Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index I > Category: Ideal

Ideal Quotes (99 quotes)

After we came out of the church, we stood talking for some time together of Bishop Berkeley’s ingenious sophistry to prove the non-existence of matter, and that every thing in the universe is merely ideal. I observed, that though we are satisfied his doctrine is not true, it is impossible to refute it. I never shall forget the alacrity with which Johnson answered, striking his foot with mighty force against a large stone, till he rebounded from it, “I refute it thus.”
In Boswell’s Life of Johnson (1820), Vol. 1, 218.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Answer (366)  |  George Berkeley (7)  |  Church (56)  |  Existence (456)  |  Force (487)  |  Forget (115)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Samuel Johnson (50)  |  Large (394)  |  Matter (798)  |  Merely (316)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observed (149)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Prove (250)  |  Stone (162)  |  Striking (48)  |  Talking (76)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Universe (857)

All our scientific and philosophic ideals are altars to unknown gods.
'The Dilemma of Determinism' (1884). In The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy (1897), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Altar (10)  |  God (757)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Unknown (182)

All successful people are big dreamers. They imagine what their future could be, ideal in every respect, and then they work every day toward their distant vision, that goal or purpose.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Big (48)  |  Distant (33)  |  Dreamer (13)  |  Future (429)  |  Goal (145)  |  Imagine (164)  |  People (1005)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Respect (207)  |  Successful (123)  |  Toward (45)  |  Vision (123)  |  Work (1351)

America has never been united by blood or birth or soil. We are bound by ideals that move us beyond our backgrounds, lift us above our interests and teach us what it means to be citizens. Every child must be taught these principles. Every citizen must uphold them. And every immigrant, by embracing these ideals, makes our country more, not less, American.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  America (127)  |  American (46)  |  Background (43)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bind (25)  |  Birth (147)  |  Blood (134)  |  Bound (119)  |  Child (307)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Country (251)  |  Embrace (46)  |  Interest (386)  |  Less (103)  |  Lift (55)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Move (216)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Principle (507)  |  Soil (86)  |  Teach (277)  |  United (14)

Among all highly civilized peoples the golden age of art has always been closely coincident with the golden age of the pure sciences, particularly with mathematics, the most ancient among them.
This coincidence must not be looked upon as accidental, but as natural, due to an inner necessity. Just as art can thrive only when the artist, relieved of the anxieties of existence, can listen to the inspirations of his spirit and follow in their lead, so mathematics, the most ideal of the sciences, will yield its choicest blossoms only when life’s dismal phantom dissolves and fades away, when the striving after naked truth alone predominates, conditions which prevail only in nations while in the prime of their development.
From Die Entwickelung der Mathematik im Zusammenhange mit der Ausbreitung der Kultur (1893), 4. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 191-192. From the original German, “Bei allen Kulturvölkern ist die Blüthezeit der Kunst auch immer zeitlich eng verbunden mit einer Blüthezeit der reinen Wissenschaften, insbesondere der ältesten unter ihnen, der Mathematik.
Dieses Zusammentreffen dürfte auch nicht ein zufälliges, sondern ein natürliches, ein Ergebniss innerer Notwendigkeit sein. Wie die Kunst nur gedeihen kann, wenn der Künstler, unbekümmert um die Bedrängnisse des Daseins, den Eingebungen seines Geistes lauschen und ihnen folgen kann, so kann die idealste Wissenschaft, die Mathematik, erst dann ihre schönsten Blüthen treiben, wenn des Erdenlebens schweres Traumbild sinkt und sinkt und sinkt, wenn das Streben nach der nackten Wahrheit allein bestimmend ist, was nur bei Nationen in der Vollkraft ihrer Entwickelung vorkommt.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accidental (27)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Art (657)  |  Artist (90)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Civilized (18)  |  Coincidence (19)  |  Coincident (2)  |  Condition (356)  |  Development (422)  |  Dissolve (20)  |  Due (141)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fade (10)  |  Follow (378)  |  Golden (45)  |  Golden Age (10)  |  Inner (71)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Listen (73)  |  Look (582)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessity (191)  |  People (1005)  |  Phantom (9)  |  Predominate (7)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Prime (11)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Relieve (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Strive (46)  |  Thrive (18)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)  |  Yield (81)

An intimate friend and a hated enemy have always been indispensable requirements for my emotional life; I have always been able to create them anew, and not infrequently my childish ideal has been so closely approached that friend and enemy coincided in the same person.
The Interpretation of Dreams (1913), 385. Sigmund Freud - 1913
Science quotes on:  |  Anew (18)  |  Approach (108)  |  Childish (20)  |  Coincidence (19)  |  Create (235)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Friend (168)  |  Hatred (21)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Infrequently (2)  |  Intimate (15)  |  Life (1795)  |  Person (363)  |  Requirement (63)

And science, we should insist, better than other discipline, can hold up to its students and followers an ideal of patient devotion to the search to objective truth, with vision unclouded by personal or political motive, not tolerating any lapse from precision or neglect of any anomaly, fearing only prejudice and preconception, accepting nature’s answers humbly and with courage, and giving them to the world with an unflinching fidelity. The world cannot afford to lose such a contribution to the moral framework of its civilisation.
Concluding statements of Pilgrim Trust Lecture (22 Oct 1946) delivered at National Academy of Science Washington, DC. Published in 'The Freedom of Science', Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society (25 Feb 1947), 91, No. 1, 72.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accepting (22)  |  Anomaly (11)  |  Answer (366)  |  Better (486)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Courage (69)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Follower (11)  |  Framework (31)  |  Hold (95)  |  Humbly (8)  |  Insist (20)  |  Lose (159)  |  Moral (195)  |  Motive (59)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Objective (91)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patient (199)  |  Personal (67)  |  Political (121)  |  Precision (68)  |  Preconception (13)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Science (3879)  |  Search (162)  |  Student (300)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vision (123)  |  World (1774)

Antiessentialist thinking forces us to view the world differently. We must accept shadings and continua as fundamental. We lose criteria for judgment by comparison to some ideal: short people, retarded people, people of other beliefs, colors, and religions are people of full status.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Belief (578)  |  Color (137)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Continua (3)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Differently (4)  |  Force (487)  |  Full (66)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Lose (159)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Religion (361)  |  Retarded (5)  |  Short (197)  |  Status (35)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

As regards religion, on the other hand, one is generally agreed that it deals with goals and evaluations and, in general, with the emotional foundation of human thinking and acting, as far as these are not predetermined by the inalterable hereditary disposition of the human species. Religion is concerned with man’s attitude toward nature at large, with the establishing of ideals for the individual and communal life, and with mutual human relationship. These ideals religion attempts to attain by exerting an educational influence on tradition and through the development and promulgation of certain easily accessible thoughts and narratives (epics and myths) which are apt to influence evaluation and action along the lines of the accepted ideals.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Accessible (25)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Agree (26)  |  Apt (9)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Certain (550)  |  Communal (7)  |  Concern (228)  |  Deal (188)  |  Development (422)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Easily (35)  |  Educational (7)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Epic (12)  |  Establish (57)  |  Evaluation (10)  |  Exert (39)  |  Far (154)  |  Foundation (171)  |  General (511)  |  Generally (15)  |  Goal (145)  |  Hereditary (7)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Species (9)  |  Individual (404)  |  Influence (222)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Line (91)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Myth (56)  |  Narrative (7)  |  Nature (1926)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Predetermined (3)  |  Promulgation (5)  |  Regard (305)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Religion (361)  |  Species (401)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Toward (45)  |  Tradition (69)

By the classification of any series of objects, is meant the actual or ideal arrangement together of those which are like and the separation of those which are unlike ; the purpose of this arrangement being to facilitate the operations of the mind in clearly conceiving and retaining in the memory the characters of the objects in question.‎
In 'Lecture I: On the Classification of Animals', Lectures on the Elements of Comparative Anatomy: On the ... - (1864), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Being (1278)  |  Character (243)  |  Classification (97)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Facilitate (5)  |  Like (22)  |  Mean (809)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Object (422)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Retain (56)  |  Separation (57)  |  Series (149)  |  Together (387)  |  Unlike (8)

Common sense is science exactly in so far as it fulfills the ideal of common sense; that is, sees facts as they are, or at any rate, without the distortion of prejudice, and reasons from them in accordance with the dictates of sound judgment. And science is simply common sense at its best, that is, rigidly accurate in observation, and merciless to fallacy in logic.
The Crayfish: an Introduction to the Study of Zoölogy (1880), 2. Excerpted in Popular Science (Apr 1880), 16, 789.
Science quotes on:  |  Accordance (10)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Best (459)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Dictate (11)  |  Distortion (13)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Fulfillment (18)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Logic (287)  |  Observation (555)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rigidity (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sound (183)

Despite rapid progress in the right direction, the program of the average elementary school has been primarily devoted to teaching the fundamental subjects, the three R’s, and closely related disciplines… Artificial exercises, like drills on phonetics, multiplication tables, and formal writing movements, are used to a wasteful degree. Subjects such as arithmetic, language, and history include content that is intrinsically of little value. Nearly every subject is enlarged unwisely to satisfy the academic ideal of thoroughness… Elimination of the unessential by scientific study, then, is one step in improving the curriculum.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Average (82)  |  Curriculum (10)  |  Degree (276)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Education (378)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Elimination (25)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  History (673)  |  Include (90)  |  Language (293)  |  Little (707)  |  Movement (155)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Multiplication Table (16)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Progress (465)  |  Right (452)  |  School (219)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Step (231)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Table (104)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thoroughness (3)  |  Value (365)  |  Writing (189)

Education has, thus, become the chief problem of the world, its one holy cause. The nations that see this will survive, and those that fail to do so will slowly perish. There must be re-education of the will and of the heart as well as of the intellect, and the ideals of service must supplant those of selfishness and greed. ... Never so much as now is education the one and chief hope of the world.
Confessions of a Psychologist (1923). Quoted in Bruce A. Kimball, The True Professional Ideal in America: A History (1996), 198.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chief (97)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Fail (185)  |  Greed (14)  |  Heart (229)  |  Holy (34)  |  Hope (299)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Never (1087)  |  Perish (50)  |  Problem (676)  |  See (1081)  |  Service (110)  |  Survive (79)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Every breath you draw, every accelerated beat of your heart in the emotional periods of your oratory depend upon highly elaborated physical and chemical reactions and mechanisms which nature has been building up through a million centuries. If one of these mechanisms, which you owe entirely to your animal ancestry, were to be stopped for a single instant, you would fall lifeless on the stage. Not only this, but some of your highest ideals of human fellowship and comradeship were not created in a moment, but represent the work of ages.
Quoted in Closing Address by Dr. Henry Sloane Coffin, president of the Union Theological Seminary, New York, at the Memorial Service for Osborn at St. Bartholomew's Church, N.Y. (18 Dec 1935). In 'Henry Fairfield Osborn', Supplement to Natural History (Feb 1936), 37:2, 133-34. Bound in Kofoid Collection of Pamphlets on Biography, University of California.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Ancestry (12)  |  Animal (617)  |  Beat (41)  |  Breath (59)  |  William Jennings Bryan (20)  |  Building (156)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Reaction (16)  |  Chemical Reactions (13)  |  Deaf (4)  |  Depend (228)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drowning (2)  |  Earth (996)  |  Elaborated (7)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fall (230)  |  Heart (229)  |  Human (1468)  |  Instant (45)  |  Lifeless (14)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Moment (253)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Owe (71)  |  Period (198)  |  Physical (508)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Represent (155)  |  Single (353)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Speech (61)  |  Stage (143)  |  Through (849)  |  Voice (52)  |  Work (1351)

Evolution ever climbing after some ideal good,
And Reversion ever dragging Evolution in the mud.
'Locksley Hall Sixty Years After' (1886), collected in Alfred Tennyson and William James Rolfe (ed.) The Poetic and Dramatic Works of Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1898), 522.
Science quotes on:  |  Climbing (4)  |  Dragging (6)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Good (889)  |  Mud (26)  |  Reversion (3)

Finally, I aim at giving denominations to things, as agreeable to truth as possible. I am not ignorant that words, like money, possess an ideal value, and that great danger of confusion may be apprehended from a change of names; in the mean time it cannot be denied that chemistry, like the other sciences, was formerly filled with improper names. In different branches of knowledge, we see those matters long since reformed: why then should chemistry, which examines the real nature of things, still adopt vague names, which suggest false ideas, and favour strongly of ignorance and imposition? Besides, there is little doubt but that many corrections may be made without any inconvenience.
Physical and Chemical Essays (1784), Vol. I, xxxvii.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreeable (18)  |  Aim (165)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Correction (40)  |  Danger (115)  |  Denomination (6)  |  Different (577)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Error (321)  |  Examine (78)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Money (170)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Things (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possess (156)  |  Possible (552)  |  Reform (22)  |  Reformed (4)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Still (613)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vague (47)  |  Value (365)  |  Why (491)  |  Word (619)

For myself, I like a universe that, includes much that is unknown and, at the same time, much that is knowable. A universe in which everything is known would be static and dull, as boring as the heaven of some weak-minded theologians. A universe that is unknowable is no fit place for a thinking being. The ideal universe for us is one very much like the universe we inhabit. And I would guess that this is not really much of a coincidence.
Concluding paragraph, 'Can We know the Universe? Reflections on a Grain of Salt', Broca's Brain (1979, 1986), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Boredom (11)  |  Boring (7)  |  Coincidence (19)  |  Dull (54)  |  Dullness (4)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fit (134)  |  Guess (61)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Include (90)  |  Inhabitation (2)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Myself (212)  |  Static (8)  |  Theologian (22)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Weak (71)

From our best qualities come our worst. From our urge to pull together comes our tendency to pull apart. From our devotion to higher good comes our propensity to the foulest atrocities. From out commitment to ideals come our excuse to hate. Since the beginning of history, we have been blinded by evil’s ability to don a selfless disguise. We have failed to see that our finest qualities often lead us to the actions we most abhor—murder, torture, genocide, and war.
In 'Who is Lucifer?', The Lucifer Principle: A Scientific Expedition Into the Forces of History (1997), 3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abhor (6)  |  Ability (152)  |  Action (327)  |  Atrocity (6)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Best (459)  |  Blind (95)  |  Commitment (27)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Disguise (11)  |  Don (2)  |  Evil (116)  |  Excuse (25)  |  Fail (185)  |  Finest (3)  |  Foul (15)  |  Good (889)  |  Hate (64)  |  History (673)  |  Lead (384)  |  Most (1731)  |  Murder (13)  |  Propensity (9)  |  Pull (43)  |  Pull Together (2)  |  Quality (135)  |  See (1081)  |  Selfless (2)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Together (387)  |  Torture (29)  |  Urge (17)  |  War (225)  |  Worst (57)

Happy is he who bears a god within himself, an ideal of beauty, and obeys him: an ideal of art, an ideal of the virtues of the Gospel. These are the living springs of great thoughts and great actions. All are illuminated by reflections of the sublime.
Speech (27 Apr 1882) on his reception into the Académie Française, as translated in Maurice Benjamin Strauss, Familiar Medical Quotations (1968), 490.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Bear (159)  |  Beauty (299)  |  God (757)  |  Gospel (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happy (105)  |  Himself (461)  |  Living (491)  |  Obey (40)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Spring (133)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Thought (953)  |  Virtue (109)

I am an adherent of the ideal of democracy, although I well know the weaknesses of the democratic form of government. Social equality and economic protection of the individual appeared to me always as the important communal aims of the state.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adherent (6)  |  Aim (165)  |  Appear (118)  |  Communal (7)  |  Democracy (33)  |  Democratic (12)  |  Economic (81)  |  Equality (31)  |  Form (959)  |  Government (110)  |  Important (209)  |  Individual (404)  |  Know (1518)  |  Protection (36)  |  Social (252)  |  State (491)  |  Weakness (48)

I can see him [Sylvester] now, with his white beard and few locks of gray hair, his forehead wrinkled o’er with thoughts, writing rapidly his figures and formulae on the board, sometimes explaining as he wrote, while we, his listeners, caught the reflected sounds from the board. But stop, something is not right, he pauses, his hand goes to his forehead to help his thought, he goes over the work again, emphasizes the leading points, and finally discovers his difficulty. Perhaps it is some error in his figures, perhaps an oversight in the reasoning. Sometimes, however, the difficulty is not elucidated, and then there is not much to the rest of the lecture. But at the next lecture we would hear of some new discovery that was the outcome of that difficulty, and of some article for the Journal, which he had begun. If a text-book had been taken up at the beginning, with the intention of following it, that text-book was most likely doomed to oblivion for the rest of the term, or until the class had been made listeners to every new thought and principle that had sprung from the laboratory of his mind, in consequence of that first difficulty. Other difficulties would soon appear, so that no text-book could last more than half of the term. In this way his class listened to almost all of the work that subsequently appeared in the Journal. It seemed to be the quality of his mind that he must adhere to one subject. He would think about it, talk about it to his class, and finally write about it for the Journal. The merest accident might start him, but once started, every moment, every thought was given to it, and, as much as possible, he read what others had done in the same direction; but this last seemed to be his real point; he could not read without finding difficulties in the way of understanding the author. Thus, often his own work reproduced what had been done by others, and he did not find it out until too late.
A notable example of this is in his theory of cyclotomic functions, which he had reproduced in several foreign journals, only to find that he had been greatly anticipated by foreign authors. It was manifest, one of the critics said, that the learned professor had not read Rummer’s elementary results in the theory of ideal primes. Yet Professor Smith’s report on the theory of numbers, which contained a full synopsis of Kummer’s theory, was Professor Sylvester’s constant companion.
This weakness of Professor Sylvester, in not being able to read what others had done, is perhaps a concomitant of his peculiar genius. Other minds could pass over little difficulties and not be troubled by them, and so go on to a final understanding of the results of the author. But not so with him. A difficulty, however small, worried him, and he was sure to have difficulties until the subject had been worked over in his own way, to correspond with his own mode of thought. To read the work of others, meant therefore to him an almost independent development of it. Like the man whose pleasure in life is to pioneer the way for society into the forests, his rugged mind could derive satisfaction only in hewing out its own paths; and only when his efforts brought him into the uncleared fields of mathematics did he find his place in the Universe.
In Florian Cajori, Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 266-267.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accident (88)  |  Adhere (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Appear (118)  |  Article (22)  |  Author (167)  |  Beard (7)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Board (12)  |  Book (392)  |  Bring (90)  |  Class (164)  |  Companion (19)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contain (68)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Critic (20)  |  Derive (65)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doom (32)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Elucidate (4)  |  Emphasize (23)  |  Error (321)  |  Example (94)  |  Explain (322)  |  Field (364)  |  Figure (160)  |  Final (118)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forehead (2)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Forest (150)  |  Formula (98)  |  Full (66)  |  Function (228)  |  Genius (284)  |  Give (202)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Hair (25)  |  Half (56)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hear (139)  |  Help (105)  |  Hew (3)  |  Independent (67)  |  Intention (46)  |  Journal (30)  |  Ernst Eduard Kummer (3)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Last (426)  |  Late (118)  |  Lead (384)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Likely (34)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listener (7)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mode (41)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Notable (5)  |  Number (699)  |  Oblivion (10)  |  Often (106)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outcome (13)  |  Oversight (4)  |  Pass (238)  |  Path (144)  |  Pause (6)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Place (177)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prime (11)  |  Principle (507)  |  Professor (128)  |  Quality (135)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Read (287)  |  Real (149)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Report (38)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Rugged (7)  |  Rum (3)  |  Same (157)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Several (32)  |  Small (477)  |  Smith (3)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Soon (186)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spring (133)  |  Start (221)  |  Stop (80)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subsequently (2)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Synopsis (2)  |  Talk (100)  |  Term (349)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Numbers (7)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weakness (48)  |  White (127)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worry (33)  |  Wrinkle (4)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

I have never looked upon ease and happiness as ends in themselves–this critical basis I call the ideal of a pigsty. The ideals that have lighted my way, and time after time have given me new courage to face life cheerfully, have been Kindness, Beauty, and Truth. Without the sense of kinship with men of like mind, without the occupation with the objective world, the eternally unattainable in the field of art and scientific endeavors, life would have seemed empty to me. The trite objects of human efforts–possessions, outward success, luxury–have always seemed to me contemptible.
In 'What I Believe,' Forum and Century (1930).
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Basis (173)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Call (769)  |  Cheerfully (2)  |  Contemptible (8)  |  Courage (69)  |  Critical (66)  |  Ease (35)  |  Effort (227)  |  Empty (80)  |  End (590)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Eternally (3)  |  Face (212)  |  Field (364)  |  Give (202)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Human (1468)  |  Kindness (14)  |  Kinship (4)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Look (582)  |  Luxury (21)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Object (422)  |  Objective (91)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Outward (7)  |  Possession (65)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sense (770)  |  Success (302)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trite (4)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unattainable (6)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

If in a given community unchecked popular rule means unlimited waste and destruction of the natural resources—soil, fertility, waterpower, forests, game, wild-life generally—which by right belong as much to subsequent generations as to the present generation, then it is sure proof that the present generation is not yet really fit for self-control, that it is not yet really fit to exercise the high and responsible privilege of a rule which shall be both by the people and for the people. The term “for the people” must always include the people unborn as well as the people now alive, or the democratic ideal is not realized.
In A Book-Lover's Holidays in the Open (1916), 319.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Belong (162)  |  Both (493)  |  Community (104)  |  Control (167)  |  Democratic (12)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Fertility (19)  |  Fit (134)  |  Forest (150)  |  Game (101)  |  Generation (242)  |  High (362)  |  Idea (843)  |  Include (90)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Resource (22)  |  People (1005)  |  Popular (29)  |  Present (619)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Proof (287)  |  Realization (43)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Right (452)  |  Rule (294)  |  Self (267)  |  Soil (86)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Term (349)  |  Unborn (5)  |  Unchecked (3)  |  Unlimited (22)  |  Waste (101)  |  Water Power (6)  |  Wild (87)  |  Wildlife (14)

Imaginary numbers are a fine and wonderful refuge of the divine spirit almost an amphibian between being and non-being. (1702)
[Alternate translation:] The Divine Spirit found a sublime outlet in that wonder of analysis, that portent of the ideal world, that amphibian between being and not-being, which we call the imaginary root of negative unity.
Quoted in Félix Klein, Elementary Mathematics From an Advanced Standpoint: Arithmetic, Algebra, Analysis (1924), 56. Alternate translation as quoted in Tobias Dantzig, Number, the Language of Science: a Critical Survey Written for the Cultured Non-Mathematician (1930), 204
Science quotes on:  |  Amphibian (6)  |  Analaysis (2)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Divine (112)  |  Imaginary (16)  |  Imaginary Number (6)  |  Negative (63)  |  Number (699)  |  Refuge (15)  |  Root (120)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Translation (21)  |  Unity (78)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  World (1774)

In science the new is an advance; but in morals, as contradicting our inner ideals and historic idols, it is ever a retrogression.
Levana, or, The Doctrine of Education translated from the German (1880), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Contradict (40)  |  Idol (5)  |  Inner (71)  |  Moral (195)  |  New (1216)  |  Retrogression (6)  |  Science (3879)

In scientific study, or, as I prefer to phrase it, in creative scholarship, the truth is the single end sought; all yields to that. The truth is supreme, not only in the vague mystical sense in which that expression has come to be a platitude, but in a special, definite, concrete sense. Facts and the immediate and necessary inductions from facts displace all pre-conceptions, all deductions from general principles, all favourite theories. Previous mental constructions are bowled over as childish play-structures by facts as they come rolling into the mind. The dearest doctrines, the most fascinating hypotheses, the most cherished creations of the reason and of the imagination perish from a mind thoroughly inspired with the scientific spirit in the presence of incompatible facts. Previous intellectual affections are crushed without hesitation and without remorse. Facts are placed before reasonings and before ideals, even though the reasonings and the ideals be more beautiful, be seemingly more lofty, be seemingly better, be seemingly truer. The seemingly absurd and the seemingly impossible are sometimes true. The scientific disposition is to accept facts upon evidence, however absurd they may appear to our pre-conceptions.
The Ethical Functions of Scientific Study: An Address Delivered at the Annual Commencement of the University of Michigan, 28 June 1888, 7-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  Accept (191)  |  Affection (43)  |  All (4108)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Better (486)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Childish (20)  |  Conception (154)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Construction (112)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creative (137)  |  Crush (18)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Definite (110)  |  Displace (8)  |  Disposition (42)  |  End (590)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  General (511)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Induction (77)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Perish (50)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Presence (63)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remorse (9)  |  Scholarship (20)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Seemingly (28)  |  Sense (770)  |  Single (353)  |  Special (184)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vague (47)  |  Yield (81)

In that pure enjoyment experienced on approaching to the ideal, in that eagerness to draw aside the veil from the hidden truth, and even in that discord which exists between the various workers, we ought to see the surest pledges of further scientific success. Science thus advances, discovering new truths, and at the same time obtaining practical results.
In The Principles of Chemistry (1891), Vol. 1, preface, footnote, ix, as translated from the Russian 5th edition by George Kamensky, edited by A. J. Greenaway.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Approach (108)  |  Discord (10)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Draw (137)  |  Eagerness (5)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experience (467)  |  Hidden (42)  |  New (1216)  |  Obtaining (5)  |  Pledge (4)  |  Practical (200)  |  Pure (291)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Success (302)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Various (200)  |  Veil (26)  |  Worker (31)

Indeed, the ideal for a well-functioning democratic state is like the ideal for a gentleman’s well-cut suit—it is not noticed. For the common people of Britain, Gestapo and concentration camps have approximately the same degree of reality as the monster of Loch Ness. Atrocity propaganda is helpless against this healthy lack of imagination.
In 'A Challenge to “Knights in Rusty Armor”', The New York Times (14 Feb 1943), Sunday Magazine, 5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Atrocity (6)  |  Britain (24)  |  Camp (10)  |  Common (436)  |  Common People (2)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Cut (114)  |  Degree (276)  |  Democracy (33)  |  Democratic (12)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Helpless (11)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Lack (119)  |  Loch Ness Monster (2)  |  Monster (31)  |  People (1005)  |  Propaganda (13)  |  Reality (261)  |  State (491)  |  Suit (11)

It did not cause anxiety that Maxwell’s equations did not apply to gravitation, since nobody expected to find any link between electricity and gravitation at that particular level. But now physics was faced with an entirely new situation. The same entity, light, was at once a wave and a particle. How could one possibly imagine its proper size and shape? To produce interference it must be spread out, but to bounce off electrons it must be minutely localized. This was a fundamental dilemma, and the stalemate in the wave-photon battle meant that it must remain an enigma to trouble the soul of every true physicist. It was intolerable that light should be two such contradictory things. It was against all the ideals and traditions of science to harbor such an unresolved dualism gnawing at its vital parts. Yet the evidence on either side could not be denied, and much water was to flow beneath the bridges before a way out of the quandary was to be found. The way out came as a result of a brilliant counterattack initiated by the wave theory, but to tell of this now would spoil the whole story. It is well that the reader should appreciate through personal experience the agony of the physicists of the period. They could but make the best of it, and went around with woebegone faces sadly complaining that on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays they must look on light as a wave; on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, as a particle. On Sundays they simply prayed.
The Strange Story of the Quantum (1947), 42.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Agony (7)  |  All (4108)  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Apply (160)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Best (459)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Cause (541)  |  Dilemma (11)  |  Dualism (4)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electron (93)  |  Enigma (14)  |  Entity (35)  |  Equation (132)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Expect (200)  |  Experience (467)  |  Face (212)  |  Find (998)  |  Flow (83)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Interference (21)  |  Light (607)  |  Look (582)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Particle (194)  |  Period (198)  |  Photon (11)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Proper (144)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Remain (349)  |  Result (677)  |  Saturday (11)  |  Science (3879)  |  Side (233)  |  Situation (113)  |  Soul (226)  |  Spread (83)  |  Story (118)  |  Tell (340)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Two (937)  |  Vital (85)  |  Water (481)  |  Wave (107)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)

It is not merely as an investigator and discoverer, but as a high-principled and unassuming man, that Scheele merits our warmest admiration. His aim and object was the discovery of truth. The letters of the man reveal to us in the most pleasant way his high scientific ideal, his genuinely philosophic temper, and his simple mode of thought. “It is the truth alone that we desire to know, and what joy there is in discovering it!” With these words he himself characterizes his own efforts.
From History of Chemistry (1899). As quoted in Victor Robinson, Pathfinders in Medicine (1912), 121.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (59)  |  Aim (165)  |  Alone (311)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Effort (227)  |  Genuine (52)  |  High (362)  |  Himself (461)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Joy (107)  |  Know (1518)  |  Letter (109)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Merit (50)  |  Most (1731)  |  Object (422)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Carl Wilhelm Scheele (5)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Simple (406)  |  Temper (9)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

It is this ideal of progress through cumulative effort rather than through genius—progress by organised effort, progress which does not wait for some brilliant stroke, some lucky discovery, or the advent of some superman, has been the chief gift of science to social philosophy.
Address to 48th annual summer convention of the American Institute of Electriccal Engineers, Cleveland (21 Jun 1932), abridged in 'The Rôle of the Engineer', The Electrical Journal (1932), 109, 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Advent (6)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Chief (97)  |  Cumulative (14)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Effort (227)  |  Genius (284)  |  Gift (104)  |  Lucky (13)  |  Organization (114)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Social (252)  |  Stroke (18)  |  Superman (3)  |  Through (849)  |  Wait (58)

Man is naturally metaphysical and arrogant, and is thus capable of believing that the ideal creations of his mind, which express his feelings, are identical with reality. From this it follows that the experimental method is not really natural to him.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrogant (3)  |  Belief (578)  |  Capable (168)  |  Creation (327)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Express (186)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Follow (378)  |  Identical (53)  |  Man (2251)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Natural (796)  |  Reality (261)  |  Scientific Method (175)

Mathematics is a broad-ranging field of study in which the properties and interactions of idealized objects are examined
In CRC Concise Encyclopedia of Mathematics (1998, 2nd ed. 2002 ), 1862.
Science quotes on:  |  Broad (27)  |  Examine (78)  |  Field (364)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Object (422)  |  Property (168)  |  Study (653)

Mathematics, the science of the ideal, becomes the means of investigating, understanding and making known the world of the real. The complex is expressed in terms of the simple. From one point of view mathematics may be defined as the science of successive substitutions of simpler concepts for more complex.
In A Scrap-book of Elementary Mathematics (1908), 215.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Complex (188)  |  Concept (221)  |  Define (49)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Express (186)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Making (300)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Real (149)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Substitution (13)  |  Successive (73)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

Medicine would be the ideal profession if it did not involve giving pain.
The Health Master (1913), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Involve (90)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Pain (136)  |  Physician (273)  |  Profession (99)

My ideal man is Benjamin Franklin—the figure in American history most worthy of emulation ... Franklin is my ideal of a whole man. ... Where are the life-size—or even pint-size—Benjamin Franklins of today?
Describing his personal hero, in a lecture (1964). In Gerald James Holton, Victory and Vexation in Science: Einstein, Bohr, Heisenberg, and Others (2005), 92. In John S. Rigden,Science: The Center of Culture (1970), 111-112. In Rabi, Scientist and Citizen (2000), xxv, the author states that a portrait of Benjamin Franklin hung in Rabi's office.
Science quotes on:  |  Emulate (2)  |  Figure (160)  |  Benjamin Franklin (91)  |  Hero (42)  |  History (673)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Today (314)  |  Whole (738)

My political ideal is democracy. Let every man be respected as an individual and no man idolized.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Democracy (33)  |  Individual (404)  |  Let (61)  |  Man (2251)  |  Political (121)  |  Respect (207)

Nature indifferently copied is far superior to the best idealities.
Journal entry (1 Mar 1827). On an artist’s goal to faithfully reproduce nature as actually observed, not stylized or contrived. He explained this credo a young artist (J.B. Kidd, age 19) over breakfast. Stated in John James Audubon and Mrs. Audubon (ed.), The Life and Adventures of John James Audubon, the Naturalist (1868), 140.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Copy (33)  |  Indifferent (16)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Superior (81)

No place affords a more striking conviction of the vanity of human hopes than a publick library; for who can see the wall crouded on every side by mighty volumes, the works of laborious meditation, and accurate inquiry, now scarcely known but by the catalogue, and preserved only to encrease the pomp of learning, without considering how many hours have been wasted in vain endeavours, how often imagination has anticipated the praises of futurity, how many statues have risen to the eye of vanity, how many ideal converts have elevated zeal, how often wit has exulted in the eternal infamy of his antagonists, and dogmatism has delighted in the gradual advances of his authority, the immutability of his decrees, and the perpetuity of his power.
Non unquam dedit
Documenta fors majora, quam fragili loco
Starent superbi.

Seneca, Troades, II, 4-6
Insulting chance ne'er call'd with louder voice,
On swelling mortals to be proud no more.
Of the innumerable authors whose performances are thus treasured up in magnificent obscurity, most are forgotten, because they never deserved to be remembered, and owed the honours which they have once obtained, not to judgment or to genius, to labour or to art, but to the prejudice of faction, the stratagem of intrigue, or the servility of adulation.
Nothing is more common than to find men whose works are now totally neglected, mentioned with praises by their contemporaries, as the oracles of their age, and the legislators of science. Curiosity is naturally excited, their volumes after long enquiry are found, but seldom reward the labour of the search. Every period of time has produced these bubbles of artificial fame, which are kept up a while by the breath of fashion and then break at once and are annihilated. The learned often bewail the loss of ancient writers whose characters have survived their works; but perhaps if we could now retrieve them we should find them only the Granvilles, Montagus, Stepneys, and Sheffields of their time, and wonder by what infatuation or caprice they could be raised to notice.
It cannot, however, be denied, that many have sunk into oblivion, whom it were unjust to number with this despicable class. Various kinds of literary fame seem destined to various measures of duration. Some spread into exuberance with a very speedy growth, but soon wither and decay; some rise more slowly, but last long. Parnassus has its flowers of transient fragrance as well as its oaks of towering height, and its laurels of eternal verdure.
The Rambler, Number 106, 23 Mar 1751. In W. J. Bate and Albrecht B. Strauss (eds.), The Rambler (1969), Vol. 2, 200-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Advance (280)  |  Age (499)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Art (657)  |  Author (167)  |  Authority (95)  |  Break (99)  |  Breath (59)  |  Bubble (22)  |  Call (769)  |  Caprice (9)  |  Chance (239)  |  Character (243)  |  Class (164)  |  Common (436)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Decay (53)  |  Decree (8)  |  Delight (108)  |  Destined (42)  |  Dogmatism (14)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faction (3)  |  Fame (50)  |  Find (998)  |  Flower (106)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Genius (284)  |  Growth (187)  |  Honour (56)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hour (186)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Kind (557)  |  Known (454)  |  Laborious (14)  |  Labour (98)  |  Last (426)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Library (48)  |  Long (790)  |  Loss (110)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Measure (232)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Most (1731)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Neglected (23)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notice (77)  |  Number (699)  |  Oak (14)  |  Oblivion (10)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Performance (48)  |  Period (198)  |  Perpetuity (9)  |  Power (746)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Produced (187)  |  Remember (179)  |  Reward (68)  |  Rise (166)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Search (162)  |  See (1081)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Side (233)  |  Soon (186)  |  Spread (83)  |  Statue (16)  |  Striking (48)  |  Time (1877)  |  Towering (11)  |  Transient (12)  |  Vain (83)  |  Various (200)  |  Wall (67)  |  Wit (59)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writer (86)

No! What we need are not prohibitory marriage laws, but a reformed society, an educated public opinion which will teach individual duty in these matters. And it is to the women of the future that I look for the needed reformation. Educate and train women so that they are rendered independent of marriage as a means of gaining a home and a living, and you will bring about natural selection in marriage, which will operate most beneficially upon humanity. When all women are placed in a position that they are independent of marriage, I am inclined to think that large numbers will elect to remain unmarried—in some cases, for life, in others, until they encounter the man of their ideal. I want to see women the selective agents in marriage; as things are, they have practically little choice. The only basis for marriage should be a disinterested love. I believe that the unfit will be gradually eliminated from the race, and human progress secured, by giving to the pure instincts of women the selective power in marriage. You can never have that so long as women are driven to marry for a livelihood.
In 'Heredity and Pre-Natal Influences. An Interview With Dr. Alfred Russel Wallace', Humanitarian (1894), 4, 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (70)  |  All (4108)  |  Basis (173)  |  Belief (578)  |  Bring (90)  |  Case (99)  |  Choice (110)  |  Disinterest (6)  |  Driven (4)  |  Duty (68)  |  Educate (13)  |  Educated (12)  |  Elect (4)  |  Encounter (22)  |  Future (429)  |  Gaining (2)  |  Giving (11)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Home (170)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Independent (67)  |  Individual (404)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Livelihood (12)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marriage (39)  |  Marry (8)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Need (290)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Operate (17)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Position (77)  |  Power (746)  |  Practically (10)  |  Progress (465)  |  Public (96)  |  Pure (291)  |  Race (268)  |  Reform (22)  |  Reformation (6)  |  Reformed (4)  |  Remain (349)  |  Render (93)  |  Rendered (2)  |  Secured (18)  |  See (1081)  |  Selection (128)  |  Selective (19)  |  Society (326)  |  Teach (277)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Train (114)  |  Unfit (12)  |  Unmarried (3)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)  |  Woman (151)

Nobody grows old merely by living a number of years. We grow old by deserting our ideals. Years may wrinkle the skin, but to give up enthusiasm wrinkles the soul.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Desert (56)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Give Up (7)  |  Grow (238)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Merely (316)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Number (699)  |  Old (481)  |  Skin (47)  |  Soul (226)  |  Wrinkle (4)  |  Year (933)

Objective evidence and certitude are doubtless very fine ideals to play with, but where on this moonlit and dream-visited planet are they found?
'The Will to Believe' (1896). In The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy (1897), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (174)  |  Certitude (6)  |  Dream (208)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Objective (91)  |  Planet (356)

Our experience up to date justifies us in feeling sure that in Nature is actualized the ideal of mathematical simplicity. It is my conviction that pure mathematical construction enables us to discover the concepts and the laws connecting them, which gives us the key to understanding nature… In a certain sense, therefore, I hold it true that pure thought can grasp reality, as the ancients dreamed.
In Herbert Spencer Lecture at Oxford (10 Jun 1933), 'On the Methods of Theoretical Physics'. Printed in Discovery (Jul 1933), 14, 227. Also quoted in Stefano Zambelli and Donald A. R. George, Nonlinearity, Complexity and Randomness in Economics (2012).
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Certain (550)  |  Concept (221)  |  Connection (162)  |  Construction (112)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Dream (208)  |  Enable (119)  |  Enabling (7)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Justification (48)  |  Key (50)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reality (261)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understanding (513)

Our ideals. laws and customs should he based on the proposition that each, in turn, becomes the custodian rather than the absolute owner of our resources and each generation has the obligation to pass this inheritance on to the future.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Base (117)  |  Become (815)  |  Custodian (3)  |  Custom (42)  |  Future (429)  |  Generation (242)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Law (894)  |  Obligation (25)  |  Owner (5)  |  Pass (238)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Resource (63)  |  Turn (447)

Physical concepts are free creations of the human mind, and are not, however it may seem, uniquely determined by the external world. In our endeavour to understand reality we are somewhat like a man trying to understand the mechanism of a closed watch. He sees the face and the moving hands, even hears its ticking, but he has no way of opening the case. If he is ingenious he may form some picture of a mechanism which could be responsible for all the things he observes, but he may never be quite sure his picture is the only one which could explain his observations. He will never be able to compare his picture with the real mechanism and he cannot even imagine the possibility or the meaning of such a comparison. But he certainly believes that, as his knowledge increases, his picture of reality will become simpler and simpler and will explain a wider and wider range of his sensuous impressions. He may also believe in the existence of the ideal limit of knowledge and that it is approached by the human mind. He may call this ideal limit the objective truth.
Albert Einstein and Leopold Infeld, The Evolution of Physics (1938), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Approach (108)  |  Become (815)  |  Call (769)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Closed (38)  |  Compare (69)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Concept (221)  |  Creation (327)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explain (322)  |  Face (212)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Hear (139)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Impression (114)  |  Increase (210)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Objective (91)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Physical (508)  |  Picture (143)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Range (99)  |  Reality (261)  |  See (1081)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Trying (144)  |  Understand (606)  |  Watch (109)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Physical science comes nearest to that complete system of exact knowledge which all sciences have before them as an ideal. Some fall far short of it. The physicist who inveighs against the lack of coherence and the indefiniteness of theological theories, will probably speak not much less harshly of the theories of biology and psychology. They also fail to come up to his standard of methodology. On the other side of him stands an even superior being—the pure mathematician—who has no high opinion of the methods of deduction used in physics, and does not hide his disapproval of the laxity of what is accepted as proof in physical science. And yet somehow knowledge grows in all these branches. Wherever a way opens we are impelled to seek by the only methods that can be devised for that particular opening, not over-rating the security of our finding, but conscious that in this activity of mind we are obeying the light that is in our nature.
Swarthmore Lecture (1929) at Friends’ House, London, printed in Science and the Unseen World (1929), 77-78.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Activity (210)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biology (216)  |  Coherence (13)  |  Complete (204)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Fail (185)  |  Fall (230)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hide (69)  |  High (362)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lack (119)  |  Light (607)  |  Method (505)  |  Methodology (12)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Open (274)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Proof (287)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Pure (291)  |  Science (3879)  |  Security (47)  |  Seek (213)  |  Short (197)  |  Side (233)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Speak (232)  |  Stand (274)  |  Superior (81)  |  System (537)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Will (2355)

Real life is, to most men, a long second-best, a perpetual compromise between the ideal and the possible; but the world of pure reason ;knows no compromise, no practical limitations, no barrier to the creative activity.
Essay, 'The Study of Mathematics' (1902), collected in Philosophical Essays (1910), 73-74. Also collected in Mysticism and Logic: And Other Essays (1919), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Barrier (32)  |  Best (459)  |  Compromise (9)  |  Creative (137)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Long (790)  |  Most (1731)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Possible (552)  |  Practical (200)  |  Pure (291)  |  Real Life (7)  |  Reason (744)  |  Second Best (2)  |  World (1774)

Religious creeds are a great obstacle to any full sympathy between the outlook of the scientist and the outlook which religion is so often supposed to require … The spirit of seeking which animates us refuses to regard any kind of creed as its goal. It would be a shock to come across a university where it was the practice of the students to recite adherence to Newton's laws of motion, to Maxwell's equations and to the electromagnetic theory of light. We should not deplore it the less if our own pet theory happened to be included, or if the list were brought up to date every few years. We should say that the students cannot possibly realise the intention of scientific training if they are taught to look on these results as things to be recited and subscribed to. Science may fall short of its ideal, and although the peril scarcely takes this extreme form, it is not always easy, particularly in popular science, to maintain our stand against creed and dogma.
Swarthmore Lecture (1929), Science and the Unseen World (1929), 54-56.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Creed (27)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Easy (204)  |  Education (378)  |  Electromagnetic Theory (5)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Equation (132)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Fall (230)  |  Form (959)  |  Goal (145)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Intention (46)  |  Kind (557)  |  Law (894)  |  Laws Of Motion (10)  |  Light (607)  |  Look (582)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Motion (310)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Outlook (30)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Practice (204)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Regard (305)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Require (219)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Shock (37)  |  Short (197)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Stand (274)  |  Student (300)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Training (80)  |  University (121)  |  Year (933)

Religious leaders and men of science have the same ideals; they want to understand and explain the universe of which they are part; they both earnestly desire to solve, if a solution be ever possible, that great riddle: Why are we here?
Concerning Man's Origin (1927), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Desire (204)  |  Explain (322)  |  Great (1574)  |  Leader (43)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Origin Of Man (9)  |  Possible (552)  |  Religious (126)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  Want (497)  |  Why (491)

Science has hitherto been proceeding without the guidance of any rational theory of logic, and has certainly made good progress. It is like a computer who is pursuing some method of arithmetical approximation. Even if he occasionally makes mistakes in his ciphering, yet if the process is a good one they will rectify themselves. But then he would approximate much more rapidly if he did not commit these errors; and in my opinion, the time has come when science ought to be provided with a logic. My theory satisfies me; I can see no flaw in it. According to that theory universality, necessity, exactitude, in the absolute sense of these words, are unattainable by us, and do not exist in nature. There is an ideal law to which nature approximates; but to express it would require an endless series of modifications, like the decimals expressing surd. Only when you have asked a question in so crude a shape that continuity is not involved, is a perfectly true answer attainable.
Letter to G. F. Becker, 11 June 1893. Merrill Collection, Library of Congress. Quoted in Nathan Reingold, Science in Nineteenth-Century America: A Documentary History (1966), 231-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  According (237)  |  Answer (366)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Approximation (31)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Commit (41)  |  Commitment (27)  |  Computer (127)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Crude (31)  |  Crudity (4)  |  Decimal (20)  |  Do (1908)  |  Endless (56)  |  Error (321)  |  Exactitude (10)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Express (186)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Good (889)  |  Guidance (28)  |  Hitherto (6)  |  Involved (90)  |  Law (894)  |  Logic (287)  |  Method (505)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Modification (55)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Provision (16)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Rational (90)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Require (219)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time Has Come (8)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universality (22)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

Science is a body of truths which offers clear and certain knowledge about the real world and is therefore superior to tradition philosophy religion dogma and superstition which offer shadowy knowledge about an ideal world.
Need primary source (can you help?).
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Certain (550)  |  Clear (100)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Offer (141)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Real World (14)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Superior (81)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Truth (1057)  |  World (1774)

Science only means knowledge; and for [Greek] ancients it did only mean knowledge. Thus the favorite science of the Greeks was Astronomy, because it was as abstract as Algebra. ... We may say that the great Greek ideal was to have no use for useful things. The Slave was he who learned useful things; the Freeman was he who learned useless things. This still remains the ideal of many noble men of science, in the sense they do desire truth as the great Greeks desired it; and their attitude is an external protest against vulgarity of utilitarianism.
'About Beliefs', in As I was Saying: A Book of Essays (1936), 65-66. Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 318.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Against (332)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Desire (204)  |  Do (1908)  |  External (57)  |  Favorite (37)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greece (8)  |  Greek (107)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Noble (90)  |  Protest (9)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remains (9)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Slave (37)  |  Still (613)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Vulgarity (2)

Science, in its ultimate ideal, consists of a set of propositions arranged in a hierarchy, the lowest level of the hierarchy being concerned with particular facts, and the highest with some general law, governing everything in the universe. The various levels in the hierarchy have a two-fold logical connection, travelling one up, one down; the upward connection proceeds by induction, the downward by deduction.
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Being (1278)  |  Concern (228)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consist (223)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Down (456)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  General (511)  |  Govern (64)  |  Governing (20)  |  Hierarchy (17)  |  Induction (77)  |  Law (894)  |  Logical (55)  |  Particular (76)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Set (394)  |  Travelling (17)  |  Two (937)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Universe (857)  |  Upward (43)  |  Various (200)

The aim of medicine is to prevent disease and prolong life, the ideal of medicine is to eliminate the need of a physician.
Concluding remark from address, 'The Aims and Ideals of the American Medical Association', collected in Proceedings of the 66th Annual Meeting of the National Education Association of the United States (1928), 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Disease (328)  |  Elimination (25)  |  Idea (843)  |  Life (1795)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Need (290)  |  Physician (273)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Prolong (29)

The belief that mathematics, because it is abstract, because it is static and cold and gray, is detached from life, is a mistaken belief. Mathematics, even in its purest and most abstract estate, is not detached from life. It is just the ideal handling of the problems of life, as sculpture may idealize a human figure or as poetry or painting may idealize a figure or a scene. Mathematics is precisely the ideal handling of the problems of life, and the central ideas of the science, the great concepts about which its stately doctrines have been built up, are precisely the chief ideas with which life must always deal and which, as it tumbles and rolls about them through time and space, give it its interests and problems, and its order and rationality. That such is the case a few indications will suffice to show. The mathematical concepts of constant and variable are represented familiarly in life by the notions of fixedness and change. The concept of equation or that of an equational system, imposing restriction upon variability, is matched in life by the concept of natural and spiritual law, giving order to what were else chaotic change and providing partial freedom in lieu of none at all. What is known in mathematics under the name of limit is everywhere present in life in the guise of some ideal, some excellence high-dwelling among the rocks, an “ever flying perfect” as Emerson calls it, unto which we may approximate nearer and nearer, but which we can never quite attain, save in aspiration. The supreme concept of functionality finds its correlate in life in the all-pervasive sense of interdependence and mutual determination among the elements of the world. What is known in mathematics as transformation—that is, lawful transfer of attention, serving to match in orderly fashion the things of one system with those of another—is conceived in life as a process of transmutation by which, in the flux of the world, the content of the present has come out of the past and in its turn, in ceasing to be, gives birth to its successor, as the boy is father to the man and as things, in general, become what they are not. The mathematical concept of invariance and that of infinitude, especially the imposing doctrines that explain their meanings and bear their names—What are they but mathematicizations of that which has ever been the chief of life’s hopes and dreams, of that which has ever been the object of its deepest passion and of its dominant enterprise, I mean the finding of the worth that abides, the finding of permanence in the midst of change, and the discovery of a presence, in what has seemed to be a finite world, of being that is infinite? It is needless further to multiply examples of a correlation that is so abounding and complete as indeed to suggest a doubt whether it be juster to view mathematics as the abstract idealization of life than to regard life as the concrete realization of mathematics.
In 'The Humanization of Teaching of Mathematics', Science, New Series, 35, 645-46.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abide (12)  |  Abound (17)  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attention (190)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Birth (147)  |  Boy (94)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Case (99)  |  Cease (79)  |  Central (80)  |  Change (593)  |  Chaotic (2)  |  Chief (97)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Constant (144)  |  Content (69)  |  Correlate (6)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Deal (188)  |  Deep (233)  |  Detach (5)  |  Determination (78)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Dream (208)  |  Element (310)  |  Ralph Waldo Emerson (150)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Equation (132)  |  Especially (31)  |  Estate (5)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Example (94)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Explain (322)  |  Far (154)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Father (110)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  Finite (59)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Flux (21)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Functionality (2)  |  General (511)  |  Give (202)  |  Gray (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guise (5)  |  Handle (28)  |  High (362)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Idealization (3)  |  Impose (22)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indication (33)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinitude (3)  |  Interdependence (4)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invariance (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Lawful (7)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Match (29)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Needless (4)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notion (113)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Painting (44)  |  Partial (10)  |  Passion (114)  |  Past (337)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Pervasive (5)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Presence (63)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Provide (69)  |  Pure (291)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Realization (43)  |  Regard (305)  |  Represent (155)  |  Restriction (11)  |  Rock (161)  |  Roll (40)  |  Save (118)  |  Scene (36)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sculpture (12)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serve (59)  |  Serving (15)  |  Show (346)  |  Space (500)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Stately (12)  |  Static (8)  |  Successor (14)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Supreme (71)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Transmutation (22)  |  Tumble (2)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unto (8)  |  Variability (5)  |  Variable (34)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

The custom of giving patients appointments weeks in advance, during which time their illness may become seriously aggravated, seems to me to fall short of the ideal doctor-patient relationship.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Aggravate (2)  |  Appointment (12)  |  Become (815)  |  Custom (42)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Fall (230)  |  Give (202)  |  Illness (34)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Patient (199)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Seem (145)  |  Seriously (19)  |  Short (197)  |  Time (1877)  |  Week (70)

The fading of ideals is sad evidence of the defeat of human endeavour. In the schools of antiquity philosophers aspired to impart wisdom, in modern colleges our humbler aim is to teach subjects
Opening lines of 'The Rhythmic Claims of Freedom and Discipline', The Aims of Education: & Other Essays (1917), 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  College (66)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Education (378)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fading (3)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humble (50)  |  Impart (23)  |  Imparting (6)  |  Modern (385)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  School (219)  |  Subject (521)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Wisdom (221)

The future does not belong to those who are content with today, apathetic toward common problems and their fellow man alike, timid and fearful in the face of bold projects and new ideas. Rather, it will belong to those who can blend passion, reason and courage in a personal commitment to the great enterprises and ideals of American society.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  American (46)  |  Apathetic (2)  |  Belong (162)  |  Blend (9)  |  Bold (22)  |  Commitment (27)  |  Common (436)  |  Content (69)  |  Courage (69)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Face (212)  |  Fearful (7)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Future (429)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Man (2251)  |  New (1216)  |  New Ideas (16)  |  Passion (114)  |  Personal (67)  |  Problem (676)  |  Project (73)  |  Reason (744)  |  Society (326)  |  Timid (5)  |  Today (314)  |  Toward (45)  |  Will (2355)

The goal of science is clear—it is nothing short of the complete interpretation of the universe. But the goal is an ideal one—it marks the direction in which we move and strive, but never the point we shall actually reach.
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Complete (204)  |  Direction (175)  |  Goal (145)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Move (216)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Point (580)  |  Reach (281)  |  Science (3879)  |  Short (197)  |  Strive (46)  |  Universe (857)

The Greeks made Space the subject-matter of a science of supreme simplicity and certainty. Out of it grew, in the mind of classical antiquity, the idea of pure science. Geometry became one of the most powerful expressions of that sovereignty of the intellect that inspired the thought of those times. At a later epoch, when the intellectual despotism of the Church, which had been maintained through the Middle Ages, had crumbled, and a wave of scepticism threatened to sweep away all that had seemed most fixed, those who believed in Truth clung to Geometry as to a rock, and it was the highest ideal of every scientist to carry on his science “more geometrico.”
In Space,Time, Matter, translated by Henry Leopold Brose (1952), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Belief (578)  |  Carry (127)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Church (56)  |  Classical (45)  |  Cling (6)  |  Crumble (3)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Greek (107)  |  Grow (238)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Later (18)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Matter (798)  |  Middle Age (18)  |  Middle Ages (12)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Rock (161)  |  Scepticism (16)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seem (145)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Skepticism (28)  |  Sovereignty (6)  |  Space (500)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subject-Matter (8)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Sweep (19)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Wave (107)

The history of penicillin is one of the disgraces of medical research. Fleming published his classic paper in the British Journal of Experimental Pathology for June, 1929, but it was not until 1939 that Florey followed up the clue. An antiseptic which is almost ideal, inasmuch as it has no toxic effects, was allowed to slumber for ten years. Had it not been for the exigencies of the present war it might be slumbering still.
In book review, 'The Story of a Neglected Miracle', New York Times (25 Mar 1945), BR3. (The book being reviewed was J.D. Ratcliff, Yellow Magic: The Story of Penicillin.)
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (45)  |  Antiseptic (8)  |  British (41)  |  Classic (11)  |  Clue (17)  |  Disgrace (12)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exigency (3)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Sir Alexander Fleming (19)  |  Sir Howard Walter Florey (3)  |  Follow (378)  |  History (673)  |  Journal (30)  |  Medical (26)  |  Paper (182)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Penicillin (17)  |  Present (619)  |  Publish (36)  |  Research (664)  |  Slumber (6)  |  Still (613)  |  Toxic (2)  |  War (225)  |  Year (933)

The ideal doctor is patient.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Doctor (187)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Patient (199)

The ideal engineer is a composite ... He is not a scientist, he is not a mathematician, he is not a sociologist or a writer; but he may use the knowledge and techniques of any or all of these disciplines in solving engineering problems.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Composite (4)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Problem (676)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sociologist (3)  |  Solve (130)  |  Technique (80)  |  Use (766)  |  Writer (86)

The ideal engineer is a composite. … He is not a scientist, he is not a mathematician, he is not a sociologist or a writer. But he may use the knowledge and techniques of any or all of these disciplines in solving problems.
Student, Teacher, and Engineer: Selected Speeches and Articles of Nathan W Dougherty (1972), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Problem (676)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Technique (80)  |  Use (766)  |  Writer (86)

The ideal government of all reflective men, from Aristotle onward, is one which lets the individual alone–one which barely escapes being no government at all. This ideal, I believe, will be realized in the world twenty or thirty centuries after I have passed from these scenes and taken up my public duties in Hell.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Barely (5)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Century (310)  |  Duty (68)  |  Escape (80)  |  Government (110)  |  Hell (32)  |  Individual (404)  |  Let (61)  |  Onward (6)  |  Pass (238)  |  Public (96)  |  Realize (147)  |  Reflective (3)  |  Scene (36)  |  Thirty (6)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

The ideal of mathematics should be to erect a calculus to facilitate reasoning in connection with every province of thought, or of external experience, in which the succession of thoughts, or of events can be definitely ascertained and precisely stated. So that all serious thought which is not philosophy, or inductive reasoning, or imaginative literature, shall be mathematics developed by means of a calculus.
In Universal Algebra (1898), Preface.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Connection (162)  |  Definitely (5)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Develop (268)  |  Erect (6)  |  Event (216)  |  Experience (467)  |  External (57)  |  Facilitate (5)  |  Imaginative (8)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Literature (103)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Province (35)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Serious (91)  |  State (491)  |  Succession (77)  |  Thought (953)

The ideal of the supreme being is nothing but a regulative principle of reason which directs us to look upon all connection in the world as if it originated from an all-sufficient necessary cause.
Critique of Pure Reason (1781), trans. Norman Kemp Smith (1929), 517.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cause (541)  |  Connection (162)  |  Direct (225)  |  God (757)  |  Look (582)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Supreme Being (8)  |  World (1774)

The ideals which have always shone before me and filled me with the joy of living are goodness, beauty, and truth. To make a goal of comfort or happiness has never appealed to me.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appeal (45)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Fill (61)  |  Goal (145)  |  Goodness (25)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Joy (107)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Never (1087)  |  Shine (45)  |  Truth (1057)

The instinct to command others, in its primitive essence, is a carnivorous, altogether bestial and savage instinct. Under the influence of the mental development of man, it takes on a somewhat more ideal form and becomes somewhat ennobled, presenting itself as the instrument of reason and the devoted servant of that abstraction, or political fiction, which is called the public good. But in its essence it remains just as baneful, and it becomes even more so when, with the application of science, it extends its scope and intensifies the power of its action. If there is a devil in history, it is this power principle.
In Mikhail Aleksandrovich Bakunin, Grigorii Petrovich Maksimov, Max Nettlau, The political philosophy of Bakunin (1953), 248.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Action (327)  |  Application (242)  |  Baneful (2)  |  Become (815)  |  Bestial (3)  |  Call (769)  |  Carnivorous (6)  |  Command (58)  |  Development (422)  |  Devil (31)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Essence (82)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fiction (22)  |  Form (959)  |  Good (889)  |  History (673)  |  Influence (222)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mental (177)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Political (121)  |  Power (746)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remain (349)  |  Savage (29)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scope (45)  |  Servant (39)

The life of the spirit is a life of thought; the ideal of thought is truth; everlasting truth is the goal of mathematics.
In The American Mathematical Monthly (1949), 56, 19. Excerpted in John Ewing (ed,), A Century of Mathematics: Through the Eyes of the Monthly (1996), 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Everlasting (8)  |  Goal (145)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)

The old scientific ideal of episteme — of absolutely certain, demonstrable knowledge — has proved to be an idol. The demand for scientific objectivity makes it inevitable that every scientific statement must remain tentative for ever. (1959)
The Logic of Scientific Discovery: Logik Der Forschung (1959, 2002), 280.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Demand (123)  |  Idol (5)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Must (1526)  |  Objectivity (16)  |  Old (481)  |  Proof (287)  |  Remain (349)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Statement (142)  |  Tentative (16)  |  Theory (970)

The one who stays in my mind as the ideal man of science is, not Huxley or Tyndall, Hooker or Lubbock, still less my friend, philosopher and guide Herbert Spencer, but Francis Galton, whom I used to observe and listen to—I regret to add, without the least reciprocity—with rapt attention. Even to-day. I can conjure up, from memory’s misty deep, that tall figure with its attitude of perfect physical and mental poise; the clean-shaven face, the thin, compressed mouth with its enigmatical smile; the long upper lip and firm chin, and, as if presiding over the whole personality of the man, the prominent dark eyebrows from beneath which gleamed, with penetrating humour, contemplative grey eyes. Fascinating to me was Francis Galton’s all-embracing but apparently impersonal beneficence. But, to a recent and enthusiastic convert to the scientific method, the most relevant of Galton’s many gifts was the unique contribution of three separate and distinct processes of the intellect; a continuous curiosity about, and rapid apprehension of individual facts, whether common or uncommon; the faculty for ingenious trains of reasoning; and, more admirable than either of these, because the talent was wholly beyond my reach, the capacity for correcting and verifying his own hypotheses, by the statistical handling of masses of data, whether collected by himself or supplied by other students of the problem.
In My Apprenticeship (1926), 134-135.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Admirable (19)  |  All (4108)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Attention (190)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Beneficence (3)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Clean (50)  |  Collected (2)  |  Common (436)  |  Compressed (3)  |  Conjuring (3)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Convert (22)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Dark (140)  |  Data (156)  |  Deep (233)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Enigma (14)  |  Enthusiastic (6)  |  Eye (419)  |  Eyebrow (2)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Figure (160)  |  Firm (47)  |  Friend (168)  |  Sir Francis Galton (18)  |  Gift (104)  |  Grey (10)  |  Guide (97)  |  Handling (7)  |  Himself (461)  |  Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (12)  |  Humour (116)  |  Thomas Henry Huxley (126)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Impersonal (5)  |  Individual (404)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Lip (4)  |  Listen (73)  |  Long (790)  |  John Lubbock (Lord Avebury) (26)  |  Man (2251)  |  Memory (134)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Misty (6)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Other (2236)  |  Penetrating (3)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Personality (62)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Physical (508)  |  Poise (4)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Prominent (6)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Rapt (5)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Recent (77)  |  Reciprocity (2)  |  Regret (30)  |  Relevant (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Separate (143)  |  Smile (31)  |  Herbert Spencer (37)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Still (613)  |  Student (300)  |  Talent (94)  |  Tall (11)  |  Thin (16)  |  Train (114)  |  Uncommon (14)  |  Unique (67)  |  Upper (4)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wholly (88)

The ordinary patient goes to his doctor because he is in pain or some other discomfort and wants to be comfortable again; he is not in pursuit of the ideal of health in any direct sense. The doctor on the other hand wants to discover the pathological condition and control it if he can. The two are thus to some degree at cross purposes from the first, and unless the affair is brought to an early and happy conclusion this diversion of aims is likely to become more and more serious as the case goes on.
Address, opening of 1932-3 session of U.C.H. Medical School (4 Oct 1932), 'Art and Science in Medicine', The Collected Papers of Wilfred Trotter, FRS (1941), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (29)  |  Aim (165)  |  Become (815)  |  Case (99)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Condition (356)  |  Control (167)  |  Degree (276)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discomfort (3)  |  Discover (553)  |  Diversion (10)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Early (185)  |  First (1283)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  Health (193)  |  More (2559)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Other Hand (2)  |  Pain (136)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Patient (199)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serious (91)  |  Seriousness (10)  |  Two (937)  |  Want (497)

The picture of scientific method drafted by modern philosophy is very different from traditional conceptions. Gone is the ideal of a universe whose course follows strict rules, a predetermined cosmos that unwinds itself like an unwinding clock. Gone is the ideal of the scientist who knows the absolute truth. The happenings of nature are like rolling dice rather than like revolving stars; they are controlled by probability laws, not by causality, and the scientist resembles a gambler more than a prophet. He can tell you only his best posits—he never knows beforehand whether they will come true. He is a better gambler, though, than the man at the green table, because his statistical methods are superior. And his goal is staked higher—the goal of foretelling the rolling dice of the cosmos. If he is asked why he follows his methods, with what title he makes his predictions, he cannot answer that he has an irrefutable knowledge of the future; he can only lay his best bets. But he can prove that they are best bets, that making them is the best he can do—and if a man does his best, what else can you ask of him?
The Rise of Scientific Philosophy (1951, 1973), 248-9. Collected in James Louis Jarrett and Sterling M. McMurrin (eds.), Contemporary Philosophy: A Book of Readings (1954), 376.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Absoluteness (4)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Best (459)  |  Bet (12)  |  Better (486)  |  Causality (11)  |  Clock (47)  |  Conception (154)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Course (409)  |  Dice (21)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draft (6)  |  Follow (378)  |  Foretelling (4)  |  Future (429)  |  Gambler (7)  |  Goal (145)  |  Green (63)  |  Happening (58)  |  Irrefutable (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Picture (143)  |  Posit (2)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prophet (21)  |  Prove (250)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Roll (40)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Stake (19)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Superior (81)  |  Superiority (19)  |  Table (104)  |  Tell (340)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

The position of the anthropologist of to-day resembles in some sort the position of classical scholars at the revival of learning. To these men the rediscovery of ancient literature came like a revelation, disclosing to their wondering eyes a splendid vision of the antique world, such as the cloistered of the Middle Ages never dreamed of under the gloomy shadow of the minster and within the sound of its solemn bells. To us moderns a still wider vista is vouchsafed, a greater panorama is unrolled by the study which aims at bringing home to us the faith and the practice, the hopes and the ideals, not of two highly gifted races only, but of all mankind, and thus at enabling us to follow the long march, the slow and toilsome ascent, of humanity from savagery to civilization. And as the scholar of the Renaissance found not merely fresh food for thought but a new field of labour in the dusty and faded manuscripts of Greece and Rome, so in the mass of materials that is steadily pouring in from many sides—from buried cities of remotest antiquity as well as from the rudest savages of the desert and the jungle—we of to-day must recognise a new province of knowledge which will task the energies of generations of students to master.
'Author’s Introduction' (1900). In Dr Theodor H. Gaster (ed.), The New Golden Bough (1959), xxv-xxvi.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Bell (35)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Classical (45)  |  Desert (56)  |  Dream (208)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fad (10)  |  Faith (203)  |  Field (364)  |  Follow (378)  |  Food (199)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Generation (242)  |  Gift (104)  |  Gifted (23)  |  Greater (288)  |  Home (170)  |  Hope (299)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Jungle (22)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labour (98)  |  Learning (274)  |  Literature (103)  |  Long (790)  |  Mankind (339)  |  March (46)  |  Mass (157)  |  Master (178)  |  Material (353)  |  Merely (316)  |  Middle Age (18)  |  Middle Ages (12)  |  Modern (385)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Panorama (5)  |  Practice (204)  |  Province (35)  |  Race (268)  |  Rediscovery (2)  |  Renaissance (14)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Rome (19)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Side (233)  |  Slow (101)  |  Solemn (20)  |  Sound (183)  |  Splendid (23)  |  Still (613)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Task (147)  |  Thought (953)  |  Two (937)  |  Vision (123)  |  Vista (10)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

The power that produced Man when the monkey was not up to the mark, can produce a higher creature than Man if Man does not come up to the mark. What it means is that if Man is to be saved, Man must save himself. There seems no compelling reason why he should be saved. He is by no means an ideal creature. At his present best many of his ways are so unpleasant that they are unmentionable in polite society, and so painful that he is compelled to pretend that pain is often a good. Nature holds no brief for the human experiment: it must stand or fall by its results. If Man will not serve, Nature will try another experiment.
Back to Methuselah: a Metabiological Pentateuch (1921), xvii.
Science quotes on:  |  Another (7)  |  Best (459)  |  Brief (36)  |  Compelling (11)  |  Creature (233)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fall (230)  |  Good (889)  |  Higher (37)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mark (43)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Pain (136)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Polite (9)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Produced (187)  |  Production (183)  |  Reason (744)  |  Result (677)  |  Save (118)  |  Serve (59)  |  Society (326)  |  Stand (274)  |  Try (283)  |  Unpleasant (12)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

The processes concerned in simple descent are those of Family Variability and Reversion. It is well to define these words clearly. By family variability is meant the departure of the children of the same or similarly descended families from the ideal mean type of all of them. Reversion is the tendency of that ideal mean type to depart from the parent type, 'reverting' towards what may be roughly and perhaps fairly described as the average ancestral type. If family variability had been the only process in simple descent, the dispersion of the race would indefinitely increase with the number of the generations, but reversion checks this increase, and brings it to a standstill.
Typical Laws of Heredity (1877), 513.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Average (82)  |  Children (200)  |  Concern (228)  |  Descend (47)  |  Descent (27)  |  Dispersion (2)  |  Family (94)  |  Generation (242)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Increase (210)  |  Mean (809)  |  Number (699)  |  Parent (76)  |  Process (423)  |  Race (268)  |  Simple (406)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Type (167)  |  Word (619)

The purpose of science is to develop, without prejudice or preconception of any kind, a knowledge of the facts, the laws, and the processes of nature. The even more important task of religion, on the other hand, is to develop the consciences, the ideals, and the aspirations of mankind.
'A Joint Statement Upon the Relations of Science and Religion' formulated by Millikan (1923), signed by forty-five leaders of religion, science and human affairs. Reproduced in Bulletin of the American Association of University Professors (May 1923), 9, No. 5, 47. Included in Science and Life (1924), 86. (Note the context in time: the contemporary social climate by 1925 led to the Butler Act banning the teaching of evolution in Tennessee schools and the resulting trial of John Scopes.)
Science quotes on:  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Conscience (50)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Importance (286)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Mankind (339)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Preconception (13)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Process (423)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Purpose Of Science (4)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Task (147)

The responsibility for maintaining the composition of the blood in respect to other constituents devolves largely upon the kidneys. It is no exaggeration to say that the composition of the blood is determined not by what the mouth ingests but by what the kidneys keep; they are the master chemists of our internal environment, which, so to speak, they synthesize in reverse. When, among other duties, they excrete the ashes of our body fires, or remove from the blood the infinite variety of foreign substances which are constantly being absorbed from our indiscriminate gastrointestinal tracts, these excretory operations are incidental to the major task of keeping our internal environment in an ideal, balanced state. Our glands, our muscles, our bones, our tendons, even our brains, are called upon to do only one kind of physiological work, while our kidneys are called upon to perform an innumerable variety of operations. Bones can break, muscles can atrophy, glands can loaf, even the brain can go to sleep, without immediately endangering our survival, but when the kidneys fail to manufacture the proper kind of blood neither bone, muscle, gland nor brain can carry on.
'The Evolution of the Kidney', Lectures on the Kidney (1943), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  Absorption (12)  |  Ash (20)  |  Atrophy (7)  |  Balance (77)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Body (537)  |  Bone (95)  |  Brain (270)  |  Break (99)  |  Call (769)  |  Carry (127)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Composition (84)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constant (144)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Determined (9)  |  Do (1908)  |  Environment (216)  |  Exaggeration (15)  |  Excretion (7)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fire (189)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Gland (14)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Indiscriminate (2)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Internal (66)  |  Keep (101)  |  Kidney (18)  |  Kind (557)  |  Loaf (5)  |  Major (84)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Master (178)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Proper (144)  |  Removal (11)  |  Remove (45)  |  Respect (207)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Say (984)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Speak (232)  |  State (491)  |  Substance (248)  |  Survival (94)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Task (147)  |  Tract (5)  |  Variety (132)  |  Work (1351)

The true mathematician is always a good deal of an artist, an architect, yes, of a poet. Beyond the real world, though perceptibly connected with it, mathematicians have intellectually created an ideal world, which they attempt to develop into the most perfect of all worlds, and which is being explored in every direction. None has the faintest conception of this world, except he who knows it.
In Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung, 32, 381. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 184.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Architect (29)  |  Artist (90)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Conception (154)  |  Connect (125)  |  Create (235)  |  Deal (188)  |  Develop (268)  |  Direction (175)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Faint (9)  |  Good (889)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics And Art (8)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Most (1731)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Poet (83)  |  Real World (14)  |  True (212)  |  World (1774)

The truth is that other systems of geometry are possible, yet after all, these other systems are not spaces but other methods of space measurements. There is one space only, though we may conceive of many different manifolds, which are contrivances or ideal constructions invented for the purpose of determining space.
In Science (1903), 18, 106. In Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica (1914), 352.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Construction (112)  |  Contrivance (9)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Invention (369)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Space (500)  |  System (537)  |  Truth (1057)

The union of the mathematician with the poet, fervor with measure, passion with correctness, this surely is the ideal.
From review by James on W.K. Clifford, Lectures and Essays in The Nation (1879), 29, No. 749, 312. In Collected Essays and Reviews (1920), 138.
Science quotes on:  |  Correctness (12)  |  Fervor (7)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Measure (232)  |  Passion (114)  |  Poet (83)  |  Surely (101)  |  Union (51)

There are pessimists who hold that such a state of affairs is necessarily inherent in human nature; it is those who propound such views that are the enemies of true religion, for they imply thereby that religious teachings are utopian ideals and unsuited to afford guidance in human affairs. The study of the social patterns in certain so-called primitive cultures, however, seems to have made it sufficiently evident that such a defeatist view is wholly unwarranted.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Afford (17)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Culture (143)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Evident (91)  |  Guidance (28)  |  Hold (95)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Affairs (5)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Imply (17)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Pessimist (7)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Propound (2)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Seem (145)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Social (252)  |  State (491)  |  State Of affairs (5)  |  Study (653)  |  Sufficiently (9)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teachings (11)  |  Thereby (5)  |  True (212)  |  Unwarranted (2)  |  Utopian (3)  |  View (488)  |  Wholly (88)

There are those who say that the human kidney was created to keep the blood pure, or more precisely, to keep our internal environment in an ideal balanced state. This I must deny. I grant that the human kidney is a marvelous organ, but I cannot grant that it was purposefully designed to excrete urine or to regulate the composition of the blood or to subserve the physiological welfare of Homo sapiens in any sense. Rather I contend that the human kidney manufactures the kind of urine that it does, and it maintains the blood in the composition which that fluid has, because this kidney has a certain functional architecture; and it owes that architecture not to design or foresight or to any plan, but to the fact that the earth is an unstable sphere with a fragile crust, to the geologic revolutions that for six hundred million years have raised and lowered continents and seas, to the predacious enemies, and heat and cold, and storms and droughts; to the unending succession of vicissitudes that have driven the mutant vertebrates from sea into fresh water, into desiccated swamps, out upon the dry land, from one habitation to another, perpetually in search of the free and independent life, perpetually failing, for one reason or another, to find it.
From Fish to Philosopher (1953), 210-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Architecture (48)  |  Balance (77)  |  Blood (134)  |  Certain (550)  |  Cold (112)  |  Composition (84)  |  Contention (14)  |  Continent (76)  |  Creation (327)  |  Crust (38)  |  Denial (17)  |  Deny (66)  |  Design (195)  |  Drought (13)  |  Dry (57)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Environment (216)  |  Excretion (7)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Foresight (6)  |  Fragile (21)  |  Fragility (2)  |  Free (232)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Function (228)  |  Geology (220)  |  Grant (73)  |  Habitation (7)  |  Heat (174)  |  Homo Sapiens (23)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Independent (67)  |  Internal (66)  |  Keep (101)  |  Kidney (18)  |  Kind (557)  |  Land (115)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lowering (4)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Marvelous (29)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Organ (115)  |  Owe (71)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Perpetually (20)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Plan (117)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Predator (6)  |  Pure (291)  |  Purity (14)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Raise (35)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Say (984)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Sea (308)  |  Search (162)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serve (59)  |  Sphere (116)  |  State (491)  |  Storm (51)  |  Storms (18)  |  Succession (77)  |  Swamp (7)  |  Unstable (8)  |  Urine (16)  |  Vertebrate (20)  |  Vicissitude (6)  |  Water (481)  |  Welfare (25)  |  Year (933)

There is a demon in technology. It was put there by man and man will have to exorcise it before technological civilization can achieve the eighteenth-century ideal of humane civilized life.
A God Within (1972), 216.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (21)  |  Century (310)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Demon (8)  |  Humane (18)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Will (2355)

This is the most beautiful place on Earth. There are many such places. Every man, every woman, carries in heart and mind the image of the ideal place, the right place, the one true home, known or unknown, actual or visionary.
Opening sentences in 'The First morning', Desert Solitaire (1968,1988), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Carry (127)  |  Earth (996)  |  Heart (229)  |  Home (170)  |  Image (96)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Place (177)  |  Right (452)  |  True (212)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Visionary (6)  |  Woman (151)

This splendid subject [mathematics], queen of all exact sciences, and the ideal and norm of all careful thinking...
Educational Problems (1911), Vol. 2, 393.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Science (3879)  |  Splendid (23)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thinking (414)

This whole theory of electrostatics constitutes a group of abstract ideas and general propositions, formulated in the clear and precise language of geometry and algebra, and connected with one another by the rules of strict logic. This whole fully satisfies the reason of a French physicist and his taste for clarity, simplicity and order. The same does not hold for the Englishman. These abstract notions of material points, force, line of force, and equipotential surface do not satisfy his need to imagine concrete, material, visible, and tangible things. 'So long as we cling to this mode of representation,' says an English physicist, 'we cannot form a mental representation of the phenomena which are really happening.' It is to satisfy the need that he goes and creates a model.
The French or German physicist conceives, in the space separating two conductors, abstract lines of force having no thickness or real existence; the English physicist materializes these lines and thickens them to the dimensions of a tube which he will fill with vulcanised rubber. In place of a family of lines of ideal forces, conceivable only by reason, he will have a bundle of elastic strings, visible and tangible, firmly glued at both ends to the surfaces of the two conductors, and, when stretched, trying both to contact and to expand. When the two conductors approach each other, he sees the elastic strings drawing closer together; then he sees each of them bunch up and grow large. Such is the famous model of electrostatic action imagined by Faraday and admired as a work of genius by Maxwell and the whole English school.
The employment of similar mechanical models, recalling by certain more or less rough analogies the particular features of the theory being expounded, is a regular feature of the English treatises on physics. Here is a book* [by Oliver Lodge] intended to expound the modern theories of electricity and to expound a new theory. In it are nothing but strings which move around pulleys, which roll around drums, which go through pearl beads, which carry weights; and tubes which pump water while others swell and contract; toothed wheels which are geared to one another and engage hooks. We thought we were entering the tranquil and neatly ordered abode of reason, but we find ourselves in a factory.
*Footnote: O. Lodge, Les Théories Modernes (Modern Views on Electricity) (1889), 16.
The Aim and Structure of Physical Theory (1906), 2nd edition (1914), trans. Philip P. Wiener (1954), 70-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Action (327)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Approach (108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (392)  |  Both (493)  |  Carry (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Closer (43)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Connect (125)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Contact (65)  |  Create (235)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Drum (8)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electrostatic (7)  |  Electrostatics (6)  |  Employment (32)  |  End (590)  |  Engage (39)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expand (53)  |  Factory (20)  |  Family (94)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geometry (255)  |  German (36)  |  Grow (238)  |  Happening (58)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Language (293)  |  Large (394)  |  Sir Oliver Joseph Lodge (13)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Material (353)  |  Materialize (2)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mental (177)  |  Model (102)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Move (216)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notion (113)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Point (580)  |  Precise (68)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regular (46)  |  Representation (53)  |  Roll (40)  |  Rubber (9)  |  Rule (294)  |  Say (984)  |  School (219)  |  See (1081)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Surface (209)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Taste (90)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Together (387)  |  Tooth (29)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trying (144)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)  |  Visible (84)  |  Water (481)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

To mix science up with philosophy is only to produce a philosophy that has lost all its ideal value and a science that has lost all its practical value. It is for my private physician to tell me whether this or that food will kill me. It is for my private philosopher to tell me whether I ought to be killed.
In All Things Considered (1908), 187.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Death (388)  |  Food (199)  |  Kill (100)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physician (273)  |  Practical (200)  |  Private (23)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Philosophy (6)  |  Tell (340)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)

We cannot idealize technology. Technology is only and always the reflection of our own imagination, and its uses must be conditioned by our own values. Technology can help cure diseases, but we can prevent a lot of diseases by old-fashioned changes in behavior.
Remarks at Knoxville Auditorium Coliseum, Knoxville, Tennessee (10 Oct 1996) while seeking re-election. American Presidency Project web page.
Science quotes on:  |  Behavior (84)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Change (593)  |  Condition (356)  |  Cure (122)  |  Disease (328)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Lot (151)  |  Must (1526)  |  Old (481)  |  Old-Fashioned (8)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Technology (257)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)

We cannot step aside and say that we have achieved our goal by inventing a new drug or a new way by which to treat presently incurable diseases, a new way to help those who suffer from malnutrition, or the creation of ideal balanced diets on a worldwide scale. We cannot rest till the way has been found, with our help, to bring our finest achievement to everyone.
Address to the Medical College of Virginia, Richmond (1 Dec 1950).
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Creation (327)  |  Diet (54)  |  Disease (328)  |  Drug (57)  |  Goal (145)  |  Incurable (10)  |  Medicine (378)  |  New (1216)  |  Research (664)  |  Rest (280)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Step (231)  |  Way (1217)  |  Worldwide (16)

We come finally, however, to the relation of the ideal theory to real world, or “real” probability. If he is consistent a man of the mathematical school washes his hands of applications. To someone who wants them he would say that the ideal system runs parallel to the usual theory: “If this is what you want, try it: it is not my business to justify application of the system; that can only be done by philosophizing; I am a mathematician”. In practice he is apt to say: “try this; if it works that will justify it”. But now he is not merely philosophizing; he is committing the characteristic fallacy. Inductive experience that the system works is not evidence.
In A Mathematician’s Miscellany (1953). Reissued as Béla Bollobás (ed.), Littlewood’s Miscellany (1986), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Business (149)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Merely (316)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Practice (204)  |  Probability (130)  |  Real World (14)  |  Relation (157)  |  Run (174)  |  Say (984)  |  School (219)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Try (283)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

We lift ourselves by our thought. We climb upon our vision of ourselves. If you want to enlarge your life, you must first enlarge your thought of it and of yourself. Hold the ideal of yourself as you long to be, always everywhere.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Climb (35)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  First (1283)  |  Hold (95)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lift (55)  |  Long (790)  |  Must (1526)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Thought (953)  |  Vision (123)  |  Want (497)

What is peculiar and new to the [19th] century, differentiating it from all its predecessors, is its technology. It was not merely the introduction of some great isolated inventions. It is impossible not to feel that something more than that was involved. … The process of change was slow, unconscious, and unexpected. In the nineteeth century, the process became quick, conscious, and expected. … The whole change has arisen from the new scientific information. Science, conceived not so much in its principles as in its results, is an obvious storehouse of ideas for utilisation. … Also, it is a great mistake to think that the bare scientific idea is the required invention, so that it has only to be picked up and used. An intense period of imaginative design lies between. One element in the new method is just the discovery of how to set about bridging the gap between the scientific ideas, and the ultimate product. It is a process of disciplined attack upon one difficulty after another This discipline of knowledge applies beyond technology to pure science, and beyond science to general scholarship. It represents the change from amateurs to professionals. … But the full self-conscious realisation of the power of professionalism in knowledge in all its departments, and of the way to produce the professionals, and of the importance of knowledge to the advance of technology, and of the methods by which abstract knowledge can be connected with technology, and of the boundless possibilities of technological advance,—the realisation of all these things was first completely attained in the nineteeth century.
In Science and the Modern World (1925, 1997), 96.
Science quotes on:  |  19th Century (33)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Amateur (19)  |  Attack (84)  |  Attain (125)  |  Bare (33)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Century (310)  |  Change (593)  |  Completely (135)  |  Connect (125)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Department (92)  |  Design (195)  |  Differentiate (19)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Element (310)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expected (5)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Gap (33)  |  General (511)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Importance (286)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Information (166)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Invention (369)  |  Involved (90)  |  Isolated (14)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lie (364)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Period (198)  |  Power (746)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Principle (507)  |  Process (423)  |  Product (160)  |  Professional (70)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Realisation (4)  |  Represent (155)  |  Required (108)  |  Result (677)  |  Scholarship (20)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Self (267)  |  Set (394)  |  Slow (101)  |  Something (719)  |  Storehouse (6)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unconscious (22)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)

When the boy begins to understand that the visible point is preceded by an invisible point, that the shortest distance between two points is conceived as a straight line before it is ever drawn with the pencil on paper, he experiences a feeling of pride, of satisfaction. And justly so, for the fountain of all thought has been opened to him, the difference between the ideal and the real, potentia et actu, has become clear to him; henceforth the philosopher can reveal him nothing new, as a geometrician he has discovered the basis of all thought.
In Sprüche in Reimen. Sprüche in Prosa. Ethisches (1850), Vol. 3, 214. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 67. From the original German, “Wenn der knabe zu begreifen anfängt, daß einem sichtbaren Punkte ein unsichtbarer vorhergehen müsse, daß der nächste Weg zwischen zwei Punkten schon als Linie gedacht werde, ehe sie mit dem Bleistift aufs Papier gezogen wird, so fühlt er einen gewissen Stolz, ein Behagen. Und nicht mit Unrecht; denn ihm ist die Quelle alles Denkens aufgeschlossen, Idee und Verwirklichtes, potentia et actu, ist ihm klargeworden; der Philosoph entdeckt ihm nichts Neues; dem Geometer war von seiner Seite der Grund alles Denkens aufgegangen.” The Latin phrase, “potentia et actu” means “potentiality and actuality”.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Basis (173)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Boy (94)  |  Clear (100)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discover (553)  |  Distance (161)  |  Draw (137)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fountain (16)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Justly (6)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Open (274)  |  Paper (182)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Point (580)  |  Potentia (3)  |  Precede (23)  |  Pride (78)  |  Real (149)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Shortest (16)  |  Shortest Distance (2)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  Thought (953)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Visible (84)

Who has studied the works of such men as Euler, Lagrange, Cauchy, Riemann, Sophus Lie, and Weierstrass, can doubt that a great mathematician is a great artist? The faculties possessed by such men, varying greatly in kind and degree with the individual, are analogous with those requisite for constructive art. Not every mathematician possesses in a specially high degree that critical faculty which finds its employment in the perfection of form, in conformity with the ideal of logical completeness; but every great mathematician possesses the rarer faculty of constructive imagination.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Sheffield, Section A, Nature (1 Sep 1910), 84, 290.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogous (5)  |  Art (657)  |  Artist (90)  |  Baron Augustin-Louis Cauchy (10)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Conformity (14)  |  Constructive (14)  |  Critical (66)  |  Degree (276)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Employment (32)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Individual (404)  |  Kind (557)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Lie (364)  |  Sophus Lie (6)  |  Logical (55)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Possess (156)  |  Rare (89)  |  Requisite (11)  |  Bernhard Riemann (7)  |  Specially (3)  |  Study (653)  |  Vary (27)  |  Karl Weierstrass (9)  |  Work (1351)

[Euclid's Elements] has been for nearly twenty-two centuries the encouragement and guide of that scientific thought which is one thing with the progress of man from a worse to a better state. The encouragement; for it contained a body of knowledge that was really known and could be relied on, and that moreover was growing in extent and application. For even at the time this book was written—shortly after the foundation of the Alexandrian Museum—Mathematics was no longer the merely ideal science of the Platonic school, but had started on her career of conquest over the whole world of Phenomena. The guide; for the aim of every scientific student of every subject was to bring his knowledge of that subject into a form as perfect as that which geometry had attained. Far up on the great mountain of Truth, which all the sciences hope to scale, the foremost of that sacred sisterhood was seen, beckoning for the rest to follow her. And hence she was called, in the dialect of the Pythagoreans, ‘the purifier of the reasonable soul.’
From a lecture delivered at the Royal Institution (Mar 1873), collected postumously in W.K. Clifford, edited by Leslie Stephen and Frederick Pollock, Lectures and Essays, (1879), Vol. 1, 296.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aim (165)  |  Alexandria (2)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Attain (125)  |  Beckoning (4)  |  Better (486)  |  Body (537)  |  Book (392)  |  Call (769)  |  Career (75)  |  Conquest (28)  |  Element (310)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Extent (139)  |  Follow (378)  |  Following (16)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Growing (98)  |  Guide (97)  |  Hope (299)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Museum (31)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rest (280)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Scale (121)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Thought (17)  |  Soul (226)  |  Start (221)  |  State (491)  |  Student (300)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

[Mathematics is] the study of ideal constructions (often applicable to real problems), and the discovery thereby of relations between the parts of these constructions, before unknown.
In 'Mathematics', Century Dictionary.
Science quotes on:  |  Applicable (31)  |  Construction (112)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Often (106)  |  Part (222)  |  Problem (676)  |  Real (149)  |  Relation (157)  |  Study (653)  |  Unknown (182)

…the ideal doctor would be a man endowed with profound knowledge of life and of the soul, intuitively divining any suffering or disorder of whatever kind, and restoring peace by his mere presence.
Amiel's Journal The Journal Intime of Henri-Frederic Amiel (22 Aug 1873), trans. By Mrs Humphry Ward (1889), Vol 2., 153.
Science quotes on:  |  Disorder (41)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Peace (108)  |  Physician (273)  |  Presence (63)  |  Profound (104)  |  Soul (226)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Whatever (234)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.