Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index E > Category: Extend

Extend Quotes (20 quotes)


A mind exclusively bent upon the idea of utility necessarily narrows the range of the imagination. For it is the imagination which pictures to the inner eye of the investigator the indefinitely extending sphere of the possible,—that region of hypothesis and explanation, of underlying cause and controlling law. The area of suggestion and experiment is thus pushed beyond the actual field of vision.
In 'The Paradox of Research', The North American Review (Sep 1908), 188, No. 634, 425.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (231)  |  Exclusive (9)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Idea (440)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Indefinite (7)  |  Investigator (28)  |  Law (418)  |  Mind (544)  |  Narrow (33)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Possible (100)  |  Push (22)  |  Range (38)  |  Region (26)  |  Research (517)  |  Sphere (40)  |  Suggestion (24)  |  Underlying (14)  |  Utility (23)  |  Vision (55)

A person who is religiously enlightened appears to me to be one who has, to the best of his ability, liberated himself from the fetters of his selfish desires and is preoccupied with thoughts, feelings, and aspirations to which he clings because of their superpersonal value. It seems to me that what is important is the force of this superpersonal content and the depth of the conviction concerning its overpowering meaningfulness, regardless of whether any attempt is made to unite this content with a divine Being, for otherwise it would not be possible to count Buddha and Spinoza as religious personalities. Accordingly, a religious person is devout in the sense that he has no doubt of the significance and loftiness of those superpersonal objects and goals which neither require nor are capable of rational foundation. They exist with the same necessity and matter-of-factness as he himself. In this sense religion is the age-old endeavor of mankind to become clearly and completely conscious of these values and goals and constantly to strengthen and extend their effect. If one conceives of religion and science according to these definitions then a conflict between them appears impossible. For science can only ascertain what is, but not what should be, and outside of its domain value judgments of all kinds remain necessary.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (75)  |  Accord (21)  |  Accordingly (3)  |  Ancient (68)  |  Appear (55)  |  Ascertain (7)  |  Aspiration (19)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Become (100)  |  Best (129)  |  Buddha (4)  |  Capable (26)  |  Clearly (17)  |  Cling (4)  |  Completely (19)  |  Conceive (22)  |  Concern (76)  |  Conflict (49)  |  Conscious (25)  |  Constantly (19)  |  Content (39)  |  Conviction (57)  |  Count (34)  |  Definition (152)  |  Depth (32)  |  Desire (101)  |  Devout (4)  |  Divine (42)  |  Domain (21)  |  Doubt (121)  |  Effect (133)  |  Endeavor (33)  |  Enlightened (4)  |  Exist (89)  |  Feelings (11)  |  Fetter (3)  |  Force (194)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Goal (81)  |  Important (124)  |  Impossible (68)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Kind (99)  |  Liberate (8)  |  Loftiness (3)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Object (110)  |  Otherwise (16)  |  Outside (37)  |  Person (114)  |  Personality (40)  |  Possible (100)  |  Rational (42)  |  Regardless (3)  |  Religion (210)  |  Religion And Science (6)  |  Religious (44)  |  Remain (77)  |  Require (33)  |  Same (92)  |  Science (1699)  |  Seem (89)  |  Selfish (2)  |  Sense (240)  |  Significance (60)  |  Spinoza (4)  |  Strengthen (13)  |  Thought (374)  |  Unite (13)  |  Value (180)

All scientific men will be delighted to extend their warmest congratulations to Tesla and to express their appreciation of his great contributions to science.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciation (19)  |  Congratulations (3)  |  Contribution (49)  |  Delight (51)  |  Express (32)  |  Great (300)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Warm (20)

An important fact, an ingenious aperçu, occupies a very great number of men, at first only to make acquaintance with it; then to understand it; and afterwards to work it out and carry it further.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 189.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (13)  |  Fact (609)  |  First (174)  |  Great (300)  |  Important (124)  |  Ingenious (18)  |  Number (179)  |  Occupy (18)  |  Understand (189)  |  Work (457)

As man advances in civilisation, and small tribes are united into larger communities, the simplest reason would tell each individual that he ought to extend his social instincts and sympathies to all the members of the same nation, though personally unknown to him. This point being once reached, there is only an artificial barrier to prevent his sympathies extending to the men of all nations and races.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  Artificial (26)  |  Barrier (19)  |  Civilisation (18)  |  Community (65)  |  Individual (177)  |  Instinct (50)  |  Large (82)  |  Member (27)  |  Nation (111)  |  Personally (4)  |  Point (72)  |  Prevent (27)  |  Race (76)  |  Reach (68)  |  Reason (330)  |  Same (92)  |  Simple (111)  |  Small (97)  |  Social (93)  |  Sympathy (15)  |  Tell (67)  |  Tribe (10)  |  United (8)  |  Unknown (87)

Evolution is the conviction that organisms developed their current forms by an extended history of continual transformation, and that ties of genealogy bind all living things into one nexus. Panselectionism is a denial of history, for perfection covers the tracks of time. A perfect wing may have evolved to its current state, but it may have been created just as we find it. We simply cannot tell if perfection be our only evidence. As Darwin himself understood so well, the primary proofs of evolution are oddities and imperfections that must record pathways of historical descent–the panda’s thumb and the flamingo’s smile of my book titles (chosen to illustrate this paramount principle of history).
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bind (18)  |  Book (181)  |  Choose (35)  |  Continual (13)  |  Conviction (57)  |  Cover (23)  |  Create (98)  |  Current (43)  |  Darwin (12)  |  Denial (13)  |  Descent (14)  |  Develop (55)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Find (248)  |  Flamingo (2)  |  Form (210)  |  Genealogy (4)  |  Historical (10)  |  History (302)  |  Illustrate (5)  |  Imperfection (19)  |  Living Things (3)  |  Nexus (3)  |  Oddity (4)  |  Organism (126)  |  Panda (2)  |  Paramount (6)  |  Pathway (11)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Primary (29)  |  Principle (228)  |  Proof (192)  |  Record (56)  |  Simply (34)  |  Smile (13)  |  State (96)  |  Tell (67)  |  Thumb (8)  |  Tie (21)  |  Time (439)  |  Title (10)  |  Track (9)  |  Transformation (47)  |  Understand (189)  |  Wing (36)

Human personality resembles a coral reef: a large hard/dead structure built and inhabited by tiny soft/live animals. The hard/dead part of our personality consists of habits, memories, and compulsions and will probably be explained someday by some sort of extended computer metaphor. The soft/live part of personality consists of moment-to-moment direct experience of being. This aspect of personality is familiar but somewhat ineffable and has eluded all attempts at physical explanation.
Quoted in article 'Nick Herbert', in Gale Cengage Learning, Contemporary Authors Online (2002).
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Aspect (37)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Being (39)  |  Build (80)  |  Compulsion (11)  |  Computer (84)  |  Coral Reef (7)  |  Dead (45)  |  Direct (44)  |  Elude (2)  |  Experience (268)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Familiar (22)  |  Habit (78)  |  Hard (70)  |  Human (445)  |  Ineffable (2)  |  Inhabitant (19)  |  Large (82)  |  Life (917)  |  Memory (81)  |  Metaphor (19)  |  Moment (61)  |  Personality (40)  |  Physical (94)  |  Probability (83)  |  Resemblance (18)  |  Soft (10)  |  Someday (4)  |  Structure (191)  |  Tiny (25)

If [science] tends to thicken the crust of ice on which, as it were, we are skating, it is all right. If it tries to find, or professes to have found, the solid ground at the bottom of the water it is all wrong. Our business is with the thickening of this crust by extending our knowledge downward from above, as ice gets thicker while the frost lasts; we should not try to freeze upwards from the bottom.
Samuel Bulter, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 329.
Science quotes on:  |  Bottom (28)  |  Business (71)  |  Crust (17)  |  Downward (4)  |  Freezing (11)  |  Frost (12)  |  Ground (63)  |  Ice (29)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Profess (5)  |  Right (144)  |  Solid (34)  |  Tendency (40)  |  Thickness (4)  |  Try (103)  |  Upward (7)  |  Water (244)  |  Wrong (116)

In 1900 however, he [Planck] worked out the revolutionary quantum theory, a towering achievement which extended and improved the basic concepts of physics. It was so revolutionary, in fact, that almost no physicist, including Planck himself could bring himself to accept it. (Planck later said that the only way a revolutionary theory could be accepted was to wait until all the old scientists had died.)
(1976). In Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 324.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (37)  |  Achievement (128)  |  Basic (52)  |  Concept (102)  |  Die (46)  |  Fact (609)  |  Improve (39)  |  Old (104)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Physics (301)  |  Max Planck (62)  |  Quantum Theory (55)  |  Revolutionary (14)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Wait (38)

In the human body the central point is naturally the navel. For if a man be placed flat on his back, with his hands and feet extended, and a pair of compasses centered at his navel, the fingers and toes of his two hands and feet will touch the circumference of a circle described therefrom.
Vitruvius
Leonardo da Vinci’s depiction of a man with outstretched limbs inscribed in a circle is thus called the Vitruvian Man (c. 1490). In De Architectura, Book 3, Chap 1, Sec. 3. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Center (30)  |  Circle (28)  |  Circumference (12)  |  Compass (19)  |  Finger (38)  |  Foot (39)  |  Hand (103)  |  Human Body (30)  |  Navel (2)  |  Toe (5)  |  Touch (48)

Intellectual work is an act of creation. It is as if the mental image that is studied over a period of time were to sprout appendages like an ameba—outgrowths that extend in all directions while avoiding one obstacle after another—before interdigitating with related ideas.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999), 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (80)  |  Amoeba (20)  |  Avoiding (2)  |  Creation (211)  |  Direction (56)  |  Idea (440)  |  Image (38)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Mental (57)  |  Obstacle (21)  |  Period (49)  |  Related (5)  |  Time (439)  |  Work (457)

It is not therefore the business of philosophy, in our present situation in the universe, to attempt to take in at once, in one view, the whole scheme of nature; but to extend, with great care and circumspection, our knowledge, by just steps, from sensible things, as far as our observations or reasonings from them will carry us, in our enquiries concerning either the greater motions and operations of nature, or her more subtile and hidden works. In this way Sir Isaac Newton proceeded in his discoveries.
An Account of Sir Isaac Newton's Philosophical Discoveries, in Four Books (1748), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (94)  |  Business (71)  |  Care (73)  |  Circumspection (2)  |  Concern (76)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Enquiry (75)  |  Hidden (34)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Motion (127)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (258)  |  Observation (418)  |  Operation (96)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Scheme (20)  |  Sensible (22)  |  Situation (41)  |  Step (67)  |  Subtle (26)  |  Universe (563)  |  View (115)

Now, at Suiattle Pass, Brower was still talking about butterflies. He said he had raised them from time to time and had often watched them emerge from the chrysalis—first a crack in the case, then a feeler, and in an hour a butterfly. He said he had felt that he wanted to help, to speed them through the long and awkward procedure; and he had once tried. The butterflies came out with extended abdomens, and their wings were balled together like miniature clenched fists. Nothing happened. They sat there until they died. ‘I have never gotten over that,’ he said. ‘That kind of information is all over in the country, but it’s not in town.”
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abdomen (2)  |  Awkward (6)  |  Ball (20)  |  Brower (2)  |  Butterfly (19)  |  Case (64)  |  Clench (2)  |  Country (121)  |  Crack (11)  |  Die (46)  |  Emerge (16)  |  Feel (93)  |  Feeler (2)  |  First (174)  |  Fist (2)  |  Happen (63)  |  Help (68)  |  Hour (42)  |  Information (102)  |  Kind (99)  |  Long (95)  |  Miniature (5)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Often (69)  |  Pass (60)  |  Procedure (16)  |  Raise (20)  |  Say (126)  |  Sit (24)  |  Speed (27)  |  Talk (61)  |  Time (439)  |  Together (48)  |  Town (18)  |  Try (103)  |  Want (120)  |  Watch (39)  |  Wing (36)

Publication has been extended far beyond our present ability to make real use of the record.
From article 'As We May Think', in Atlantic Magazine (Jul 1945). Bush was expressing concern that the vastly increasing body of research information and knowledge needed mechanical systems to store and effectively manage its retrieval.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (75)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Far (77)  |  Present (103)  |  Publication (83)  |  Real (95)  |  Record (56)

The argument of the ‘long view’ may be correct in some meaninglessly abstract sense, but it represents a fundamental mistake in categories and time scales. Our only legitimate long view extends to our children and our children’s children’s children–hundreds or a few thousands of years down the road. If we let the slaughter continue, they will share a bleak world with rats, dogs, cockroaches, pigeons, and mosquitoes. A potential recovery millions of years later has no meaning at our appropriate scale.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (43)  |  Appropriate (18)  |  Argument (59)  |  Category (10)  |  Child (189)  |  Cockroach (6)  |  Continue (38)  |  Correct (53)  |  Dog (39)  |  Down (44)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Hundreds (3)  |  Late (28)  |  Legitimate (8)  |  Let (30)  |  Long (95)  |  Mean (63)  |  Millions (13)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Pigeon (4)  |  Potential (34)  |  Rat (19)  |  Recovery (18)  |  Represent (27)  |  Road (47)  |  Scale (49)  |  Sense (240)  |  Share (30)  |  Slaughter (6)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Time (439)  |  View (115)  |  World (667)  |  Year (214)

The instinct to command others, in its primitive essence, is a carnivorous, altogether bestial and savage instinct. Under the influence of the mental development of man, it takes on a somewhat more ideal form and becomes somewhat ennobled, presenting itself as the instrument of reason and the devoted servant of that abstraction, or political fiction, which is called the public good. But in its essence it remains just as baneful, and it becomes even more so when, with the application of science, it extends its scope and intensifies the power of its action. If there is a devil in history, it is this power principle.
In Mikhail Aleksandrovich Bakunin, Grigorii Petrovich Maksimov, Max Nettlau, The political philosophy of Bakunin (1953), 248.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (29)  |  Action (151)  |  Application (117)  |  Baneful (2)  |  Bestial (3)  |  Carnivorous (3)  |  Command (14)  |  Development (228)  |  Devil (18)  |  Devoted (8)  |  Essence (42)  |  Fiction (16)  |  History (302)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Influence (110)  |  Instinct (50)  |  Instrument (73)  |  Mental (57)  |  Political (31)  |  Power (273)  |  Primitive (37)  |  Principle (228)  |  Reason (330)  |  Savage (23)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scope (13)  |  Servant (11)

The maintenance of biological diversity requires special measures that extend far beyond the establishment of nature reserves. Several reasons for this stand out. Existing reserves have been selected according to a number of criteria, including the desire to protect nature, scenery, and watersheds, and to promote cultural values and recreational opportunities. The actual requirements of individual species, populations, and communities have seldom been known, nor has the available information always been employed in site selection and planning for nature reserves. The use of lands surrounding nature reserves has typically been inimical to conservation, since it has usually involved heavy use of pesticides, industrial development, and the presence of human settlements in which fire, hunting, and firewood gathering feature as elements of the local economy.
The Fragmented Forest: Island Biogeography Theory and the Preservation of Biotic Diversity (1984), xii.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (34)  |  Available (18)  |  Biodiversity (8)  |  Community (65)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Criteria (6)  |  Cultural (16)  |  Desire (101)  |  Economy (46)  |  Establishment (29)  |  Far (77)  |  Fire (117)  |  Gather (29)  |  Heavy (13)  |  Human (445)  |  Hunting (7)  |  Individual (177)  |  Information (102)  |  Involve (27)  |  Known (15)  |  Land (83)  |  Maintenance (13)  |  Opportunity (43)  |  Pesticide (4)  |  Plan (69)  |  Population (71)  |  Promote (14)  |  Protect (26)  |  Reason (330)  |  Recreation (11)  |  Requirement (45)  |  Scenery (5)  |  Seldom (21)  |  Select (5)  |  Selection (27)  |  Settlement (2)  |  Site (11)  |  Special (51)  |  Species (181)  |  Surround (17)  |  Typical (10)  |  Use (70)  |  Usually (20)  |  Value (180)  |  Watershed (2)

What is education? Teaching a man what his powers and relations are, and how he can best extend, strengthen, and employ them.
In Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), lxi.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (129)  |  Education (280)  |  Employ (14)  |  Power (273)  |  Relation (96)  |  Strengthen (13)  |  Teach (102)

When the mathematician says that such and such a proposition is true of one thing, it may be interesting, and it is surely safe. But when he tries to extend his proposition to everything, though it is much more interesting, it is also much more dangerous. In the transition from one to all, from the specific to the general, mathematics has made its greatest progress, and suffered its most serious setbacks, of which the logical paradoxes constitute the most important part. For, if mathematics is to advance securely and confidently, it must first set its affairs in order at home. [Coauthor with James R. Newman]
In Edward Kasner and James Newman, Mathematics and the Imagination (1940, 1949), 219.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  Confident (6)  |  Constitute (19)  |  Dangerous (45)  |  General (92)  |  Greatest (53)  |  Important (124)  |  Interesting (38)  |  Logic (187)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Paradox (35)  |  Progress (317)  |  Proposition (47)  |  Safe (15)  |  Secure (13)  |  Serious (37)  |  Setback (2)  |  Specific (30)  |  Suffered (2)  |  Transition (15)  |  True (120)

You may perceive something of the distinction which I think necessary to keep in view between art and science, between the artist and the man of knowledge, or the philosopher. The man of knowledge, the philosopher, is he who studies and acquires knowledge in order to improve his own mind; and with a desire of extending the department of knowledge to which he turns his attention, or to render it useful to the world, by discoveries, or by inventions, which may be the foundation of new arts, or of improvements in those already established. Excited by one or more of these motives, the philosopher employs himself in acquiring knowledge and in communicating it. The artist only executes and practises what the philosopher or man of invention has discovered or contrived, while the business of the trader is to retail the productions of the artist, exchange some of them for others, and transport them to distant places for that purpose.
From the first of a series of lectures on chemistry, collected in John Robison (ed.), Lectures on the Elements of Chemistry: Delivered in the University of Edinburgh (1807), Vol. 1, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (19)  |  Artist (46)  |  Attention (76)  |  Business (71)  |  Communicate (10)  |  Contrive (4)  |  Definition (152)  |  Department (33)  |  Desire (101)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Distant (16)  |  Distinction (37)  |  Employ (14)  |  Establish (30)  |  Exchange (11)  |  Excite (12)  |  Execute (3)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Improve (39)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Invention (283)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mind (544)  |  Motive (26)  |  New (340)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Place (111)  |  Practise (4)  |  Production (105)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Render (17)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Study (331)  |  Transport (10)  |  Useful (66)  |  World (667)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.