Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I have no satisfaction in formulas unless I feel their arithmetical magnitude.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Similarity

Similarity Quotes (31 quotes)

From thus meditating on the great similarity of the structure of the warm-blooded animals, and at the same time of the great changes they undergo both before and after their nativity; and by considering in how minute a portion of time many of the changes of animals above described have been produced; would it be too bold to imagine that, in the great length of time since the earth began to exist, perhaps millions of ages before the commencement of the history of mankind would it be too bold to imagine that all warm-blooded animals have arisen from one living filament, which THE GREAT FIRST CAUSE endued with animality, with the power of acquiring new parts, attended with new propensities, directed by irritations, sensations, volitions and associations, and thus possessing the faculty of continuing to improve by its own inherent activity, and of delivering down these improvements by generation to its posterity, world without end!
Zoonomia, Or, The Laws of Organic Life, in three parts (1803), Vol. 1, 397.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Association (46)  |  Attend (65)  |  Blood (134)  |  Bold (22)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Commencement (14)  |  Direct (225)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Filament (4)  |  First (1283)  |  Generation (242)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Mankind (13)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Living (491)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Minute (125)  |  New (1216)  |  Portion (84)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Power (746)  |  Produced (187)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Small (477)  |  Structure (344)  |  Time (1877)  |  Volition (3)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warm-Blooded (3)  |  World (1774)

Question: If you walk on a dry path between two walls a few feet apart, you hear a musical note or “ring” at each footstep. Whence comes this?
Answer: This is similar to phosphorescent paint. Once any sound gets between two parallel reflectors or walls, it bounds from one to the other and never stops for a long time. Hence it is persistent, and when you walk between the walls you hear the sounds made by those who walked there before you. By following a muffin man down the passage within a short time you can hear most distinctly a musical note, or, as it is more properly termed in the question, a “ring” at every (other) step.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 175-6, Question 2. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Before (8)  |  Bound (119)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Down (456)  |  Dry (57)  |  Examination (98)  |  Following (16)  |  Footstep (5)  |  Hear (139)  |  Howler (15)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Music (129)  |  Never (1087)  |  Note (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paint (22)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Passage (50)  |  Path (144)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Phosphorescent (3)  |  Question (621)  |  Reflector (4)  |  Short (197)  |  Sound (183)  |  Step (231)  |  Stop (80)  |  Term (349)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Walk (124)  |  Wall (67)

A noteworthy and often-remarked similarity exists between the facts and methods of geology and those of linguistic study. The science of language is, as it were, the geology of the most modern period, the Age of the Man, having for its task to construct the history of development of the earth and its inhabitants from the time when the proper geological record remains silent … The remains of ancient speech are like strata deposited in bygone ages, telling of the forms of life then existing, and of the circumstances which determined or affected them; while words are as rolled pebbles, relics of yet more ancient formations, or as fossils, whose grade indicates the progress of organic life, and whose resemblances and relations show the correspondence or sequence of the different strata; while, everywhere, extensive denudation has marred the completeness of the record, and rendered impossible a detailed exhibition of the whole course of development.
In Language and the Study of Language (1867), 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Bygone (4)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Construct (124)  |  Construction (112)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Course (409)  |  Denudation (2)  |  Detail (146)  |  Development (422)  |  Different (577)  |  Earth (996)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Exhibition (7)  |  Exist (443)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Geology (220)  |  History (673)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Language (293)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marred (3)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Organic (158)  |  Pebble (25)  |  Period (198)  |  Progress (465)  |  Proper (144)  |  Record (154)  |  Remain (349)  |  Render (93)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Roll (40)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Show (346)  |  Speech (61)  |  Strata (35)  |  Stratum (10)  |  Study (653)  |  Task (147)  |  Time (1877)  |  Whole (738)  |  Word (619)

A poet is, after all, a sort of scientist, but engaged in a qualitative science in which nothing is measurable. He lives with data that cannot be numbered, and his experiments can be done only once. The information in a poem is, by definition, not reproducible. ... He becomes an equivalent of scientist, in the act of examining and sorting the things popping in [to his head], finding the marks of remote similarity, points of distant relationship, tiny irregularities that indicate that this one is really the same as that one over there only more important. Gauging the fit, he can meticulously place pieces of the universe together, in geometric configurations that are as beautiful and balanced as crystals.
In The Medusa and the Snail: More Notes of a Biology Watcher (1974, 1995), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Balance (77)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Become (815)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Data (156)  |  Definition (221)  |  Distance (161)  |  Engagement (8)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Examination (98)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fit (134)  |  Gauge (2)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Importance (286)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Indication (33)  |  Information (166)  |  Irregularity (11)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Mark (43)  |  Measurement (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Once (4)  |  Piece (38)  |  Poem (96)  |  Poet (83)  |  Point (580)  |  Qualitative (14)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Remote (83)  |  Reproducibility (2)  |  Reproducible (7)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sort (49)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Together (387)  |  Universe (857)

All things are the same except for the differences, and different except for the similarities.
'Penetrating the Rhetoric', The Vision of the Anointed (1996), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Thing (1915)

Among the memoirs of Kirchhoff are some of uncommon beauty. … Can anything be beautiful, where the author has no time for the slightest external embellishment?—But—; it is this very simplicity, the indispensableness of each word, each letter, each little dash, that among all artists raises the mathematician nearest to the World-creator; it establishes a sublimity which is equalled in no other art, something like it exists at most in symphonic music. The Pythagoreans recognized already the similarity between the most subjective and the most objective of the arts.
In Ceremonial Speech (15 Nov 1887) celebrating the 301st anniversary of the Karl-Franzens-University Graz. Published as Gustav Robert Kirchhoff: Festrede zur Feier des 301. Gründungstages der Karl-Franzens-Universität zu Graz (1888), 28-29, as translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 186. From the original German, “Gerade unter den zuletzt erwähnten Abhandlungen Kirchhoff’s sind einige von ungewöhnlicher Schönheit. … kann etwas schön sein, wo dem Autor auch zur kleinsten äusseren Ausschmückung die Zeit fehlt?–Doch–; gerade durch diese Einfachheit, durch diese Unentbehrlichkeit jedes Wortes, jedes Buchstaben, jedes Strichelchens kömmt der Mathematiker unter allen Künstlern dem Weltenschöpfer am nächsten; sie begründet eine Erhabenheit, die in keiner Kunst ein Gleiches,–Aehnliches höchstens in der symphonischen Musik hat. Erkannten doch schon die Pythagoräer die Aehnlichkeit der subjectivsten und der objectivsten der Künste.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Art (657)  |  Artist (90)  |  Author (167)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Creator (91)  |  Dash (3)  |  Equal (83)  |  Establish (57)  |  Exist (443)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Gustav Robert Kirchhoff (4)  |  Letter (109)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics And Art (8)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Memoir (13)  |  Most (1731)  |  Music (129)  |  Objective (91)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Raise (35)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Something (719)  |  Subjective (19)  |  Sublimity (5)  |  Symphony (9)  |  Time (1877)  |  Uncommon (14)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

Every complete set of chromosomes contains the full code; so there are, as a rule, two copies of the latter in the fertilized egg cell, which forms the earliest stage of the future individual. In calling the structure of the chromosome fibres a code-script we mean that the all-penetrating mind, once conceived by Laplace, to which every causal connection lay immediately open, could tell from their structure whether the egg would develop, under suitable conditions, into a black cock or into a speckled hen, into a fly or a maize plant, a rhododendron, a beetle, a mouse or a woman. To which we may add, that the appearances of the egg cells are very often remarkably similar; and even when they are not, as in the case of the comparatively gigantic eggs of birds and reptiles, the difference is not so much in the relevant structures as in the nutritive material which in these cases is added for obvious reasons.
But the term code-script is, of course, too narrow. The chromosome structures are at the same time instrumental in bringing about the development they foreshadow. They are law-code and executive power?or, to use another simile, they are architect's plan and builder’s craft-in one.
In What is Life? : The Physical Aspect of the Living Cell (1944), 20-21.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Architect (29)  |  Beetle (15)  |  Bird (149)  |  Builder (12)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cell (138)  |  Chromosome (23)  |  Chromosomes (17)  |  Cock (6)  |  Code (31)  |  Complete (204)  |  Condition (356)  |  Connection (162)  |  Copy (33)  |  Course (409)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Egg (69)  |  Executive (3)  |  Fertilization (15)  |  Fly (146)  |  Foreshadow (5)  |  Form (959)  |  Future (429)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Hen (7)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Individual (404)  |  Instrumental (5)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (62)  |  Law (894)  |  Maize (4)  |  Material (353)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Open (274)  |  Plan (117)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reptile (29)  |  Rule (294)  |  Set (394)  |  Simile (6)  |  Speckled (3)  |  Stage (143)  |  Structure (344)  |  Tell (340)  |  Term (349)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Woman (151)

Haemoglobin is a very large molecule by ordinary standards, containing about ten thousand atoms, but the chances are that your haemoglobin and mine are identical, and significantly different from that of a pig or horse. You may be impressed by how much human beings differ from one another, but if you were to look into the fine details of the molecules of which they are constructed, you would be astonished by their similarity.
In Of Molecules and Men (1966, 2004), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonish (37)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Atom (355)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chance (239)  |  Construct (124)  |  Construction (112)  |  Detail (146)  |  Differ (85)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Fine (33)  |  Haemoglobin (4)  |  Horse (74)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Identical (53)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Large (394)  |  Look (582)  |  Mine (76)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Pig (8)  |  Significance (113)  |  Standard (57)  |  Thousand (331)

I will insist particularly upon the following fact, which seems to me quite important and beyond the phenomena which one could expect to observe: The same [double sulfate of uranium and potassium] crystalline crusts, arranged the same way [as reported to the French academy on 24 Feb 1896] with respect to the photographic plates, in the same conditions and through the same screens, but sheltered from the excitation of incident rays and kept in darkness, still produce the same photographic images … [when kept from 26 Feb 1896] in the darkness of a bureau drawer. … I developed the photographic plates on the 1st of March, expecting to find the images very weak. Instead the silhouettes appeared with great intensity.
It is important to observe that it appears this phenomenon must not be attributed to the luminous radiation emitted by phosphorescence … One hypothesis which presents itself to the mind naturally enough would be to suppose that these rays, whose effects have a great similarity to the effects produced by the rays studied by M. Lenard and M. Röntgen, are invisible rays …
[Having eliminated phosphorescence as a cause, he has further revealed the effect of the as yet unknown radioactivity.]
Read at French Academy of Science (2 Mar 1896). In Comptes Rendus (1896), 122, 501. As translated by Carmen Giunta on the Classic Chemistry web site.
Science quotes on:  |  Academy (35)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Cause (541)  |  Condition (356)  |  Crust (38)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Develop (268)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enough (340)  |  Excitation (9)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Image (96)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Luminous (18)  |  March (46)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observe (168)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Phosphorescence (2)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Potassium (11)  |  Present (619)  |  Produced (187)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Ray (114)  |  Respect (207)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Wilhelm Röntgen (8)  |  Shelter (22)  |  Silhouette (3)  |  Still (613)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Through (849)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Uranium (20)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weak (71)  |  Will (2355)

In order to translate a sentence from English into French two things are necessary. First, we must understand thoroughly the English sentence. Second, we must be familiar with the forms of expression peculiar to the French language. The situation is very similar when we attempt to express in mathematical symbols a condition proposed in words. First, we must understand thoroughly the condition. Second, we must be familiar with the forms of mathematical expression.
In How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), 174.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Condition (356)  |  English (35)  |  Express (186)  |  Expression (175)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  French (20)  |  Language (293)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Order (632)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Peculiarity (25)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Situation (113)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Translate (19)  |  Translation (21)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Word (619)

In reality, all Arguments from Experience are founded on the Similarity which we discover among natural Objects, and by which we are induc'd to expect effects similar to those which we have found to follow from such Objects. And tho' none but a Fool or Madman will ever pretend to dispute the Authority of Experience, or to reject that great Guide of human Life, it may surely be allow'd a Philosopher to have so much Curiosity at least as to examine the Principle of human Nature, which gives this mighty Authority to Experience, and makes us draw Advantage from that Similarity which Nature has plac'd among different Objects. From Causes which appear similar we expect similar Effects. This is the Sum of our experimental Conclusions.
An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Authority (95)  |  Cause (541)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Draw (137)  |  Effect (393)  |  Examine (78)  |  Expect (200)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fool (116)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guide (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Life (1795)  |  Madman (6)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reject (63)  |  Sum (102)  |  Surely (101)  |  Will (2355)

In the dog two conditions were found to produce pathological disturbances by functional interference, namely, an unusually acute clashing of the excitatory and inhibitory processes, and the influence of strong and extraordinary stimuli. In man precisely similar conditions constitute the usual causes of nervous and psychic disturbances. Different conditions productive of extreme excitation, such as intense grief or bitter insults, often lead, when the natural reactions are inhibited by the necessary restraint, to profound and prolonged loss of balance in nervous and psychic activity.
Ivan Pavlov and G. V. Anrep (ed., trans.), Conditioned Reflexes—An Investigation of the Physiological Activity of the Cerebral Cortex (1927), 397.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Acuteness (3)  |  Balance (77)  |  Bitter (30)  |  Bitterness (3)  |  Cause (541)  |  Clash (8)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Dog (70)  |  Excitation (9)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Function (228)  |  Grief (18)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inhibition (13)  |  Insult (14)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Interference (21)  |  Lead (384)  |  Loss (110)  |  Man (2251)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nervousness (2)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Production (183)  |  Productive (32)  |  Profound (104)  |  Profoundness (2)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Psychic (13)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Restraint (13)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Strong (174)  |  Two (937)  |  Unusual (37)

It is not surprising, in view of the polydynamic constitution of the genuinely mathematical mind, that many of the major heros of the science, men like Desargues and Pascal, Descartes and Leibnitz, Newton, Gauss and Bolzano, Helmholtz and Clifford, Riemann and Salmon and Plücker and Poincaré, have attained to high distinction in other fields not only of science but of philosophy and letters too. And when we reflect that the very greatest mathematical achievements have been due, not alone to the peering, microscopic, histologic vision of men like Weierstrass, illuminating the hidden recesses, the minute and intimate structure of logical reality, but to the larger vision also of men like Klein who survey the kingdoms of geometry and analysis for the endless variety of things that flourish there, as the eye of Darwin ranged over the flora and fauna of the world, or as a commercial monarch contemplates its industry, or as a statesman beholds an empire; when we reflect not only that the Calculus of Probability is a creation of mathematics but that the master mathematician is constantly required to exercise judgment—judgment, that is, in matters not admitting of certainty—balancing probabilities not yet reduced nor even reducible perhaps to calculation; when we reflect that he is called upon to exercise a function analogous to that of the comparative anatomist like Cuvier, comparing theories and doctrines of every degree of similarity and dissimilarity of structure; when, finally, we reflect that he seldom deals with a single idea at a tune, but is for the most part engaged in wielding organized hosts of them, as a general wields at once the division of an army or as a great civil administrator directs from his central office diverse and scattered but related groups of interests and operations; then, I say, the current opinion that devotion to mathematics unfits the devotee for practical affairs should be known for false on a priori grounds. And one should be thus prepared to find that as a fact Gaspard Monge, creator of descriptive geometry, author of the classic Applications de l’analyse à la géométrie; Lazare Carnot, author of the celebrated works, Géométrie de position, and Réflections sur la Métaphysique du Calcul infinitesimal; Fourier, immortal creator of the Théorie analytique de la chaleur; Arago, rightful inheritor of Monge’s chair of geometry; Poncelet, creator of pure projective geometry; one should not be surprised, I say, to find that these and other mathematicians in a land sagacious enough to invoke their aid, rendered, alike in peace and in war, eminent public service.
In Lectures on Science, Philosophy and Art (1908), 32-33.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  A Priori (26)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Administrator (11)  |  Admit (45)  |  Affair (29)  |  Aid (97)  |  Alike (60)  |  Alone (311)  |  Analogous (5)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Anatomist (23)  |  Application (242)  |  François Arago (14)  |  Army (33)  |  Attain (125)  |  Author (167)  |  Balance (77)  |  Behold (18)  |  Bernhard Bolzano (2)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Call (769)  |  Lazare-Nicolas-Marguerite Carnot (4)  |  Celebrated (2)  |  Central (80)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chair (24)  |  Civil (26)  |  Classic (11)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Commercial (26)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Compare (69)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Contemplate (18)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creator (91)  |  Current (118)  |  Baron Georges Cuvier (30)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Deal (188)  |  Degree (276)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Descriptive (17)  |  Descriptive Geometry (3)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Direct (225)  |  Dissimilar (6)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Division (65)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Due (141)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Empire (14)  |  Endless (56)  |  Engage (39)  |  Enough (340)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  False (100)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Field (364)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (998)  |  Flora (9)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Baron Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier (17)  |  Function (228)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  General (511)  |  Genuinely (4)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Ground (217)  |  Group (78)  |  Hero (42)  |  Hide (69)  |  High (362)  |  Histology (3)  |  Host (16)  |  Idea (843)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Illuminating (12)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Industry (137)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Inheritor (2)  |  Interest (386)  |  Intimate (15)  |  Invoke (6)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Felix Klein (15)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Land (115)  |  Large (394)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Letter (109)  |  Logical (55)  |  Major (84)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  Monarch (4)  |  Gaspard Monge (2)  |  Most (1731)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Office (71)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Organize (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Blaise Pascal (80)  |  Peace (108)  |  Peer (12)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Henri Poincaré (96)  |  Jean-Victor Poncelet (2)  |  Position (77)  |  Practical (200)  |  Prepare (37)  |  Probability (130)  |  Projective Geometry (3)  |  Public Service (5)  |  Pure (291)  |  Range (99)  |  Reality (261)  |  Recess (8)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reducible (2)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Relate (21)  |  Render (93)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Bernhard Riemann (7)  |  Rightful (3)  |  Sagacious (7)  |  Salmon (7)  |  Say (984)  |  Scatter (6)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Service (110)  |  Single (353)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Structure (344)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Survey (33)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tune (19)  |  Unfit (12)  |  Variety (132)  |  View (488)  |  Vision (123)  |  War (225)  |  Karl Weierstrass (9)  |  Wield (10)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Man is a classifying animal: in one sense it may be said that the whole process of speaking is nothing but distributing phenomena, of which no two are alike in every respect, into different classes on the strength of perceived similarities and dissimilarities. In the name-giving process we witness the same ineradicable and very useful tendency to see likenesses and to express similarity in the phenomena through similarity in name.
Language: Its Nature, Development and Origin (1922), 388-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  Animal (617)  |  Classification (97)  |  Different (577)  |  Express (186)  |  Man (2251)  |  Name (333)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Process (423)  |  Respect (207)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Speech (61)  |  Strength (126)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  Useful (250)  |  Whole (738)  |  Witness (54)

Mathematical science is in my opinion an indivisible whole, an organism whose vitality is conditioned upon the connection of its parts. For with all the variety of mathematical knowledge, we are still clearly conscious of the similarity of the logical devices, the relationship of the ideas in mathematics as a whole and the numerous analogies in its different departments.
In 'Mathematical Problems', Bulletin American Mathematical Society, 8, 478.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Condition (356)  |  Connection (162)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Department (92)  |  Device (70)  |  Different (577)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indivisible (21)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Logical (55)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Organism (220)  |  Part (222)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Science (3879)  |  Still (613)  |  Variety (132)  |  Vitality (23)  |  Whole (738)

Now it is a well-known principle of zoological evolution that an isolated region, if large and sufficiently varied in its topography, soil, climate and vegetation, will give rise to a diversified fauna according to the law of adaptive radiation from primitive and central types. Branches will spring off in all directions to take advantage of every possible opportunity of securing food. The modifications which animals undergo in this adaptive radiation are largely of mechanical nature, they are limited in number and kind by hereditary, stirp or germinal influences, and thus result in the independent evolution of similar types in widely-separated regions under the law of parallelism or homoplasy. This law causes the independent origin not only of similar genera but of similar families and even of our similar orders. Nature thus repeats herself upon a vast scale, but the similarity is never complete and exact.
'The Geological and Faunal Relations of Europe and America during the Tertiary Period and the Theory of the Successive Invasions of an African Fauna', Science (1900), 11, 563-64.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Branch (150)  |  Cause (541)  |  Central (80)  |  Climate (97)  |  Complete (204)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Direction (175)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Family (94)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Food (199)  |  Genus (25)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Independence (34)  |  Influence (222)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Kind (557)  |  Known (454)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Modification (55)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin (239)  |  Parallelism (2)  |  Possible (552)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Principle (507)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Region (36)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Result (677)  |  Rise (166)  |  Scale (121)  |  Soil (86)  |  Spring (133)  |  Type (167)  |  Variation (90)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Will (2355)  |  Zoology (36)

One dictionary that I consulted remarks that “natural history” now commonly means the study of animals and plants “in a popular and superficial way,” meaning popular and superficial to be equally damning adjectives. This is related to the current tendency in the biological sciences to label every subdivision of science with a name derived from the Greek. “Ecology” is erudite and profound; while “natural history” is popular and superficial. Though, as far as I can see, both labels apply to just about the same package of goods.
In The Nature of Natural History (1961, 2014), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Adjective (2)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apply (160)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Both (493)  |  Common (436)  |  Current (118)  |  Derivation (13)  |  Dictionary (15)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Equal (83)  |  Equally (130)  |  Erudite (2)  |  Good (889)  |  Goods (8)  |  Greek (107)  |  History (673)  |  Label (11)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Package (6)  |  Plant (294)  |  Popular (29)  |  Profound (104)  |  Related (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Study (653)  |  Subdivision (2)  |  Superficial (12)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Way (1217)

Scripture and Nature agree in this, that all things were covered with water; how and when this aspect began, and how long it lasted, Nature says not, Scripture relates. That there was a watery fluid, however, at a time when animals and plants were not yet to be found, and that the fluid covered all things, is proved by the strata of the higher mountains, free from all heterogeneous material. And the form of these strata bears witness to the presence of a fluid, while the substance bears witness to the absence of heterogeneous bodies. But the similarity of matter and form in the strata of mountains which are different and distant from each other, proves that the fluid was universal.
The Prodromus of Nicolaus Steno's Dissertation Concerning a Solid Body enclosed by Process of Nature within a Solid (1669), trans. J. G. Winter (1916), 263-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (18)  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Bear (159)  |  Covering (14)  |  Different (577)  |  Distance (161)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Heterogeneous (3)  |  Last (426)  |  Long (790)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plant (294)  |  Presence (63)  |  Prove (250)  |  Say (984)  |  Scripture (12)  |  Strata (35)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universality (22)  |  Water (481)  |  Witness (54)

Suppose there is something which a person cannot understand. He happens to notice the similarity of this something to some other thing which he understands quite well. By comparing them he may come to understand the thing which he could not understand up to that moment. If his understanding turns out to be appropriate and nobody else has ever come to such an understanding, he can claim that his thinking was really creative.
Creativity and Intuition: A Physicist Looks at East and West (1973), 114.
Science quotes on:  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Claim (146)  |  Creative (137)  |  Happen (274)  |  Moment (253)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Notice (77)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Something (719)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Turn (447)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

The only similarity between the car and the human body is that if something is seriously wrong with the design of the former you can send it back to its maker.
A Sense of Asher (1972), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Body (537)  |  Car (71)  |  Design (195)  |  Former (137)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Maker (34)  |  Something (719)  |  Wrong (234)

The universe may have a purpose, but nothing we know suggests that, if so, this purpose has any similarity to ours.
Portraits from Memory and Other Essays
Science quotes on:  |  Know (1518)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Universe (857)

There is a finite number of species of plants and animals—even of insects—upon the earth. … Moreover, the universality of the genetic code, the common character of proteins in different species, the generality of cellular structure and cellular reproduction, the basic similarity of energy metabolism in all species and of photosynthesis in green plants and bacteria, and the universal evolution of living forms through mutation and natural selection all lead inescapably to a conclusion that, although diversity may be great, the laws of life, based on similarities, are finite in number and comprehensible to us in the main even now.
Presidential Address (28 Dec 1970) to the American Association for the Advancement of Science. 'Science: Endless Horizons or Golden Age?', Science (8 Jan 1971), 171, No. 3866, 24.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Bacterium (5)  |  Basic (138)  |  Cell (138)  |  Character (243)  |  Code (31)  |  Common (436)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Earth (996)  |  Energy (344)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Finite (59)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Great (1574)  |  Green (63)  |  Inescapable (7)  |  Insect (77)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Life Form (6)  |  Living (491)  |  Metabolism (14)  |  Mutation (37)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Law (41)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Number (699)  |  Photosynthesis (19)  |  Plant (294)  |  Protein (54)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Selection (128)  |  Similar (36)  |  Species (401)  |  Structure (344)  |  Through (849)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universality (22)

This method is, to define as the number of a class the class of all classes similar to the given class. Membership of this class of classes (considered as a predicate) is a common property of all the similar classes and of no others; moreover every class of the set of similar classes has to the set of a relation which it has to nothing else, and which every class has to its own set. Thus the conditions are completely fulfilled by this class of classes, and it has the merit of being determinate when a class is given, and of being different for two classes which are not similar. This, then, is an irreproachable definition of the number of a class in purely logical terms.
The Principles of Mathematics (1903), 115.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Class (164)  |  Common (436)  |  Completely (135)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consider (416)  |  Definition (221)  |  Determination (78)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Fulfillment (18)  |  Irreproachable (2)  |  Logic (287)  |  Membership (5)  |  Merit (50)  |  Method (505)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Predicate (3)  |  Property (168)  |  Purely (109)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Set (394)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Two (937)

Thus we conclude, that the strata both primary and secondary, both those of ancient and those of more recent origin, have had their materials furnished from the ruins of former continents, from the dissolution of rocks, or the destruction of animal or vegetable bodies, similar, at least in some respects, to those that now occupy the surface of the earth.
Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802), 14-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Animal (617)  |  Both (493)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Continent (76)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Dissolution (11)  |  Earth (996)  |  Former (137)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Furnishing (4)  |  Material (353)  |  More (2559)  |  Origin (239)  |  Primary (80)  |  Recent (77)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rock (161)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Secondary (14)  |  Strata (35)  |  Stratum (10)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Vegetable (46)

To characterize the import of pure geometry, we might use the standard form of a movie-disclaimer: No portrayal of the characteristics of geometrical figures or of the spatial properties of relationships of actual bodies is intended, and any similarities between the primitive concepts and their customary geometrical connotations are purely coincidental.
From 'Geometry and Empirical Science', collected in Carl Hempel and James H. Fetzer (ed.), The Philosophy of Carl G. Hempel: Studies in Science, Explanation, and Rationality (2001), Chap. 2, 24. Also Carl Hempel, 'Geometry and Empirical Science', collected in J.R. Newman (ed.), The World of Mathematics (1956), Vol. 3, 1641.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Body (537)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Concept (221)  |  Connotation (2)  |  Customary (18)  |  Disclaimer (2)  |  Figure (160)  |  Form (959)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Importance (286)  |  Intend (16)  |  Movie (16)  |  Portrayal (2)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Property (168)  |  Pure (291)  |  Purely (109)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Spatial (8)  |  Use (766)

We are going through the body-snatching phase right now, and there are all these Burke and Hare attitudes towards geneticists-that they are playing God and that DNA is sacred. No, it’s not. It’s no more sacred than your toenails. Basically, we are not going to make long-term medical progress without understanding how the genes work.
[Referring to the similarity of fears and superstitions in genetics as once were associated with anatomy ]
Quoted by Sean O’Hagan, in 'End of sperm report', The Observer (14 Sep 2002).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Body (537)  |  DNA (77)  |  Fear (197)  |  Gene (98)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Geneticist (16)  |  God (757)  |  Long (790)  |  Long-Term (9)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Phase (36)  |  Play (112)  |  Playing (42)  |  Progress (465)  |  Right (452)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Term (349)  |  Through (849)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Work (1351)

We might call it the transformational content of the body … But as I hold it better to borrow terms for important magnitudes from the ancient languages, so that they may be adopted unchanged in all modern languages, I propose to call [it] the entropy of the body, from the Greek word “trope” for “transformation” I have intentionally formed the word “entropy” to be as similar as possible to the word “energy”; for the two magnitudes to be denoted by these words are so nearly allied in their physical meanings, that a certain similarity in designation appears to be desirable.
In 'The Bulldog: A Profile of Ludwig Boltzmann', The American Scholar (1 Jan 1999), 99.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Better (486)  |  Body (537)  |  Borrow (30)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Content (69)  |  Designation (13)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Energy (344)  |  Entropy (44)  |  Form (959)  |  Greek (107)  |  Intentionally (3)  |  Language (293)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Modern (385)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possible (552)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Two (937)  |  Word (619)

We shall find everywhere, that the several Species are linked together, and differ but in almost insensible degrees. And when we consider the infinite Power and Wisdom of the Maker, we have reason to think, that it is suitable to the magnificent Harmony of the Universe, and the great Design and infinite Goodness of the Architect, that the Species of Creatures should also, by gentle degrees, ascend upward from us toward his infinite Perfection, as we see they gradually descend from us downwards.
In An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding (1689, 1706, 5th ed.), 381.
Science quotes on:  |  Architect (29)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Consider (416)  |  Creature (233)  |  Degree (276)  |  Descend (47)  |  Design (195)  |  Differ (85)  |  Difference (337)  |  Downward (4)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Find (998)  |  Goodness (25)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Maker (34)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Power (746)  |  Reason (744)  |  See (1081)  |  Species (401)  |  Think (1086)  |  Together (387)  |  Universe (857)  |  Upward (43)  |  Wisdom (221)

We [may] answer the question: “Why is snow white?” by saying, “For the same reason that soap-suds or whipped eggs are white”—in other words, instead of giving the reason for a fact, we give another example of the same fact. This offering a similar instance, instead of a reason, has often been criticised as one of the forms of logical depravity in men. But manifestly it is not a perverse act of thought, but only an incomplete one. Furnishing parallel cases is the necessary first step towards abstracting the reason imbedded in them all.
In The Principles of Psychology (1918), Vol. 2, 363-364.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Case (99)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Depravity (3)  |  Egg (69)  |  Example (94)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Logic (287)  |  Manifestly (11)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Perverse (5)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Snow (37)  |  Soap (11)  |  Step (231)  |  Thought (953)  |  White (127)  |  Why (491)  |  Word (619)

What distinguishes the straight line and circle more than anything else, and properly separates them for the purpose of elementary geometry? Their self-similarity. Every inch of a straight line coincides with every other inch, and of a circle with every other of the same circle. Where, then, did Euclid fail? In not introducing the third curve, which has the same property—the screw. The right line, the circle, the screw—the representations of translation, rotation, and the two combined—ought to have been the instruments of geometry. With a screw we should never have heard of the impossibility of trisecting an angle, squaring the circle, etc.
From Letter (15 Feb 1852) to W.R. Hamilton, collected in Robert Perceval Graves, Life of W.R. Hamilton (1889), Vol. 3, 343.
Science quotes on:  |  Angle (20)  |  Circle (110)  |  Coincide (5)  |  Combine (57)  |  Curve (49)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Fail (185)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Line (91)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Property (168)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Representation (53)  |  Right (452)  |  Rotation (12)  |  Screw (17)  |  Self (267)  |  Separate (143)  |  Similar (36)  |  Square (70)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  Translation (21)  |  Two (937)

… however useful the words may have been in the past, they have now become handicaps to the further development of knowledge. Words like botany and zoology imply that plants and animals are quite different things. … But the differences rapidly become blurred when we start looking at the world through a microscope. … The similarities between plants and animals became more important than their differences with the discoveries that both were built up of cells, had sexual reproduction,… nutrition and respiration … and with the development of evolutionary theory.
In The Forest and the Sea (1960), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Become (815)  |  Blur (8)  |  Botany (57)  |  Both (493)  |  Cell (138)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Handicap (6)  |  Imply (17)  |  Important (209)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Microscope (80)  |  More (2559)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Nutrition (23)  |  Past (337)  |  Plant (294)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Respiration (13)  |  Sex (69)  |  Sexual (26)  |  Start (221)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Useful (250)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)  |  Zoology (36)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.