Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index D > Category: Diversion

Diversion Quotes (10 quotes)

But having considered everything which has been said, one could by this believe that the earth and not the heavens is so moved, and there is no evidence to the contrary. Nevertheless, this seems prima facie as much, or more, against natural reason as are all or several articles of our faith. Thus, that which I have said by way of diversion (esbatement) in this manner can be valuable to refute and check those who would impugn our faith by argument.
On the Book of the Heavens and the World of Aristotle [1377], bk. II, ch. 25, sect. 10, trans. A. D. Menut and A. J. Denomy, quoted in Marshall Clagett, The Science of Mechanics in the Middle Ages (1959), 606.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Check (24)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Earth (996)  |  Everything (476)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Faith (203)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Impugn (2)  |  Manner (58)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Prima Facie (2)  |  Reason (744)  |  Refutation (12)  |  Value (365)  |  Way (1217)

In structure these little animals were fashioned like a bell, and at the round opening they made such a stir, that the particles in the water thereabout were set in motion thereby. … And though I must have seen quite 20 of these little animals on their long tails alongside one another very gently moving, with outstretcht bodies and straitened-out tails; yet in an instant, as it were, they pulled their bodies and their tails together, and no sooner had they contracted their bodies and tails, than they began to stick their tails out again very leisurely, and stayed thus some time continuing their gentle motion: which sight I found mightily diverting.
[Describing the ciliate Vorticella.]
Letter to the Royal Society, London (25 Dec 1702). In Clifford Dobell (ed.), Anthony van Leewenhoek and his “Little Animals” (1932), 277.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Animalcule (12)  |  Bell (35)  |  Contract (11)  |  Instant (45)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Motion (310)  |  Must (1526)  |  Particle (194)  |  Protist (3)  |  Pull (43)  |  Set (394)  |  Sight (132)  |  Stir (21)  |  Structure (344)  |  Tail (18)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Water (481)

People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices. It is impossible indeed to prevent such meetings, by any law which either could be executed, or would be consistent with liberty and justice.
An Enquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776). In R. H. Campbell and A. S. Skinner (eds.), An Enquiry Into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1976), Vol. 1, Book 1, Chapter 10, Part 2, 145.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Conspiracy (4)  |  Contrivance (9)  |  Conversation (43)  |  End (590)  |  Execution (25)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Justice (39)  |  Law (894)  |  Liberty (25)  |  Meeting (20)  |  People (1005)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Price (51)  |  Public (96)  |  Raise (35)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Together (387)  |  Trade (31)

The ordinary patient goes to his doctor because he is in pain or some other discomfort and wants to be comfortable again; he is not in pursuit of the ideal of health in any direct sense. The doctor on the other hand wants to discover the pathological condition and control it if he can. The two are thus to some degree at cross purposes from the first, and unless the affair is brought to an early and happy conclusion this diversion of aims is likely to become more and more serious as the case goes on.
Address, opening of 1932-3 session of U.C.H. Medical School (4 Oct 1932), 'Art and Science in Medicine', The Collected Papers of Wilfred Trotter, FRS (1941), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (29)  |  Aim (165)  |  Become (815)  |  Case (99)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Condition (356)  |  Control (167)  |  Degree (276)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discomfort (3)  |  Discover (553)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Early (185)  |  First (1283)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  Health (193)  |  Ideal (99)  |  More (2559)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Other Hand (2)  |  Pain (136)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Patient (199)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serious (91)  |  Seriousness (10)  |  Two (937)  |  Want (497)

The questions we ask are "What?" and "How?" What are the facts and how are they related? If sometimes, in a moment of absent-mindedness or idle diversion, we ask the question "Why?" the answer escapes us.
In The Heavenly City of the Eighteenth-Century Philosophers (1932, 2003), 16
Science quotes on:  |  Absent-Minded (4)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Escape (80)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Idle (33)  |  Moment (253)  |  Question (621)  |  Related (5)  |  Why (491)

The spiritual and intellectual decline which has overtaken us in the last thirty years … [may be due] to the diversion of all the best brains to technology.
In London Review of Books, 1984.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Best (459)  |  Brain (270)  |  Decline (26)  |  Due (141)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Last (426)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Technology (257)  |  Year (933)

To arrive at the simplest truth, as Newton knew and practiced, requires years of contemplation. Not activity Not reasoning. Not calculating. Not busy behaviour of any kind. Not reading. Not talking. Not making an effort. Not thinking. Simply bearing in mind what it is one needs to know. And yet those with the courage to tread this path to real discovery are not only offered practically no guidance on how to do so, they are actively discouraged and have to set about it in secret, pretending meanwhile to be diligently engaged in the frantic diversions and to conform with the deadening personal opinions which are continually being thrust upon them.
In 'Appendix 1', The Laws of Form (1969), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Actively (3)  |  Activity (210)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Being (1278)  |  Busy (28)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Conform (13)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Continual (43)  |  Courage (69)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Discourage (13)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effort (227)  |  Engage (39)  |  Frantic (2)  |  Guidance (28)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Making (300)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Offer (141)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Path (144)  |  Personal (67)  |  Practically (10)  |  Practice (204)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Real (149)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Require (219)  |  Secret (194)  |  Set (394)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simply (53)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thrust (12)  |  Tread (17)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Year (933)

Travel by canoe is not a necessity, and will nevermore be the most efficient way to get from one region to another, or even from one lake to another anywhere. A canoe trip has become simply a rite of oneness with certain terrain, a diversion off the field, an art performed not because it is a necessity but because there is value in the art itself.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anywhere (13)  |  Art (657)  |  Become (815)  |  Canoe (2)  |  Certain (550)  |  Efficient (26)  |  Field (364)  |  Lake (32)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Oneness (6)  |  Perform (121)  |  Region (36)  |  Rite (3)  |  Simply (53)  |  Terrain (5)  |  Travel (114)  |  Trip (10)  |  Value (365)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

When he had a few moments for diversion, he [Napoleon] not unfrequently employed them over a book of logarithms, in which he always found recreation.
In Napoleon Bonaparte (1904), Vol. 1, chap. 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Emperor Napolιon Bonaparte (19)  |  Book (392)  |  Employ (113)  |  Find (998)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Logarithm (12)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Moment (253)  |  Napoleon (16)  |  Recreation (20)

[The principle, in building a sewer system, was] ...of diverting the cause of the mischief to a locality where it can do no mischief.
Quoted in George Drysdale Dempsey and Daniel Kinnear Clark, On the Drainage of Lands, Towns, & Buildings (1887), 246.
Science quotes on:  |  Building (156)  |  Cause (541)  |  Do (1908)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Mischief (13)  |  Principle (507)  |  Sewer (5)  |  System (537)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.