Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Rest

Rest Quotes (64 quotes)
Resting Quotes, Rested Quotes


A human being is part of the whole, called by us ‘Universe’; a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as some thing separated from the rest—a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty. Nobody is able to achieve this completely but the striving for such achievement is, in itself, a part of the liberation and a foundation for inner security.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (36)  |  Achievement (128)  |  Affection (14)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Call (68)  |  Circle (28)  |  Compassion (9)  |  Completely (19)  |  Consciousness (71)  |  Creature (127)  |  Delusion (13)  |  Desire (101)  |  Embrace (22)  |  Experience (268)  |  Feelings (11)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Free (59)  |  Human Being (54)  |  Inner (27)  |  Kind (99)  |  Liberation (8)  |  Limit (86)  |  Live (186)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Nobody (38)  |  Optical (3)  |  Ourselves (34)  |  Part (146)  |  Person (114)  |  Personal (49)  |  Prison (7)  |  Restrict (8)  |  Security (27)  |  Separate (46)  |  Strive (35)  |  Task (68)  |  Thought (374)  |  Time And Space (30)  |  Universe (563)  |  Whole (122)  |  Widen (3)

A man cannot well stand by himself, and so he is glad to join a party; because if he does not find rest there, he at any rate finds quiet and safety.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Find (248)  |  Glad (4)  |  Join (15)  |  Party (16)  |  Quiet (12)  |  Safety (39)  |  Stand (60)

A Vulgar Mechanick can practice what he has been taught or seen done, but if he is in an error he knows not how to find it out and correct it, and if you put him out of his road, he is at a stand; Whereas he that is able to reason nimbly and judiciously about figure, force and motion, is never at rest till he gets over every rub.
Letter (25 May 1694) to Nathaniel Hawes. In J. Edleston (ed.), Correspondence of Sir Isaac Newton and Professor Cotes (1850), 284.
Science quotes on:  |  Correct (53)  |  Error (230)  |  Figure (32)  |  Force (194)  |  Mechanic (13)  |  Motion (127)  |  Nimble (2)  |  Practice (67)  |  Reason (330)  |  Teaching (99)  |  Vulgar (11)

Above all things expand the frontiers of science: without this the rest counts for nothing.
Aphorism 262 in Notebook J (1789-1793), as translated by R. J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 181.
Science quotes on:  |  Count (34)  |  Expanding (2)  |  Frontier (16)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Science (1699)

Ask a follower of Bacon what [science] the new philosophy, as it was called in the time of Charles the Second, has effected for mankind, and his answer is ready; “It has lengthened life; it has mitigated pain; it has extinguished diseases; it has increased the fertility of the soil; it has given new securities to the mariner; it has furnished new arms to the warrior; it has spanned great rivers and estuaries with bridges of form unknown to our fathers; it has guided the thunderbolt innocuously from heaven to earth; it has lighted up the night with the splendour of the day; it has extended the range of the human vision; it has multiplied the power of the human muscles; it has accelerated motion; it has annihilated distance; it has facilitated intercourse, correspondence, all friendly offices, all dispatch of business; it has enabled man to descend to the depths of the sea, to soar into the air, to penetrate securely into the noxious recesses of the earth, to traverse the land in cars which whirl along without horses, to cross the ocean in ships which run ten knots an hour against the wind. These are but a part of its fruits, and of its first-fruits; for it is a philosophy which never rests, which has never attained, which is never perfect. Its law is progress. A point which yesterday was invisible is its goal to-day, and will be its starting-point to-morrow.”
From essay (Jul 1837) on 'Francis Bacon' in Edinburgh Review. In Baron Thomas Babington Macaulay and Lady Trevelyan (ed.) The Works of Lord Macaulay Complete (1871), Vol. 6, 222.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceleration (6)  |  Aeronautics (12)  |  Agriculture (62)  |  Attainment (35)  |  Automobile (19)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (167)  |  Benefit (54)  |  Bridge (22)  |  Bridge Engineering (8)  |  Business (71)  |  Cave (12)  |  Correspondence (8)  |  Disease (257)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Estuary (3)  |  Exploration (93)  |  Fertility (11)  |  Fruit (63)  |  Human (445)  |  Invisibility (5)  |  Law (418)  |  Life (917)  |  Lighting (5)  |  Machine (133)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Mariner (7)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Mining (11)  |  Motion (127)  |  Muscle (32)  |  Oceanography (16)  |  Pain (82)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Progress (317)  |  River (68)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sea (143)  |  Ship (33)  |  Soil (51)  |  Steam Engine (41)  |  Strength (63)  |  Telegraph (31)  |  Thunderbolt (4)  |  Today (86)  |  Tomorrow (29)  |  Vision (55)  |  Warrior (5)  |  Yesterday (14)

Astronomy affords the most extensive example of the connection of physical sciences. In it are combined the sciences of number and quantity, or rest and motion. In it we perceive the operation of a force which is mixed up with everything that exists in the heavens or on earth; which pervades every atom, rules the motion of animate and inanimate beings, and is a sensible in the descent of the rain-drop as in the falls of Niagara; in the weight of the air, as in the periods of the moon.
On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences (1858), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (151)  |  Animate (6)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Atom (251)  |  Being (39)  |  Combination (69)  |  Connection (86)  |  Descent (14)  |  Earth (487)  |  Everything (120)  |  Example (57)  |  Existence (254)  |  Force (194)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Inanimate (14)  |  Mix (13)  |  Moon (132)  |  Motion (127)  |  Niagara (2)  |  Number (179)  |  Operation (96)  |  Perception (53)  |  Period (49)  |  Pervade (4)  |  Physical Science (54)  |  Quantity (35)  |  Raindrop (3)  |  Rule (135)  |  Sensible (22)  |  Weight (61)

Between men of different studies and professions, may be observed a constant reciprocation of reproaches. The collector of shells and stones derides the folly of him who pastes leaves and flowers upon paper, pleases himself with colours that are perceptibly fading, and amasses with care what cannot be preserved. The hunter of insects stands amazed that any man can waste his short time upon lifeless matter, while many tribes of animals yet want their history. Every one is inclined not only to promote his own study, but to exclude all others from regard, and having heated his imagination with some favourite pursuit, wonders that the rest of mankind are not seized with the same passion.
From 'Numb. 83, Tuesday, January 1, 1750', The Rambler (1756), Vol. 2, 150.
Science quotes on:  |  Amass (2)  |  Animal (309)  |  Care (73)  |  Collector (9)  |  Color (78)  |  Constant (40)  |  Deride (2)  |  Different (110)  |  Exclude (4)  |  Fading (3)  |  Favourite (5)  |  Flower (65)  |  Folly (27)  |  History (302)  |  Hunter (11)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Inclined (7)  |  Insect (57)  |  Leaf (43)  |  Lifeless (10)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Matter (270)  |  Observed (5)  |  Paper (52)  |  Passion (54)  |  Perceptibly (2)  |  Please (10)  |  Preserved (2)  |  Profession (54)  |  Promote (14)  |  Pursuit (55)  |  Regard (58)  |  Seized (2)  |  Shell (35)  |  Short (31)  |  Stand (60)  |  Stone (57)  |  Study (331)  |  Time (439)  |  Tribe (10)  |  Want (120)  |  Waste (57)  |  Wonder (134)

Bradley is one of the few basketball players who have ever been appreciatively cheered by a disinterested away-from-home crowd while warming up. This curious event occurred last March, just before Princeton eliminated the Virginia Military Institute, the year’s Southern Conference champion, from the NCAA championships. The game was played in Philadelphia and was the last of a tripleheader. The people there were worn out, because most of them were emotionally committed to either Villanova or Temple-two local teams that had just been involved in enervating battles with Providence and Connecticut, respectively, scrambling for a chance at the rest of the country. A group of Princeton players shooting basketballs miscellaneously in preparation for still another game hardly promised to be a high point of the evening, but Bradley, whose routine in the warmup time is a gradual crescendo of activity, is more interesting to watch before a game than most players are in play. In Philadelphia that night, what he did was, for him, anything but unusual. As he does before all games, he began by shooting set shots close to the basket, gradually moving back until he was shooting long sets from 20 feet out, and nearly all of them dropped into the net with an almost mechanical rhythm of accuracy. Then he began a series of expandingly difficult jump shots, and one jumper after another went cleanly through the basket with so few exceptions that the crowd began to murmur. Then he started to perform whirling reverse moves before another cadence of almost steadily accurate jump shots, and the murmur increased. Then he began to sweep hook shots into the air. He moved in a semicircle around the court. First with his right hand, then with his left, he tried seven of these long, graceful shots-the most difficult ones in the orthodoxy of basketball-and ambidextrously made them all. The game had not even begun, but the presumably unimpressible Philadelphians were applauding like an audience at an opera.
A Sense of Where You Are: Bill Bradley at Princeton
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (52)  |  Accurate (21)  |  Activity (97)  |  Air (151)  |  Audience (13)  |  Back (55)  |  Basket (5)  |  Basketball (2)  |  Battle (30)  |  Begin (52)  |  Bradley (2)  |  Cadence (2)  |  Champion (3)  |  Championship (2)  |  Chance (122)  |  Cheer (5)  |  Close (40)  |  Commit (17)  |  Conference (8)  |  Country (121)  |  Court (16)  |  Crescendo (3)  |  Crowd (12)  |  Curious (24)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Disinterest (6)  |  Drop (27)  |  Eliminate (15)  |  Emotionally (2)  |  Event (97)  |  Exception (33)  |  First (174)  |  Foot (39)  |  Game (45)  |  Gradual (18)  |  Gradually (13)  |  Group (52)  |  Hand (103)  |  Hardly (12)  |  High (78)  |  Hook (4)  |  Increase (107)  |  Institute (7)  |  Interest (170)  |  Involve (27)  |  Jump (13)  |  Leave (63)  |  Local (15)  |  Long (95)  |  March (15)  |  Mechanical (31)  |  Military (24)  |  Move (58)  |  Murmur (2)  |  Nearly (19)  |  Net (10)  |  Night (73)  |  Occur (26)  |  Opera (3)  |  Orthodoxy (7)  |  People (269)  |  Perform (27)  |  Philadelphia (3)  |  Play (60)  |  Player (5)  |  Point (72)  |  Preparation (33)  |  Presumably (3)  |  Princeton (3)  |  Promise (27)  |  Providence (6)  |  Respectively (2)  |  Reverse (14)  |  Rhythm (12)  |  Right (144)  |  Routine (11)  |  Series (38)  |  Set (56)  |  Shoot (10)  |  Start (68)  |  Steadily (4)  |  Sweep (11)  |  Team (5)  |  Time (439)  |  Try (103)  |  Unusual (13)  |  Virginia (2)  |  Warm (20)  |  Watch (39)  |  Whirl (2)  |  Worn Out (2)  |  Year (214)

But I believe that there is no philosophical high-road in science, with epistemological signposts. No, we are in a jungle and find our way by trial and error, building our road behind us as we proceed. We do not find signposts at cross-roads, but our own scouts erect them, to help the rest.
Max Born
In Experiment and Theory in Physics (1943), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Behind (25)  |  Build (80)  |  Erect (3)  |  Find (248)  |  Help (68)  |  Jungle (13)  |  Philosophical (14)  |  Proceed (25)  |  Road (47)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scout (3)  |  Trial And Error (5)

Christian Science … is the direct denial both of science and of Christianity, for Science rests wholly on the recognition of truth and Christianity on the recognition of pain.
From The Illustrated London News (1 Nov 1930), 177, Part 2, 750. In 'More on American Optimism', Collected Works (1990), Vol. 35, 406-407.
Science quotes on:  |  Christianity (8)  |  Denial (13)  |  Direct (44)  |  Pain (82)  |  Recognition (62)  |  Truth (750)  |  Wholly (7)

Detest it as lewd intercourse, it can deprive you of all your leisure, your health, your rest, and the whole happiness of your life.
Having himself spent a lifetime unsuccessfully trying to prove Euclid's postulate that parallel lines do not meet, Farkas discouraged his son János from any further attempt.
Letter (1820), to his son, János Bolyai. Translation as in Dirk Jan Struik, A concise history of mathematics (2nd Ed., 1948), 253.
Science quotes on:  |  Deprive (9)  |  Detest (3)  |  Euclid (28)  |  Happiness (82)  |  Health (136)  |  Leisure (11)  |  Lewd (2)  |  Life (917)  |  Parallel (16)  |  Postulate (23)

Developmental Biology, in capitals, is the wave of the future. The creeping reductionism of biochemistry and molecular biology has taken over the cell and heredity, and looks covetously toward the heights of development and evolution. Recent literature is last year. Ancient literature is a decade ago. The rest is history, doubtfully alive. There is no time and often no opportunity to find and study the work of experimental biologists of 50 or 100 years ago, yet that was a time when the world was fresh.
Developmental biology was a lowercase phrase that graduated about 1950 and had previously lived under the cloak of Experimental Zoology
In obituary by Charles R. Scriver, Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society (Nov 1999), 45, 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (38)  |  Ancient (68)  |  Biochemistry (46)  |  Biologist (31)  |  Biology (150)  |  Capital (15)  |  Cell (125)  |  Cloak (3)  |  Creep (7)  |  Decade (19)  |  Development (228)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Experimental (12)  |  Find (248)  |  Fresh (21)  |  Future (229)  |  Graduate (9)  |  Height (24)  |  Heredity (51)  |  History (302)  |  Literature (64)  |  Live (186)  |  Molecular Biology (23)  |  Often (69)  |  Opportunity (43)  |  Phrase (21)  |  Previously (7)  |  Recent (23)  |  Reductionism (4)  |  Study (331)  |  Time (439)  |  Toward (29)  |  Wave (55)  |  Work (457)  |  World (667)  |  Year (214)  |  Zoology (28)

Einstein uses his concept of God more often than a Catholic priest. Once I asked him:
'Tomorrow is Sunday. Do you want me to come to you, so we can work?'
'Why not?'
'Because I thought perhaps you would like to rest on Sunday.'
Einstein settled the question by saying with a loud laugh: 'God does not rest on Sunday either.'
Quest: The Evolution of a Scientist (1941), 247.
Science quotes on:  |  Albert Einstein (535)  |  God (454)  |  Priest (16)  |  Sunday (6)

Even the taking of medicine serves to make time go on with less heaviness. I have a sort of genius for physic and always had great entertainment in observing the changes of the human body and the effects produced by diet, labor, rest, and physical operations.
Science quotes on:  |  Diet (41)  |  Effect (133)  |  Human Body (30)  |  Labor (53)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Operation (96)  |  Physical (94)

I am convinced that this is the only means of advancing science, of clearing the mind from a confused heap of contradictory observations, that do but perplex and puzzle the Student, when he compares them, or misguide him if he gives himself up to their authority; but bringing them under one general head, can alone give rest and satisfaction to an inquisitive mind.
From 'A Discourse Delivered to the Students of the Royal Academy, on the Distribution of Prizes' (11 Dec 1770), in Seven Discourses Delivered in the Royal Academy (1778), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (36)  |  Authority (50)  |  Compare (15)  |  Confusion (34)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  General (92)  |  Head (52)  |  Heap (12)  |  Inquisitiveness (4)  |  Mind (544)  |  Observation (418)  |  Perplex (2)  |  Puzzle (30)  |  Satisfaction (48)  |  Science (1699)  |  Student (131)

I do not claim that intelligence, however defined, has no genetic basis–I regard it as trivially true, uninteresting, and unimportant that it does. The expression of any trait represents a complex interaction of heredity and environment ... a specific claim purporting to demonstrate a mean genetic deficiency in the intelligence of American blacks rests upon no new facts whatever and can cite no valid data in its support. It is just as likely that blacks have a genetic advantage over whites. And, either way, it doesn’t matter a damn. An individual can’t be judged by his group mean.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (42)  |  American (34)  |  Basis (60)  |  Black (27)  |  Cite (5)  |  Claim (52)  |  Complex (78)  |  Damn (11)  |  Data (100)  |  Deficiency (8)  |  Define (29)  |  Demonstrate (25)  |  Environment (138)  |  Expression (82)  |  Fact (609)  |  Genetic (11)  |  Group (52)  |  Heredity (51)  |  Individual (177)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Interaction (28)  |  Judge (43)  |  Likely (23)  |  Matter (270)  |  Mean (63)  |  New (340)  |  Purport (2)  |  Regard (58)  |  Represent (27)  |  Specific (30)  |  Support (63)  |  Trait (19)  |  True (120)  |  Unimportant (4)  |  Uninteresting (3)  |  Valid (6)  |  White (38)

I do not see any reason to assume that the heuristic significance of the principle of general relativity is restricted to gravitation and that the rest of physics can be dealt with separately on the basis of special relativity, with the hope that later on the whole may be fitted consistently into a general relativistic scheme. I do not think that such an attitude, although historically understandable, can be objectively justified. The comparative smallness of what we know today as gravitational effects is not a conclusive reason for ignoring the principle of general relativity in theoretical investigations of a fundamental character. In other words, I do not believe that it is justifiable to ask: What would physics look like without gravitation?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (99)  |  Assume (19)  |  Attitude (47)  |  Basis (60)  |  Belief (400)  |  Character (82)  |  Comparative (8)  |  Consistently (4)  |  Deal (25)  |  Effect (133)  |  Fit (31)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  General (92)  |  General Relativity (5)  |  Gravitation (27)  |  Historically (2)  |  Hope (129)  |  Ignore (22)  |  In Other Words (4)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Justify (19)  |  Know (321)  |  Late (28)  |  Objectively (5)  |  Physics (301)  |  Principle (228)  |  Reason (330)  |  Relativistic (2)  |  Restrict (8)  |  Scheme (20)  |  See (197)  |  Significance (60)  |  Smallness (4)  |  Special Relativity (3)  |  Theoretical (10)  |  Think (205)  |  Today (86)  |  Understandable (4)  |  Whole (122)

I learned what research was all about as a research student [with] Stoppani ... Max Perutz, and ... Fred Sanger... From them, I always received an unspoken message which in my imagination I translated as “Do good experiments, and don’t worry about the rest.”
From Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1984), collected in Tore Frängsmyr and ‎Jan Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures in Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 268.
Science quotes on:  |  Experiment (543)  |  Good (228)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Message (30)  |  Max Ferdinand Perutz (13)  |  Receive (39)  |  Research (517)  |  Student (131)  |  Translation (12)  |  Worry (27)

I want to know God’s thoughts; the rest are details.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Detail (65)  |  God (454)  |  Know (321)  |  Thought (374)  |  Want (120)

I want to know how God created this world. I am not interested in this or that phenomenon, in the spectrum of this or that element. I want to know His thoughts; the rest are details.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Create (98)  |  Detail (65)  |  Element (129)  |  God (454)  |  Interest (170)  |  Know (321)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Spectrum (23)  |  Thought (374)  |  Want (120)  |  World (667)

If a solution fails to appear … and yet we feel success is just around the corner, try resting for a while. … Like the early morning frost, this intellectual refreshment withers the parasitic and nasty vegetation that smothers the good seed. Bursting forth at last is the flower of truth.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999), 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (77)  |  Burst (17)  |  Corner (24)  |  Early (39)  |  Fail (34)  |  Flower (65)  |  Frost (12)  |  Good (228)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Morning (31)  |  Nasty (6)  |  Parasite (28)  |  Refreshment (2)  |  Seed (52)  |  Solution (168)  |  Success (202)  |  Truth (750)  |  Vegetation (16)

Impressed force is the action exerted on a body to change its state either of resting or of moving uniformly straight forward.
The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1687), 3rd edition (1726), trans. I. Bernard Cohen and Anne Whitman (1999), Definition 4, 405.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Change (291)  |  Exert (9)  |  Force (194)  |  Impressed (10)  |  Law Of Motion (12)

In science there is only physics; all the rest is stamp collecting.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Physics (301)  |  Science (1699)  |  Stamp Collecting (4)

In this model, the sun is a very tiny speck of dust indeed—a speck less than a three-thousandth of an inch in diameter ... Think of the sun as something less than a speck of dust in a vast city, of the earth as less than a millionth part of such a speck of dust, and we have perhaps as vivid a picture as the mind can really grasp of the relation of our home in space to the rest of the universe.
In The Universe Around Us (1953), 96.
Science quotes on:  |  City (37)  |  Diameter (9)  |  Dust (42)  |  Earth (487)  |  Grasping (2)  |  Home (58)  |  Mind (544)  |  Model (64)  |  Picture (55)  |  Relation (96)  |  Space (154)  |  Speck (8)  |  Sun (211)  |  Universe (563)  |  Vivid (16)

It is childish to rest in the discovery of mere coincidences, or of partial and extraneous laws.
A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1873), 383.
Science quotes on:  |  Childish (5)  |  Coincidence (12)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Extraneous (2)  |  Law (418)  |  Mere (41)  |  Part (146)

It is for such inquiries the modern naturalist collects his materials; it is for this that he still wants to add to the apparently boundless treasures of our national museums, and will never rest satisfied as long as the native country, the geographical distribution, and the amount of variation of any living thing remains imperfectly known. He looks upon every species of animal and plant now living as the individual letters which go to make up one of the volumes of our earth’s history; and, as a few lost letters may make a sentence unintelligible, so the extinction of the numerous forms of life which the progress of cultivation invariably entails will necessarily render obscure this invaluable record of the past. It is, therefore, an important object, which governments and scientific institutions should immediately take steps to secure, that in all tropical countries colonised by Europeans the most perfect collections possible in every branch of natural history should be made and deposited in national museums, where they may be available for study and interpretation. If this is not done, future ages will certainly look back upon us as a people so immersed in the pursuit of wealth as to be blind to higher considerations. They will charge us with having culpably allowed the destruction of some of those records of Creation which we had it in our power to preserve; and while professing to regard every living thing as the direct handiwork and best evidence of a Creator, yet, with a strange inconsistency, seeing many of them perish irrecoverably from the face of the earth, uncared for and unknown.
In 'On the Physical Geography of the Malay Archipelago', Journal of the Royal Geographical Society (1863), 33, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (26)  |  Age (137)  |  Allowed (3)  |  Amount (20)  |  Animal (309)  |  Apparently (11)  |  Available (18)  |  Back (55)  |  Best (129)  |  Blind (35)  |  Boundless (11)  |  Branch (61)  |  Certainly (18)  |  Charge (29)  |  Collect (10)  |  Collection (38)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Country (121)  |  Creation (211)  |  Creator (40)  |  Cultivation (23)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Direct (44)  |  Distribution (21)  |  Earth (487)  |  Entail (4)  |  European (5)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Extinction (55)  |  Face (69)  |  Form (210)  |  Future (229)  |  Geographical (3)  |  Government (85)  |  Handiwork (5)  |  Higher (28)  |  History (302)  |  Immediately (9)  |  Important (124)  |  Inconsistency (4)  |  Individual (177)  |  Inquiry (33)  |  Institution (32)  |  Interpretation (61)  |  Invaluable (4)  |  Invariably (8)  |  Known (15)  |  Letter (36)  |  Life (917)  |  Living (44)  |  Long (95)  |  Look (46)  |  Lost (28)  |  Made (14)  |  Material (124)  |  Modern (104)  |  Museum (22)  |  National (20)  |  Native (11)  |  Natural (128)  |  Naturalist (49)  |  Necessarily (13)  |  Numerous (21)  |  Object (110)  |  Obscure (19)  |  Past (109)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Perish (23)  |  Person (114)  |  Plant (173)  |  Possible (100)  |  Power (273)  |  Preserve (38)  |  Professing (2)  |  Progress (317)  |  Pursuit (55)  |  Record (56)  |  Regard (58)  |  Remain (77)  |  Render (17)  |  Satisfied (14)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Secure (13)  |  Seeing (48)  |  Sentence (20)  |  Species (181)  |  Step (67)  |  Strange (61)  |  Study (331)  |  Treasure (35)  |  Tropical (4)  |  Unintelligible (7)  |  Unknown (87)  |  Variation (50)  |  Volume (13)  |  Want (120)  |  Wealth (50)

It is odd to think that there is a word for something which, strictly speaking, does not exist, namely, “rest.” We distinguish between living and dead matter; between moving bodies and bodies at rest. This is a primitive point of view. What seems dead, a stone or the proverbial “door-nail,” say, is actually forever in motion. We have merely become accustomed to judge by outward appearances; by the deceptive impressions we get through our senses.
Max Born
The Restless Universe (1935), I.
Science quotes on:  |  Word (221)

It seems plain and self-evident, yet it needs to be said: the isolated knowledge obtained by a group of specialists in a narrow field has in itself no value whatsoever, but only in its synthesis with all the rest of knowledge and only inasmuch as it really contributes in this synthesis toward answering the demand, ‘Who are we?’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Contribute (10)  |  Demand (52)  |  Field (119)  |  Group (52)  |  Inasmuch (2)  |  Isolate (10)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Narrow (33)  |  Need (211)  |  Obtain (21)  |  Plain (24)  |  Really (50)  |  Say (126)  |  Seem (89)  |  Self-Evident (6)  |  Specialist (20)  |  Synthesis (38)  |  Toward (29)  |  Value (180)  |  Whatsoever (6)

Let me arrest thy thoughts; wonder with me, why plowing, building, ruling and the rest, or most of those arts, whence our lives are blest, by cursed Cain’s race invented be, and blest Seth vexed us with Astronomy.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Arrest (5)  |  Art (205)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Build (80)  |  Curse (9)  |  Invent (30)  |  Let (30)  |  Live (186)  |  Plow (6)  |  Race (76)  |  Rule (135)  |  Thou (4)  |  Thought (374)  |  Wonder (134)

Men who do not know the truth of things try to reach certainty about them, so that, if they cannot satisfy their intellects by science, their wills at least may rest on conscience.
In The New Science (3rd ed., 1744), Book 1, Para. 137, as translated by Thomas Goddard Bergin and Max Harold Fisch, The New Science of Giambattista Vico (1948), 56.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (97)  |  Conscience (36)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Satisfaction (48)  |  Truth (750)  |  Trying (18)

Montaigne simply turns his mind loose and writes whatever he feels like writing. Mostly, he wants to say that reason is not a special, unique gift of human beings, marking us off from the rest of nature.
In The Medusa and the Snail: More Notes of a Biology Watcher (1974, 1979), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Feeling (79)  |  Gift (47)  |  Human Being (54)  |  Mark (28)  |  Mind (544)  |  Michel Eyquem de Montaigne (17)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Reason (330)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Special (51)  |  Turning (5)  |  Uniqueness (7)  |  Want (120)  |  Whatever (9)  |  Writing (72)

Nature! … Incessant life, development, and movement are in her, but she advances not. She changes for ever and ever, and rests not a moment. Quietude is inconceivable to her, and she has laid her curse upon rest. She is firm. Her steps are measured, her exceptions rare, her laws unchangeable.
As quoted by T.H. Huxley, in Norman Lockyer (ed.), 'Nature: Aphorisms by Goethe', Nature (1870), 1, 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  Change (291)  |  Curse (9)  |  Development (228)  |  Exception (33)  |  Firm (19)  |  Incessant (6)  |  Inconceivable (7)  |  Laid (3)  |  Law (418)  |  Life (917)  |  Measure (70)  |  Moment (61)  |  Movement (65)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Quiet (12)  |  Rare (31)  |  Step (67)  |  Unchangeable (7)

No collateral science had profited so much by palæontology as that which teaches the structure and mode of formation of the earth’s crust, with the relative position, time, and order of formation of its constituent stratified and unstratified parts. Geology has left her old hand-maiden mineralogy to rest almost wholly on the broad shoulders of her young and vigorous offspring, the science of organic remains.
In article 'Palæontology' contributed to Encyclopædia Britannica (8th ed., 1859), Vol. 17, 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Broad (18)  |  Collateral (3)  |  Constituent (13)  |  Crust (17)  |  Earth (487)  |  Formation (54)  |  Geology (187)  |  Mineralogy (15)  |  Mode (29)  |  Offspring (15)  |  Order (167)  |  Organic (48)  |  Paleontology (29)  |  Position (54)  |  Profit (28)  |  Relative (24)  |  Remains (9)  |  Science (1699)  |  Shoulder (13)  |  Structure (191)  |  Teach (102)  |  Time (439)  |  Vigorous (11)  |  Young (72)

Oh that I had wings like a dove! for then would I fly away, and be at rest.
Bible
Psalm 55:6, The Holy Bible (1815), 475.
Science quotes on:  |  Aeronautics (12)  |  Dove (2)  |  Flying (18)  |  Wing (36)

Probably I am very naive, but I also think I prefer to remain so, at least for the time being and perhaps for the rest of my life.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Least (43)  |  Life (917)  |  Naive (8)  |  Prefer (18)  |  Probably (21)  |  Remain (77)  |  Think (205)  |  Time (439)

REST IN PEACE. THE MISTAKE SHALL NOT BE REPEATED.
Anonymous
Inscription on the cenotaph at Hiroshima, Japan. Quoted in Alan L. Mackay, The Harvest of a Quiet Eye (1977. In Robert Andrews Famous Lines: a Columbia Dictionary of Familiar Quotations (1997), 340.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (101)  |  Hiroshima (13)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Peace (58)  |  Repetition (21)

Rest is not idleness, and to lie sometimes on the grass under trees on a summer's day, listening to the murmur of the water, or watching the clouds float across the sky, is by no means a waste of time.
The Use of Life (1895), 66.

Science does not mean an idle resting upon a body of certain knowledge; it means unresting endeavor and continually progressing development toward an end which the poetic intuition may apprehend, but which the intellect can never fully grasp.
In The Philosophy of Physics (1936). Collected in The New Science: 3 Complete Works (1959), 290.
Science quotes on:  |  Continual (13)  |  Development (228)  |  Endeavour (24)  |  Grasp (43)  |  Idle (11)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Intuition (39)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Poetic (4)  |  Progress (317)  |  Science (1699)

Some people get an education without going to college; the rest get it after they get out.
Anonymous
Seen on the web, without citation, incorrectly attributed to Mark Twain. Webmaster has not yet found a book with this quotation, and greatly doubts that it is a Twain quote.
Science quotes on:  |  College (27)  |  Education (280)

Some think that the earth remains at rest. But Philolaus the Pythagorean believes that, like the sun and moon, it revolves around the fire in an oblique circle. Heraclides of Pontus, and Ephantus the Pythagorean make the earth move, not in a progressive motion, but like a wheel in a rotation from west to east about its own center.
From Preface to Book on the Revolutions.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Center (30)  |  Circle (28)  |  Earth (487)  |  East (10)  |  Fire (117)  |  Moon (132)  |  Motion (127)  |  Move (58)  |  Progressive (13)  |  Pythagoras (27)  |  Revolve (6)  |  Rotation (6)  |  Sun (211)  |  West (13)  |  Wheel (13)

Study the hindrances, acquaint yourself with the causes which have led up to the disease. Don’t guess at them, but know them through and through if you can; and if you do not know them, know that you do not, and still inquire. “Cannot” is a word for the idle, the indifferent, the self-satisfied, but it is not admissible in science. “I do not know” is manly if it does not stop there, but to say “I cannot” is a judgment both entirely illogical, and in itself bad as favouring rest in ignorance.
In Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), lix.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaint (4)  |  Admissible (3)  |  Bad (78)  |  Cause (231)  |  Diagnosis (61)  |  Disease (257)  |  Favor (22)  |  Guess (36)  |  Hindrance (3)  |  Idle (11)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Indifferent (9)  |  Inquire (6)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Know (321)  |  Manly (2)  |  Say (126)  |  Science (1699)  |  Self-Satisfied (2)  |  Stop (56)  |  Study (331)  |  Word (221)

Suppose we loosely define a religion as any discipline whose foundations rest on an element of faith, irrespective of any element of reason which may be present. Quantum mechanics for example would be a religion under this definition. But mathematics would hold the unique position of being the only branch of theology possessing a rigorous demonstration of the fact that it should be so classified.
Concluding remark in 'Consistency and Completeness—A Résumé', The American Mathematical Monthly (May 1956), 63, No.5, 305.
Science quotes on:  |  Branch (61)  |  Classification (79)  |  Definition (152)  |  Demonstration (51)  |  Discipline (38)  |  Element (129)  |  Example (57)  |  Fact (609)  |  Faith (131)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Irrespective (3)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Position (54)  |  Possessing (3)  |  Quantum Mechanics (31)  |  Reason (330)  |  Religion (210)  |  Rigorous (10)  |  Suppose (29)  |  Theology (35)  |  Unique (24)

Surgery is the red flower that blooms among the leaves and thorns that are the rest of medicine.
In Letters to a Young Doctor (1982), 51.
Science quotes on:  |  Bloom (5)  |  Flower (65)  |  Leaf (43)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Red (25)  |  Surgery (39)  |  Thorn (5)

The Qualities then that are in Bodies rightly considered, are of Three sorts.
First, the Bulk, Figure, Number, Situation, and Motion, or Rest of their solid Parts; those are in them, whether we perceive them or no; and when they are of that size, that we can discover them, we have by these an Idea of the thing, as it is in it self, as is plain in artificial things. These I call primary Qualities.
Secondly, The Power that is in any Body, by Reason of its insensible primary Qualities, to operate after a peculiar manner on any of our Senses, and thereby produce in us the different Ideas of several Colours, Sounds, Smells, Tastes, etc. These are usually called sensible Qualities.
Thirdly, The Power that is in any Body, by Reason of the particular Constitution of its primary Qualities, to make such a change in the Bulk, Figure, Texture, and Motion of another Body, as to make it operate on our Senses, differently from what it did before. Thus the Sun has a Power to make Wax white, and Fire to make Lead fluid. These are usually called Powers.
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690). Edited by Peter Nidditch (1975), Book 2, Chapter 8, Section 23, 140-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Bulk (5)  |  Color (78)  |  Figure (32)  |  Fire (117)  |  Idea (440)  |  Lead (101)  |  Motion (127)  |  Number (179)  |  Quality (65)  |  Sense (240)  |  Situation (41)  |  Smell (16)  |  Sound (59)  |  Sun (211)  |  Taste (35)  |  Wax (8)

The best of all medicines are rest and fasting.
In Tryon Edwards (ed.), A Dictionary of Thoughts (1908), 339.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (129)  |  Fasting (2)  |  Medicine (322)

The edge of the sea is a strange and beautiful place. All through the long history of Earth it has been an area of unrest where waves have broken heavily against the land, where the tides have pressed forward over the continents, receded, and then returned. For no two suc-cessive days is the shore line precisely the same. Not only do the tides advance and retreat in their eternal rhythms, but the level of the sea itself is never at rest. It rises or falls as the glaciers melt or grow, as the floor of the deep ocean basins shifts under its increasing load of sediments, or as the Earth’s crust along the continental margins warps up or down in adjustment to strain and tension. Today a little more land may belong to the sea, tomorrow a little less. Always the edge of the sea remains an elusive and indefinable boundary.
The Edge of the Sea
Science quotes on:  |  Adjustment (12)  |  Advance (123)  |  Area (18)  |  Basin (2)  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Belong (33)  |  Boundary (27)  |  Break (33)  |  Continent (39)  |  Crust (17)  |  Deep (81)  |  Down (44)  |  Earth (487)  |  Edge (16)  |  Elusive (6)  |  Eternal (43)  |  Fall (89)  |  Floor (16)  |  Forward (21)  |  Glacier (13)  |  Grow (66)  |  Heavily (3)  |  History Of Earth (2)  |  Increase (107)  |  Indefinable (2)  |  Land (83)  |  Less (54)  |  Level (51)  |  Line (44)  |  Little (126)  |  Load (8)  |  Long (95)  |  Margin (5)  |  Melt (15)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Place (111)  |  Precisely (11)  |  Press (16)  |  Recede (2)  |  Remain (77)  |  Retreat (9)  |  Return (35)  |  Rhythm (12)  |  Rise (51)  |  Same (92)  |  Sea (143)  |  Sediment (7)  |  Shift (21)  |  Shore (11)  |  Strain (8)  |  Strange (61)  |  Tension (7)  |  Tide (18)  |  Today (86)  |  Tomorrow (29)  |  Unrest (2)  |  Warp (5)  |  Wave (55)

The heart is the only organ that takes no rest.
Martin H. Fischer, Howard Fabing (ed.) and Ray Marr (ed.), Fischerisms (1944).
Science quotes on:  |  Heart (110)  |  Organ (60)

The indescribable pleasure—which pales the rest of life's joys—is abundant compensation for the investigator who endures the painful and persevering analytical work that precedes the appearance of the new truth, like the pain of childbirth. It is true to say that nothing for the scientific scholar is comparable to the things that he has discovered. Indeed, it would be difficult to find an investigator willing to exchange the paternity of a scientific conquest for all the gold on earth. And if there are some who look to science as a way of acquiring gold instead of applause from the learned, and the personal satisfaction associated with the very act of discovery, they have chosen the wrong profession.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999), 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (15)  |  Acquisition (32)  |  Analysis (123)  |  Appearance (77)  |  Applause (6)  |  Childbirth (2)  |  Choice (64)  |  Comparable (5)  |  Compensation (6)  |  Conquest (13)  |  Difficulty (113)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Earth (487)  |  Endurance (4)  |  Exchange (11)  |  Find (248)  |  Gold (55)  |  Investigator (28)  |  Joy (61)  |  Learned (20)  |  Life (917)  |  New (340)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Pain (82)  |  Pale (4)  |  Paternity (2)  |  Perseverance (15)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Preceding (8)  |  Profession (54)  |  Satisfaction (48)  |  Scholar (31)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Truth (750)  |  Willingness (9)  |  Work (457)

The love of experiment was very strong in him [Charles Darwin], and I can remember the way he would say, “I shan't be easy till I have tried it,” as if an outside force were driving him. He enjoyed experimenting much more than work which only entailed reasoning, and when he was engaged on one of his books which required argument and the marshalling of facts, he felt experimental work to be a rest or holiday.
In Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of his Published Letters (1908), 95.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (227)  |  Book (181)  |  Charles Darwin (284)  |  Enjoyment (27)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Fact (609)  |  Holiday (3)  |  Reasoning (79)

The one quality that seems to be so universal among eccentrics is … so subjective as to be incapable of being proved or disproved, yet … eccentrics appear to be happier than the rest of us.
From a summary his study of 1,000 people, done at Royal Edinburgh Hospital in Scotland. In David Weeks, David Joseph Weeks and Jamie James, Eccentrics (1995), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (55)  |  Disprove (15)  |  Eccentric (10)  |  Happiness (82)  |  Happy (22)  |  Incapable (11)  |  Prove (60)  |  Quality (65)  |  Research (517)  |  Seem (89)  |  Subjective (9)  |  Universal (70)

The only man who behaved sensibly was my tailor; he took my measurement anew every time he saw me, while all the rest went on with their old measurements and expected them to fit me.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anew (5)  |  Behave (13)  |  Expect (27)  |  Fit (31)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Old (104)  |  See (197)  |  Tailor (2)  |  Time (439)

The sciences are said, and they are truly said, to have a mutual connection, that any one of them may be the better understood, for an insight into the rest.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Better (131)  |  Connection (86)  |  Insight (57)  |  Mutual (22)  |  Say (126)  |  Science (1699)  |  Truly (19)  |  Understand (189)

The sun rises. In that short phrase, in a single fact, is enough information to keep biology, physics, and philosophy busy for all the rest of time.
Lifetide: a Biology of the Unconscious (1979)
Science quotes on:  |  Biology (150)  |  Busy (21)  |  Fact (609)  |  Information (102)  |  Keep (47)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Phrase (21)  |  Physics (301)  |  Rise (51)  |  Short (31)  |  Single (72)  |  Sun (211)  |  Time (439)

The third [argument of motion is] to the effect that the flying arrow is at rest, which result follows from the assumption that time is composed of moments: if this assumption is not granted, the conclusion will not follow.Arrow paradox
Zeno
Aristotle, Physics, 239b, 30-1. In Jonathan Barnes (ed.), The Complete Works of Aristotle (1984), Vol. 1, 405.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrow (13)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Continuous (24)  |  Discrete (6)  |  Moment (61)  |  Motion (127)

There were two kinds of physicists in Berlin: on the one hand there was Einstein, and on the other all the rest.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Berlin (7)  |  Einstein (4)  |  Hand (103)  |  Kind (99)  |  Physicist (130)

Thinking about the universe has now been handed over to specialists. The rest of us merely read about it.
City Aphorisms, Seventh Selection (1990).
Science quotes on:  |  Hand (103)  |  Merely (35)  |  Read (83)  |  Specialist (20)  |  Think (205)  |  Universe (563)

Two-thirds of all preachers, doctors and lawyers are hanging on to the coat tails of progress, shouting, whoa! while a good many of the rest are busy strewing banana peels along the line of march.
In Elbert Hubbard (ed. and publ.), The Philistine (May 1908), 26, No. 6, 151.
Science quotes on:  |  Banana (3)  |  Busy (21)  |  Clergyman (5)  |  Coattails (2)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Hanging (4)  |  Lawyer (18)  |  March (15)  |  Peel (2)  |  Preacher (9)  |  Progress (317)  |  Shout (9)  |  Strewing (2)

We cannot rest and sit down lest we rust and decay. Health is maintained only through work. And as it is with all life so it is with science. We are always struggling from the relative to the absolute.
In Where is Science Going? (1932), 200.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (65)  |  Decay (31)  |  Health (136)  |  Life (917)  |  Maintenance (13)  |  Relative (24)  |  Rust (4)  |  Sitting (5)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Work (457)

We may have to live with the failure to control atomic energy for the rest of our lives. If that is to be our lot, let us face it steadfastly with faith in the civilisation we defend. The acid test of the strength of our society is the self-discipline of its adherents.
As quoted in 'On This Day', The Times (1 Feb 2001), 21, reprinting the article 'United States to Develop Hydrogen Bomb' from The Times (1 Feb 1950), which in turn was quoting Baruch from 'International Control of Atomic Energy', Air Affairs (Spring 1950), 319.
Science quotes on:  |  Adherent (6)  |  Atomic Energy (21)  |  Civilisation (18)  |  Control (93)  |  Defend (20)  |  Failure (118)  |  Faith (131)  |  Life (917)  |  Self-Discipline (2)  |  Society (188)  |  Steadfast (2)  |  Strength (63)

What binds us to space-time is our rest mass, which prevents us from flying at the speed of light, when time stops and space loses meaning. In a world of light there are neither points nor moments of time; beings woven from light would live “nowhere” and “nowhen”; only poetry and mathematics are capable of speaking meaningfully about such things.
In 'Mathematics and Physics', collected in Mathematics as Metaphor: Selected Essays of Yuri I. Manin (2007), 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Bind (18)  |  Capability (35)  |  Flying (18)  |  Light (246)  |  Lose (53)  |  Mass (61)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Meaningful (14)  |  Moment (61)  |  Nowhere (19)  |  Poetry (96)  |  Point (72)  |  Prevent (27)  |  Space (154)  |  Space-Time (14)  |  Speaking (38)  |  Speed Of Light (11)  |  Stop (56)  |  Time (439)  |  World (667)

Wherever possible, scientists experiment. Which experiments suggest themselves often depends on which theories currently prevail. Scientists are intent of testing those theories to the breaking point. They do not trust what is intuitively obvious. That the Earth is flat was once obvious. That heavy bodies fall faster than light ones was once obvious. That bloodsucking leeches cure most diseases was once obvious. That some people are naturally and by divine decree slaves was once obvious. That there is such a place as the center of the Universe, and that the Earth sits in that exalted spot was once obvious. That there is an absolute standard of rest was once obvious. The truth may be puzzling or counterintuitive. It may contradict deeply held beliefs. Experiment is how we get a handle on it.
In The Demon-Haunted World: Science As A Candle in the Dark (1995), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (65)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Flat (13)  |  Leech (5)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Prevailing (2)  |  Puzzling (2)  |  Slave (21)  |  Test (96)  |  Theory (582)  |  Trust (40)  |  Universe (563)

Without the suitable conditions life could not exist. But both life and its conditions set forth the operations of inscrutable Power. We know not its origin; we know not its end. And the presumption, if not the degradation, rests with those who place upon the throne of the universe a magnified image of themselves, and make its doings a mere colossal imitation of their own.
In Forms of Water in Clouds and Rivers, Ice and Glaciers (1872), 125.
Science quotes on:  |  Colossal (10)  |  Condition (119)  |  Degradation (12)  |  Doing (36)  |  End (141)  |  Existence (254)  |  God (454)  |  Image (38)  |  Imitation (17)  |  Inscrutability (2)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Magnification (8)  |  Operation (96)  |  Origin (77)  |  Place (111)  |  Power (273)  |  Presumption (11)  |  Suitability (11)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Throne (3)  |  Universe (563)  |  Without (13)

Zoocentrism is the primary fallacy of human sociobiology, for this view of human behavior rests on the argument that if the actions of ‘lower’ animals with simple nervous systems arise as genetic products of natural selection, then human behavior should have a similar basis.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Animal (309)  |  Argument (59)  |  Arise (32)  |  Basis (60)  |  Fallacy (19)  |  Genetic (11)  |  Human (445)  |  Human Behavior (4)  |  Low (16)  |  Natural Selection (79)  |  Primary (29)  |  Product (72)  |  Similar (22)  |  Simple (111)  |  Sociobiology (4)  |  View (115)

[The blame for the future 'plight of civilization] must rest on scientific men, equally with others, for being incapable of accepting the responsibility for the profound social upheavals which their own work primarily has brought about in human relationships.
Quoted in Thaddeus Trenn, 'The Central Role of Energy in Soddy's Holistic and Critical Approach to Nuclear Science, Economics, and Social Responsibility', British Journal for the History of Science (1979), 42, 261.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (41)  |  Blame (17)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Equality (21)  |  Human (445)  |  Incapable (11)  |  Profound (46)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Responsibility (47)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Social (93)  |  Upheaval (3)  |  Work (457)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.