, than its wild parents.
From On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (1861), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Attribute (61)  |  Bone (95)  |  Do (1908)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Duck (3)  |  Find (998)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Leg (34)  |  More (2559)  |  Parent (76)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Skeleton (22)  |  Walk (124)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Weight (134)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wild (87)  |  Wing (75)

I find myself now preaching about the golden age of manned spaceflight, because something went on there, within us, that we’re missing. When we went to the Moon, it was not only just standing on a new plateau for all mankind. We changed the way everybody in the world thought of themselves, you know. It was a change that went on inside of us. And we’re losing that.
From interview with Ron Stone (24 May 1999) for NASA Johnson Space Center Oral History Project on NASA website.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Changed (2)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Find (998)  |  Golden (45)  |  Golden Age (10)  |  Inside (26)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Missing (21)  |  Moon (237)  |  Myself (212)  |  New (1216)  |  Plateau (6)  |  Something (719)  |  Space Flight (25)  |  Standing (11)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

I had a feeling once about Mathematics—that I saw it all. Depth beyond depth was revealed to me—the Byss and Abyss. I saw—as one might see the transit of Venus or even the Lord Mayor’s Show—a quantity passing through infinity and changing its sign from plus to minus. I saw exactly why it happened and why the tergiversation was inevitable but it was after dinner and I let it go.
In Sir Winston Churchill: A Self-Portrait (1954), 38.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abyss (29)  |  All (4108)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Depth (94)  |  Dinner (15)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Lord (93)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Minus (7)  |  Passing (76)  |  Plus (43)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Sign (58)  |  Through (849)  |  Venus (20)  |  Why (491)

I have long since come to see that no one deserves either praise or blame for the ideas that come to him, but only for the actions resulting therefrom. Ideas and beliefs are certainly not voluntary acts. They come to us—we hardly know how or whence, and once they have got possession of us we can not reject or change them at will. It is for the common good that the promulgation of ideas should be free—uninfluenced by either praise or blame, reward or punishment. But the actions which result from our ideas may properly be so treated, because it is only by patient thought and work, that new ideas, if good and true, become adopted and utilized; while, if untrue or if not adequately presented to the world, they are rejected or forgotten.
In 'The Origin of the Theory of Natural Selection', Popular Science Monthly (1909), 74, 400.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Become (815)  |  Belief (578)  |  Blame (30)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Common (436)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Free (232)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Know (1518)  |  Long (790)  |  New (1216)  |  Patient (199)  |  Possession (65)  |  Praise (26)  |  Present (619)  |  Promulgation (5)  |  Punishment (14)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Result (677)  |  Reward (68)  |  See (1081)  |  Thought (953)  |  Treated (2)  |  True (212)  |  Untrue (12)  |  Voluntary (4)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

I searched along the changing edge
Where, sky-pierced now the cloud had broken.
I saw no bird, no blade of wing,
No song was spoken.
I stood, my eyes turned upward still
And drank the air and breathed the light.
Then, like a hawk upon the wind,
I climbed the sky, I made the flight.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Bird (149)  |  Blade (11)  |  Break (99)  |  Breath (59)  |  Breathe (45)  |  Broken (56)  |  Climb (35)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Drink (53)  |  Edge (47)  |  Eye (419)  |  Flight (98)  |  Hawk (4)  |  Light (607)  |  Saw (160)  |  Search (162)  |  See (1081)  |  Sky (161)  |  Song (37)  |  Speak (232)  |  Stand (274)  |  Still (613)  |  Turn (447)  |  Upward (43)  |  Wind (128)  |  Wing (75)

I should like to compare this rearrangement which the proteins undergo in the animal or vegetable organism to the making up of a railroad train. In their passage through the body parts of the whole may be left behind, and here and there new parts added on. In order to understand fully the change we must remember that the proteins are composed of Bausteine united in very different ways. Some of them contain Bausteine of many kinds. The multiplicity of the proteins is determined by many causes, first through the differences in the nature of the constituent Bausteine; and secondly, through differences in the arrangement of them. The number of Bausteine which may take part in the formation of the proteins is about as large as the number of letters in the alphabet. When we consider that through the combination of letters an infinitely large number of thoughts may be expressed, we can understand how vast a number of the properties of the organism may be recorded in the small space which is occupied by the protein molecules. It enables us to understand how it is possible for the proteins of the sex-cells to contain, to a certain extent, a complete description of the species and even of the individual. We may also comprehend how great and important the task is to determine the structure of the proteins, and why the biochemist has devoted himself with so much industry to their analysis.
'The Chemical Composition of the Cell', The Harvey Lectures (1911), 7, 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Behind (137)  |  Biochemist (9)  |  Body (537)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cell (138)  |  Certain (550)  |  Combination (144)  |  Compare (69)  |  Complete (204)  |  Consider (416)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Determine (144)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Enable (119)  |  Express (186)  |  Extent (139)  |  First (1283)  |  Formation (96)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  Individual (404)  |  Industry (137)  |  Kind (557)  |  Large (394)  |  Letter (109)  |  Making (300)  |  Model (102)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Order (632)  |  Organism (220)  |  Passage (50)  |  Possible (552)  |  Protein (54)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Rearrangement (5)  |  Record (154)  |  Remember (179)  |  Sex (69)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Species (401)  |  Structure (344)  |  Task (147)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Train (114)  |  Understand (606)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)

I shuddered when I saw a crimson flame through the porthole instead of the usual starry sky at the night horizon of the planet. Vast pillars of light were bursting into the sky, melting into it, and flooding over with all the colors of the rainbow. An area of red luminescence merged smoothly into the black of the cosmos. The intense and dynamic changes in the colors and forms of the pillars and garlands made me think of visual music. Finally, we saw that we had entered directly into the aurora borealis.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Area (31)  |  Aurora (3)  |  Aurora Borealis (2)  |  Black (42)  |  Burst (39)  |  Color (137)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Crimson (4)  |  Directly (22)  |  Dynamic (14)  |  Enter (141)  |  Finally (26)  |  Flame (40)  |  Flood (50)  |  Form (959)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Instead (21)  |  Intense (20)  |  Light (607)  |  Luminescence (2)  |  Melt (16)  |  Merge (3)  |  Music (129)  |  Night (120)  |  Pillar (9)  |  Planet (356)  |  Rainbow (16)  |  Red (35)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Shudder (2)  |  Sky (161)  |  Smoothly (2)  |  Starry (2)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Vast (177)  |  Visual (15)

I specifically paused to show that, if there were such machines with the organs and shape of a monkey or of some other non-rational animal, we would have no way of discovering that they are not the same as these animals. But if there were machines that resembled our bodies and if they imitated our actions as much as is morally possible, we would always have two very certain means for recognizing that, none the less, they are not genuinely human. The first is that they would never be able to use speech, or other signs composed by themselves, as we do to express our thoughts to others. For one could easily conceive of a machine that is made in such a way that it utters words, and even that it would utter some words in response to physical actions that cause a change in its organs—for example, if someone touched it in a particular place, it would ask what one wishes to say to it, or if it were touched somewhere else, it would cry out that it was being hurt, and so on. But it could not arrange words in different ways to reply to the meaning of everything that is said in its presence, as even the most unintelligent human beings can do. The second means is that, even if they did many things as well as or, possibly, better than anyone of us, they would infallibly fail in others. Thus one would discover that they did not act on the basis of knowledge, but merely as a result of the disposition of their organs. For whereas reason is a universal instrument that can be used in all kinds of situations, these organs need a specific disposition for every particular action.
Discourse on Method in Discourse on Method and Related Writings (1637), trans. Desmond M. Clarke, Penguin edition (1999), Part 5, 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arrange (30)  |  Ask (411)  |  Basis (173)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Cry (29)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Do (1908)  |  Everything (476)  |  Express (186)  |  Fail (185)  |  First (1283)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Organ (115)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possible (552)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Presence (63)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reply (56)  |  Response (53)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Show (346)  |  Situation (113)  |  Specific (95)  |  Speech (61)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Touch (141)  |  Two (937)  |  Universal (189)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

I suspect that the changes that have taken place during the last century in the average man's fundamental beliefs, in his philosophy, in his concept of religion. in his whole world outlook, are greater than the changes that occurred during the preceding four thousand years all put together. ... because of science and its applications to human life, for these have bloomed in my time as no one in history had had ever dreamed could be possible.
In The Autobiography of Robert A. Millikan (1951, 1980), xii.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Average (82)  |  Belief (578)  |  Century (310)  |  Concept (221)  |  Dream (208)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Greater (288)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Outlook (30)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Preceding (8)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

I suspect that the most important effect of World War II on physical science lay in the change in the attitude of people to science. The politicians and the public were convinced that science was useful and were in no position to argue about the details. A professor of physics might be more sinister than he was in the 1930s, but he was no longer an old fool with a beard in a comic-strip. The scientists or at any rate the physicists, had changed their attitude. They not only believed in the interest of science for themselves, they had acquired also a belief that the tax-payer should and would pay for it and would, in some unspecified length of run, benefit by it.
'The Effect of World War II on the Development of Knowledge in the Physical Sciences', Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 1975, Series A, 342, 532.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Belief (578)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Detail (146)  |  Effect (393)  |  Fool (116)  |  Interest (386)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Old (481)  |  People (1005)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Politician (38)  |  Politics (112)  |  Professor (128)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Tax (26)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Useful (250)  |  War (225)  |  World (1774)

I take it that a monograph of this sort belongs to the ephemera literature of science. The studied care which is warranted in the treatment of the more slowly moving branches of science would be out of place here. Rather with the pen of a journalist we must attempt to record a momentary phase of current thought, which may at any instant change with kaleidoscopic abruptness.
Valence and the Structure of Atoms and Molecules (1923), Preface.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Belong (162)  |  Care (186)  |  Current (118)  |  Instant (45)  |  Journalist (8)  |  Kaleidoscope (5)  |  Literature (103)  |  Monograph (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Pen (20)  |  Phase (36)  |  Publication (101)  |  Record (154)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Warrant (8)

I want to argue that the ‘sudden’ appearance of species in the fossil record and our failure to note subsequent evolutionary change within them is the proper prediction of evolutionary theory as we understand it ... Evolutionary ‘sequences’ are not rungs on a ladder, but our retrospective reconstruction of a circuitous path running like a labyrinth, branch to branch, from the base of the bush to a lineage now surviving at its top.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Argue (23)  |  Base (117)  |  Branch (150)  |  Bush (9)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Fossil Record (10)  |  Labyrinth (10)  |  Ladder (16)  |  Lineage (3)  |  Note (34)  |  Path (144)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Proper (144)  |  Reconstruction (14)  |  Record (154)  |  Retrospective (3)  |  Run (174)  |  Running (61)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Species (401)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Survive (79)  |  Theory (970)  |  Top (96)  |  Understand (606)  |  Want (497)

I was born not knowing and have only had a little time to change that here and there.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (159)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Little (707)  |  Time (1877)

I will now direct the attention of scientists to a previously unnoticed cause which brings about the metamorphosis and decomposition phenomena which are usually called decay, putrefaction, rotting, fermentation and moldering. This cause is the ability possessed by a body engaged in decomposition or combination, i.e. in chemical action, to give rise in a body in contact with it the same ability to undergo the same change which it experiences itself.
Annalen der Pharmacie 1839, 30, 262. Trans. W. H. Brock.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Action (327)  |  Attention (190)  |  Body (537)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Combination (144)  |  Contact (65)  |  Decay (53)  |  Decomposition (18)  |  Direct (225)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fermentation (15)  |  Metamorphosis (5)  |  Mold (33)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possess (156)  |  Putrefaction (4)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rotting (2)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Usually (176)  |  Will (2355)

I won’t let anyone take us backward, deny our economy the benefits of harnessing a clean energy future, or force our children to endure the catastrophe that would result from unchecked climate change.
In Hillary Clinton, 'Hillary Clinton: America Must Lead at Paris Climate Talks', Time (29 Nov 2015)
Science quotes on:  |  Backward (9)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Clean (50)  |  Climate (97)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Deny (66)  |  Economy (55)  |  Endure (20)  |  Energy (344)  |  Force (487)  |  Future (429)  |  Harnessing (5)  |  Renewable Energy (14)  |  Result (677)  |  Unchecked (3)

I would ... change the accepted rule that the nature of a complex molecule is determined by the nature, quantity, and position of its elementary component parts, by the following statement: the chemical nature of a complex molecule is determined by the nature of its elementary component parts, their quantity and chemical structure.
'On the Chemical Structure of Substances' 1861.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Complex (188)  |  Component (48)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Rule (294)  |  Statement (142)  |  Structure (344)

I would by all means have men beware, lest Æsop’s pretty fable of the fly that sate [sic] on the pole of a chariot at the Olympic races and said, “What a dust do I raise,” be verified in them. For so it is that some small observation, and that disturbed sometimes by the instrument, sometimes by the eye, sometimes by the calculation, and which may be owing to some real change in the heaven, raises new heavens and new spheres and circles.
'Of Vain Glory' (1625) in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1887-1901), Vol. 6, 503.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Beware (16)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Chariot (9)  |  Circle (110)  |  Disturb (28)  |  Disturbed (15)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dust (64)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fable (12)  |  Fly (146)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Measurement (174)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Owing (39)  |  Pole (46)  |  Race (268)  |  Small (477)  |  Sphere (116)

I'm not saying … I'm gonna change the world, but I guarantee you that I will spark the brain that will change the world.
From interview on MTV (1994).
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Guarantee (30)  |  Spark (31)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

I'm not saying … I'm gonna change the world, but I guarantee you that I will spark the brain that will change the world.
From interview on MTV (1994).
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Guarantee (30)  |  Spark (31)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

If a little less time was devoted to the translation of letters by Julius Caesar describing Britain 2000 years ago and a little more time was spent on teaching children how to describe (in simple modern English) the method whereby ethylene was converted into polythene in 1933 in the ICI laboratories at Northwich, and to discussing the enormous social changes which have resulted from this discovery, then I believe that we should be training future leaders in this country to face the world of tomorrow far more effectively than we are at the present time.
Quoted in an Obituary, D. P. Craig, Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society (1972), 18, 461.
Science quotes on:  |  2000 (15)  |  Britain (24)  |  Caesar_Julius (2)  |  Children (200)  |  Conversion (17)  |  Country (251)  |  Describe (128)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Education (378)  |  Face (212)  |  Future (429)  |  History (673)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Leader (43)  |  Letter (109)  |  Little (707)  |  Method (505)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Obituary (10)  |  Politician (38)  |  Present (619)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Science And Society (23)  |  Simple (406)  |  Social (252)  |  Spent (85)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Training (80)  |  Translation (21)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

If enough of us stop looking away and decide that climate change is a crisis worthy of Marshall Plan levels of response, then it will become one.
From This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate (2014), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Climate (97)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Crisis (24)  |  Decision (91)  |  Enough (340)  |  Level (67)  |  Looking (189)  |  Plan (117)  |  Response (53)  |  Will (2355)  |  Worthy (34)

If I make a decision it is a possession. I take pride in it, I tend to defend it and not listen to those who question it. If I make sense, then this is more dynamic, and I listen and I can change it. A decision is something you polish. Sensemaking is a direction for the next period.
Personal communication (13 Jun 1995). In Karl E. Weick, 'The Experience of Theorizing: Sensemaking as Topic and Resource'. Quoted in Ken G. Smith (ed.) and Michael A. Hitt (ed), Great Minds in Management: the Theory of Process Development (2005), 398. Weick writes that Gleason explains how leadership needs 'sensemaking rather than decision making.' As a highly skilled wildland firefighter he would make sense of an unfolding fire, giving directives that are open to revision at any time, so they can be self-correcting, responsive, with a transparent rationale. By contrast, decision making eats up valuable time with polishing the decision to get it 'right' and defending it, and also encourages blind spots.
Science quotes on:  |  Decision (91)  |  Defend (30)  |  Direction (175)  |  Dynamic (14)  |  Listen (73)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Period (198)  |  Polish (15)  |  Possession (65)  |  Pride (78)  |  Question (621)  |  Sense (770)  |  Something (719)  |  Tend (124)

If the great story of the last century was the conflict among various political ideologies—communism, fascism and democracy—then the great narrative of this century will be the changes wrought by astonishing scientific breakthroughs
Atlanta Journal-Constitution, column also distributed by United Press Syndicate, American Know-How Hobbled by Know-Nothings (9 Aug 2005). In Eve Herold, George Daley, Stem Cell Wars (2007), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonishing (27)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Breakthrough (15)  |  Century (310)  |  Communism (11)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Democracy (33)  |  Fascism (4)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ideology (14)  |  Last (426)  |  Narrative (7)  |  Political (121)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Story (118)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2355)

If the human race wants to go to hell in a basket, technology can help it get there by jet. It won’t change the desire or the direction, but it can greatly speed the passage.
In a speech at Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, April 25, 1967.
Science quotes on:  |  Desire (204)  |  Direction (175)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Passage (50)  |  Race (268)  |  Speed (65)  |  Technology (257)  |  Want (497)

If the mysterious influence to which the dissymmetry of nature is due should come to change in sense or direction, the constituting elements of all living beings would take an inverse dissymmetry. Perhaps a new world would be presented to us. Who could foresee the organization of living beings, if the cellulose, which is right, should become left, if the left albumen of the blood should become right? There are here mysteries which prepare immense labours for the future, and from this hour invite the most serious meditations in science.
Lecture (3 Feb 1860), to the Chemical Society of Paris, 'On the Molecular Dissymetry of Natural Organic Products', reprinted in The Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science (3 May 1862), 5, No. 126, 248.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Cellulose (3)  |  Direction (175)  |  Due (141)  |  Element (310)  |  Foresee (19)  |  Future (429)  |  Hour (186)  |  Immense (86)  |  Influence (222)  |  Labour (98)  |  Left (13)  |  Living (491)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Organization (114)  |  Present (619)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serious (91)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  World (1774)

If there is anything that we wish to change in a child, we should first examine it and see whether it is not something that could be better changed in ourselves.
Carl Jung
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Child (307)  |  Examine (78)  |  First (1283)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Wish (212)

If there were not something of mind in matter, how could matter change the mind?
In Pamela Weintraub (ed.), 'Through the Looking Glass', The Omni Interviews (1984), 161.
Science quotes on:  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Something (719)

If we are correct in understanding how evolution actually works, and provided we can survive the complications of war, environmental degradation, and possible contact with interstellar planetary travelers, we will look exactly the same as we do now. We won’t change at all. The species is now so widely dispersed that it is not going to evolve, except by gradualism.
In Pamela Weintraub, The Omni Interviews (1984), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Alien (34)  |  All (4108)  |  Complication (29)  |  Contact (65)  |  Degradation (17)  |  Do (1908)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Interstellar (8)  |  Look (582)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Possible (552)  |  Species (401)  |  Survive (79)  |  Traveler (30)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  War (225)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

If we lived on a planet where nothing ever changed, there would be little to do. There would be nothing to figure out. There would be no impetus for science. And if we lived in an unpredictable world, where things changed in random or very complex ways, we would not be able to figure things out. But we live in an in-between universe, where things change, but according to patterns, rules, or as we call them, laws of nature. If I throw a stick up in the air, it always falls down. If the sun sets in the west, it always rises again the next morning in the east. And so it becomes possible to figure things out. We can do science, and with it we can improve our lives.
Cosmos (1980, 1985), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  According (237)  |  Air (347)  |  Become (815)  |  Call (769)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Down (456)  |  East (18)  |  Fall (230)  |  Figure (160)  |  Figure Out (6)  |  Impetus (5)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Morning (94)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Next (236)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Planet (356)  |  Possible (552)  |  Random (41)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Stick (24)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Throw (43)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unpredictability (7)  |  Unpredictable (17)  |  Way (1217)  |  West (17)  |  World (1774)

If we look round the world, there seem to be not above six distinct varieties in the human species, each of which is strongly marked, and speaks the kind seldom to have mixed with any other. But there is nothing in the shape, nothing in the faculties, that shows their coming from different originals; and the varieties of climate, of nourishment, and custom, are sufficient to produce every change.
In History of the Earth and Animated Nature (1774, 1812), Vol. 2, 154.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Climate (97)  |  Coming (114)  |  Custom (42)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Human (1468)  |  Kind (557)  |  Look (582)  |  Marked (55)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Show (346)  |  Speak (232)  |  Species (401)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Variety (132)  |  World (1774)

If we sink to the biochemical level, then the human being has lost a great many synthetic abilities possessed by other species and, in particular, by plants and microorganisms. Our loss of ability to manufacture a variety of vitamins makes us dependent on our diet and, therefore, on the greater synthetic versatility of other creatures. This is as much a “degenerative” change as the tapeworm’s abandonment of a stomach it no longer needs, but since we are prejudiced in our own favor, we don’t mention it.
In 'The Modern Demonology' (Jan 1962). Collected in Asimov on Physics (1976), 150.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abandon (68)  |  Ability (152)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Creature (233)  |  Degenerative (2)  |  Diet (54)  |  Favor (63)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Loss (110)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Mention (82)  |  Microorganism (28)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plant (294)  |  Possess (156)  |  Sink (37)  |  Species (401)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Tapeworm (2)  |  Variety (132)  |  Versatility (5)  |  Vitamin (13)

If you look at a tree and think of it as a design assignment, it would be like asking you to make something that makes oxygen, sequesters carbon, fixes nitrogen, distills water, provides habitat for hundreds of species, accrues solar energy’s fuel, makes complex sugars and food, changes colors with the seasons, creates microclimates, and self-replicates.
In audio segment, 'William McDonough: Godfather of Green', WNYC, Studio 360 broadcast on NPR radio (18 Mar 2008) and archived on the station website.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accrue (3)  |  Asking (73)  |  Assignment (12)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Chemical Engineering (4)  |  Color (137)  |  Complex (188)  |  Create (235)  |  Creation (327)  |  Design (195)  |  Distillation (10)  |  Energy (344)  |  Fix (25)  |  Food (199)  |  Fuel (32)  |  Habitat (16)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Look (582)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Season (47)  |  Self (267)  |  Sequester (2)  |  Solar Energy (20)  |  Something (719)  |  Species (401)  |  Sugar (23)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tree (246)  |  Water (481)

Imperceptibly a change had been wrought in me until I no longer felt alone in a strange, silent country. I had learned to hear the echoes of a time when every living thing upon this land and even the varied overshadowing skies had its voice, a voice that was attentively heard and devoutly heeded by the ancient people of America. Henceforth, to me the plants, the trees, the clouds and all things had become vocal with human hopes, fears and supplications.
From Preface, Indian Games and Dances with Native Songs (1915), v.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  America (127)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Become (815)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Country (251)  |  Devout (5)  |  Echo (11)  |  Fear (197)  |  Hear (139)  |  Heed (12)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imperceptible (8)  |  Land (115)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Living (491)  |  People (1005)  |  Plant (294)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Silent (29)  |  Sky (161)  |  Strange (157)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Vocal (2)  |  Voice (52)

Impressed force is the action exerted on a body to change its state either of resting or of moving uniformly straight forward.
The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1687), 3rd edition (1726), trans. I. Bernard Cohen and Anne Whitman (1999), Definition 4, 405.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Body (537)  |  Exert (39)  |  Force (487)  |  Forward (102)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Law Of Motion (14)  |  Rest (280)  |  State (491)  |  Straight (73)

In a time of drastic change it is the learners who inherit the future. The learned usually find themselves equipped to live in a world that no longer exists.
In Reflections on the Human Condition (1973), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Drastic (2)  |  Equipped (17)  |  Exist (443)  |  Find (998)  |  Future (429)  |  Inherit (33)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learner (10)  |  Live (628)  |  Past (337)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Usually (176)  |  World (1774)

In a world that is rightly so concerned about climate change and the atmosphere, to be so ignorant and neglectful of our oceans is deeply troubling. However, … having woken up to this living disaster and having realized that there are limits to how much abuse we can inflict, it’s not too late to turn things around.
In 'Can We Stop Killing Our Oceans Now, Please?', Huffington Post (14 Aug 2013).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abuse (22)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Climate (97)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Late (118)  |  Limit (280)  |  Living (491)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Ocean Pollution (10)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Realize (147)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Turn (447)  |  World (1774)

In all speculations on the origin, or agents that have produced the changes on this globe, it is probable that we ought to keep within the boundaries of the probable effects resulting from the regular operations of the great laws of nature which our experience and observation have brought within the sphere of our knowledge. When we overleap those limits, and suppose a total change in nature's laws, we embark on the sea of uncertainty, where one conjecture is perhaps as probable as another; for none of them can have any support, or derive any authority from the practical facts wherewith our experience has brought us acquainted.
Observations on the Geology of the United States of America (1817), iv-v.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Agent (70)  |  All (4108)  |  Authority (95)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Derive (65)  |  Effect (393)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Geology (220)  |  Great (1574)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Limit (280)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Origin (239)  |  Practical (200)  |  Probability (130)  |  Produced (187)  |  Regular (46)  |  Sea (308)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Support (147)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Total (94)  |  Uncertainty (56)

In attempting to explain geological phenomena, the bias has always been on the wrong side; there has always been a disposition to reason á priori on the extraordinary violence and suddenness of changes, both in the inorganic crust of the earth, and in organic types, instead of attempting strenuously to frame theories in accordance with the ordinary operations of nature.
Letter to Rev. W. Whewell (7 Mar 1837). Quoted in Mrs Lyell (ed.), Life, Letters and Journals of Sir Charles Lyell, Bart (1881), Vol. 2, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Bias (20)  |  Both (493)  |  Crust (38)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Earth (996)  |  Explain (322)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Organic (158)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Reason (744)  |  Side (233)  |  Suddenness (6)  |  Type (167)  |  Violence (34)  |  Wrong (234)

In August, 1896, I exposed the sodium flame to large magnetic forces by placing it between the poles of a strong electromagnet. Again I studied the radiation of the flame by means of Rowland's mirror, the observations being made in the direction perpendicular to the lines of force. Each line, which in the absence of the effect of the magnetic forces was very sharply defined, was now broadened. This indicated that not only the original oscillations, but also others with greater and again others with smaller periods of oscillation were being radiated by the flame. The change was however very small. In an easily produced magnetic field it corresponded to a thirtieth of the distance between the two sodium lines, say two tenths of an Angstrom, a unit of measure whose name will always recall to physicists the meritorious work done by the father of my esteemed colleague.
'Light Radiation in a Magnetic Field', Nobel Lecture, 2 May 1903. In Nobel Lectures: Physics 1901-1921 (1967), 34-5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Being (1278)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Direction (175)  |  Distance (161)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Father (110)  |  Field (364)  |  Flame (40)  |  Force (487)  |  Greater (288)  |  Large (394)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Magnetic Field (7)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mirror (41)  |  Name (333)  |  Observation (555)  |  Oscillation (13)  |  Other (2236)  |  Period (198)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Pole (46)  |  Produced (187)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Say (984)  |  Small (477)  |  Sodium (14)  |  Spectral Line (5)  |  Spectroscopy (11)  |  Strong (174)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

In Darwin’s theory, you just have to substitute ‘mutations’ for his ‘slight accidental variations’ (just as quantum theory substitutes ‘quantum jump’ for ‘continuous transfer of energy’). In all other respects little change was necessary in Darwin’s theory.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accidental (27)  |  All (4108)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Darwins (5)  |  Energy (344)  |  Jump (29)  |  Little (707)  |  Mutation (37)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Other (2236)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Respect (207)  |  Slight (31)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Theory (970)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Variation (90)

In departing from any settled opinion or belief, the variation, the change, the break with custom may come gradually; and the way is usually prepared; but the final break is made, as a rule, by some one individual, … who sees with his own eyes, and with an instinct or genius for truth, escapes from the routine in which his fellows live. But he often pays dearly for his boldness.
In The Harveian Oration, delivered before the Royal College of Physicians of London (18 Oct 1906). Printed in 'The Growth of Truth, as Illustrated in the Discovery of the Circulation of Blood', The Lancet (27 Oct 1906), Vol. 2, Pt. 2, 1114.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Boldness (10)  |  Break (99)  |  Custom (42)  |  Escape (80)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Final (118)  |  Genius (284)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Individual (404)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Live (628)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Routine (25)  |  Rule (294)  |  See (1081)  |  Settled (34)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Usually (176)  |  Variation (90)  |  Way (1217)

In deriving a body from the water type I intend to express that to this body, considered as an oxide, there corresponds a chloride, a bromide, a sulphide, a nitride, etc., susceptible of double compositions, or resulting from double decompositions, analogous to those presented by hydrochloric acid, hydrobromic acid, sulphuretted hydrogen, ammonia etc., or which give rise to the same compounds. The type is thus the unit of comparison for all the bodies which, like it, are susceptible of similar changes or result from similar changes.
Traité de Chimie Organique, 1856, 4, 587. Trans. J. R. Partington, A History of Chemistry, (1970), Vol. 4, 456.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  All (4108)  |  Ammonia (15)  |  Body (537)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Composition (84)  |  Compound (113)  |  Consider (416)  |  Decomposition (18)  |  Express (186)  |  Hydrochloric Acid (2)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Present (619)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Result (677)  |  Rise (166)  |  Type (167)  |  Water (481)

In every combustion there is disengagement of the matter of fire or of light. A body can burn only in pure air [oxygen]. There is no destruction or decomposition of pure air and the increase in weight of the body burnt is exactly equal to the weight of air destroyed or decomposed. The body burnt changes into an acid by addition of the substance that increases its weight. Pure air is a compound of the matter of fire or of light with a base. In combustion the burning body removes the base, which it attracts more strongly than does the matter of heat, which appears as flame, heat and light.
'Memoire sur la combustion en général', Mémoires de l'Académie des Sciences, 1777, 592. Reprinted in Oeuvres de Lavoisier (1864), Vol. 2, 225-33, trans. M. P. Crosland.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Addition (66)  |  Air (347)  |  Base (117)  |  Body (537)  |  Burn (87)  |  Burning (48)  |  Combustion (18)  |  Compound (113)  |  Decomposition (18)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flame (40)  |  Heat (174)  |  Increase (210)  |  Light (607)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Remove (45)  |  Stoichiometry (2)  |  Substance (248)  |  Weight (134)

In every living being there exists a capacity for endless diversity of form; each possesses the power of adapting its organization to the variations of the external world, and it is this power, called into activity by cosmic changes, which has enabled the simple zoophytes of the primitive world to climb to higher and higher stages of organization, and has brought endless variety into nature.
From Gottfried Reinold Treviranus, Biologie, oder Philosophie der lebenden Natur [Biology, or Philosophy of Animate Nature], quoted in Lecture 1, August Weismann (1904, 2nd German ed.) as translated in August Weismann, Margaret R. Thomson (trans.), The Evolution Theory, Vol 1., 18-19.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Climb (35)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Enable (119)  |  Endless (56)  |  Exist (443)  |  External (57)  |  Form (959)  |  Higher (37)  |  Living (491)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organism (220)  |  Organization (114)  |  Possess (156)  |  Power (746)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Simple (406)  |  Stage (143)  |  Variation (90)  |  Variety (132)  |  World (1774)  |  Zoophyte (4)

In India, rice is grown below sea level in Kuttanad in Kerala and at above 3,000 meters in Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh. The importance of rice as the mainstay of a sustainable food security system will grow during this century because of climate change. No other cereal has the resilience of rice to grow under a wide range of growing conditions.
In 'Science and Shaping the Future of Rice', collected in Pramod K. Aggarwal et al. (eds.), 206 International Rice Congress: Science, Technology, and Trade for Peace and Prosperity (2007), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Century (310)  |  Climate (97)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Condition (356)  |  Food (199)  |  Food Security (6)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Importance (286)  |  India (16)  |  Other (2236)  |  Range (99)  |  Resilience (2)  |  Rice (4)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sea Level (5)  |  Security (47)  |  Sustainable (12)  |  Sustainable Agriculture (3)  |  System (537)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)

In our time this search [for extraterrestrial life] will eventually change our laws, our religions, our philosophies, our arts, our recreations, as well as our sciences. Space, the mirror, waits for life to come look for itself there.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Extraterrestrial Life (20)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Mirror (41)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Recreation (20)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Search (162)  |  Space (500)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wait (58)  |  Will (2355)

In passing, I firmly believe that research should be offset by a certain amount of teaching, if only as a change from the agony of research. The trouble, however, I freely admit, is that in practice you get either no teaching, or else far too much.
From 'The Mathematician's Art of Work' (1967) in Béla Bollobás (ed.) Littlewood's Miscellany (1986), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Agony (7)  |  Amount (151)  |  Belief (578)  |  Certain (550)  |  In Practice (2)  |  Offset (3)  |  Passing (76)  |  Practice (204)  |  Research (664)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Work (1351)

In science it often happens that scientists say, “You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,” and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. It’s very rare that a senator, say, replies, “That’s a good argument. I will now change my political affiliation.”
From keynote address at CSICOP conference, Pasadena, California (3 Apr 1987). Printed in 'The Burden of Skepticism', Skeptical Inquirer (1987), 12, No. 1. Collected in Kendrick Frazier (ed.), The Hundredth Monkey: And Other Paradigms of the Paranormal (1991), 5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Argument (138)  |  Do (1908)  |  Good (889)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hear (139)  |  Human (1468)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Old (481)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  Rare (89)  |  Religion (361)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Something (719)  |  Time (1877)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

In science the important thing is to modify and change one's ideas as science advances.
As given by in Bertha McCool, 'The Development of Embryology', Bios (Oct 1935), 6, No. 3, 303. Also in Rudolf Franz Flesch, The Art of Clear Thinking (1951), 122. Webmaster has also seen this attributed to Herbert Spencer, but has yet found such examples date only after 1997. If you know the primary source from Bernard, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Advancement (62)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  Modification (55)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)

In science the important thing is to modify and change one's ideas as science advances.
[Misattributed? See instead Claude Bernard]
Webmaster believes this is a quote by Claude Bernard, for whom examples date back to at least 1935, whereas Webmaster has found attribution to Spencer only as early as 1997. If you know the primary source from either Spencer or Bernard, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  Misattributed (19)  |  Modification (55)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Thing (1915)

In science, attempts at formulating hierarchies are always doomed to eventual failure. A Newton will always be followed by an Einstein, a Stahl by a Lavoisier; and who can say who will come after us? What the human mind has fabricated must be subject to all the changes—which are not progress—that the human mind must undergo. The 'last words' of the sciences are often replaced, more often forgotten. Science is a relentlessly dialectical process, though it suffers continuously under the necessary relativation of equally indispensable absolutes. It is, however, possible that the ever-growing intellectual and moral pollution of our scientific atmosphere will bring this process to a standstill. The immense library of ancient Alexandria was both symptom and cause of the ossification of the Greek intellect. Even now I know of some who feel that we know too much about the wrong things.
Voices in the Labyrinth: Nature, Man, and Science (1979), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Doom (32)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Equally (130)  |  Failure (161)  |  Feel (367)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Greek (107)  |  Growing (98)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Immense (86)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Last Word (10)  |  Last Words (6)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  Library (48)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Possible (552)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Georg Ernst Stahl (8)  |  Subject (521)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Wrong (234)

In scientific thought we adopt the simplest theory which will explain all the facts under consideration and enable us to predict new facts of the same kind. The catch in this criterion lies in the world “simplest.” It is really an aesthetic canon such as we find implicit in our criticisms of poetry or painting. The layman finds such a law as dx/dt = κ(d²x/dy²) much less simple than “it oozes,” of which it is the mathematical statement. The physicist reverses this judgment, and his statement is certainly the more fruitful of the two, so far as prediction is concerned. It is, however, a statement about something very unfamiliar to the plain man, namely the rate of change of a rate of change.
In 'Science and Theology as Art-Forms', Possible Worlds (1927), 227.
Science quotes on:  |  Adopt (19)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Catch (31)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Enable (119)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (998)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Implicit (12)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Kind (557)  |  Law (894)  |  Layman (21)  |  Lie (364)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Ooze (2)  |  Painting (44)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Thought (17)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplest (10)  |  Something (719)  |  Statement (142)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Two (937)  |  Unfamiliar (16)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

In the case of the Sun, we have a new understanding of the cosmological meaning of sacrifice. The Sun is, with each second, transforming four million tons of itself into light—giving itself over to become energy that we, with every meal, partake of. The Sun converts itself into a flow of energy that photosynthesis changes into plants that are consumed by animals. Humans have been feasting on the Sun’s energy stored in the form of wheat or maize or reindeer as each day the Sun dies as Sun and is reborn as the vitality of Earth. These solar flares are in fact the very power of the vast human enterprise. Every child of ours needs to learn the simple truth: she is the energy of the Sun. And we adults should organize things so her face shines with the same radiant joy.
In The Hidden Heart of the Cosmos: Humanity and the New Story (1996), 40-41.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Animal (617)  |  Become (815)  |  Child (307)  |  Consume (9)  |  Cosmological (11)  |  Die (86)  |  Earth (996)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Flow (83)  |  Form (959)  |  Human (1468)  |  Joy (107)  |  Learn (629)  |  Light (607)  |  Maize (4)  |  Meal (18)  |  Meaning (233)  |  New (1216)  |  Organize (29)  |  Photosynthesis (19)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Radiant (15)  |  Reindeer (2)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Same (157)  |  Shine (45)  |  Simple (406)  |  Solar Flare (2)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Ton (21)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vitality (23)  |  Wheat (10)

In the course of the history of the earth innumerable events have occurred one after another, causing changes of states, all with certain lasting consequences. This is the basis of our developmental law, which, in a nutshell, claims that the diversity of phenomena is a necessary consequence of the accumulation of the results of all individual occurrences happening one after another... The current state of the earth, thus, constitutes the as yet most diverse final result, which of course represents not a real but only a momentary end-point.
Ober das Entwicklung der Erde, (1867), 5-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (50)  |  All (4108)  |  Basis (173)  |  Certain (550)  |  Claim (146)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Course (409)  |  Current (118)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Event (216)  |  Final (118)  |  Happening (58)  |  History (673)  |  Individual (404)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Law (894)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Point (580)  |  Represent (155)  |  Result (677)  |  State (491)

In the early days of dealing with climate change, I wouldn’t go out on a limb one way or another, because I don’t have the qualifications there. But I do have the qualifications to measure the scientific community and see what the consensus is about climate change. I remember the moment when I suddenly thought it was incontrovertible. There was a lecture given by a distinguished American expert in atmospheric science and he showed a series of graphs about the temperature changes in the upper atmosphere. He plotted time against population growth and industrialisation. It was incontrovertible, and once you think it’s really totally incontrovertible, then you have a responsibility to say so.
From interview with Brian Cox and Robert Ince, in 'A Life Measured in Heartbeats', New Statesman (21 Dec 2012), 141, No. 5138, 32.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Climate (97)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Community (104)  |  Consensus (8)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Do (1908)  |  Early (185)  |  Expert (65)  |  Graph (7)  |  Growth (187)  |  Incontrovertible (8)  |  Industrialisation (2)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Measure (232)  |  Moment (253)  |  Population (110)  |  Population Growth (8)  |  Qualification (14)  |  Remember (179)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Series (149)  |  Show (346)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)

In the past century, there were more changes than in the previous thousand years. The new century will see changes that will dwarf those of the last.
Referring to the 19th and 20th centuries.
Lecture, 'Discovery of the Future' at the Royal Institution (1902). Quoted in Martin J. Rees, Our Final Hour: a Scientist's Warning (2004), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Century (310)  |  Dwarf (7)  |  Last (426)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Past (337)  |  See (1081)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

In the physical world, one cannot increase the size or quantity of anything without changing its quality. Similar figures exist only in pure geometry.
In W.H. Auden and ‎Louis Kronenberger, The Viking Book of Aphorisms: A Personal Selection, (1966), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Exist (443)  |  Figure (160)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Increase (210)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical World (28)  |  Pure (291)  |  Quality (135)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Similar (36)  |  Size (60)  |  World (1774)

In the real changes which animals undergo during their embryonic growth, in those external transformations as well as in those structural modifications within the body, we have a natural scale to measure the degree or the gradation of those full grown animals which corresponds in their external form and in their structure, to those various degrees in the metamorphoses of animals, as illustrated by embryonic changes, a real foundation for zoological classification.
From Lecture 4, collected in Twelve Lectures on Comparative Embryology: Delivered Before the Lowell Institute in Boston: December and January 1848-9 (1849), 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Body (537)  |  Classification (97)  |  Degree (276)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Growth (187)  |  Illustrate (10)  |  Measure (232)  |  Modification (55)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Scale (121)  |  Structural (29)  |  Structure (344)  |  Taxonomy (18)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Various (200)  |  Zoological (5)

In the vast cosmical changes, the universal life comes and goes in unknown quantities ... sowing an animalcule here, crumbling a star there, oscillating and winding, ... entangling, from the highest to the lowest, all activities in the obscurity of a dizzying mechanism, hanging the flight of an insect upon the movement of the earth... Enormous gearing, whose first motor is the gnat, and whose last wheel is the zodiac.
Victor Hugo and Charles E. Wilbour (trans.), Les Misérables (1862), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Animalcule (12)  |  Come (4)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Crumbling (2)  |  Dizzy (4)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enormity (4)  |  First (1283)  |  Flight (98)  |  Gear (4)  |  Gnat (7)  |  Go (6)  |  Insect (77)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Motor (23)  |  Movement (155)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Oscillation (13)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Sowing (9)  |  Star (427)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Vast (177)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Winding (8)

In the vestibule of the Manchester Town Hall are placed two life-sized marble statues facing each other. One of these is that of John Dalton … the other that of James Prescott Joule. … Thus honour is done to Manchester’s two greatest sons—to Dalton, the founder of modern Chemistry and of the Atomic Theory, and the laws of chemical-combining proportions; to Joule, the founder of modern Physics and the discoverer of the Law of Conservation of Energy. The one gave to the world the final and satisfactory proof … that in every kind of chemical change no loss of matter occurs; the other proved that in all the varied modes of physical change, no loss of energy takes place.
In John Dalton and the Rise of Modern Chemistry (1895), 7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Atomic Theory (15)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Change (8)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Combination (144)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Conservation Of Energy (29)  |  Conservation Of Mass (2)  |  John Dalton (21)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Energy (344)  |  Final (118)  |  Founder (26)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Honour (56)  |  James Prescott Joule (7)  |  Kind (557)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Loss (110)  |  Manchester (6)  |  Marble (20)  |  Matter (798)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Physics (23)  |  Occur (150)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Change (5)  |  Physics (533)  |  Proof (287)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Statue (16)  |  Theory (970)  |  Town Hall (2)  |  Two (937)  |  Vestibule (2)  |  World (1774)

In the year 1692, James Bernoulli, discussing the logarithmic spiral [or equiangular spiral, ρ = αθ] … shows that it reproduces itself in its evolute, its involute, and its caustics of both reflection and refraction, and then adds: “But since this marvellous spiral, by such a singular and wonderful peculiarity, pleases me so much that I can scarce be satisfied with thinking about it, I have thought that it might not be inelegantly used for a symbolic representation of various matters. For since it always produces a spiral similar to itself, indeed precisely the same spiral, however it may be involved or evolved, or reflected or refracted, it may be taken as an emblem of a progeny always in all things like the parent, simillima filia matri. Or, if it is not forbidden to compare a theorem of eternal truth to the mysteries of our faith, it may be taken as an emblem of the eternal generation of the Son, who as an image of the Father, emanating from him, as light from light, remains ὁμοούσιος with him, howsoever overshadowed. Or, if you prefer, since our spira mirabilis remains, amid all changes, most persistently itself, and exactly the same as ever, it may be used as a symbol, either of fortitude and constancy in adversity, or, of the human body, which after all its changes, even after death, will be restored to its exact and perfect self, so that, indeed, if the fashion of Archimedes were allowed in these days, I should gladly have my tombstone bear this spiral, with the motto, ‘Though changed, I arise again exactly the same, Eadem numero mutata resurgo.’”
In 'The Uses of Mathesis', Bibliotheca Sacra, Vol. 32, 516-516. [The Latin phrase “simillima filia matri” roughly translates as “the daughter resembles the mother”. “Spira mirabilis” is Latin for “marvellous spiral”. The Greek word (?µ???s???) translates as “consubstantial”, meaning of the same substance or essence (used especially of the three persons of the Trinity in Christian theology). —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Adversity (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Arise (158)  |  Bear (159)  |  Jacob Bernoulli (6)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Caustic (2)  |  Compare (69)  |  Constancy (12)  |  Death (388)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Emanate (2)  |  Emblem (4)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Evolute (2)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Faith (203)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Father (110)  |  Forbid (14)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Fortitude (2)  |  Generation (242)  |  Gladly (2)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Image (96)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  James (3)  |  Light (607)  |  Logarithmic (5)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motto (28)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Overshadow (2)  |  Parent (76)  |  Peculiarity (25)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Please (65)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Produce (104)  |  Progeny (15)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Refraction (11)  |  Remain (349)  |  Representation (53)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Restore (8)  |  Same (157)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Scarce (10)  |  Self (267)  |  Show (346)  |  Similar (36)  |  Singular (23)  |  Son (24)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tombstone (2)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Year (933)

In this lecture I would like to conclude with … some characteristics [of] gravity … The most impressive fact is that gravity is simple. It is simple to state the principles completely and not have left any vagueness for anybody to change the ideas of the law. It is simple, and therefore it is beautiful. It is simple in its pattern. I do not mean it is simple in its action—the motions of the various planets and the perturbations of one on the other can be quite complicated to work out, and to follow how all those stars in a globular cluster move is quite beyond our ability. It is complicated in its actions, but the basic pattern or the system beneath the whole thing is simple. This is common to all our laws; they all turn out to be simple things, although complex in their actual actions.
In 'The Law of Gravitation, as Example of Physical Law', the first of his Messenger Lectures (1964), Cornell University. Collected in The Character of Physical Law (1967), 33-34.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Action (327)  |  Actual (117)  |  All (4108)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Basic (138)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Common (436)  |  Completely (135)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Follow (378)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Idea (843)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Law (894)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Mean (809)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Perturbation (7)  |  Planet (356)  |  Principle (507)  |  Simple (406)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Turn (447)  |  Vagueness (15)  |  Various (200)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

Inheritance by itself leads to no change, and variation leads to no permanent change, unless the variations themselves are heritable. Thus it is not inheritance and variation which bring about evolution, but the inheritance of variation.
In 'Variation Due to Change in the Individual Gene', The American Naturalist (Jan-Feb 1922), 56, No. 642, 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Evolution (590)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Lead (384)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Variation (90)

It is a curious situation that the sea, from which life first arose should now be threatened by the activities of one form of that life. But the sea, though changed in a sinister way, will continue to exist; the threat is rather to life itself.
The Sea Around Us (1951).
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Arise (158)  |  Continue (165)  |  Curious (91)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Life (1795)  |  Marine Biology (24)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sinister (8)  |  Situation (113)  |  Threat (30)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

It is a good thing Heaven has not given us the power to change as much of our body as we would like to or as our theory would assert is necessary.
Aphorism 34 in Notebook D (1773-1775), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Assert (66)  |  Body (537)  |  Good (889)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Liking (4)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Power (746)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)

It is both a sad and a happy fact of engineering history that disasters have been powerful instruments of change. Designers learn from failure. Industrial society did not invent grand works of engineering, and it was not the first to know design failure. What it did do was develop powerful techniques for learning from the experience of past disasters. It is extremely rare today for an apartment house in North America, Europe, or Japan to fall down. Ancient Rome had large apartment buildings too, but while its public baths, bridges and aqueducts have lasted for two thousand years, its big residential blocks collapsed with appalling regularity. Not one is left in modern Rome, even as ruin.
In Why Things Bite Back: Technology and the Revenge of Unintended Consequences (1997), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  America (127)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Apartment (4)  |  Appalling (10)  |  Aqueduct (4)  |  Bath (10)  |  Both (493)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Bridge Engineering (8)  |  Building (156)  |  Collapse (17)  |  Design (195)  |  Designer (6)  |  Develop (268)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fall (230)  |  First (1283)  |  Grand (27)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  History (673)  |  House (140)  |  Industry (137)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Invention (369)  |  Know (1518)  |  Large (394)  |  Last (426)  |  Lasting (7)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Modern (385)  |  Past (337)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Rare (89)  |  Rarity (11)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Residence (2)  |  Rome (19)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Sadness (35)  |  Society (326)  |  Technique (80)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Today (314)  |  Two (937)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

It is change, continuing change, inevitable change, that is the dominant factor in society today. No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is, but the world as it will be … This, in turn, means that our statesmen, our businessmen, our everyman must take on a science fictional way of thinking.
In 'My Own View', Robert Holdstock (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction (1978). As cited in Robert Andrews, The Columbia Dictionary of Quotations (1993), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Decision (91)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sensible (27)  |  Society (326)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Today (314)  |  Turn (447)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

It is clear, then, that though there may be countless instances of the perishing of unmoved movers, and though many things that move themselves perish and are succeeded by others that come into being, and though one thing that is unmoved moves one thing while another moves another, nevertheless there is something that comprehends them all, and that as something apart from each one of them, and this it is that is the cause of the fact that some things are and others are not and of the continuous process of change; and this causes the motion of the other movers, while they are the causes of the motion of other things. Motion, then, being eternal, the first mover, if there is but one, will be eternal also; if there are more than one, there will be a plurality of such eternal movers.
Aristotle
Physics, 258b, 32-259a, 8. In Jonathan Barnes (ed.), The Complete Works of Aristotle (1984), Vol. 1, 432.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cause (541)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Countless (36)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perish (50)  |  Physics (533)  |  Process (423)  |  Something (719)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)

It is difficult to imagine a greater imposition [than adding] genes to future generations that changes the nature of future people.
in The Second Creation: Dolly and the Age of Biological Control
Science quotes on:  |  Difficult (246)  |  Future (429)  |  Gene (98)  |  Generation (242)  |  Genetic Engineering (15)  |  Greater (288)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Nature (1926)  |  People (1005)

It is natural selection that gives direction to changes, orients chance, and slowly, progressively produces more complex structures, new organs, and new species. Novelties come from previously unseen association of old material. To create is to recombine.
In 'Evolution and Tinkering', Science (10 Jun 1977), 196, 1163.
Science quotes on:  |  Association (46)  |  Chance (239)  |  Complex (188)  |  Create (235)  |  Direction (175)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Material (353)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Organ (115)  |  Selection (128)  |  Species (401)  |  Structure (344)  |  Unseen (22)

It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but rather the one most responsive to change.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Most (1731)  |  Species (401)  |  Strong (174)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Survive (79)

It is often said that all the conditions for the first production of a living being are now present, which could ever have been present. But if (and oh what a big if) we could conceive in some warm little pond with all sort of ammonia and phosphoric salts—light, heat, electricity present, that a protein compound was chemically formed, ready to undergo still more complex changes, at the present such matter would be instantly devoured, or absorbed, which would not have been the case before living creatures were formed.
Letter (1 Feb 1871) to Joseph Dalton Hooker. In The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1888), Vol. 3, 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  All (4108)  |  Ammonia (15)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Complex (188)  |  Compound (113)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Condition (356)  |  Creature (233)  |  Devour (29)  |  Electricity (159)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Heat (174)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Origin Of Life (36)  |  Pond (15)  |  Present (619)  |  Production (183)  |  Protein (54)  |  Salt (46)  |  Still (613)  |  Warm (69)

It is often said that all the conditions for the first production of a living organism are now present, which could have ever been present. But if (and oh! what a big if!) we could conceive in some warm pond, with all sorts of ammonia and phosphoric salts, light, heat, electricity, &c., present, that a proteine compound was chemically formed ready to undergo still more complex changes, at the present day such matter would be instantly devoured or absorbed, which would not have been the case before living creatures were formed.
Letter; as quoted in The Origin of Life by J.D. Bernal (1967) publ.Weidenfeld and Nicholson, London
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  All (4108)  |  Ammonia (15)  |  Complex (188)  |  Compound (113)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Condition (356)  |  Creature (233)  |  Devour (29)  |  Electricity (159)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Heat (174)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Light (607)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Organism (220)  |  Origin Of Life (36)  |  Pond (15)  |  Present (619)  |  Production (183)  |  Salt (46)  |  Still (613)  |  Warm (69)

It is probable that serum acts on bacteria by changing the relations of molecular attraction between the bacteria and the surrounding fluid.
In Studies in Immunity (1909), 144.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Probability (130)  |  Relation (157)  |  Serum (11)  |  Surrounding (13)

It is said to be the manner of hypochondriacs to change often their physician …For a physician who does not admit the reality of the disease cannot be supposed to take much pains to cure it.
First Lines of the Practice of Physic, (annoted by John Rotheram, 1796), Vol. 3, 297-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Cure (122)  |  Disease (328)  |  Hypochondriac (9)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Pain (136)  |  Physician (273)  |  Reality (261)

It is still an unending source of surprise for me to see how a few scribbles on a blackboard or on a sheet of paper could change the course of human affairs.
In Adventures of a Mathematician (1976), Prologue, 5. Also used as epigraph in Richard Rhodes, The Making of the Atomic Bomb (1986), 11. The scribbles were those of scientists during the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos, while discussing the design the atomic bomb.
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (29)  |  Blackboard (11)  |  Course (409)  |  Human (1468)  |  Paper (182)  |  Scribble (5)  |  See (1081)  |  Sheet (7)  |  Source (93)  |  Still (613)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Unending (3)

It is strange, but the longer I live the more I am governed by the feeling of Fatalism, or rather predestination. The feeling or free-will, said to be innate in man, fails me more and more. I feel so deeply that however much I may struggle, I cannot change fate one jot. I am now almost resigned. I work because I feel I am at the worst. I can neither wish nor hope for anything. You have no idea how indifferent I am to everything.
In Letter to Anna Carlotta, collected in Anna Charlotte Leffler, Sonya Kovalevsky: A Biography (1895), 133, as translated by A. De Furuhjelm and A.M. Clive Bayley.
Science quotes on:  |  Deeply (17)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fail (185)  |  Fatalism (2)  |  Fate (72)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Free (232)  |  Free Will (15)  |  Govern (64)  |  Hope (299)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indifferent (16)  |  Innate (14)  |  Jot (3)  |  Live (628)  |  Longer (10)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Resign (4)  |  Strange (157)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worst (57)

It is tautological to say that an organism is adapted to its environment. It is even tautological to say that an organism is physiologically adapted to its environment. However, just as in the case of many morphological characters, it is unwarranted to conclude that all aspects of the physiology of an organism have evolved in reference to a specific milieu. It is equally gratuitous to assume that an organism will inevitably show physiological specializations in its adaptation to a particular set of conditions. All that can be concluded is that the functional capacities of an organism are sufficient to have allowed persistence within its environment. On one hand, the history of an evolutionary line may place serious constraints upon the types of further physiological changes that are readily feasible. Some changes might require excessive restructuring of the genome or might involve maladaptive changes in related functions. On the other hand, a taxon which is successful in occupying a variety of environments may be less impressive in individual physiological capacities than one with a far more limited distribution.
In W.R. Dawson, G.A. Bartholomew, and A.F. Bennett, 'A Reappraisal of the Aquatic Specializations of the Galapagos Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus)', Evolution (1977), 31, 891.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Assume (38)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Case (99)  |  Character (243)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constraint (13)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Environment (216)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Excessive (23)  |  Far (154)  |  Feasible (3)  |  Function (228)  |  Functional (10)  |  Genome (15)  |  Gratuitous (2)  |  Hand (143)  |  History (673)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inevitably (6)  |  Involve (90)  |  Less (103)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Line (91)  |  Milieu (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Morphological (3)  |  Occupy (26)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particular (76)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Place (177)  |  Readily (10)  |  Reference (33)  |  Relate (21)  |  Require (219)  |  Restructuring (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Serious (91)  |  Set (394)  |  Show (346)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Specific (95)  |  Successful (123)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Tautological (2)  |  Type (167)  |  Unwarranted (2)  |  Variety (132)  |  Will (2355)

It is unreasonable to expect science to produce a system of ethics—ethics are a kind of highway code for traffic among mankind—and the fact that in physics atoms which were yesterday assumed to be square are now assumed to be round is exploited with unjustified tendentiousness by all who are hungry for faith; so long as physics extends our dominion over nature, these changes ought to be a matter of complete indifference to you.
Letter to Oskar Pfister, 24 Feb 1928. Quoted in H. Meng and E. Freud (eds.), Psycho-Analysis and Faith: The Letters of Sigmund Freud and Oscar Pfister (1963), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Code (31)  |  Complete (204)  |  Ethic (40)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Expect (200)  |  Exploit (19)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Faith (203)  |  Kind (557)  |  Long (790)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Science (3879)  |  Square (70)  |  System (537)  |  Traffic (10)  |  Yesterday (36)

It is usual to say that the two sources of experience are Observation and Experiment. When we merely note and record the phenomena which occur around us in the ordinary course of nature we are said to observe. When we change the course of nature by the intervention of our will and muscular powers, and thus produce unusual combinations and conditions of phenomena, we are said to experiment. [Sir John] Herschel has justly remarked that we might properly call these two modes of experience passive and active observation. In both cases we must certainly employ our senses to observe, and an experiment differs from a mere observation in the fact that we more or less influence the character of the events which we observe. Experiment is thus observation plus alteration of conditions.
Principles of Science: A Treatise on Logic and Scientific Method (1874, 2nd ed., 1913), 400.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Both (493)  |  Call (769)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Character (243)  |  Combination (144)  |  Condition (356)  |  Course (409)  |  Definition (221)  |  Differ (85)  |  Employ (113)  |  Event (216)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Sir John Herschel (23)  |  Influence (222)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Note (34)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Occur (150)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Plus (43)  |  Power (746)  |  Record (154)  |  Say (984)  |  Sense (770)  |  Source (93)  |  Two (937)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Will (2355)

It is well for people who think to change their minds occasionally in order to keep them clean.
As quoted in Forbes (1948). 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Clean (50)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Order (632)  |  People (1005)  |  Think (1086)

It is well to observe the force and virtue and consequence of discoveries, and these are to be seen nowhere more conspicuously than in those three which were unknown to the ancients, and of which the origins, although recent, are obscure and inglorious; namely, printing, gunpowder, and the magnet. For these three have changed the whole face and state of things throughout the world; the first in literature, the second in warfare, the third in navigation; whence have followed innumerable changes, insomuch that no empire, no sect, no star seems to have exerted greater power and influence in human affairs than these mechanical discoveries.
From Novum Organum (1620), Book 1, Aphorism 129. Translated as The New Organon: Aphorisms Concerning the Interpretation of Nature and the Kingdom of Man), collected in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1857), Vol. 4, 114.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Exert (39)  |  Face (212)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Force (487)  |  Greater (288)  |  Gunpowder (16)  |  Human (1468)  |  Influence (222)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Invention (369)  |  Literature (103)  |  Magnet (20)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Navigation (25)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Observe (168)  |  Origin (239)  |  Power (746)  |  Printing (22)  |  Recent (77)  |  Star (427)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Warfare (11)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

It may metaphorically be said that natural selection is daily and hourly scrutinising, throughout the world, the slightest variations; rejecting those that are bad, preserving and adding up all that are good; silently and insensibly working, whenever and wherever opportunity offers, at the improvement of each organic being in relation to its organic and inorganic conditions of life. We see nothing of these slow changes in progress, until the hand of time has marked the lapse of ages...
The Origin of Species (1870), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Bad (180)  |  Being (1278)  |  Condition (356)  |  Daily (87)  |  Good (889)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Life (1795)  |  Marked (55)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Offer (141)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Organic (158)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Preserving (18)  |  Progress (465)  |  See (1081)  |  Selection (128)  |  Slow (101)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Variation (90)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Wherever (51)  |  World (1774)

It seems wonderful to everyone that sometimes stones are found that have figures of animals inside and outside. For outside they have an outline, and when they are broken open, the shapes of the internal organs are found inside. And Avicenna says that the cause of this is that animals, just as they are, are sometimes changed into stones, and especially [salty] stones. For he says that just as the Earth and Water are material for stones, so animals, too, are material for stones. And in places where a petrifying force is exhaling, they change into their elements and are attacked by the properties of the qualities [hot, cold, moist, dry] which are present in those places, and in the elements in the bodies of such animals are changed into the dominant element, namely Earth mixed with Water; and then the mineralizing power converts [the mixture] into stone, and the parts of the body retain their shape, inside and outside, just as they were before. There are also stones of this sort that are [salty] and frequently not hard; for it must be a strong power which thus transmutes the bodies of animals, and it slightly burns the Earth in the moisture, so it produces a taste of salt.
De Mineralibus (On Minerals) (c.1261-1263), Book I, tract 2, chapter 8, trans. Dorothy Wyckoff (1967), 52-53.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Attack (84)  |  Body (537)  |  Broken (56)  |  Burn (87)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cold (112)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Dry (57)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  Figure (160)  |  Force (487)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hot (60)  |  Internal (66)  |  Material (353)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Moist (12)  |  Moisture (20)  |  Must (1526)  |  Open (274)  |  Organ (115)  |  Outside (141)  |  Petrification (5)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Retain (56)  |  Rock (161)  |  Salt (46)  |  Say (984)  |  Stone (162)  |  Strong (174)  |  Taste (90)  |  Water (481)  |  Wonderful (149)

It will be a general expression of the facts that have been detailed, relating to the changes and transitions by electricity, in common philosophical language, to say, that hydrogen, the alkaline substances, the metals, and certain metallic oxides, are all attracted by negatively electrified metallic surfaces; and contrariwise, that oxygen and acid substances are attracted by positively electrified metallic surfaces and rejected by negatively electrified metallic surfaces; and these attractive and repulsive forces are sufficiently energetic to destroy or suspend the usual operation of elective affinity.
Bakerian Lecture, 'On Some Chemical Agencies of Electricity', Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, 1807, 97, 28-29.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Affinity (27)  |  Alkali (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Certain (550)  |  Charge (59)  |  Common (436)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Detail (146)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Language (293)  |  Metal (84)  |  Operation (213)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Say (984)  |  Substance (248)  |  Surface (209)  |  Transition (26)  |  Will (2355)

It will be noticed that the fundamental theorem proved above bears some remarkable resemblances to the second law of thermodynamics. Both are properties of populations, or aggregates, true irrespective of the nature of the units which compose them; both are statistical laws; each requires the constant increase of a measurable quantity, in the one case the entropy of a physical system and in the other the fitness, measured by m, of a biological population. As in the physical world we can conceive the theoretical systems in which dissipative forces are wholly absent, and in which the entropy consequently remains constant, so we can conceive, though we need not expect to find, biological populations in which the genetic variance is absolutely zero, and in which fitness does not increase. Professor Eddington has recently remarked that “The law that entropy always increases—the second law of thermodynamics—holds, I think, the supreme position among the laws of nature.” It is not a little instructive that so similar a law should hold the supreme position among the biological sciences. While it is possible that both may ultimately be absorbed by some more general principle, for the present we should note that the laws as they stand present profound differences—-(1) The systems considered in thermodynamics are permanent; species on the contrary are liable to extinction, although biological improvement must be expected to occur up to the end of their existence. (2) Fitness, although measured by a uniform method, is qualitatively different for every different organism, whereas entropy, like temperature, is taken to have the same meaning for all physical systems. (3) Fitness may be increased or decreased by changes in the environment, without reacting quantitatively upon that environment. (4) Entropy changes are exceptional in the physical world in being irreversible, while irreversible evolutionary changes form no exception among biological phenomena. Finally, (5) entropy changes lead to a progressive disorganization of the physical world, at least from the human standpoint of the utilization of energy, while evolutionary changes are generally recognized as producing progressively higher organization in the organic world.
The Genetical Theory of Natural Selection (1930), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  Aggregate (23)  |  All (4108)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biological (137)  |  Both (493)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Consider (416)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington (130)  |  End (590)  |  Energy (344)  |  Entropy (44)  |  Environment (216)  |  Exception (73)  |  Exceptional (18)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  General (511)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Human (1468)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Increase (210)  |  Irreversible (12)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Little (707)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Method (505)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occur (150)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organism (220)  |  Organization (114)  |  Other (2236)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical World (28)  |  Population (110)  |  Possible (552)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Professor (128)  |  Profound (104)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Remain (349)  |  Require (219)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Science (3879)  |  Second Law Of Thermodynamics (14)  |  Species (401)  |  Stand (274)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Supreme (71)  |  System (537)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Think (1086)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Utilization (15)  |  Variance (12)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Zero (37)

It would be an easy task to show that the characteristics in the organization of man, on account of which the human species and races are grouped as a distinct family, are all results of former changes of occupation, and of acquired habits, which have come to be distinctive of individuals of his kind. When, compelled by circumstances, the most highly developed apes accustomed themselves to walking erect, they gained the ascendant over the other animals. The absolute advantage they enjoyed, and the new requirements imposed on them, made them change their mode of life, which resulted in the gradual modification of their organization, and in their acquiring many new qualities, and among them the wonderful power of speech.
Quoted in Ernst Heinrich Philipp August Haeckel The Evolution of Man (1897), Vol. 1, 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Account (192)  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Ape (53)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Develop (268)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Easy (204)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Family (94)  |  Former (137)  |  Gain (145)  |  Habit (168)  |  Human (1468)  |  Individual (404)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modification (55)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Organization (114)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Race (268)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Result (677)  |  Show (346)  |  Species (401)  |  Speech (61)  |  Task (147)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Wonderful (149)

It would not become physical science to see in its self created, changeable, economical tools, molecules and atoms, realities behind phenomena... The atom must remain a tool for representing phenomena.
'The Economical Nature of Physics' (1882), in Popular Scientific Lectures, trans. Thomas J. McConnack (1910), 206-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Become (815)  |  Behind (137)  |  Creation (327)  |  Economical (9)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Must (1526)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Remain (349)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Self (267)  |  Tool (117)

It [mathematics] is in the inner world of pure thought, where all entia dwell, where is every type of order and manner of correlation and variety of relationship, it is in this infinite ensemble of eternal verities whence, if there be one cosmos or many of them, each derives its character and mode of being,—it is there that the spirit of mathesis has its home and its life.
Is it a restricted home, a narrow life, static and cold and grey with logic, without artistic interest, devoid of emotion and mood and sentiment? That world, it is true, is not a world of solar light, not clad in the colours that liven and glorify the things of sense, but it is an illuminated world, and over it all and everywhere throughout are hues and tints transcending sense, painted there by radiant pencils of psychic light, the light in which it lies. It is a silent world, and, nevertheless, in respect to the highest principle of art—the interpenetration of content and form, the perfect fusion of mode and meaning—it even surpasses music. In a sense, it is a static world, but so, too, are the worlds of the sculptor and the architect. The figures, however, which reason constructs and the mathematic vision beholds, transcend the temple and the statue, alike in simplicity and in intricacy, in delicacy and in grace, in symmetry and in poise. Not only are this home and this life thus rich in aesthetic interests, really controlled and sustained by motives of a sublimed and supersensuous art, but the religious aspiration, too, finds there, especially in the beautiful doctrine of invariants, the most perfect symbols of what it seeks—the changeless in the midst of change, abiding things hi a world of flux, configurations that remain the same despite the swirl and stress of countless hosts of curious transformations.
In 'The Universe and Beyond', Hibbert Journal (1904-1906), 3, 314.
Science quotes on:  |  Abide (12)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Architect (29)  |  Art (657)  |  Artistic (23)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Behold (18)  |  Being (1278)  |  Character (243)  |  Cold (112)  |  Color (137)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Construct (124)  |  Content (69)  |  Control (167)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Countless (36)  |  Curious (91)  |  Delicacy (8)  |  Derive (65)  |  Despite (7)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Ensemble (7)  |  Especially (31)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  Flux (21)  |  Form (959)  |  Fusion (16)  |  Glorify (6)  |  Grace (31)  |  Grey (10)  |  High (362)  |  Home (170)  |  Host (16)  |  Hue (3)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Inner (71)  |  Interest (386)  |  Intricacy (8)  |  Invariant (10)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Logic (287)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mode (41)  |  Mood (13)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motive (59)  |  Music (129)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Order (632)  |  Paint (22)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Poise (4)  |  Principle (507)  |  Psychic (13)  |  Pure (291)  |  Radiant (15)  |  Really (78)  |  Reason (744)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Religious (126)  |  Remain (349)  |  Respect (207)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Rich (62)  |  Same (157)  |  Sculptor (9)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sensuous (5)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Silent (29)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solar (8)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Static (8)  |  Statue (16)  |  Stress (22)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Swirl (10)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Temple (42)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Tint (2)  |  Transcend (26)  |  Transformation (69)  |  True (212)  |  Type (167)  |  Variety (132)  |  Verity (5)  |  Vision (123)  |  World (1774)

It’s funny how worms can turn leaves into silk.
But funnier far is the cow:
She changes a field of green grass into milk
And not a professor knows how.
In Dorothy Caruso, Enrico Caruso: His Life and Death (1963), 42. Written for Michael Pupin, who made a similar statement in prose: “Look at those animals and remember the greatest scientists in the world have never discovered how to make grass into milk.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Cow (39)  |  Field (364)  |  Funny (11)  |  Grass (46)  |  Green (63)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Milk (22)  |  Professor (128)  |  Silk (13)  |  Turn (447)  |  Worm (42)

It’s important to always bear in mind that life occurs in historical time. Everyone in every culture lives in some sort of historical time, though it might not be perceived in the same way an outside observer sees it. It’s an interesting question, “When is now?” “Now” can be drawn from some point like this hour, this day, this month, this lifetime, or this generation. “Now” can also have occurred centuries ago; things like unfair treaties, the Trail of Tears, and the Black Hawk War, for instance, remain part of the “Now” from which many Native Americans view their place in time today. Human beings respond today to people and events that actually occurred hundreds or even thousands of years ago. Ethnohistorians have played a major role in showing how now is a social concept of time, and that time is part of all social life. I can only hope that their work will further the understanding that the study of social life is a study of change over time.
From Robert S. Grumet, 'An Interview with Anthony F. C. Wallace', Ethnohistory (Winter 1998), 45, No. 1, 127.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Century (310)  |  Concept (221)  |  Culture (143)  |  Event (216)  |  Generation (242)  |  Historical (70)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hour (186)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lifetime (31)  |  Live (628)  |  Major (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Month (88)  |  Native (38)  |  Native American (4)  |  Now (5)  |  Occur (150)  |  Outside (141)  |  People (1005)  |  Point (580)  |  Question (621)  |  Remain (349)  |  Role (86)  |  See (1081)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Life (8)  |  Study (653)  |  Tear (42)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Treaty (2)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unfair (8)  |  View (488)  |  War (225)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

It’s the Heisenberg principle. Me asking the question changes the answer.
On caution collecting opinions from advisors to refine decision-making. As quoted in Michael Lewis, 'Obama’s Way', Vanity Fair (Oct 2012).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Werner Heisenberg (42)  |  Principle (507)  |  Question (621)

I… formerly had two pair of spectacles, which I shifted occasionally, as in travelling I sometimes read, and often wanted to regard the prospects. Finding this change troublesome, and not always sufficiently ready, I had the glasses cut, and half of each kind associated in the same circle. … By this means, as I wear my spectacles constantly, I have only to move my eyes up or down, as I want to see distinctly far or near, the proper glasses being always ready.
Letter (23 May 1785) to George Wheatley). Collected in William Temple Franklin (ed.), The Works of Dr. Benjamin Franklin (1809), Vol. 6, 168.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Circle (110)  |  Cut (114)  |  Down (456)  |  Eye (419)  |  Far (154)  |  Glass (92)  |  Kind (557)  |  Lens (14)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Move (216)  |  Near (2)  |  Optic (2)  |  Proper (144)  |  Prospect (30)  |  Read (287)  |  Regard (305)  |  See (1081)  |  Shift (44)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Spectacles (10)  |  Travelling (17)  |  Two (937)  |  Want (497)

I’ll change my state with any wretch
Thou canst from gaol of dunghill fetch.
My pain’s past cure, another hell;
I may not in this torment dwell.
Now desperate I hate my life,
Lend me a halter or a knife!
All my griefs to this are jolly,
Naught so damned as melancholy.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Cure (122)  |  Grief (18)  |  Hate (64)  |  Jail (4)  |  Knife (23)  |  Life (1795)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  Naught (10)  |  Pain (136)  |  Past (337)  |  Psychology (154)  |  State (491)  |  Torment (18)  |  Wretch (5)

I’m convinced that the best solutions are often the ones that are counterintuitive—that challenge conventional thinking—and end in breakthroughs. It is always easier to do things the same old way … why change? To fight this, keep your dissatisfaction index high and break with tradition. Don’t be too quick to accept the way things are being done. Question whether there’s a better way. Very often you will find that once you make this break from the usual way - and incidentally, this is probably the hardest thing to do—and start on a new track your horizon of new thoughts immediately broadens. New ideas flow in like water. Always keep your interests broad - don’t let your mind be stunted by a limited view.
1988
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Break (99)  |  Breakthrough (15)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Conventional (30)  |  Counterintuitive (4)  |  Dissatisfaction (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Easier (53)  |  End (590)  |  Find (998)  |  Flow (83)  |  High (362)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Interest (386)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Mind (1338)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Question (621)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Start (221)  |  Stunt (7)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Track (38)  |  Tradition (69)  |  View (488)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

I’m one of those people that think Thomas Edison and the light bulb changed the world more than Karl Marx ever did.
Expressing his reason for having no interest in a public sector role in politics. Interview with Rolling Stone writer, Steven Levy (late Nov 1983). As quoted in Nick Bilton, 'The 30-Year-Old Macintosh and a Lost Conversation With Steve Jobs' (24 Jan 2014), on New York Times blog web page. Levy appended a transcript of the interview to an updated Kindle version of his book, Insanely Great: The Life and Times of Macintosh, the Computer that Changed Everything.
Science quotes on:  |  Bulb (10)  |  Thomas Edison (84)  |  Light (607)  |  Light Bulb (6)  |  Karl Marx (21)  |  More (2559)  |  People (1005)  |  Think (1086)  |  World (1774)

James Watt patented his steam engine on the eve of the American Revolution, consummating a relationship between coal and the new Promethean spirit of the age, and humanity made its first tentative steps into an industrial way of life that would, over the next two centuries, forever change the world.
In The Hydrogen Economy: The Creation of the Worldwide Energy Web and the Redistribution of Power on Earth (2002), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Century (310)  |  Coal (57)  |  Consummation (7)  |  Engine (98)  |  Eve (4)  |  First (1283)  |  Forever (103)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Industrial Revolution (10)  |  Life (1795)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Patent (33)  |  Prometheus (7)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Step (231)  |  Tentative (16)  |  Two (937)  |  James Watt (11)  |  Way (1217)  |  Way Of Life (12)  |  World (1774)

Joad, the philosopher, said … “science changes our environment faster than we have the ability to adjust ourselves to it.”
In 'The Talk of the Town', in The New Yorker (18 Aug 1945), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Adjust (8)  |  Environment (216)  |  Faster (50)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Science (3879)

Just as the musician is able to form an acoustic image of a composition which he has never heard played by merely looking at its score, so the equation of a curve, which he has never seen, furnishes the mathematician with a complete picture of its course. Yea, even more: as the score frequently reveals to the musician niceties which would escape his ear because of the complication and rapid change of the auditory impressions, so the insight which the mathematician gains from the equation of a curve is much deeper than that which is brought about by a mere inspection of the curve.
In Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereiningung, 13, 864. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 190
Science quotes on:  |  Acoustic