Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Columbia is lost; there are no survivors.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Serious

Serious Quotes (91 quotes)

'Tis certain that a serious attention to the sciences and liberal arts softens and humanizes the temper, and cherishes those fine emotions in which true virtue and honor consist. It rarely, very rarely happens that a man of taste and learning is not, at least, an honest man, whatever frailties may attend him.
Essay XVIII, 'The Sceptic', Essays and Treatises on Several Subjects (1742, New ed. 1767), Vol. 1, 193.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Attend (65)  |  Attention (190)  |  Certain (550)  |  Consist (223)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Happen (274)  |  Honest (50)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Honor (54)  |  Learning (274)  |  Liberal Arts (5)  |  Man (2251)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Science (3879)  |  Taste (90)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Whatever (234)

Ath. There still remain three studies suitable for freemen. Calculation in arithmetic is one of them; the measurement of length, surface, and depth is the second; and the third has to do with the revolutions of the stars in reference to one another … there is in them something that is necessary and cannot be set aside, … if I am not mistaken, [something of] divine necessity; for as to the human necessities of which men often speak when they talk in this manner, nothing can be more ridiculous than such an application of the words.
Cle. And what necessities of knowledge are there, Stranger, which are divine and not human?
Ath. I conceive them to be those of which he who has no use nor any knowledge at all cannot be a god, or demi-god, or hero to mankind, or able to take any serious thought or charge of them.
Plato
In Republic, Bk. 7, in Jowett, Dialogues of Plato (1897, 2010), Vol. 4, 331.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Charge (59)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Depth (94)  |  Divine (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  God (757)  |  Hero (42)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Length (23)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Reference (33)  |  Remain (349)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Ridiculous (24)  |  Set (394)  |  Set Aside (4)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Suitable (8)  |  Surface (209)  |  Thought (953)  |  Use (766)  |  Word (619)

Hoc age ['do this'] is the great rule, whether you are serious or merry; whether ... learning science or duty from a folio, or floating on the Thames. Intentions must be gathered from acts.
In James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson (1821), 139.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Age (499)  |  Do (1908)  |  Duty (68)  |  Float (30)  |  Gather (72)  |  Great (1574)  |  Intention (46)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Merry (3)  |  Must (1526)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thames (6)

A chess problem is genuine mathematics, but it is in some way “trivial” mathematics. However, ingenious and intricate, however original and surprising the moves, there is something essential lacking. Chess problems are unimportant. The best mathematics is serious as well as beautiful—“important” if you like, but the word is very ambiguous, and “serious” expresses what I mean much better.
'A Mathematician's Apology', in James Roy Newman, The World of Mathematics (2000), 2029.
Science quotes on:  |  Ambiguous (13)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Chess (25)  |  Essential (199)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Important (209)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Move (216)  |  Original (58)  |  Problem (676)  |  Something (719)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Unimportant (6)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

A considerable number of persons are able to protect themselves against the outbreak of serious neurotic phenomena only through intense work.
From Observations on Ferenczi's paper on 'Sunday Neuroses' (1918). Quoted in Peter Bryan Warr, Work, Happiness, and Unhappiness (2007), 161.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Neurotic (6)  |  Number (699)  |  Person (363)  |  Protect (58)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Through (849)  |  Work (1351)

A hot topic of late, expressed most notably in Bernie Siegel’s best-selling books, has emphasized the role of positive attitude in combating such serious diseases as cancer. From the depths of my skeptical and rationalist soul, I ask the Lord to protect me from California touchie-feeliedom.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Best (459)  |  Book (392)  |  California (9)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Combat (15)  |  Depth (94)  |  Disease (328)  |  Emphasize (23)  |  Express (186)  |  Hot (60)  |  Late (118)  |  Lord (93)  |  Most (1731)  |  Positive (94)  |  Protect (58)  |  Rationalist (5)  |  Role (86)  |  Selling (6)  |  Skeptical (20)  |  Soul (226)  |  Topic (21)

A moment's consideration of this case shows what a really great advance in the theory and practise of breeding has been obtained through the discovery of Mendel's law. What a puzzle this case would have presented to the biologist ten years ago! Agouti crossed with chocolate gives in the second filial generation (not in the first) four varieties, viz., agouti, chocolate, black and cinnamon. We could only have shaken our heads and looked wise (or skeptical).
Then we had no explanation to offer for such occurrences other than the 'instability of color characters under domestication,' the 'effects of inbreeding,' 'maternal impressions.' Serious consideration would have been given to the proximity of cages containing both black and cinnamon-agouti mice.
Now we have a simple, rational explanation, which anyone can put to the test. We are able to predict the production of new varieties, and to produce them.
We must not, of course, in our exuberance, conclude that the powers of the hybridizer know no limits. The result under consideration consists, after all, only in the making of new combinations of unit characters, but it is much to know that these units exist and that all conceivable combinations of them are ordinarily capable of production. This valuable knowledge we owe to the discoverer and to the rediscoverers of Mendel's law.
'New Colour Variety of the Guinea Pig', Science, 1908, 28, 250-252.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Both (493)  |  Breeding (21)  |  Cage (12)  |  Capable (168)  |  Character (243)  |  Chocolate (4)  |  Color (137)  |  Combination (144)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Consist (223)  |  Course (409)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Domestication (5)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exist (443)  |  Explanation (234)  |  First (1283)  |  Generation (242)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Hybrid (14)  |  Impression (114)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Limit (280)  |  Look (582)  |  Making (300)  |  Gregor Mendel (21)  |  Moment (253)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Power (746)  |  Predict (79)  |  Present (619)  |  Production (183)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Rational (90)  |  Result (677)  |  Show (346)  |  Simple (406)  |  Skeptical (20)  |  Test (211)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Wise (131)  |  Year (933)

A scientist should be the happiest of men. Not that science isn't serious; but as everyone knows, being serious is one way of being happy, just as being gay is one way of being unhappy.
Nobel banquet speech (10 Dec 1967). In Ragnar Granit (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1967 (1968).
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seriousness (10)  |  Unhappiness (9)  |  Unhappy (16)  |  Way (1217)

A shallow brain behind a serious mask,
An oracle within an empty cask.
In 'Conversation', Table Talk: And Other Poems (1817), 155.
Science quotes on:  |  Behind (137)  |  Brain (270)  |  Empty (80)  |  Mask (12)  |  Oracle (4)  |  Shallow (8)

A very sincere and serious freshman student came to my office with a question that had clearly been troubling him deeply. He said to me, ‘I am a devout Christian and have never had any reason to doubt evolution, an idea that seems both exciting and well documented. But my roommate, a proselytizing evangelical, has been insisting with enormous vigor that I cannot be both a real Christian and an evolutionist. So tell me, can a person believe both in God and in evolution?’ Again, I gulped hard, did my intellectual duty, a nd reassured him that evolution was both true and entirely compatible with Christian belief –a position that I hold sincerely, but still an odd situation for a Jewish agnostic.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agnostic (9)  |  Belief (578)  |  Both (493)  |  Christian (43)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Compatible (4)  |  Deeply (17)  |  Devout (5)  |  Document (7)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Duty (68)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Evolutionist (7)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Freshman (3)  |  God (757)  |  Gulp (3)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hold (95)  |  Idea (843)  |  Insist (20)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Jewish (15)  |  Nd (2)  |  Never (1087)  |  Odd (13)  |  Office (71)  |  Person (363)  |  Position (77)  |  Question (621)  |  Real (149)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reassure (7)  |  Roommate (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sincere (4)  |  Sincerely (3)  |  Situation (113)  |  Still (613)  |  Student (300)  |  Tell (340)  |  Trouble (107)  |  True (212)  |  Vigor (9)

A week or so after I learned that I was to receive the Miller Award, our president, Marty Morton, phoned and asked me if I would utter a few words of scientific wisdom as a part of the ceremony. Unfortunately for me, and perhaps for you, I agreed to do so. In retrospect I fear that my response was a serious error, because I do not feel wise. I do not know whether to attribute my response to foolhardiness, to conceit, to an inordinate susceptibility to flattery, to stupidity, or to some combination of these unfortunate attributes all of which I have been told are recognizable in my personality. Personally, I tend to favor stupidity, because that is a condition over which I have little control.
Bartholomew, April 1993, unpublished remarks when receiving the Miller Award from the Cooper Ornithological Society.
Science quotes on:  |  Agree (26)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Award (13)  |  Ceremony (6)  |  Combination (144)  |  Conceit (15)  |  Condition (356)  |  Control (167)  |  Do (1908)  |  Error (321)  |  Favor (63)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feel (367)  |  Flattery (7)  |  Inordinate (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Little (707)  |  Miller (2)  |  Part (222)  |  Personality (62)  |  Personally (7)  |  Phone (2)  |  President (31)  |  Receive (114)  |  Response (53)  |  Retrospect (2)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Stupidity (39)  |  Susceptibility (3)  |  Tell (340)  |  Tend (124)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  Unfortunately (38)  |  Utter (7)  |  Week (70)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Wise (131)  |  Word (619)

As soon as he ceased to be mad he became merely stupid. There are maladies we must not seek to cure because they alone protect us from others that are more serious.
'Le Côté de Guermantes', À la recherche du temps perdu (1913-27).
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Cure (122)  |  Disease (328)  |  Mad (53)  |  Malady (8)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Protect (58)  |  Seek (213)  |  Soon (186)  |  Stupid (35)

As to the Christian religion, Sir, … there is a balance in its favor from the number of great men who have been convinced of its truth after a serious consideration of the question. Grotius was an acute man, a lawyer, a man accustomed to examine evidence, and he was convinced. Grotius was not a recluse, but a man of the world, who surely had no bias on the side of religion. Sir Isaac Newton set out an infidel, and came to be a very firm believer.
(1763). In George Birkbeck Hill (ed.), Boswell’s Life of Johnson (1799), Vol. 1, 524.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Balance (77)  |  Believer (25)  |  Bias (20)  |  Christian (43)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Examine (78)  |  Favor (63)  |  Firm (47)  |  Great (1574)  |  Infidel (3)  |  Lawyer (27)  |  Man (2251)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Number (699)  |  Question (621)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Set (394)  |  Side (233)  |  Surely (101)  |  Truth (1057)  |  World (1774)

Clearly, we have compiled a record of serious failures in recent technological encounters with the environment. In each case, the new technology was brought into use before the ultimate hazards were known. We have been quick to reap the benefits and slow to comprehend the costs.
In 'Frail Reeds in a Harsh World', Natural History Journal of the American Museum of Natural History (Feb 1969), 79, No. 2, 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (114)  |  Compile (2)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Cost (86)  |  Encounter (22)  |  Environment (216)  |  Failure (161)  |  Hazard (18)  |  Known (454)  |  New (1216)  |  Reap (17)  |  Recent (77)  |  Record (154)  |  Slow (101)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Use (766)

Debunking bad science should be constant obligation of the science community, even if it takes time away from serious research or seems to be a losing battle. One takes comfort from the fact there is no Gresham’s laws in science. In the long run, good science drives out bad.
In preamble to 'Part III: Pseudoscience', The Night Is Large: Collected Essays 1938-1995 (1996), 171.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bad (180)  |  Bad Science (5)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Community (104)  |  Constant (144)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Good (889)  |  In The Long Run (2)  |  Law (894)  |  Long (790)  |  Obligation (25)  |  Research (664)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3879)  |  Time (1877)

Eventually, it becomes hard to take the selections seriously, because we have no idea what factors are taken into consideration, except that somehow, it ends with only white and Asian men receiving the [Nobel] prize.
As quoted in Jesse Emspak, 'Are the Nobel Prizes Missing Female Scientists?' (5 Oct 2016), on LiveScience website.
Science quotes on:  |  Asian (3)  |  Become (815)  |  Consideration (139)  |  End (590)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Factor (46)  |  Hard (243)  |  Idea (843)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Receive (114)  |  Selection (128)  |  Somehow (48)  |  White (127)

Every one who has seriously investigated a novel question, who has really interrogated Nature with a view to a distinct answer, will bear me out in saying that it requires intense and sustained effort of imagination.
In The Principles of Success in Literature (1901), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Bear (159)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Effort (227)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Intense (20)  |  Interrogation (4)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Novel (32)  |  Question (621)  |  Require (219)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Sustain (46)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

Every serious scientific worker is painfully conscious of this involuntary relegation to an ever-narrowing sphere of knowledge, which threatens to deprive the investigator of his broad horizon and degrades him to the level of a mechanic.
In Ideas and Opinions (1954), 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Broad (27)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Degrade (8)  |  Deprive (12)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Involuntary (4)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Level (67)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Relegation (3)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Threat (30)  |  Threaten (32)

Everything that we call Invention or Discovery in the higher sense of the word is the serious exercise and activity of an original feeling for truth, which, after a long course of silent cultivation, suddenly flashes out into fruitful knowledge.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 193.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Call (769)  |  Course (409)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Flash (49)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Invention (369)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Long (790)  |  Original (58)  |  Sense (770)  |  Silent (29)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Word (619)

For any serious purpose, intelligence is a very minor gift.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Gift (104)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Minor (10)  |  Purpose (317)

Geometric writings are not rare in which one would seek in vain for an idea at all novel, for a result which sooner or later might be of service, for anything in fact which might be destined to survive in the science; and one finds instead treatises on trivial problems or investigations on special forms which have absolutely no use, no importance, which have their origin not in the science itself but in the caprice of the author; or one finds applications of known methods which have already been made thousands of times; or generalizations from known results which are so easily made that the knowledge of the latter suffices to give at once the former. Now such work is not merely useless; it is actually harmful because it produces a real incumbrance in the science and an embarrassment for the more serious investigators; and because often it crowds out certain lines of thought which might well have deserved to be studied.
From 'On Some Recent Tendencies in Geometric Investigations', Rivista di Matematica (1891), 43. In Bulletin American Mathematical Society (1904), 443.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Application (242)  |  Author (167)  |  Caprice (9)  |  Certain (550)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Destined (42)  |  Embarrassment (5)  |  Encumbrance (5)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Former (137)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Harmful (12)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  In Vain (9)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Latter (21)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Novel (32)  |  Origin (239)  |  Problem (676)  |  Rare (89)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Service (110)  |  Sooner Or Later (6)  |  Special (184)  |  Study (653)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Survive (79)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Use (766)  |  Useless (33)  |  Vain (83)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)

Good people are seldom fully recognised during their lifetimes, and here, there are serious problems of corruption. One day it will be realised that my findings should have been acknowledged.
It was difficult, but she always smiled when asked why she went on when recognition eluded her in her own country.
Quoted in obituary by Anthony Tucker, 'Alice Stewart', The Guardian newspaper (28 Jun 2002).
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Biography (240)  |  Corruption (15)  |  Country (251)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Fame (50)  |  Good (889)  |  People (1005)  |  Problem (676)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

Good scholars struggle to understand the world in an integral way (pedants bite off tiny bits and worry them to death). These visions of reality ... demand our respect, for they are an intellectual’s only birthright. They are often entirely wrong and always flawed in serious ways, but they must be understood honorably and not subjected to mayhem by the excision of patches.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Birthright (4)  |  Bit (22)  |  Bite (17)  |  Death (388)  |  Demand (123)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Flawed (2)  |  Good (889)  |  Integral (26)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Must (1526)  |  Often (106)  |  Patch (8)  |  Pedant (5)  |  Reality (261)  |  Respect (207)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Subject (521)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Vision (123)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)  |  Worry (33)  |  Wrong (234)

Hitherto the principle of causality was universally accepted as an indispensable postulate of scientific research, but now we are told by some physicists that it must be thrown overboard. The fact that such an extraordinary opinion should be expressed in responsible scientific quarters is widely taken to be significant of the all-round unreliability of human knowledge. This indeed is a very serious situation.
In Max Planck and James Vincent Murphy (trans.), Where is Science Going?, (1932), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Acceptance (52)  |  All (4108)  |  Causality (11)  |  Express (186)  |  Expression (175)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Human (1468)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indispensability (2)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Must (1526)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Overboard (3)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Principle (507)  |  Research (664)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Seriousness (10)  |  Significance (113)  |  Significant (74)  |  Situation (113)  |  Telling (23)  |  Throw (43)

I am very sorry, Pyrophilus, that to the many (elsewhere enumerated) difficulties which you may meet with, and must therefore surmount, in the serious and effectual prosecution of experimental philosophy I must add one discouragement more, which will perhaps is much surprise as dishearten you; and it is, that besides that you will find (as we elsewhere mention) many of the experiments published by authors, or related to you by the persons you converse with, false and unsuccessful (besides this, I say), you will meet with several observations and experiments which, though communicated for true by candid authors or undistrusted eye-witnesses, or perhaps recommended by your own experience, may, upon further trial, disappoint your expectation, either not at all succeeding constantly, or at least varying much from what you expected.
Opening paragraph of The First Essay Concerning the Unsuccessfulness of Experiments (1673), collected in The Works of the Honourable Robert Boyle in Six Volumes to Which is Prefixed the Life of the Author (1772), Vol. 1, 318-319.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Author (167)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Disappoint (14)  |  Disappointment (16)  |  Discouragement (8)  |  Disheartening (2)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Eye (419)  |  False (100)  |  Find (998)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Person (363)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Say (984)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Succeeding (14)  |  Success (302)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Trial (57)  |  Unsuccessful (2)  |  Will (2355)

I have been a sore-headed occupant of a file drawer labeled ‘‘Science Fiction’’; and I would like out, particularly since so many serious critics regularly mistake the drawer for a urinal
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Critic (20)  |  Drawer (2)  |  File (6)  |  Label (11)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Regularly (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Fiction (31)

I have paid special attention to those Properties of the Positive Rays which seem to throw light on the problems of the structure of molecules and atoms and the question of chemical combination … I am convinced that as yet we are only at the beginning of the harvest of results which will elucidate the process of chemical combination, and thus bridge over the most serious gap which now exists between Physics and Chemistry.
Rays of Positive Electricity and their Application to Chemical Analyses (1921), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Attention (190)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Combination (144)  |  Exist (443)  |  Gap (33)  |  Harvest (27)  |  Light (607)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Positive (94)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Question (621)  |  Ray (114)  |  Result (677)  |  Special (184)  |  Structure (344)  |  Will (2355)

I shall no doubt be blamed by certain scientists, and, I am afraid, by some philosophers, for having taken serious account of the alleged facts which are investigated by Psychical Researchers. I am wholly impenitent about this. The scientists in question seem to me to confuse the Author of Nature with the Editor of Nature; or at any rate to suppose that there can be no productions of the former which would not be accepted for publication by the latter. And I see no reason to believe this.
The Mind and its Place in Nature (1925), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Account (192)  |  Author (167)  |  Certain (550)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Former (137)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Production (183)  |  Psychical Research (2)  |  Publication (101)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Scientist (820)  |  See (1081)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Wholly (88)

I think it’s going to be great if people can buy a ticket to fly up and see black sky and the stars. I’d like to do it myself - but probably after it has flown a serious number of times first!
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Black (42)  |  Buy (20)  |  Do (1908)  |  First (1283)  |  Fly (146)  |  Great (1574)  |  Myself (212)  |  Number (699)  |  People (1005)  |  Probably (49)  |  See (1081)  |  Sky (161)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Think (1086)  |  Ticket (5)  |  Time (1877)

I view the major features of my own odyssey as a set of mostly fortunate contingencies. I was not destined by inherited mentality or family tradition to become a paleontologist. I can locate no tradition for scientific or intellectual careers anywhere on either side of my eastern European Jewish background ... I view my serious and lifelong commitment to baseball in entirely the same manner: purely as a contingent circumstance of numerous, albeit not entirely capricious, accidents.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Anywhere (13)  |  Background (43)  |  Baseball (3)  |  Become (815)  |  Capricious (7)  |  Career (75)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Commitment (27)  |  Contingency (11)  |  Contingent (12)  |  Destined (42)  |  Eastern (3)  |  Entirely (34)  |  European (5)  |  Family (94)  |  Feature (44)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Inherit (33)  |  Inherited (21)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Jewish (15)  |  Lifelong (9)  |  Locate (7)  |  Major (84)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mentality (5)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Paleontologist (19)  |  Purely (109)  |  Same (157)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Set (394)  |  Side (233)  |  Tradition (69)  |  View (488)

If the mysterious influence to which the dissymmetry of nature is due should come to change in sense or direction, the constituting elements of all living beings would take an inverse dissymmetry. Perhaps a new world would be presented to us. Who could foresee the organization of living beings, if the cellulose, which is right, should become left, if the left albumen of the blood should become right? There are here mysteries which prepare immense labours for the future, and from this hour invite the most serious meditations in science.
Lecture (3 Feb 1860), to the Chemical Society of Paris, 'On the Molecular Dissymetry of Natural Organic Products', reprinted in The Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science (3 May 1862), 5, No. 126, 248.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Cellulose (3)  |  Change (593)  |  Direction (175)  |  Due (141)  |  Element (310)  |  Foresee (19)  |  Future (429)  |  Hour (186)  |  Immense (86)  |  Influence (222)  |  Labour (98)  |  Left (13)  |  Living (491)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Organization (114)  |  Present (619)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  World (1774)

If the world goes crazy for a lovely fossil, that's fine with me. But if that fossil releases some kind of mysterious brain ray that makes people say crazy things and write lazy articles, a serious swarm of flies ends up in my ointment.
Criticism of excessive media hype about a fossil discovery, from blog 'The Loom' (19 May 2009) on Discover magazine website.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Article (22)  |  Brain (270)  |  Crazy (26)  |  End (590)  |  Fly (146)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Kind (557)  |  Lazy (9)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Mystery (177)  |  People (1005)  |  Ray (114)  |  Release (27)  |  Say (984)  |  Swarm (14)  |  Thing (1915)  |  World (1774)  |  Write (230)

In ancient days two aviators procured to themselves wings. Daedalus flew safely through the middle air and was duly honored on his landing. Icarus soared upwards to the sun till the wax melted which bound his wings and his flight ended in fiasco. In weighing their achievements, there is something to be said for Icarus. The classical authorities tell us that he was only “doing a stunt,” but I prefer to think of him as the man who brought to light a serious constructional defect in the flying machines of his day.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Aeronautics (14)  |  Air (347)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Authority (95)  |  Bind (25)  |  Bound (119)  |  Classical (45)  |  Defect (31)  |  Doing (280)  |  End (590)  |  Fiasco (2)  |  Flight (98)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Flying Machine (13)  |  Honor (54)  |  Icarus (2)  |  Light (607)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Melt (16)  |  Soar (23)  |  Something (719)  |  Stunt (7)  |  Sun (385)  |  Tell (340)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  Upward (43)  |  Wax (13)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Wing (75)

In my first publication I might have claimed that I had come to the conclusion, as a result of serious study of the literature and deep thought, that valuable antibacterial substances were made by moulds and that I set out to investigate the problem. That would have been untrue and I preferred to tell the truth that penicillin started as a chance observation. My only merit is that I did not neglect the observation and that I pursued the subject as a bacteriologist. My publication in 1929 was the starting-point of the work of others who developed penicillin especially in the chemical field.
'Penicillin', Nobel Lecture, 11 Dec 1945. In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1942-1962 (1964), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Bacteriologist (5)  |  Bacteriology (5)  |  Chance (239)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Claim (146)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Deep (233)  |  Develop (268)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Literature (103)  |  Merit (50)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Penicillin (17)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Publication (101)  |  Result (677)  |  Set (394)  |  Start (221)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Substance (248)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Untrue (12)  |  Work (1351)

In my position you can’t go out and just say, “I think,” because it’s a very serious thing. So if you get up and say climate is changing because of CO2 emissions, you better bloody well be right.
As quoted in interview with Joe Shute, 'David Attenborough at 90: ‘I think about my mortality every day’', The Telegraph (29 Oct 2016). Note: Elsewhere, Attenborough says that the evidence of climate change is now, in fact, “ironclad.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Better (486)  |  Carbon Dioxide (22)  |  Climate (97)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Emission (17)  |  Right (452)  |  Say (984)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)

It has hitherto been a serious impediment to the progress of knowledge, that is in investigating the origin or causes of natural productions, recourse has generally been had to the examination, both by experiment and reasoning, of what might be rather than what is. The laws or processes of nature we have every reason to believe invariable. Their results from time to time vary, according to the combinations of influential circumstances; but the process remains the same. Like the poet or the painter, the chemist may, and no doubt often' does, create combinations which nature never produced; and the possibility of such and such processes giving rise to such and such results, is no proof whatever that they were ever in natural operation.
Considerations on Volcanoes (1825), 243.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Belief (578)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Combination (144)  |  Create (235)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Examination (98)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Impediment (11)  |  Influence (222)  |  Invariability (5)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Operation (213)  |  Origin (239)  |  Painter (29)  |  Poet (83)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Process (423)  |  Produced (187)  |  Production (183)  |  Progress (465)  |  Proof (287)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Recourse (12)  |  Remain (349)  |  Result (677)  |  Rise (166)  |  Time (1877)  |  Variation (90)  |  Whatever (234)

It is a serious question whether America, following England’s lead, has not gone into problem-solving too extensively. Certain it is that we are producing no text-books in which the theory is presented in the delightful style which characterizes many of the French works … , or those of the recent Italian school, or, indeed, those of the continental writers in general.
In The Teaching of Elementary Mathematics (1902), 219.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  America (127)  |  Book (392)  |  Certain (550)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Continental (2)  |  Delightful (17)  |  England (40)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Follow (378)  |  French (20)  |  General (511)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Italian (12)  |  Lead (384)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Problem-Solving (3)  |  Produce (104)  |  Question (621)  |  Recent (77)  |  School (219)  |  Style (23)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Theory (970)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writer (86)

It is important to go into work you would like to do. Then it doesn't seem like work. You sometimes feel it's almost too good to be true that someone will pay you for enjoying yourself. I've been very fortunate that my work led to useful drugs for a variety of serious illnesses. The thrill of seeing people get well who might otherwise have died of diseases like leukemia, kidney failure, and herpes virus encephalitis cannot be described in words.
From her lecture notes.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Biography (240)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drug (57)  |  Failure (161)  |  Feel (367)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Good (889)  |  Kidney (18)  |  Leukemia (4)  |  People (1005)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Thrill (22)  |  Useful (250)  |  Variety (132)  |  Virus (27)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

It is tautological to say that an organism is adapted to its environment. It is even tautological to say that an organism is physiologically adapted to its environment. However, just as in the case of many morphological characters, it is unwarranted to conclude that all aspects of the physiology of an organism have evolved in reference to a specific milieu. It is equally gratuitous to assume that an organism will inevitably show physiological specializations in its adaptation to a particular set of conditions. All that can be concluded is that the functional capacities of an organism are sufficient to have allowed persistence within its environment. On one hand, the history of an evolutionary line may place serious constraints upon the types of further physiological changes that are readily feasible. Some changes might require excessive restructuring of the genome or might involve maladaptive changes in related functions. On the other hand, a taxon which is successful in occupying a variety of environments may be less impressive in individual physiological capacities than one with a far more limited distribution.
In W.R. Dawson, G.A. Bartholomew, and A.F. Bennett, 'A Reappraisal of the Aquatic Specializations of the Galapagos Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus)', Evolution (1977), 31, 891.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Assume (38)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Case (99)  |  Change (593)  |  Character (243)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constraint (13)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Environment (216)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Excessive (23)  |  Far (154)  |  Feasible (3)  |  Function (228)  |  Functional (10)  |  Genome (15)  |  Gratuitous (2)  |  Hand (143)  |  History (673)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inevitably (6)  |  Involve (90)  |  Less (103)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Line (91)  |  Milieu (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Morphological (3)  |  Occupy (26)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particular (76)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Place (177)  |  Readily (10)  |  Reference (33)  |  Relate (21)  |  Require (219)  |  Restructuring (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Set (394)  |  Show (346)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Specific (95)  |  Successful (123)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Tautological (2)  |  Type (167)  |  Unwarranted (2)  |  Variety (132)  |  Will (2355)

It is therefore easy to see why the churches have always fought science and persecuted its devotees. On the other hand, I maintain that the cosmic religious feeling is the strongest and noblest motive for scientific research. Only those who realize the immense efforts and, above all, the devotion without which pioneer work in theoretical science cannot be achieved are able to grasp the strength of the emotion out of which alone such work, remote as it is from the immediate realities of life, can issue. What a deep conviction of the rationality of the universe and what a yearning to understand, were it but a feeble reflection of the mind revealed in this world, Kepler and Newton must have had to enable them to spend years of solitary labor in disentangling the principles of celestial mechanics! Those whose acquaintance with scientific research is derived chiefly from its practical results easily develop a completely false notion of the mentality of the men who, surrounded by a skeptical world, have shown the way to kindred spirits scattered wide through the world and through the centuries. Only one who has devoted his life to similar ends can have a vivid realization of what has inspired these men and given them the strength to remain true to their purpose in spite of countless failures. It is cosmic religious feeling that gives a man such strength. A contemporary has said, not unjustly, that in this materialistic age of ours the serious scientific workers are the only profoundly religious people.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Celestial Mechanics (4)  |  Century (310)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Church (56)  |  Completely (135)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Countless (36)  |  Deep (233)  |  Derive (65)  |  Develop (268)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Disentangle (4)  |  Easily (35)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effort (227)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Enable (119)  |  End (590)  |  Failure (161)  |  False (100)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fight (44)  |  Give (202)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Issue (42)  |  Kepler (4)  |  Kindred (12)  |  Labor (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Man (2251)  |  Materialistic (2)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mentality (5)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motive (59)  |  Must (1526)  |  Newton (10)  |  Nobl (4)  |  Notion (113)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ours (4)  |  People (1005)  |  Persecute (4)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Practical (200)  |  Principle (507)  |  Profoundly (13)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Reality (261)  |  Realization (43)  |  Realize (147)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Religious (126)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remote (83)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Say (984)  |  Scatter (6)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Similar (36)  |  Skeptical (20)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spite (55)  |  Strength (126)  |  Strong (174)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Surround (30)  |  Theoretical Science (4)  |  Through (849)  |  True (212)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unjustly (2)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Wide (96)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worker (31)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)  |  Yearn (12)  |  Yearning (12)

It may be said of many palaeontologists, as Professor Hugh Trevor-Roper said recently of 18th century historians: “Their most serious error was to measure the past by the present”.
In The Nature of the Stratigraphical Record (1973), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (21)  |  Century (310)  |  Error (321)  |  Historian (54)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Paleontologist (19)  |  Past (337)  |  Present (619)  |  Professor (128)

It would not be difficult to come to an agreement as to what we understand by science. Science is the century-old endeavor to bring together by means of systematic thought the perceptible phenomena of this world into as thoroughgoing an association as possible. To put it boldly, it is the attempt at the posterior reconstruction of existence by the process of conceptualization. But when asking myself what religion is I cannot think of the answer so easily. And even after finding an answer which may satisfy me at this particular moment, I still remain convinced that I can never under any circumstances bring together, even to a slight extent, the thoughts of all those who have given this question serious consideration.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Association (46)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Boldly (5)  |  Bring (90)  |  Century (310)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Easily (35)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Existence (456)  |  Extent (139)  |  Find (998)  |  Give (202)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Moment (253)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Old (481)  |  Particular (76)  |  Perceptible (6)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possible (552)  |  Posterior (7)  |  Process (423)  |  Question (621)  |  Reconstruction (14)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remain (349)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Science (3879)  |  Slight (31)  |  Still (613)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Together (387)  |  Understand (606)  |  World (1774)

Most discussions of the population crisis lead logically to zero population growth as the ultimate goal, because any growth rate, if continued, will eventually use up the earth... Turning to the actual measures taken we see that the very use of family planning as the means for implementing population policy poses serious but unacknowledged limits the intended reduction in fertility. The family-planning movement, clearly devoted to the improvement and dissemination of contraceptive devices, states again and again that its purpose is that of enabling couples to have the number of children they want.
With the publication of this article 'zero population growth' and the acronym 'ZPG' came into general use.
'Population Policy: Will Current Programs Succeed?', Science, 1967, 158, 732.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Children (200)  |  Crisis (24)  |  Device (70)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Dissemination (3)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Family (94)  |  Fertility (19)  |  General (511)  |  Goal (145)  |  Growth (187)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Lead (384)  |  Limit (280)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Measure (232)  |  Most (1731)  |  Movement (155)  |  Number (699)  |  Planning (20)  |  Population (110)  |  Population Growth (8)  |  Publication (101)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reduction (51)  |  See (1081)  |  State (491)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Use (766)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)  |  Zero (37)

My work is a game, a very serious game.
Epigraph, without citation, for the entry, 'Escher, Maurits Cornelius (1898–1972)', in David Darling, The Universal Book of Mathematics: From Abracadabra to Zeno’s Paradoxes (2004), 107. Although widely seen feral on the web, Webmaster has so far found no satisfactory primary source. Can you help? Compare the text in Maurits Cornelis Escher, The Graphic Work of M. C. Escher (1978), 14, in which the commentary refers to the image as a game: “This inward or outward turning, this inversion of a shape, is the game that is played in the two following prints.”
Science quotes on:  |  Game (101)  |  Work (1351)

Never mind what two tons refers to. What is it? How has it entered in so definite a way into our exprerience? Two tons is the reading of the pointer when the elephant was placed on a weighing machine. Let us pass on. … And so we see that the poetry fades out of the problem, and by the time the serious application of exact science begins we are left only with pointer readings.
From Gifford Lecture, Edinburgh, (1927), 'Pointer Readings', collected in The Nature of the Physical World (1928), 252.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Begin (260)  |  Definite (110)  |  Elephant (31)  |  Enter (141)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Pass (238)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Pointer (5)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reading (133)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Time (1877)  |  Ton (21)  |  Two (937)  |  Way (1217)

No serious student of human behavior denies the potent influence of evolved biology upon our cultural lives. Our struggle is to figure out how biology affects us, not whether it does.
In An Urchin in the Storm: Essays about Books and Ideas (1988, 2010), 152.
Science quotes on:  |  Affect (19)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Biology (216)  |  Cultural (25)  |  Deny (66)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Figure (160)  |  Figure Out (6)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Behavior (9)  |  Influence (222)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Potent (12)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Student (300)

One of Euler’s main recreations was music, and by cultivating it he brought with it all his geometrical spirit; … he rested his serious researches and composed his Essay of a New Theory of Music, published in 1739; a book full of new ideas presented in a new point of view, but that did not have a great success, apparently for the sole reason that it contains too much of geometry for the musician and too much music for the geometer.
From his Eulogy of Leonhard Euler, read at the Imperial Academy of Sciences of Saint Petersburg (23 Oct 1783). Published in 'Éloge de Léonard Euler, Prononcé en Français par Nicolas Fuss'. Collected in Leonard Euler, Oeuvres Complètes en Français de L. Euler (1839), Vol. 1, xii. From the original French, “Un des principaux délassements d'Euler était la musique, et en la cultivant il y apporta tout son esprit géométrique; … il accordait à ses recherches profondes, il composa son Essai d'une nouvelle théorie de la musique, publié en 1739; ouvrage rempli d'idées neuves ou présentées sous un nouveau point de vue, mais qui n’eut pas un grand succès, apparemment par la seule raison qu’il renferme trop de géométrie pour le musicien et trop de musique pour le géomètre.” English version by Webmaster using Google translate.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Apparently (20)  |  Book (392)  |  Compose (17)  |  Contain (68)  |  Essay (27)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Music (129)  |  Musician (21)  |  New (1216)  |  New Ideas (16)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Present (619)  |  Publish (36)  |  Reason (744)  |  Recreation (20)  |  Research (664)  |  Rest (280)  |  Sole (49)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Success (302)  |  Theory (970)  |  View (488)

One [idea] was that the Universe started its life a finite time ago in a single huge explosion, and that the present expansion is a relic of the violence of this explosion. This big bang idea seemed to me to be unsatisfactory even before detailed examination showed that it leads to serious difficulties.
In radio talk on the BBC Third Programme, as subsequently printed in the BBC’s The Listener magazine (9 Mar 1950), Vol.43, 420. This was his further use of the term “big bang” that he first expressed in a radio talk on 28 Mar 1949.
Science quotes on:  |  Bang (29)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Creation (327)  |  Detail (146)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Examination (98)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Finite (59)  |  Idea (843)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Present (619)  |  Relic (6)  |  Show (346)  |  Single (353)  |  Start (221)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unsatisfactory (3)  |  Violence (34)

Our inventions are wont to be pretty toys, which distract our attention from serious things. They are but improved means to an unimproved end.
In Walden (1854, 1906), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (190)  |  Distract (5)  |  End (590)  |  Improve (58)  |  Invention (369)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Pretty (20)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Toy (19)  |  Unimproved (2)

Pursuit of the objective of maximum species diversity or even maximum species richness could lead to serious negative consequences if taken literally.
In The Fragmented Forest: Island Biogeography Theory and the Preservation of Biotic Diversity (1984), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Consequence (203)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Lead (384)  |  Literal (11)  |  Literally (30)  |  Maximum (12)  |  Negative (63)  |  Objective (91)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Richness (14)  |  Species (401)

Since the seventeenth century, physical intuition has served as a vital source for mathematical porblems and methods. Recent trends and fashions have, however, weakened the connection between mathematics and physics; mathematicians, turning away from their roots of mathematics in intuition, have concentrated on refinement and emphasized the postulated side of mathematics, and at other times have overlooked the unity of their science with physics and other fields. In many cases, physicists have ceased to appreciate the attitudes of mathematicians. This rift is unquestionably a serious threat to science as a whole; the broad stream of scientific development may split into smaller and smaller rivulets and dry out. It seems therefore important to direct our efforts towards reuniting divergent trends by classifying the common features and interconnections of many distinct and diverse scientific facts.
As co-author with David Hilbert, in Methods of Mathematical Physics (1937, 1989), Preface, v.
Science quotes on:  |  17th Century (16)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Ceasing (2)  |  Century (310)  |  Classification (97)  |  Common (436)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Connection (162)  |  Development (422)  |  Direct (225)  |  Directing (5)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Divergence (6)  |  Divergent (6)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Dry (57)  |  Effort (227)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Feature (44)  |  Field (364)  |  Importance (286)  |  Interconnection (12)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Overlooking (3)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Problem (676)  |  Recent (77)  |  Refinement (17)  |  Rift (3)  |  Rivulet (5)  |  Root (120)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Serving (15)  |  Side (233)  |  Source (93)  |  Stream (81)  |  Threat (30)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trend (22)  |  Turning (5)  |  Unity (78)  |  Unquestionably (3)  |  Vital (85)  |  Weakening (2)  |  Whole (738)

Since the stomach gives no obvious external sign of its workings, investigators of gastric movements have hitherto been obliged to confine their studies to pathological subjects or to animals subjected to serious operative interference. Observations made under these necessarily abnormal conditions have yielded a literature which is full of conflicting statements and uncertain results. The only sure conclusion to be drawn from this material is that when the stomach receives food, obscure peristaltic contractions are set going, which in some way churn the food to a liquid chyme and force it into the intestines. How imperfectly this describes the real workings of the stomach will appear from the following account of the actions of the organ studied by a new method. The mixing of a small quantity of subnitrate of bismuth with the food allows not only the contractions of the gastric wall, but also the movements of the gastric contents to be seen with the Röntgen rays in the uninjured animal during normal digestion.
In 'The Movements of the Stomach Studied by Means of the Röntgen Rays,' American Journal of Physiology (1898), 1, 359-360.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Action (327)  |  Animal (617)  |  Bismuth (7)  |  Churn (4)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conflicting (13)  |  Contraction (15)  |  Describe (128)  |  Digestion (28)  |  Food (199)  |  Force (487)  |  Gastric (3)  |  Interference (21)  |  Intestine (14)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Literature (103)  |  Material (353)  |  Method (505)  |  Movement (155)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  New (1216)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Observation (555)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Operative (10)  |  Organ (115)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Ray (114)  |  Receive (114)  |  Result (677)  |  Wilhelm Röntgen (8)  |  Set (394)  |  Small (477)  |  Statement (142)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Subject (521)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Wall (67)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  X-ray (37)  |  Yield (81)

Sir James Jeans
Always says what he means
He is really perfectly serious
About the Universe being Mysterious.
E. C. Bentley, Baseless Biography (1939), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Say (984)  |  Universe (857)

Some years ago John Kenneth Galbraith wrote in an essay on his efforts at writing a history of economics: “As one approaches the present, one is filled with a sense of hopelessness; in a year and possibly even a month, there is now more economic comment in the supposedly serious literature than survives from the whole of the thousand years commonly denominated as the Middle Ages … anyone who claims to be familiar with it all is a confessing liar.” I believe that all physicists would subscribe to the same sentiments regarding their own professional literature. I do at any rate.
In H. Henry Stroke, 'The Physical Review Then and Now', Physical Review: The First Hundred Years: a Selection of Seminal Papers and Commentaries, Vol. 1, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Approach (108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Claim (146)  |  Comment (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Effort (227)  |  Essay (27)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Fill (61)  |  John Kenneth Galbraith (11)  |  History (673)  |  Hopelessness (6)  |  Liar (6)  |  Literature (103)  |  Middle Age (18)  |  Middle Ages (12)  |  Month (88)  |  More (2559)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Present (619)  |  Professional (70)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Survive (79)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Whole (738)  |  Writing (189)  |  Year (933)

That one must do some work seriously and must be independent and not merely amuse oneself in life—this our mother [Marie Curie] has told us always, but never that science was the only career worth following.
As quoted by Mary Margaret McBride in A Long Way From Missouri (1959), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Amusement (33)  |  Career (75)  |  Do (1908)  |  Independence (34)  |  Life (1795)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mother (114)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Science (3879)  |  Tell (340)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worth (169)

The achievements of the Beagle did not just depend on FitzRoy’s skill as a hydrographer, nor on Darwin’s skill as a natural scientist, but on the thoroughly effective fashion in which everyone on board pulled together. Of course Darwin and FitzRoy had their quarrels, but all things considered, they were remarkably infrequent. To have shared such cramped quarters for nearly five years with a man often suffering from serious depression, prostrate part of the time with sea sickness, with so little friction, Darwin must have been one of the best-natured people ever! This is, indeed, apparent in his letters. And anyone who has participated in a scientific expedition will agree that when he wrote from Valparaiso in July 1834 that ‘The Captain keeps all smooth by rowing everyone in turn, which of course he has as much right to do as a gamekeeper to shoot partridges on the first of September’, he was putting a finger on an important ingredient in the Beagle’s success.
From Introduction to The Beagle Record (1979, 2012), 9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achievement (179)  |  All (4108)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Beagle (13)  |  Best (459)  |  Biography (240)  |  Captain (14)  |  Consider (416)  |  Course (409)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Depend (228)  |  Depression (24)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effective (59)  |  Expedition (8)  |  First (1283)  |  Robert Fitzroy (4)  |  Friction (14)  |  Hydrographer (3)  |  Importance (286)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Ingredient (15)  |  Letter (109)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Scientist (5)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Partridge (2)  |  People (1005)  |  Pull (43)  |  Quarrel (10)  |  Right (452)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Skill (109)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Success (302)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

The creative life [is] the only one for a serious man.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  One (6)

The fact that XY thinks slowly is not serious, but that he publishes faster than he thinks is inexcusable.
Quoted in Ralph Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 154.
Science quotes on:  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fast (45)  |  Faster (50)  |  Inexcusable (4)  |  Publish (36)  |  Seriousness (10)  |  Slow (101)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)

The human race believes in not taking its problems seriously enough to solve them.
In The Decline and Fall of Science (1976), 170.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Enough (340)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Problem (676)  |  Race (268)  |  Solve (130)

The ideal of mathematics should be to erect a calculus to facilitate reasoning in connection with every province of thought, or of external experience, in which the succession of thoughts, or of events can be definitely ascertained and precisely stated. So that all serious thought which is not philosophy, or inductive reasoning, or imaginative literature, shall be mathematics developed by means of a calculus.
In Universal Algebra (1898), Preface.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Connection (162)  |  Definitely (5)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Develop (268)  |  Erect (6)  |  Event (216)  |  Experience (467)  |  External (57)  |  Facilitate (5)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Imaginative (8)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Literature (103)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Province (35)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  State (491)  |  Succession (77)  |  Thought (953)

The increasing technicality of the terminology employed is also a serious difficulty. It has become necessary to learn an extensive vocabulary before a book in even a limited department of science can be consulted with much profit. This change, of course, has its advantages for the initiated, in securing precision and concisement of statement; but it tends to narrow the field in which an investigator can labour, and it cannot fail to become, in the future, a serious impediment to wide inductive generalisations.
Year Book of Science (1892), preface, from review in Chemical News and Journal of Physical Science (14 Apr 1892), 65, 190.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Become (815)  |  Book (392)  |  Change (593)  |  Conciseness (3)  |  Consultation (4)  |  Course (409)  |  Department (92)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Employ (113)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Field (364)  |  Future (429)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Impediment (11)  |  Induction (77)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Labour (98)  |  Learn (629)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Precision (68)  |  Profit (52)  |  Science (3879)  |  Statement (142)  |  Technicality (5)  |  Tend (124)  |  Terminology (12)  |  Vocabulary (8)  |  Wide (96)

The line between entertaining math and serious math is a blurry one.
His final retrospective article, 'A Quarter-Century of Recreational Mathematics', Scientific American (Aug 1998).
Science quotes on:  |  Entertain (24)  |  Entertaining (9)  |  Line (91)  |  Mathematics (1328)

The most beautiful and deepest experience a man can have is the sense of the mysterious. It is the underlying principle of religion as well as all serious endeavour in art and science. He who never had this experience seems to me, if not dead, then at least blind. To sense that behind anything that can be experienced there is a something that our mind cannot grasp and whose beauty and sublimity reaches us only indirectly and as a feeble reflection, this is religiousness.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Behind (137)  |  Blind (95)  |  Dead (59)  |  Deep (233)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Indirectly (7)  |  Least (75)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Never (1087)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religiousness (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sense (770)  |  Something (719)  |  Sublimity (5)  |  Underlying (30)

The most important thing accomplished by the ultimate discovery of the 3 °K radiation background (Penzias and Wilson, 1965) was to force all of us to take seriously the idea that there was an early universe.
In The First Three Minutes: A Modern View of the Origin of the Universe (1977, 1993), 131-132.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  All (4108)  |  Background (43)  |  Background Radiation (3)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Early (185)  |  Force (487)  |  Idea (843)  |  Important (209)  |  Most (1731)  |  Arno Penzias (2)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Universe (857)  |  Robert Woodrow Wilson (5)

The only ethical principle which has made science possible is that the truth shall be told all the time. If we do not penalize false statements made in error, we open up the way for false statements by intention. And a false statement of fact, made deliberately, is the most serious crime a scientist can commit.
In The Search (1934, rev. ed. 1959). Also seen attributed to Dorothy L. Sayers, Gaudy Night (1935). Webmaster has not yet solved the mystery of which author wrote it first. If you have access to both books, and can identify the first to publish, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Commit (41)  |  Crime (38)  |  Deliberate (18)  |  Do (1908)  |  Error (321)  |  Ethic (40)  |  Ethical (34)  |  Fact (1210)  |  False (100)  |  Intention (46)  |  Most (1731)  |  Open (274)  |  Possible (552)  |  Principle (507)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Statement (142)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Way (1217)

The ordinary patient goes to his doctor because he is in pain or some other discomfort and wants to be comfortable again; he is not in pursuit of the ideal of health in any direct sense. The doctor on the other hand wants to discover the pathological condition and control it if he can. The two are thus to some degree at cross purposes from the first, and unless the affair is brought to an early and happy conclusion this diversion of aims is likely to become more and more serious as the case goes on.
Address, opening of 1932-3 session of U.C.H. Medical School (4 Oct 1932), 'Art and Science in Medicine', The Collected Papers of Wilfred Trotter, FRS (1941), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (29)  |  Aim (165)  |  Become (815)  |  Case (99)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Condition (356)  |  Control (167)  |  Degree (276)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discomfort (3)  |  Discover (553)  |  Diversion (10)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Early (185)  |  First (1283)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  Health (193)  |  Ideal (99)  |  More (2559)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Other Hand (2)  |  Pain (136)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Patient (199)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Sense (770)  |  Seriousness (10)  |  Two (937)  |  Want (497)

The outcome of any serious research can only be to make two questions grow where only one grew before.
'Evolution of the Scientific Point of View', essay, collected in The Place of Science in Modern Civilisation and Other Essays (1919), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Grow (238)  |  Outcome (13)  |  Question (621)  |  Research (664)  |  Two (937)

The philosophy that I have worked under most of my life is that the serious study of natural history is an activity which has far-reaching effects in every aspect of a person's life. It ultimately makes people protective of the environment in a very committed way. It is my opinion that the study of natural history should be the primary avenue for creating environmentalists.
As quoted in William V. Mealy, Peter Friederici and Roger Tory Peterson Institute, Value in American Wildlife Art: Proceedings of the 1992 Forum (1992), 3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Activity (210)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Avenue (14)  |  Committed (2)  |  Create (235)  |  Effect (393)  |  Environment (216)  |  Environmentalist (5)  |  Far-Reaching (8)  |  History (673)  |  Life (1795)  |  Make (25)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Opinion (281)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Primary (80)  |  Protective (5)  |  Study (653)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

The science, the art, the jurisprudence, the chief political and social theories, of the modern world have grown out of Greece and Rome—not by favour of, but in the teeth of, the fundamental teachings of early Christianity, to which science, art, and any serious occupation with the things of this world were alike despicable.
'Agnosticism and Christianity'. Collected Essays (1900), 315.
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  Art (657)  |  Chief (97)  |  Despicable (3)  |  Early (185)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Greece (8)  |  Modern (385)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Political (121)  |  Rome (19)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Social (252)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teachings (11)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Thing (1915)  |  World (1774)

The symbol A is not the counterpart of anything in familiar life. To the child the letter A would seem horribly abstract; so we give him a familiar conception along with it. “A was an Archer who shot at a frog.” This tides over his immediate difficulty; but he cannot make serious progress with word-building so long as Archers, Butchers, Captains, dance round the letters. The letters are abstract, and sooner or later he has to realise it. In physics we have outgrown archer and apple-pie definitions of the fundamental symbols. To a request to explain what an electron really is supposed to be we can only answer, “It is part of the A B C of physics”.
In Introduction to The Nature of the Physical World (1928), xiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Answer (366)  |  Apple (40)  |  Building (156)  |  Butcher (9)  |  Captain (14)  |  Child (307)  |  Conception (154)  |  Counterpart (9)  |  Dance (32)  |  Definition (221)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Electron (93)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Frog (38)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Letter (109)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Outgrow (4)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Progress (465)  |  Realize (147)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Tide (34)  |  Word (619)

The theory of numbers is particularly liable to the accusation that some of its problems are the wrong sort of questions to ask. I do not myself think the danger is serious; either a reasonable amount of concentration leads to new ideas or methods of obvious interest, or else one just leaves the problem alone. “Perfect numbers” certainly never did any good, but then they never did any particular harm.
In A Mathematician’s Miscellany (1953). Reissued as Béla Bollobás (ed.), Littlewood’s Miscellany (1986), 74.
Science quotes on:  |  Accusation (6)  |  Alone (311)  |  Amount (151)  |  Ask (411)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Danger (115)  |  Do (1908)  |  Good (889)  |  Harm (39)  |  Idea (843)  |  Interest (386)  |  Lead (384)  |  Leave Alone (2)  |  Liable (4)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  New Ideas (16)  |  Number (699)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfect Number (6)  |  Problem (676)  |  Question (621)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Numbers (7)  |  Think (1086)  |  Wrong (234)

The trained nurse has given nursing the human, or shall we say, the divine touch, and made the hospital desirable for patients with serious ailments regardless of their home advantages.
Collected Papers of the Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation (1913).
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Ailment (6)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Desire (204)  |  Divine (112)  |  Home (170)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Human (1468)  |  Nurse (25)  |  Nursing (9)  |  Patient (199)  |  Say (984)  |  Touch (141)  |  Train (114)  |  Training (80)

The world of mathematics, which you condemn, is really a beautiful world; it has nothing to do with life and death and human sordidness, but is eternal, cold and passionless. To me, pure, mathematics is one of the highest forms of art; it has a sublimity quite special to itself, and an immense dignity derived, from the fact that its world is exempt I, from change and time. I am quite serious in this. The only difficulty is that none but mathematicians can enter this enchanted region, and they hardly ever have a sense of beauty. And mathematics is the only thing we know of that is capable of perfection; in thinking about it we become Gods.
Letter to Helen Thomas (30 Dec 1901). Quoted in Nicholas Griffin (ed.), The Selected Letters of Bertrand Russell (1992), Vol. 1, 224.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Become (815)  |  Capability (41)  |  Capable (168)  |  Change (593)  |  Cold (112)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Condemnation (15)  |  Death (388)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enchantment (8)  |  Enter (141)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Form (959)  |  God (757)  |  Human (1468)  |  Immense (86)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Passion (114)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Pure (291)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Sense (770)  |  Special (184)  |  Sublimity (5)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  World (1774)

There has never been an age so full of humbug. Humbug everywhere, even in science. For years now the scientists have been promising us every morning a new miracle, a new element, a new metal, guaranteeing to warm us with copper discs immersed in water, to feed us with nothing, to kill us at no expense whatever on a grand scale, to keep us alive indefinitely, to make iron out of heaven knows what. And all this fantastic, scientific humbugging leads to membership of the Institut, to decorations, to influence, to stipends, to the respect of serious people. In the meantime the cost of living rises, doubles, trebles; there is a shortage of raw materials; even death makes no progress—as we saw at Sebastopol, where men cut each other to ribbons—and the cheapest goods are still the worst goods in the world.
With co-author Jules de Goncourt (French writer, 1830-70)
Diary entry, 7 Jan 1857. In R. Baldick (ed. & trans.), Pages from the Goncourt Journal (1978), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Author (167)  |  Copper (25)  |  Cost (86)  |  Cut (114)  |  Death (388)  |  Element (310)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Fantastic (20)  |  Good (889)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Humbug (5)  |  Influence (222)  |  Iron (96)  |  Kill (100)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lead (384)  |  Living (491)  |  Material (353)  |  Metal (84)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Morning (94)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Progress (465)  |  Raw (28)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rise (166)  |  Saw (160)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Still (613)  |  Warm (69)  |  Water (481)  |  Whatever (234)  |  World (1774)  |  Worst (57)  |  Writer (86)  |  Year (933)

There is an insistent tendency among serious social scientists to think of any institution which features rhymed and singing commercials, intense and lachrymose voices urging highly improbable enjoyment, caricatures of the human esophagus in normal and impaired operation, and which hints implausibly at opportunities for antiseptic seduction as inherently trivial. This is a great mistake. The industrial system is profoundly dependent on commercial television and could not exist in its present form without it.
In The New Industrial State (1967), 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Antiseptic (8)  |  Caricature (6)  |  Commercial (26)  |  Dependent (24)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Exist (443)  |  Feature (44)  |  Form (959)  |  Great (1574)  |  Highly (16)  |  Hint (21)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impair (3)  |  Improbable (13)  |  Industrial (13)  |  Inherently (5)  |  Insistent (2)  |  Institution (69)  |  Intense (20)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Normal (28)  |  Operation (213)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Present (619)  |  Profoundly (13)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seduction (3)  |  Sing (26)  |  Singing (19)  |  Social (252)  |  System (537)  |  Television (30)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Think (1086)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Urge (17)  |  Voice (52)

There prevails among men of letters, an opinion, that all appearance of science is particularly hateful to Women; and that therefore whoever desires to be well received in female assemblies, 'must qualify himself by a total rejection of all that is serious, rational, or important; must consider argument or criticism as perpetually interdicted; and devote all his attention to trifles, and all his eloquence to compliment.
The Rambler, Number 173, 12 Nov 1751. In W. J. Bate and Albrecht B. Strauss (eds.), The Rambler (1969), Vol. 3, 152-3.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Argument (138)  |  Attention (190)  |  Consider (416)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Desire (204)  |  Female (50)  |  Himself (461)  |  Letter (109)  |  Must (1526)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Perpetually (20)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Rational (90)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Science (3879)  |  Total (94)  |  Trifle (15)  |  Whoever (42)  |  Woman (151)

This is, in truth, the first charm of chemistry, and the secret of the almost universal interest excited by its discoveries. The serious complacency which is afforded by the sense of truth, utility, permanence, and progression, blends with and ennobles the exhilarating surprise and the pleasurable sting of curiosity, which accompany the propounding and the solving of an Enigma... If in SHAKPEARE [sic] we find Nature idealized into Poetry, through the creative power of a profound yet observant meditation, so through the meditative observation of a DAVY, a WOOLLASTON [sic], or a HATCHETT; we find poetry, as if were, substantiated and realized in nature.
Essays on the Principle of Method, Essay VI (1818). In The Collected Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge: The Friend (1969), Vol. 4, 1, Barbara E. Rooke (ed.), 471.
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (22)  |  Charm (51)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Creative (137)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Sir Humphry Davy (47)  |  Enigma (14)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Interest (386)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Power (746)  |  Profound (104)  |  Progression (23)  |  Secret (194)  |  Sense (770)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universal (189)  |  Utility (49)  |  William Hyde Wollaston (3)

Those who have occasion to enter into the depths of what is oddly, if generously, called the literature of a scientific subject, alone know the difficulty of emerging with an unsoured disposition. The multitudinous facts presented by each corner of Nature form in large part the scientific man's burden to-day, and restrict him more and more, willy-nilly, to a narrower and narrower specialism. But that is not the whole of his burden. Much that he is forced to read consists of records of defective experiments, confused statement of results, wearisome description of detail, and unnecessarily protracted discussion of unnecessary hypotheses. The publication of such matter is a serious injury to the man of science; it absorbs the scanty funds of his libraries, and steals away his poor hours of leisure.
'Physiology, including Experimental Pathology and Experimental Physiology', Reports of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1899, 891-2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  Alone (311)  |  Burden (27)  |  Call (769)  |  Consist (223)  |  Corner (57)  |  Depth (94)  |  Detail (146)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Enter (141)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Form (959)  |  Fund (18)  |  Generous (17)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Injury (36)  |  Know (1518)  |  Large (394)  |  Leisure (24)  |  Library (48)  |  Literature (103)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  More (2559)  |  Multitudinous (4)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Poor (136)  |  Present (619)  |  Publication (101)  |  Read (287)  |  Record (154)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Specialty (12)  |  Statement (142)  |  Subject (521)  |  Unnecessary (23)  |  Whole (738)

Very few [doctors] are men of science in any very serious sense; they're men of technique.
Interview with Tom Harpur, 'You Should Face Up to Your Death, Says Author', Toronto Star (15 Nov 1975). Collected in Robertson Davies and J. Madison Davis (eds.) Conversations with Robertson Davies (1989), 157.
Science quotes on:  |  Doctor (187)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Technique (80)

Very old and wide-spread is the opinion that forests have an important impact on rainfall. ... If forests enhance the amount and frequency of precipitation simply by being there, deforestation as part of agricultural expansion everywhere, must necessarily result in less rainfall and more frequent droughts. This view is most poignantly expressed by the saying: Man walks the earth and desert follows his steps! ... It is not surprising that under such circumstances the issue of a link between forests and climate has ... been addressed by governments. Lately, the Italian government has been paying special attention to reforestation in Italy and its expected improvement of the climate. ... It must be prevented that periods of heavy rainfall alternate with droughts. ...In the Unites States deforestation plays an important role as well and is seen as the cause for a reduction in rainfall. ... committee chairman of the American Association for Advancement of Science demands decisive steps to extend woodland in order to counteract the increasing drought. ... some serious concerns. In 1873, in Vienna, the congress for agriculture and forestry discussed the problem in detail; and when the Prussian house of representatives ordered a special commission to examine a proposed law pertaining to the preservation and implementation of forests for safeguarding, it pointed out that the steady decrease in the water levels of Prussian rivers was one of the most serious consequences of deforestation only to be rectified by reforestation programs. It is worth mentioning that ... the same concerns were raised in Russia as well and governmental circles reconsidered the issue of deforestation.
as quoted in Eduard Brückner - The Sources and Consequences of Climate Change and Climate Variability in Historical Times editted by N. Stehr and H. von Storch (2000)
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (62)  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Amount (151)  |  Association (46)  |  Attention (190)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circle (110)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Climate (97)  |  Concern (228)  |  Congress (19)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Decisive (25)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Demand (123)  |  Desert (56)  |  Detail (146)  |  Drought (13)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enhance (16)  |  Environment (216)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Examine (78)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Expect (200)  |  Express (186)  |  Extend (128)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forest (150)  |  Forestry (16)  |  Frequency (22)  |  Government (110)  |  House (140)  |  Impact (42)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Italian (12)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Old (481)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Order (632)  |  Period (198)  |  Point (580)  |  Precipitation (7)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Problem (676)  |  Rectified (4)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Reforestation (6)  |  Result (677)  |  River (119)  |  Role (86)  |  Science (3879)  |  Special (184)  |  Spread (83)  |  State (491)  |  Steady (44)  |  Step (231)  |  Unite (42)  |  View (488)  |  Walk (124)  |  Water (481)  |  Wide (96)  |  Worth (169)

We called the new [fourth] quark the “charmed quark” because we were pleased, and fascinated by the symmetry it brought to the subnuclear world. “Charm” also means a “a magical device to avert evil,” and in 1970 it was realized that the old three quark theory ran into very serious problems. ... As if by magic the existence of the charmed quark would [solve those problems].
From asppearance in the BBC-TV program written by Nigel Calder, 'The Key to the Universe,' (27 Jan 1977). As cited in Arthur Lewis Caso, 'The Production of New Scientific Terms', American Speech (Summer 1980), 55, No. 2, 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Avert (4)  |  Bringing (10)  |  Call (769)  |  Charm (51)  |  Device (70)  |  Evil (116)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Magic (86)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Particle (194)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Problem (676)  |  Quark (7)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Theory (970)  |  World (1774)

We used to be a source of fuel; we are increasingly becoming a sink. These supplies of foreign liquid fuel are no doubt vital to our industry, but our ever-increasing dependence upon them ought to arouse serious and timely reflection. The scientific utilisation, by liquefaction, pulverisation and other processes, or our vast and magnificent deposits of coal, constitutes a national object of prime importance.
Parliamentary Debate (24 Apr 1928). Quoted in Winston Churchill and Richard Langworth (ed.), Churchill by Himself: The Definitive Collection of Quotations (2008), 469.
Science quotes on:  |  Becoming (96)  |  Coal (57)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Energy (344)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Fuel (32)  |  Importance (286)  |  Industry (137)  |  Liquefaction (2)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Object (422)  |  Oil (59)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sink (37)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vital (85)

What is the use of this history, what the use of all this minute research? I well know that it will not produce a fall in the price of pepper, a rise in that of crates of rotten cabbages, or other serious events of this kind, which cause fleets to be manned and set people face to face intent upon one another's extermination. The insect does not aim at so much glory. It confines itself to showing us life in the inexhaustible variety of its manifestations; it helps us to decipher in some small measure the obscurest book of all, the book of ourselves.
Introducing the natural history and his study of the insect Minotaurus typhoeus. In Jean-Henri Fabre and Alexander Teixeira de Mattos (trans.), The Life and Love of the Insect (1918), 128.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Book (392)  |  Cabbage (5)  |  Cause (541)  |  Decipher (7)  |  Event (216)  |  Extermination (14)  |  Face (212)  |  Fall (230)  |  History (673)  |  Inexhaustible (24)  |  Insect (77)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Measure (232)  |  Minute (125)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  People (1005)  |  Pepper (2)  |  Price (51)  |  Research (664)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rotten (3)  |  Set (394)  |  Small (477)  |  Use (766)  |  Variety (132)  |  Will (2355)

When the mathematician says that such and such a proposition is true of one thing, it may be interesting, and it is surely safe. But when he tries to extend his proposition to everything, though it is much more interesting, it is also much more dangerous. In the transition from one to all, from the specific to the general, mathematics has made its greatest progress, and suffered its most serious setbacks, of which the logical paradoxes constitute the most important part. For, if mathematics is to advance securely and confidently, it must first set its affairs in order at home.
With co-author James R. Newman, in Mathematics and the Imagination (1940), 219.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Confident (25)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Everything (476)  |  Extend (128)  |  First (1283)  |  General (511)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Home (170)  |  Important (209)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Progress (465)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Safe (54)  |  Say (984)  |  Secure (22)  |  Set (394)  |  Setback (3)  |  Specific (95)  |  Suffered (2)  |  Surely (101)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Transition (26)  |  True (212)

Why should a lobster be any more ridiculous than a dog? ... or a cat, or a gazelle, or a lion, or any other animal one chooses to take for a walk? I have a liking for lobsters. They are peaceful, serious creatures. ... Goethe had an aversion to dogs, and he wasn't mad. They know the secrets of the sea, they don't bark.
[By walking a lobster at the end of a blue silk ribbon in the gardens of the Palais-Royal, he mocked middle-class pretensions, but caused concern for his sanity.]
Quoted by his friend, Théophile Gautier, in Portraits et souvenirs littéraires (1875). In Théophile Gautier, My Fantoms, translated by Richard Holmes (1976), 150.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Aversion (8)  |  Bark (18)  |  Cat (47)  |  Choice (110)  |  Choose (112)  |  Class (164)  |  Concern (228)  |  Creature (233)  |  Dog (70)  |  End (590)  |  Garden (60)  |  Gazelle (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Liking (4)  |  Lion (22)  |  Lobster (5)  |  Mad (53)  |  Madness (33)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peace (108)  |  Ridicule (23)  |  Ridiculous (24)  |  Royal (57)  |  Sanity (9)  |  Sea (308)  |  Secret (194)  |  Seriousness (10)  |  Silk (13)  |  Walk (124)  |  Why (491)

You can go anywhere you want if you look serious and carry a rack of microfuge tubes.
Anonymous
Found in The NIH Catalyst (May-June 2003), 11, No. 3, 8, as part of list 'A Scientist’s Dozen,' cited as “culled and adapted…from a variety of sources” by Howard Young.
Science quotes on:  |  Access (20)  |  Anywhere (13)  |  Carry (127)  |  Carrying (7)  |  Look (582)  |  Rack (4)  |  Tube (5)  |  Want (497)

[In addition to classical, literary and philosophical studies,] I devoured without much appetite the Elements of Algebra and Geometry…. From these serious and scientific pursuits I derived a maturity of judgement, a philosophic spirit, of more value than the sciences themselves…. I could extract and digest the nutritive particles of every species of litterary food.
In The Autobiographies of Edward Gibbon (1896), 235. [“litterary” is sic.]
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Appetite (17)  |  Classical (45)  |  Derive (65)  |  Devour (29)  |  Digest (9)  |  Element (310)  |  Extract (40)  |  Food (199)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Judgement (7)  |  Literary (13)  |  Maturity (14)  |  More (2559)  |  Nutrition (23)  |  Particle (194)  |  Philosophic (5)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Species (401)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Study (653)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Value (365)

[Physicists] feel that the field of bacterial viruses is a fine playground for serious children who ask ambitious questions.
From 'Experiments with Bacterial Viruses (Bacteriophages)', Harvey Lecture (1946), 41, 161. As cited in Robert Olby, The Path of the Double Helix: The Discovery of DNA (1974, 1994), 237.
Science quotes on:  |  Ambitious (4)  |  Ask (411)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Feel (367)  |  Field (364)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Playground (6)  |  Question (621)  |  Virus (27)

[Resist the temptation to] work so hard that there is no time left for serious thinking …[Scientists] should heed the saying, “A busy life is a wasted life.”
As quoted in J. Michael Bishop, How to Win the Nobel Prize: An Unexpected Life in Science (2009), 59. Citing What Mad Pursuit: A Personal View of Scientific Discovery (1988), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  Hard (243)  |  Heed (12)  |  Life (1795)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Work (1351)

[Shawn Lawrence Otto describes the damaging] strategy used to undermine science in the interest of those industries where science has pointed out the dangers of their products to individuals and human life in general … [It was] used a generation ago by the tobacco industry… First they manufacture uncertainty by raising doubts about even the most indisputable scientific evidence. Then they launder information by using seemingly independent front organizations to promote their desired message and thereby confuse the public. And finally they recruit unscrupulous scientific spokespeople to misrepresent peer-reviewed scientific findings and cherry-pick facts in an attempt to persuade the media and the public that there is still serious debate among scientists on the issue at hand.
In 'Science Is Politics', Huffington Post (28 May 2014).
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attempting (3)  |  Cherry-Pick (2)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Damage (34)  |  Danger (115)  |  Debate (38)  |  Describe (128)  |  Description (84)  |  Desired (6)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Finding (30)  |  First (1283)  |  Front (16)  |  General (511)  |  Generation (242)  |  Global Warming (27)  |  Human (1468)  |  Independent (67)  |  Indisputable (8)  |  Individual (404)  |  Industry (137)  |  Information (166)  |  Interest (386)  |  Issue (42)  |  Life (1795)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Media (13)  |  Message (49)  |  Most (1731)  |  Organization (114)  |  Peer Review (4)  |  Persuasion (8)  |  Point (580)  |  Product (160)  |  Promote (29)  |  Promoting (7)  |  Public (96)  |  Raising (4)  |  Recruiting (3)  |  Review (26)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seemingly (28)  |  Still (613)  |  Strategy (13)  |  Tobacco (18)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Undermining (2)  |  Unscrupulous (2)  |  Using (6)

[The child] takes his play very seriously and he expends large amounts of emotion on it. The opposite of play is not what is serious but what is real.
Creative Writers and Day-Dreaming (1906), In James Strachey (ed.), The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychcological Works of Sigmund Freud (1959), Vol 9, 144.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (151)  |  Child (307)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Large (394)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Psychoanalysis (37)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.