Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Translation

Translation Quotes (21 quotes)

...I may perhaps venture a short word on the question much discussed in certain quarters, whether in the work of excavation it is a good thing to have cooperation between men and women ... Of a mixed dig ... I have seen something, and it is an experiment that I would be reluctant to try again. I would grant if need be that women are admirable fitted for the work, yet I would uphold that they should undertake it by themselves ... the work of an excavator on the dig and off it lays on those who share it a bond of closer daily intercourse than is conceivable ... between men and women, except in chance cases, I do not believe that such close and unavoidable companionship can ever be other than a source of irritation; at any rate, I believe that however it may affect women, the ordinary male at least cannot stand it ... A minor ... objection lies in one particular form of contraint ... moments will occur on the best regulated dig when you want to say just what you think without translation, which before the ladies, whatever their feelings about it, cannot be done.
Archaeological Excavation (1915), 63-64. In Getzel M. Cohen and Martha Sharp Joukowsky Breaking Ground (2006), 557-558. By (), 163-164.
Science quotes on:  |  Archaeologist (17)  |  Best (459)  |  Bond (45)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chance (239)  |  Closer (43)  |  Companionship (4)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Daily (87)  |  Dig (21)  |  Do (1908)  |  Excavation (8)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Form (959)  |  Good (889)  |  Grant (73)  |  Lie (364)  |  Moment (253)  |  Objection (32)  |  Occur (150)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Question (621)  |  Say (984)  |  Share (75)  |  Short (197)  |  Something (719)  |  Stand (274)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Try (283)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Want (497)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Women Scientists (13)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

An amino acid residue (other than glycine) has no symmetry elements. The general operation of conversion of one residue of a single chain into a second residue equivalent to the first is accordingly a rotation about an axis accompanied by translation along the axis. Hence the only configurations for a chain compatible with our postulate of equivalence of the residues are helical configurations.
[Co-author with American chemist, ert B. Corey (1897-1971) and H. R. Branson]
'The Structure of Proteins: Two Hydrogen-bonded Helical Configurations of the Polypeptide Chain', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1951), 37, 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Amino Acid (11)  |  Author (167)  |  Axis (9)  |  Chain (50)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Compatibility (4)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Conversion (17)  |  Element (310)  |  Equivalence (6)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  First (1283)  |  General (511)  |  Helix (10)  |  Operation (213)  |  Other (2236)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Residue (9)  |  Rotation (12)  |  Single (353)  |  Symmetry (43)

Doubtless many can recall certain books which have greatly influenced their lives, and in my own case one stands out especially—a translation of Hofmeister's epoch-making treatise on the comparative morphology of plants. This book, studied while an undergraduate at the University of Michigan, was undoubtedly the most important factor in determining the trend of my botanical investigation for many years.
D.H. Campbell, 'The Centenary of Wilhelm Hofmeister', Science (1925), 62, No. 1597, 127-128. Cited in William C. Steere, Obituary, 'Douglas Houghton Campbell', American Bryological and Lichenological Society, The Bryologist (1953), 127. The book to which Cambell refers is W. Hofmeister, On the Germination, Development, and Fructification of the Higher Cryptogamia, and on the Fructification of the Coniferae, trans. by Frederick Currey (1862).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Book (392)  |  Botany (57)  |  Certain (550)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Wilhelm Hofmeister (2)  |  Importance (286)  |  Influence (222)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Live (628)  |  Making (300)  |  Morphology (22)  |  Most (1731)  |  Plant (294)  |  Recollection (12)  |  Stand (274)  |  Study (653)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trend (22)  |  Undergraduate (15)  |  University (121)  |  Year (933)

For the birth of something new, there has to be a happening. Newton saw an apple fall; James Watt watched a kettle boil; Roentgen fogged some photographic plates. And these people knew enough to translate ordinary happenings into something new...
Quoted by André Maurois, The Life of Sir Alexander Fleming, trans. by Gerard Hopkins (1959), 167. Cited in Steven Otfinoski, Alexander Fleming: Conquering Disease with Penicillin (1993), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Apple (40)  |  Birth (147)  |  Boil (23)  |  Boiling (3)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fog (10)  |  Happening (58)  |  Kettle (3)  |  New (1216)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  People (1005)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Plate (6)  |  Wilhelm Röntgen (8)  |  Saw (160)  |  Something (719)  |  Translate (19)  |  Watch (109)  |  Watching (10)  |  James Watt (11)

Hubble touches people. When you're looking that far out, you're giving people their place in the universe, it touches people. Science is often visual, so it doesn't need translation. It's like poetry, it touches you.
Interview (22 May 1997). On Academy of Achievement website.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Hubble Space Telescope (9)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  People (1005)  |  Place (177)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Science (3879)  |  Touch (141)  |  Universe (857)  |  Visual (15)

I believe that the present laws of physics are at least incomplete without a translation into terms of mental phenomena.
In 'Physics and the Explanation of Life', Foundations of Physics 1970, I, 35-45.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Law (894)  |  Mental (177)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Present (619)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)

I learned what research was all about as a research student [with] Stoppani ... Max Perutz, and ... Fred Sanger... From them, I always received an unspoken message which in my imagination I translated as “Do good experiments, and don’t worry about the rest.”
From Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1984), collected in Tore Frängsmyr and Jan Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures in Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 268.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Good (889)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Message (49)  |  Max Ferdinand Perutz (14)  |  Receive (114)  |  Research (664)  |  Rest (280)  |  Student (300)  |  Worry (33)

If a little less time was devoted to the translation of letters by Julius Caesar describing Britain 2000 years ago and a little more time was spent on teaching children how to describe (in simple modern English) the method whereby ethylene was converted into polythene in 1933 in the ICI laboratories at Northwich, and to discussing the enormous social changes which have resulted from this discovery, then I believe that we should be training future leaders in this country to face the world of tomorrow far more effectively than we are at the present time.
Quoted in an Obituary, D. P. Craig, Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society (1972), 18, 461.
Science quotes on:  |  2000 (15)  |  Britain (24)  |  Caesar_Julius (2)  |  Change (593)  |  Children (200)  |  Conversion (17)  |  Country (251)  |  Describe (128)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Education (378)  |  Face (212)  |  Future (429)  |  History (673)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Leader (43)  |  Letter (109)  |  Little (707)  |  Method (505)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Obituary (10)  |  Politician (38)  |  Present (619)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Science And Society (23)  |  Simple (406)  |  Social (252)  |  Spent (85)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Training (80)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

If we consider what science already has enabled men to know—the immensity of space, the fantastic philosophy of the stars, the infinite smallness of the composition of atoms, the macrocosm whereby we succeed only in creating outlines and translating a measure into numbers without our minds being able to form any concrete idea of it—we remain astounded by the enormous machinery of the universe.
Address (10 Sep 1934) to the International Congress of Electro-Radio Biology, Venice. In Associated Press, 'Life a Closed Book, Declares Marconi', New York Times (11 Sep 1934), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Astound (7)  |  Astounding (9)  |  Atom (355)  |  Being (1278)  |  Composition (84)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Creation (327)  |  Enabled (3)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Fantastic (20)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Know (1518)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Macrocosm (2)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Number (699)  |  Outline (11)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Science (3879)  |  Smallness (7)  |  Space (500)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Universe (857)

Imaginary numbers are a fine and wonderful refuge of the divine spirit almost an amphibian between being and non-being. (1702)
[Alternate translation:] The Divine Spirit found a sublime outlet in that wonder of analysis, that portent of the ideal world, that amphibian between being and not-being, which we call the imaginary root of negative unity.
Quoted in Félix Klein, Elementary Mathematics From an Advanced Standpoint: Arithmetic, Algebra, Analysis (1924), 56. Alternate translation as quoted in Tobias Dantzig, Number, the Language of Science: a Critical Survey Written for the Cultured Non-Mathematician (1930), 204
Science quotes on:  |  Amphibian (6)  |  Analaysis (2)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Divine (112)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Imaginary (16)  |  Imaginary Number (6)  |  Negative (63)  |  Number (699)  |  Refuge (15)  |  Root (120)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Unity (78)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  World (1774)

In order to translate a sentence from English into French two things are necessary. First, we must understand thoroughly the English sentence. Second, we must be familiar with the forms of expression peculiar to the French language. The situation is very similar when we attempt to express in mathematical symbols a condition proposed in words. First, we must understand thoroughly the condition. Second, we must be familiar with the forms of mathematical expression.
In How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), 174.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Condition (356)  |  English (35)  |  Express (186)  |  Expression (175)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  French (20)  |  Language (293)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Order (632)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Peculiarity (25)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Situation (113)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Translate (19)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Word (619)

Mathematics, among all school subjects, is especially adapted to further clearness, definite brevity and precision in expression, although it offers no exercise in flights of rhetoric. This is due in the first place to the logical rigour with which it develops thought, avoiding every departure from the shortest, most direct way, never allowing empty phrases to enter. Other subjects excel in the development of expression in other respects: translation from foreign languages into the mother tongue gives exercise in finding the proper word for the given foreign word and gives knowledge of laws of syntax, the study of poetry and prose furnish fit patterns for connected presentation and elegant form of expression, composition is to exercise the pupil in a like presentation of his own or borrowed thoughtsand their development, the natural sciences teach description of natural objects, apparatus and processes, as well as the statement of laws on the grounds of immediate sense-perception. But all these aids for exercise in the use of the mother tongue, each in its way valuable and indispensable, do not guarantee, in the same manner as mathematical training, the exclusion of words whose concepts, if not entirely wanting, are not sufficiently clear. They do not furnish in the same measure that which the mathematician demands particularly as regards precision of expression.
In Anleitung zum mathematischen Unterricht in höheren Schulen (1906), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Borrow (30)  |  Brevity (8)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Clear (100)  |  Composition (84)  |  Concept (221)  |  Connect (125)  |  Definite (110)  |  Demand (123)  |  Departure (9)  |  Description (84)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Direct (225)  |  Do (1908)  |  Due (141)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Empty (80)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Excel (4)  |  Exclusion (16)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Expression (175)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Fit (134)  |  Flight (98)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Form (959)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Give (202)  |  Ground (217)  |  Guarantee (30)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Logical (55)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mother (114)  |  Mother Tongue (3)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Never (1087)  |  Object (422)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Perception (97)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Place (177)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Precision (68)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Process (423)  |  Proper (144)  |  Prose (11)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Regard (305)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rhetoric (12)  |  Rigour (21)  |  Same (157)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Short (197)  |  Shortest (16)  |  Statement (142)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sufficiently (9)  |  Syntax (2)  |  Teach (277)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Training (80)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

Science is organized knowledge. Wisdom is organized life.
[Author Will Durant’s summary of Kant’s ideas; not a direct translation of Kant’s own words.]
Although often seen, these are (almost certainly) not Kant’s own words. While explaining Kant’s ideas, this are the words used by Will Durant in 'Kant and German Idealism: Transcendental Analytic', The Story of Philosophy (1924, 1938), 295-296. The first sentence, “Science is organized knowledge,” was first stated by Herbert Spencer in 1854 (see Science Quotes by Herbert Spencer.) On the webside of quoteinvestigator.com, which pinpoints Durant as the origin of the quote, it is further explained that Kant’s writing style used complicated expression that makes it rare to find intelligible direct quotes of Kant’s own words.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Author (167)  |  Direct (225)  |  Idea (843)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Science (3879)  |  Summary (11)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Word (619)

Scientists are not robotic inducing machines that infer structures of explanation only from regularities observed in natural phenomena (assuming, as I doubt, that such a style of reasoning could ever achieve success in principle). Scientists are human beings, immersed in culture, and struggling with all the curious tools of inference that mind permits ... Culture can potentiate as well as constrain–as Darwin’s translation of Adam Smith’s laissez-faire economic models into biology as the theory of natural selection. In any case, objective minds do not exist outside culture, so we must make the best of our ineluctable embedding.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achieve (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Assume (38)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Biology (216)  |  Case (99)  |  Constrain (9)  |  Culture (143)  |  Curious (91)  |  Darwins (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Economic (81)  |  Embed (7)  |  Exist (443)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Immerse (4)  |  Induce (22)  |  Infer (12)  |  Inference (45)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Model (102)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Objective (91)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Outside (141)  |  Permit (58)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Potentiate (2)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Selection (128)  |  Structure (344)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Style (23)  |  Success (302)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tool (117)

The dolphin ... [in air] ... has a voice (and can therefore utter vocal or vowel sounds), for it is furnished with a lung and a windpipe; but its tongue is not loose, nor has it lips, so as to give utterance to an articulate sound (or a sound of vowel and consonant in combination.)
Other translations vary. Sometimes seen quoted more briefly as: The voice of the dolphin in air is like that of the human in that they can pronounce vowels and combinations of vowels, but have difficulties with the consonants.
Aristotle
Historia Animalium (c.350 BC) as translated by D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson, The History of Animals (1910, reprint, 2004), Book IV, 110; also online etext. Brief form as quoted in Communication Between Man and Dolphin (1987), 11. By John Cunningham Lilly
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Combination (144)  |  Consonant (3)  |  Dolphin (9)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Human (1468)  |  Lung (34)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pronounce (10)  |  Sound (183)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Utterance (10)  |  Voice (52)

The laws of light and of heat translate each other;—so do the laws of sound and colour; and so galvanism, electricity and magnetism are varied forms of this selfsame energy.
In 'Letters and Social Aims: Poetry and Imagination', Prose works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1880), Vol. 3, 198.
Science quotes on:  |  Color (137)  |  Do (1908)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Energy (344)  |  Form (959)  |  Galvanism (8)  |  Heat (174)  |  Law (894)  |  Light (607)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Other (2236)  |  Sound (183)  |  Translate (19)  |  Variation (90)

The original Greek is of great use in elucidating Browning’s translation of Agamemnon.
As quoted, without citation, in William Reville, 'The Science of Writing a Good Joke', The Irish Times (5 Jun 2000). Webmaster has not yet found a primary source. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Robert Browning (7)  |  Elucidate (4)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greek (107)  |  Original (58)  |  Use (766)

To Monsieur Lavoisier by appointment. Madame Lavoisier, a lively, sensible, scientific lady, had prepared a dejuné Anglois of tea and coffee, but her conversation on Mr. Kirwan’s Essay on Phlogiston, which she is translating from the English, and on other subjects, which a woman of understanding, that works with her husband in his laboratory, knows how to adorn, was the best repast.
Entry for 16 Oct 1787. In Arthur Young, Travels in France During the Years, 1787, 1788 and 1789 (1792), 64.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Appointment (12)  |  Best (459)  |  Coffee (19)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Essay (27)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  Lively (17)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phlogiston (9)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Subject (521)  |  Tea (12)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Woman (151)  |  Work (1351)

What distinguishes the straight line and circle more than anything else, and properly separates them for the purpose of elementary geometry? Their self-similarity. Every inch of a straight line coincides with every other inch, and of a circle with every other of the same circle. Where, then, did Euclid fail? In not introducing the third curve, which has the same property—the screw. The right line, the circle, the screw—the representations of translation, rotation, and the two combined—ought to have been the instruments of geometry. With a screw we should never have heard of the impossibility of trisecting an angle, squaring the circle, etc.
From Letter (15 Feb 1852) to W.R. Hamilton, collected in Robert Perceval Graves, Life of W.R. Hamilton (1889), Vol. 3, 343.
Science quotes on:  |  Angle (20)  |  Circle (110)  |  Coincide (5)  |  Combine (57)  |  Curve (49)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Fail (185)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Line (91)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Property (168)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Representation (53)  |  Right (452)  |  Rotation (12)  |  Screw (17)  |  Self (267)  |  Separate (143)  |  Similar (36)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Square (70)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  Two (937)

You may translate books of science exactly. ... The beauties of poetry cannot be preserved in any language except that in which it was originally written.
Quoted in James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. (1826), Vol. 3, 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Book (392)  |  Language (293)  |  Original (58)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Translate (19)  |  Writing (189)

[About research with big particle accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider.] I think the primary justification for this sort of science that we do is fundamental human curiosity. ... It's true, of course, that every previous generation that's made some breakthrough in understanding nature has seen those discoveries translated into new technologies, new possibilities for the human race. That may well happen with the Higgs boson. Quite frankly, at the moment I don't see how you can use the Higgs boson for anything useful.
As quoted in Alan Boyle, 'Discovery of Doom? Collider Stirs Debate', article (8 Sep 2008) on a msnbc.com web page.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accelerator (10)  |  Breakthrough (15)  |  Course (409)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Generation (242)  |  Happen (274)  |  Higgs Boson (2)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Justification (48)  |  Large (394)  |  Large Hadron Collider (6)  |  Moment (253)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Particle (194)  |  Particle Accelerator (4)  |  Particle Physics (13)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Previous (12)  |  Primary (80)  |  Race (268)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Technology (257)  |  Think (1086)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.