Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index O > Category: Offer

Offer Quotes (16 quotes)

...Furthermore, an inducement must be offered to those who are engaged in the industrial exploitation of natural sources of power, as waterfalls, by guaranteeing greater returns on the capital invested than they can secure by local development of the prop
http://web.archive.org/web/20070109161311/http://www.knowprose.com/node/12961
Science quotes on:  |  Capital (15)  |  Development (228)  |  Engage (11)  |  Exploitation (8)  |  Great (300)  |  Guarantee (16)  |  Inducement (3)  |  Industrial (11)  |  Invest (9)  |  Local (15)  |  Natural (128)  |  Power (273)  |  Prop (6)  |  Return (35)  |  Secure (13)  |  Source (71)  |  Waterfall (3)

But, as we consider the totality of similarly broad and fundamental aspects of life, we cannot defend division by two as a natural principle of objective order. Indeed, the ‘stuff’ of the universe often strikes our senses as complex and shaded continua, admittedly with faster and slower moments, and bigger and smaller steps, along the way. Nature does not dictate dualities, trinities, quarterings, or any ‘objective’ basis for human taxonomies; most of our chosen schemes, and our designated numbers of categories, record human choices from a cornucopia of possibilities offered by natural variation from place to place, and permitted by the flexibility of our mental capacities. How many seasons (if we wish to divide by seasons at all) does a year contain? How many stages shall we recognize in a human life?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admittedly (2)  |  Aspect (37)  |  Basis (60)  |  Big (33)  |  Broad (18)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Category (10)  |  Choice (64)  |  Choose (35)  |  Complex (78)  |  Consider (45)  |  Contain (37)  |  Continua (3)  |  Defend (20)  |  Designation (10)  |  Dictate (9)  |  Divide (24)  |  Division (27)  |  Fast (24)  |  Flexibility (5)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Human (445)  |  Human Life (25)  |  Life (917)  |  Mental (57)  |  Moment (61)  |  Natural (128)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Number (179)  |  Objective (49)  |  Often (69)  |  Order (167)  |  Permit (20)  |  Place (111)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Principle (228)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Record (56)  |  Scheme (20)  |  Season (24)  |  Sense (240)  |  Shade (12)  |  Similarly (3)  |  Slow (36)  |  Small (97)  |  Stage (39)  |  Step (67)  |  Strike (21)  |  Stuff (15)  |  Taxonomy (16)  |  Totality (9)  |  Universe (563)  |  Variation (50)  |  Wish (62)  |  Year (214)

Encryption...is a powerful defensive weapon for free people. It offers a technical guarantee of privacy, regardless of who is running the government... It’s hard to think of a more powerful, less dangerous tool for liberty.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Dangerous (45)  |  Free (59)  |  Government (85)  |  Guarantee (16)  |  Hard (70)  |  Less (54)  |  Liberty (17)  |  People (269)  |  Powerful (51)  |  Privacy (6)  |  Regardless (3)  |  Run (33)  |  Technical (26)  |  Think (205)  |  Tool (70)  |  Weapon (57)

Evolution advances, not by a priori design, but by the selection of what works best out of whatever choices offer. We are the products of editing, rather than of authorship.
In 'The Origin of Optical Activity', Annals of the New York Academy of Science (1957), 69, 367.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (16)  |  Advance (123)  |  Best (129)  |  Choice (64)  |  Design (92)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Product (72)  |  Selection (27)  |  Work (457)

I am not insensible to natural beauty, but my emotional joys center on the improbable yet sometimes wondrous works of that tiny and accidental evolutionary twig called Homo sapiens. And I find, among these works, nothing more noble than the history of our struggle to understand nature—a majestic entity of such vast spatial and temporal scope that she cannot care much for a little mammalian afterthought with a curious evolutionary invention, even if that invention has, for the first time in so me four billion years of life on earth, produced recursion as a creature reflects back upon its own production and evolution. Thus, I love nature primarily for the puzzles and intellectual delights that she offers to the first organ capable of such curious contemplation.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accidental (3)  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Back (55)  |  Billion (52)  |  Call (68)  |  Capable (26)  |  Care (73)  |  Center (30)  |  Contemplation (37)  |  Creature (127)  |  Curious (24)  |  Delight (51)  |  Emotional (13)  |  Entity (23)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Evolutionary (16)  |  Find (248)  |  First (174)  |  First Time (3)  |  History (302)  |  Homo Sapiens (19)  |  Improbable (9)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Invention (283)  |  Joy (61)  |  Life On Earth (5)  |  Little (126)  |  Love (164)  |  Majestic (7)  |  Mammalian (3)  |  Natural Beauty (2)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Noble (41)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Organ (60)  |  Primarily (9)  |  Produce (63)  |  Production (105)  |  Puzzle (30)  |  Reflect (17)  |  Scope (13)  |  Sometimes (27)  |  Spatial (4)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Temporal (4)  |  Tiny (25)  |  Twig (7)  |  Understand (189)  |  Vast (56)  |  Wondrous (7)  |  Work (457)  |  Year (214)

I have long recognized the theory and aesthetic of such comprehensive display: show everything and incite wonder by sheer variety. But I had never realized how power fully the decor of a cabinet museum can promote this goal until I saw the Dublin [Natural History Museum] fixtures redone right ... The exuberance is all of one piece–organic and architectural. I write this essay to offer my warmest congratulations to the Dublin Museum for choosing preservation–a decision not only scientifically right, but also ethically sound and decidedly courageous. The avant-garde is not an exclusive locus of courage; a principled stand within a reconstituted rear unit may call down just as much ridicule and demand equal fortitude. Crowds do not always rush off in admirable or defendable directions.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (11)  |  Aesthetic (26)  |  Cabinet (4)  |  Call (68)  |  Choose (35)  |  Comprehensive (7)  |  Congratulations (3)  |  Courage (39)  |  Crowd (12)  |  Decision (58)  |  Demand (52)  |  Direction (56)  |  Display (22)  |  Down (44)  |  Dublin (2)  |  Equal (53)  |  Essay (9)  |  Ethically (4)  |  Everything (120)  |  Exclusive (9)  |  Fixture (2)  |  Fully (11)  |  Goal (81)  |  Incite (2)  |  Locus (3)  |  Long (95)  |  Museum (22)  |  Natural History (44)  |  Organic (48)  |  Piece (32)  |  Power (273)  |  Preservation (28)  |  Principle (228)  |  Promote (14)  |  Realize (43)  |  Rear (6)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Reconstitute (2)  |  Ridicule (13)  |  Right (144)  |  Rush (12)  |  Scientifically (3)  |  See (197)  |  Sheer (6)  |  Show (55)  |  Sound (59)  |  Stand (60)  |  Theory (582)  |  Unit (25)  |  Variety (53)  |  Warm (20)  |  Wonder (134)  |  Write (87)

I have nothing to offer except a way of looking at things.
(1986)
Science quotes on:  |  Looking (25)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Psychology (125)

In an age of specialization people are proud to be able to do one thing well, but if that is all they know about, they are missing out on much else life has to offer.
As given in John Rennie, 'Dennis Flanagan, A Proud “Renaissance Hack”', Scientific American (26 Jan 2005).
Science quotes on:  |  Life (917)  |  Miss (16)  |  Pride (45)  |  Specialization (12)

In the following pages I offer nothing more than simple facts, plain arguments, and common sense; and have no other preliminaries to settle with the reader, than that he will divest himself of prejudice and repossession, and suffer his reason and feelings to determine for themselves; and that he will put on, or rather that he will not put off, the true character of man, and generously enlarge his view beyond the present day.
In Common Sense: Addressed to the Inhabitants of America (1792), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (59)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Character (82)  |  Common Sense (69)  |  Determine (45)  |  Enlarge (15)  |  Fact (609)  |  Feeling (79)  |  Generous (12)  |  Plain (24)  |  Prejudice (58)  |  Present (103)  |  Reason (330)  |  Simple (111)  |  Suffer (25)  |  True (120)  |  View (115)

It is mathematics that offers the exact natural sciences a certain measure of security which, without mathematics, they could not attain.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (21)  |  Certain (84)  |  Exact (38)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Measure (70)  |  Natural Sciences (3)  |  Security (27)

Scientists like myself merely use their gifts to show up that which already exists, and we look small compared to the artists who create works of beauty out of themselves. If a good fairy came and offered me back my youth, asking me which gifts I would rather have, those to make visible a thing which exists but which no man has ever seen before, or the genius needed to create, in a style of architecture never imagined before, the great Town Hall in which we are dining tonight, I might be tempted to choose the latter.
Nobel Banquet Speech (10 Dec 1962).
Science quotes on:  |  Architecture (35)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Choice (64)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Creation (211)  |  Existence (254)  |  Fairy (8)  |  Genius (186)  |  Gift (47)  |  See (197)  |  Small (97)  |  Temptation (9)  |  Town Hall (2)  |  Visibility (6)

The aim of poetry is to give a high and voluptuous plausibility to what is palpably not true. I offer the Twenty-third Psalm as an example: ‘The Lord is my shepherd: I shall not want.’ It is immensely esteemed by the inmates of almshouses, and by gentlemen waiting to be hanged. I have to limit my own reading of it, avoiding soft and yielding moods, for I too, in my way, am a gentleman waiting to be hanged, as you are.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (58)  |  Avoid (34)  |  Esteem (8)  |  Example (57)  |  Gentleman (17)  |  Give (117)  |  Hang (13)  |  High (78)  |  Inmate (3)  |  Limit (86)  |  Lord (12)  |  Mood (6)  |  Palpably (2)  |  Plausibility (6)  |  Poetry (96)  |  Psalm (3)  |  Read (83)  |  Shepherd (5)  |  Soft (10)  |  True (120)  |  Voluptuous (2)  |  Wait (38)  |  Want (120)  |  Yield (23)

The forest is a peculiar organism of unlimited kindness and benevolence that makes no demands for its sustenance and extends generously the products of its life activity; it provides protection to all beings, offering shade even to the axeman who destroys it.
In Sergius Alexander Wilde, Forest Soils and Forest Growth (1946), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Benevolence (5)  |  Demand (52)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Forest (88)  |  Generosity (6)  |  Generous (12)  |  Kindness (10)  |  Organism (126)  |  Peculiarity (15)  |  Product (72)  |  Protection (23)  |  Provide (48)  |  Shade (12)  |  Sustenance (3)  |  Tree (143)  |  Unlimited (11)

There are no shortcuts to moral insight. Nature is not intrinsically anything that can offer comfort or solace in human terms–if only because our species is such an insignificant latecomer in a world not constructed for us. So much the better. The answers to moral dilemmas are not lying out there, waiting to be discovered. They reside, like the kingdom of God, within us–the most difficult and inaccessible spot for any discovery or consensus.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Better (131)  |  Comfort (42)  |  Consensus (5)  |  Construct (25)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Dilemma (6)  |  Discover (115)  |  Discovery (591)  |  God (454)  |  Human (445)  |  Inaccessible (8)  |  Insight (57)  |  Insignificant (11)  |  Intrinsically (2)  |  Kingdom (34)  |  Lie (80)  |  Moral (100)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Reside (8)  |  Shortcut (3)  |  Solace (5)  |  Species (181)  |  Spot (11)  |  Term (87)  |  Wait (38)  |  World (667)

When we seek a textbook case for the proper operation of science, the correction of certain error offers far more promise than the establishment of probable truth. Confirmed hunches, of course, are more upbeat than discredited hypotheses. Since the worst traditions of ‘popular’ writing falsely equate instruction with sweetness and light, our promotional literature abounds with insipid tales in the heroic mode, although tough stories of disappointment and loss give deeper insight into a methodology that the celebrated philosopher Karl Popper once labeled as ‘conjecture and refutation.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abound (3)  |  Bad (78)  |  Case (64)  |  Celebrate (7)  |  Certain (84)  |  Confirm (12)  |  Conjecture (22)  |  Correction (28)  |  Deep (81)  |  Disappointment (11)  |  Discredit (7)  |  Equate (3)  |  Error (230)  |  Establishment (29)  |  Far (77)  |  Give (117)  |  Heroic (4)  |  Hunch (4)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Insight (57)  |  Instruction (51)  |  Label (11)  |  Light (246)  |  Literature (64)  |  Loss (62)  |  Methodology (8)  |  Mode (29)  |  Of Course (11)  |  Operation (96)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Karl Raimund Popper (44)  |  Popular (21)  |  Probable (14)  |  Promise (27)  |  Proper (27)  |  Refutation (10)  |  Science (1699)  |  Seek (57)  |  Story (58)  |  Sweetness (8)  |  Tale (12)  |  Textbook (19)  |  Tough (8)  |  Tradition (43)  |  Truth (750)  |  Write (87)

Why do they prefer to tell stories about the possible medicinal bene-fits of the Houston toad rather than to offer moral reasons for sup-porting the Endangered Species Act? That law is plainly ideological; it is hardly to be excused on economic grounds.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Act (80)  |  Economic (21)  |  Endangered Species (3)  |  Excuse (15)  |  Ground (63)  |  Hardly (12)  |  Ideological (3)  |  Law (418)  |  Medicinal (2)  |  Moral (100)  |  Plainly (2)  |  Possible (100)  |  Prefer (18)  |  Reason (330)  |  Story (58)  |  Tell (67)  |  Toad (7)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.