Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, ... finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell ... whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index G > Category: Governing

Governing Quotes (20 quotes)

As a scientist and geneticist I started to feel that science would probably soon reach the point where its interference into the life processes would be counterproductive if a properly designed governing policy was not implemented. A heavily overcrowded planet, ninety-five percent urbanized with nuclear energy as the main source of energy and with all aspects of life highly computerized, is not too pleasant a place for human life. The life of any individual soon will be predictable from birth to death. Medicine, able to cure almost everything, will make the load of accumulated defects too heavy in the next two or three centuries. The artificial prolongation of life, which looked like a very bright idea when I started research in aging about twenty-five years ago, has now lost its attractiveness for me. This is because I now know that the aging process is so multiform and complex that the real technology and chemistry of its prevention by artificial interference must be too complex and expensive. It would be the privilege of a few, not the method for the majority. I also was deeply concerned about the fact that most research is now either directly or indirectly related to military projects and objectives for power.
Quoted in 'Zhores A(leksandrovich) Medvedev', Contemporary Authors Online, Gale, 2002.
Science quotes on:  |  Aging (9)  |  All (4108)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Birth (147)  |  Bright (79)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Complex (188)  |  Concern (228)  |  Cure (122)  |  Death (388)  |  Defect (31)  |  Design (195)  |  Energy (344)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feel (367)  |  Future (429)  |  Geneticist (16)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Heavily (14)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Implement (13)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interference (21)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Majority (66)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Method (505)  |  Military (40)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Next (236)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Energy (15)  |  Objective (91)  |  Planet (356)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Process (423)  |  Project (73)  |  Reach (281)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Soon (186)  |  Start (221)  |  Technology (257)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

Engineering is the practice of safe and economic application of the scientific laws governing the forces and materials of nature by means of organization, design and construction, for the general benefit of mankind.
1920
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Construction (112)  |  Design (195)  |  Economic (81)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  Govern (64)  |  Law (894)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Material (353)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organization (114)  |  Practice (204)  |  Safe (54)  |  Scientific (941)

Every science has for its basis a system of principles as fixed and unalterable as those by which the universe is regulated and governed. Man cannot make principles; he can only discover them.
In The Age of Reason (1794, 1834), 30-31.
Science quotes on:  |  Basis (173)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Govern (64)  |  Man (2251)  |  Principle (507)  |  Science (3879)  |  System (537)  |  Unalterable (7)  |  Universe (857)

I fully agree with all that you say on the advantages of H. Spencer's excellent expression of 'the survival of the fittest.' This, however, had not occurred to me till reading your letter. It is, however, a great objection to this term that it cannot be used as a substantive governing a verb; and that this is a real objection I infer from H. Spencer continually using the words, natural selection.
Letter to A. R. Wallace July 1866. In Francis Darwin (ed.), The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Including an Autobiographical Chapter (1887), Vol. 3, 45-6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Expression (175)  |  Great (1574)  |  Letter (109)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Objection (32)  |  Reading (133)  |  Say (984)  |  Selection (128)  |  Herbert Spencer (37)  |  Survival (94)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (40)  |  Term (349)  |  Word (619)

I suppose that I tend to be optimistic about the future of physics. And nothing makes me more optimistic than the discovery of broken symmetries. In the seventh book of the Republic, Plato describes prisoners who are chained in a cave and can see only shadows that things outside cast on the cave wall. When released from the cave at first their eyes hurt, and for a while they think that the shadows they saw in the cave are more real than the objects they now see. But eventually their vision clears, and they can understand how beautiful the real world is. We are in such a cave, imprisoned by the limitations on the sorts of experiments we can do. In particular, we can study matter only at relatively low temperatures, where symmetries are likely to be spontaneously broken, so that nature does not appear very simple or unified. We have not been able to get out of this cave, but by looking long and hard at the shadows on the cave wall, we can at least make out the shapes of symmetries, which though broken, are exact principles governing all phenomena, expressions of the beauty of the world outside.
In Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1989), 'Conceptual Foundations of the Unified Theory of Weak and Electromagnetic Interactions.' Nobel Lectures: Physics 1971-1980 (1992), 556.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Book (392)  |  Broken (56)  |  Cast (66)  |  Cave (15)  |  Describe (128)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Expression (175)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  Hard (243)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Long (790)  |  Looking (189)  |  Low (80)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Outside (141)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Plato (76)  |  Principle (507)  |  Prisoner (7)  |  Reality (261)  |  Republic (15)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Shape (72)  |  Simple (406)  |  Study (653)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Tend (124)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vision (123)  |  Wall (67)  |  World (1774)

I think the next [21st] century will be the century of complexity. We have already discovered the basic laws that govern matter and understand all the normal situations. We don’t know how the laws fit together, and what happens under extreme conditions. But I expect we will find a complete unified theory sometime this century. The is no limit to the complexity that we can build using those basic laws.
[Answer to question: Some say that while the twentieth century was the century of physics, we are now entering the century of biology. What do you think of this?]
'"Unified Theory" Is Getting Closer, Hawking Predicts', interview in San Jose Mercury News (23 Jan 2000), 29A. Answer quoted in Ashok Sengupta, Chaos, Nonlinearity, Complexity: The Dynamical Paradigm of Nature (2006), vii. Question included in Hans-Joachim Schellnhuber, Nicholas Stern and Mario Molina , Global Sustainability: a Nobel Cause (2010), 13. Cite from Brent Davis and Dennis J. Sumara, Complexity and Education: Inquiries Into Learning, Teaching, and Research (2006), 171.
Science quotes on:  |  20th Century (36)  |  21st Century (7)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Answer (366)  |  Basic (138)  |  Biology (216)  |  Build (204)  |  Century (310)  |  Complete (204)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Condition (356)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Find (998)  |  Fit (134)  |  Govern (64)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Limit (280)  |  Matter (798)  |  Next (236)  |  Normal (28)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Question (621)  |  Say (984)  |  Situation (113)  |  Sometime (4)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Together (387)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unified Theory (7)  |  Will (2355)

If and when all the laws governing physical phenomena are finally discovered, and all the empirical constants occurring in these laws are finally expressed through the four independent basic constants, we will be able to say that physical science has reached its end, that no excitement is left in further explorations, and that all that remains to a physicist is either tedious work on minor details or the self-educational study and adoration of the magnificence of the completed system. At that stage physical science will enter from the epoch of Columbus and Magellan into the epoch of the National Geographic Magazine!
'Any Physics Tomorrow', Physics Today, January 1949, 2, 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Adoration (4)  |  All (4108)  |  Basic (138)  |  Completed (30)  |  Constant (144)  |  Detail (146)  |  Discover (553)  |  Empirical (54)  |  End (590)  |  Enter (141)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Express (186)  |  Geographic (10)  |  Law (894)  |  Magnificence (13)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Reach (281)  |  Remain (349)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Self (267)  |  Stage (143)  |  Study (653)  |  System (537)  |  Tedious (14)  |  Through (849)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

My original decision to devote myself to science was a direct result of the discovery which has never ceased to fill me with enthusiasm since my early youth—the comprehension of the far from obvious fact that the laws of human reasoning coincide with the laws governing the sequences of the impressions we receive from the world about us; that, therefore, pure reasoning can enable man to gain an insight into the mechanism of the latter. In this connection, it is of paramount importance that the outside world is something independent from man, something absolute, and the quest for the laws which apply to this absolute appeared to me as the most sublime scientific pursuit in life.
'A Scientific Autobiography' (1948), in Scientific Autobiography and Other Papers, trans. Frank Gaynor (1950), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Application (242)  |  Apply (160)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Conincidence (4)  |  Connection (162)  |  Decision (91)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Early (185)  |  Enable (119)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fill (61)  |  Gain (145)  |  Human (1468)  |  Importance (286)  |  Impression (114)  |  Independence (34)  |  Insight (102)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Original (58)  |  Outside (141)  |  Paramount (10)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Quest (39)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Receive (114)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Something (719)  |  Sublime (46)  |  World (1774)  |  Youth (101)

Physical science is thus approaching the stage when it will be complete, and therefore uninteresting. Given the laws governing the motions of electrons and protons, the rest is merely geography—a collection of particular facts.
In What I Believe (1925), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (108)  |  Collection (64)  |  Complete (204)  |  Electron (93)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Geography (36)  |  Govern (64)  |  Law (894)  |  Merely (316)  |  Motion (310)  |  Particular (76)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Proton (21)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Stage (143)  |  Uninteresting (9)  |  Will (2355)

Science, in its ultimate ideal, consists of a set of propositions arranged in a hierarchy, the lowest level of the hierarchy being concerned with particular facts, and the highest with some general law, governing everything in the universe. The various levels in the hierarchy have a two-fold logical connection, travelling one up, one down; the upward connection proceeds by induction, the downward by deduction.
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Being (1278)  |  Concern (228)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consist (223)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Down (456)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  General (511)  |  Govern (64)  |  Hierarchy (17)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Induction (77)  |  Law (894)  |  Logical (55)  |  Particular (76)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Set (394)  |  Travelling (17)  |  Two (937)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Universe (857)  |  Upward (43)  |  Various (200)

Scientific method, although in its more refined forms it may seem complicated, is in essence remarkably simply. It consists in observing such facts as will enable the observer to discover general laws governing facts of the kind in question. The two stages, first of observation, and second of inference to a law, are both essential, and each is susceptible of almost indefinite refinement. (1931)
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Consist (223)  |  Discover (553)  |  Enable (119)  |  Essence (82)  |  Essential (199)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Indefinite (20)  |  Inference (45)  |  Kind (557)  |  Law (894)  |  Method (505)  |  More (2559)  |  Observation (555)  |  Question (621)  |  Refinement (17)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Stage (143)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)

The animal kingdom exhibits a series of mental developments which may be regarded as antecedents to the mental development of man, for the mental life of animals shows itself to be throughout, in its elements and in the general laws governing the combination of the elements, the same as the mental life of man.
Outline of Psychology (1902)
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Kingdom (20)  |  Combination (144)  |  Development (422)  |  Element (310)  |  General (511)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Regard (305)  |  Series (149)  |  Show (346)  |  Throughout (98)

The focal points of our different reflections have been called “science”’ or “art” according to the nature of their “formal” objects, to use the language of logic. If the object leads to action, we give the name of “art” to the compendium of rules governing its use and to their technical order. If the object is merely contemplated under different aspects, the compendium and technical order of the observations concerning this object are called “science.” Thus metaphysics is a science and ethics is an art. The same is true of theology and pyrotechnics.
Definition of 'Art', Encyclopédie (1751). Translated by Nelly S. Hoyt and Thomas Cassirer (1965), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Action (327)  |  Art (657)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Call (769)  |  Compendium (5)  |  Concern (228)  |  Contemplate (18)  |  Different (577)  |  Ethic (40)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Formal (33)  |  Govern (64)  |  Language (293)  |  Lead (384)  |  Logic (287)  |  Merely (316)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Point (580)  |  Pyrotechnic (2)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Technical (43)  |  Theology (52)  |  Use (766)

The future science of government should be called “la cybernétique” (1843)
Coining the French word to mean “the art of governing,” from the Greek (Kybernetes = navigator or steersman), subsequently adopted as cybernetics by Norbert Weiner for the field of control and communication theory.
Essai sur la philosophie des sciences, ou Exposition analytique d'une classification naturelle de toutes les connaissances humaines (1834). Quoted http://www.control.lth.se/news/cyber.html. Information for English origin from Oxford English Dictionary.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Call (769)  |  Communication (94)  |  Control (167)  |  Cybernetic (5)  |  Cybernetics (5)  |  Field (364)  |  Future (429)  |  Government (110)  |  Greek (107)  |  Mean (809)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Science (3879)  |  Theory (970)  |  Word (619)

The game of chess has always fascinated mathematicians, and there is reason to suppose that the possession of great powers of playing that game is in many features very much like the possession of great mathematical ability. There are the different pieces to learn, the pawns, the knights, the bishops, the castles, and the queen and king. The board possesses certain possible combinations of squares, as in rows, diagonals, etc. The pieces are subject to certain rules by which their motions are governed, and there are other rules governing the players. … One has only to increase the number of pieces, to enlarge the field of the board, and to produce new rules which are to govern either the pieces or the player, to have a pretty good idea of what mathematics consists.
In Book review, 'What is Mathematics?', Bulletin American Mathematical Society (May 1912), 18, 386-387.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Bishop (3)  |  Board (12)  |  Castle (5)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chess (25)  |  Combination (144)  |  Consist (223)  |  Diagonal (3)  |  Different (577)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Fascinate (12)  |  Feature (44)  |  Field (364)  |  Game (101)  |  Good (889)  |  Govern (64)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Increase (210)  |  King (35)  |  Knight (6)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Motion (310)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pawn (2)  |  Piece (38)  |  Play (112)  |  Player (8)  |  Playing (42)  |  Possess (156)  |  Possession (65)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Pretty (20)  |  Produce (104)  |  Queen (14)  |  Reason (744)  |  Row (9)  |  Rule (294)  |  Square (70)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suppose (156)

The prediction of nuclear winter is drawn not, of course, from any direct experience with the consequences of global nuclear war, but rather from an investigation of the governing physics. (The problem does not lend itself to full experimental verification—at least not more than once.)[co-author with American atmospheric chemist Richard P. Turco (1943- )]
A Path Where No Man Thought: Nuclear Winter and the End of the Arms Race (1990), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Author (167)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Course (409)  |  Direct (225)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Global (35)  |  Investigation (230)  |  More (2559)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Winter (3)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Problem (676)  |  Verification (31)  |  War (225)  |  Winter (44)

The universe is governed by science. But science tells us that we can’t solve the equations, directly in the abstract. We need to use the effective theory of Darwinian natural selection of those societies most likely to survive. We assign them higher value.
[Answer to question: What is the value in knowing “Why are we here?”]
'Stephen Hawking: "There is no heaven; it’s a fairy story"', interview in newspaper The Guardian (15 May 2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Answer (366)  |  Assignment (12)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Directly (22)  |  Effective (59)  |  Equation (132)  |  Govern (64)  |  Higher (37)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Likely (34)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Need (290)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Selection (128)  |  Society (326)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Survival (94)  |  Survive (79)  |  Tell (340)  |  Theory (970)  |  Universe (857)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Why (491)

Too early and perverse sexual satisfaction injures not merely the mind, but also the body; inasmuch as it induces neuroses of the sexual apparatus (irritable weakness of the centres governing erection and ejaculation; defective pleasurable feeling in coitus), while, at the same time, it maintains the imagination and libido in continuous excitement.
Psychopathia Sexualis: With Special Reference to Contrary Sexual Instinct: A Medico-Legal Study (1886), trans. Charles Gilbert Chaddock (1892), 189.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Body (537)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Early (185)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Induce (22)  |  Libido (2)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Neurosis (9)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Sex (69)  |  Sexual (26)  |  Time (1877)  |  Weakness (48)

We have simply arrived too late in the history of the universe to see this primordial simplicity easily ... But although the symmetries are hidden from us, we can sense that they are latent in nature, governing everything about us. That's the most exciting idea I know: that nature is much simpler than it looks. Nothing makes me more hopeful that our generation of human beings may actually hold the key to the universe in our hands—that perhaps in our lifetimes we may be able to tell why all of what we see in this immense universe of galaxies and particles is logically inevitable.
Quoted in Nigel Calder, The Key to the Universe: A Report on the New Physics (1978), 185.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Everything (476)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Galaxies (29)  |  Galaxy (51)  |  Generation (242)  |  Hidden (42)  |  History (673)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hopeful (6)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inevitability (9)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Key (50)  |  Know (1518)  |  Late (118)  |  Latent (12)  |  Lifetime (31)  |  Logic (287)  |  Look (582)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Particle (194)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Tell (340)  |  Universe (857)  |  Why (491)

Whoever would not remain in complete ignorance of the resources which cause him to act; whoever would seize, at a single philosophical glance, the nature of man and animals, and their relations to external objects; whoever would establish, on the intellectual and moral functions, a solid doctrine of mental diseases, of the general and governing influence of the brain in the states of health and disease, should know, that it is indispensable, that the study of the organization of the brain should march side by side with that of its functions.
On the Organ of the Moral Qualities and Intellectual Faculties, and the Plurality of the Cerebral Organs (1835), 45-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Animal (617)  |  Brain (270)  |  Cause (541)  |  Complete (204)  |  Disease (328)  |  Function (228)  |  General (511)  |  Glance (34)  |  Health (193)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Influence (222)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Man And Animals (5)  |  March (46)  |  Mental (177)  |  Moral (195)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Man (8)  |  Object (422)  |  Organization (114)  |  Remain (349)  |  Side (233)  |  Single (353)  |  Solid (116)  |  State (491)  |  Study (653)  |  Whoever (42)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.