Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition, we must lead it... That is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by God. That’s what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Reserve

Reserve Quotes (24 quotes)

Between the frontiers of the three super-states Eurasia, Oceania, and Eastasia, and not permanently in possession of any of them, there lies a rough quadrilateral with its corners at Tangier, Brazzaville, Darwin, and Hongkong. These territories contain a bottomless reserve of cheap labour. Whichever power controls equatorial Africa, or the Middle East or Southern India or the Indonesian Archipelago, disposes also of the bodies of hundreds of millions of ill-paid and hardworking coolies, expended by their conquerors like so much coal or oil in the race to turn out more armaments, to capture more territory, to control more labour, to turn out more armaments, to capture more territory, to control…
Thus George Orwell—in his only reference to the less-developed world.
I wish I could disagree with him. Orwell may have erred in not anticipating the withering of direct colonial controls within the “quadrilateral” he speaks about; he may not quite have gauged the vehemence of urges to political self-assertion. Nor, dare I hope, was he right in the sombre picture of conscious and heartless exploitation he has painted. But he did not err in predicting persisting poverty and hunger and overcrowding in 1984 among the less privileged nations.
I would like to live to regret my words but twenty years from now, I am positive, the less-developed world will be as hungry, as relatively undeveloped, and as desperately poor, as today.
'The Less-Developed World: How Can We be Optimists?' (1964). Reprinted in Ideals and Realities (1984), xv-xvi. Referencing a misquote from George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty Four (1949), Ch. 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (35)  |  Archipelago (7)  |  Armament (6)  |  Bottomless (6)  |  Coal (57)  |  Conqueror (8)  |  Control (167)  |  Corner (57)  |  Dare (50)  |  Develop (268)  |  Direct (225)  |  Exploitation (14)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Heartless (3)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Labour (98)  |  Lie (364)  |  Live (628)  |  More (2559)  |  Nation (193)  |  Oil (59)  |  George Orwell (3)  |  Persisting (2)  |  Picture (143)  |  Political (121)  |  Poor (136)  |  Positive (94)  |  Possession (65)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Power (746)  |  Race (268)  |  Regret (30)  |  Right (452)  |  Self (267)  |  Speak (232)  |  State (491)  |  Territory (24)  |  Today (314)  |  Turn (447)  |  Undeveloped (6)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

A discovery in science, or a new theory, even when it appears most unitary and most all-embracing, deals with some immediate element of novelty or paradox within the framework of far vaster, unanalysed, unarticulated reserves of knowledge, experience, faith, and presupposition. Our progress is narrow; it takes a vast world unchallenged and for granted. This is one reason why, however great the novelty or scope of new discovery, we neither can, nor need, rebuild the house of the mind very rapidly. This is one reason why science, for all its revolutions, is conservative. This is why we will have to accept the fact that no one of us really will ever know very much. This is why we shall have to find comfort in the fact that, taken together, we know more and more.
Science and the Common Understanding (1954), 53-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Acceptance (52)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Articulation (2)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Conservative (15)  |  Deal (188)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Element (310)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Faith (203)  |  Find (998)  |  Framework (31)  |  Grant (73)  |  Granted (5)  |  Great (1574)  |  House (140)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Presupposition (2)  |  Progress (465)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rebuild (4)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scope (45)  |  Theory (970)  |  Together (387)  |  Unitary (2)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vastness (15)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

A man reserves his true and deepest love not for the species of woman in whose company he finds himself electrified and enkindled, but for that one in whose company he may feel tenderly drowsy.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Company (59)  |  Deep (233)  |  Enkindle (2)  |  Feel (367)  |  Find (998)  |  Himself (461)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Species (401)  |  True (212)  |  Woman (151)

A religion old or new, that stressed the magnificence of the universe as revealed by modern science, might be able to draw forth reserves of reverence and awe hardly tapped by the conventional faiths. Sooner or later such a religion will emerge.
Pale Blue Dot: a Vision of the Human Future in Space (1994), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Awe (43)  |  Convention (14)  |  Conventional (30)  |  Draw (137)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Faith (203)  |  Magnificence (13)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Religion (361)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Stress (22)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

Although with the majority of those who study and practice in these capacities [engineers, builders, surveyors, geographers, navigators, hydrographers, astronomers], secondhand acquirements, trite formulas, and appropriate tables are sufficient for ordinary purposes, yet these trite formulas and familiar rules were originally or gradually deduced from the profound investigations of the most gifted minds, from the dawn of science to the present day. … The further developments of the science, with its possible applications to larger purposes of human utility and grander theoretical generalizations, is an achievement reserved for a few of the choicest spirits, touched from time to time by Heaven to these highest issues. The intellectual world is filled with latent and undiscovered truth as the material world is filled with latent electricity.
In Orations and Speeches, Vol. 3 (1870), 513.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Acquirement (3)  |  Application (242)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Builder (12)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Development (422)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Far (154)  |  Fill (61)  |  Formula (98)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Geographer (6)  |  Gift (104)  |  Gifted (23)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Grand (27)  |  Heaven (258)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hydrographer (3)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Issue (42)  |  Large (394)  |  Latent (12)  |  Majority (66)  |  Material (353)  |  Material World (8)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Navigator (8)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Originally (6)  |  Possible (552)  |  Practice (204)  |  Present (619)  |  Present Day (5)  |  Profound (104)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Secondhand (6)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Study (653)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Surveyor (5)  |  Table (104)  |  Theoretical (22)  |  Time (1877)  |  Touch (141)  |  Trite (4)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Undiscovered (15)  |  Utility (49)  |  World (1774)

Five centuries ago the printing press sparked a radical reshaping of the nature of education. By bringing a master’s words to those who could not hear a master’s voice, the technology of printing dissolved the notion that education must be reserved for those with the means to hire personal tutors. Today we are approaching a new technological revolution, one whose impact on education may be as far-reaching as that of the printing press: the emergence of powerful computers that are sufficiently inexpensive to be used by students for learning, play and exploration. It is our hope that these powerful but simple tools for creating and exploring richly interactive environments will dissolve the barriers to the production of knowledge as the printing press dissolved the barriers to its transmission.
As co-author with A.A. diSessa, from 'Preface', Turtle Geometry: The Computer as a Medium for Exploring Mathematics (1986), xiii.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Approach (108)  |  Barrier (32)  |  Bring (90)  |  Century (310)  |  Computer (127)  |  Create (235)  |  Dissolve (20)  |  Education (378)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Environment (216)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Far-Reaching (8)  |  Hear (139)  |  Hire (7)  |  Hope (299)  |  Impact (42)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Master (178)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Notion (113)  |  Personal (67)  |  Play (112)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Print (17)  |  Printing (22)  |  Printing Press (3)  |  Production (183)  |  Radical (25)  |  Reshape (4)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Rich (62)  |  Simple (406)  |  Spark (31)  |  Student (300)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Today (314)  |  Tool (117)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Tutor (3)  |  Voice (52)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

I have a boundless admiration for the solitary genius which enabled [Hermann Oberth] to bring into focus all of the essential elements of a gigantic concept, together with the human greatness which allowed him, in shy reserve, to bear with equanimity the “crucify hims” as well as the “hosannas” of public opinion. I myself owe him a debt of gratitude not only for being the guiding light of my life, but also for my first contact with the theoretical and practical aspects of rocket technology and space travel.
Primary source needed for verification. (Can you help?)
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Concept (221)  |  Contact (65)  |  Debt (13)  |  Element (310)  |  Essential (199)  |  First (1283)  |  Focus (35)  |  Genius (284)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Gratitude (13)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Human (1468)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Myself (212)  |  Hermann Oberth (6)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Owe (71)  |  Practical (200)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Travel (19)  |  Technology (257)  |  Theoretical (22)  |  Together (387)  |  Travel (114)

I should like to urge some arguments for wilderness preservation that involve recreation,…. Hunting, fishing, hiking, mountain-climbing, camping, photography, and the enjoyment of natural scenery will all, surely, figure in your report. So will the wilderness as a genetic reserve, a scientific yardstick by which we may measure the world in its natural balance against the world in its man-made imbalance.
Letter (3 Dec 1960) written to David E. Pesonen of the Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission. Collected in 'Coda: Wilderness Letter', The Sound of Mountain Water: The Changing American West (1969), 145-146.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Balance (77)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Figure (160)  |  Fishing (19)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Hunting (23)  |  Imbalance (2)  |  Involve (90)  |  Man (2251)  |  Man-Made (7)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Mountaineering (2)  |  Natural (796)  |  Photography (8)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Recreation (20)  |  Report (38)  |  Scenery (7)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Surely (101)  |  Wilderness (45)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

I think it would be desirable that this form of word [mathematics] should be reserved for the applications of the science, and that we should use mathematic in the singular to denote the science itself, in the same way as we speak of logic, rhetoric, or (own sister to algebra) music.
In Presidential Address to the British Association, Exeter British Association Report (1869); Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 2, 669.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  Application (242)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Denote (5)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Form (959)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematic (3)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Music (129)  |  Rhetoric (12)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Singular (23)  |  Sister (8)  |  Speak (232)  |  Think (1086)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

It is the destiny of wine to be drunk, and it is the destiny of glucose to be oxidized. But it was not oxidized immediately: its drinker kept it in his liver for more than a week, well curled up and tranquil, as a reserve aliment for a sudden effort; an effort that he was forced to make the following Sunday, pursuing a bolting horse. Farewell to the hexagonal structure: in the space of a few instants the skein was unwound and became glucose again, and this was dragged by the bloodstream all the way to a minute muscle fiber in the thigh, and here brutally split into two molecules of lactic acid, the grim harbinger of fatigue: only later, some minutes after, the panting of the lungs was able to supply the oxygen necessary to quietly oxidize the latter. So a new molecule of carbon dioxide returned to the atmosphere, and a parcel of the energy that the sun had handed to the vine-shoot passed from the state of chemical energy to that of mechanical energy, and thereafter settled down in the slothful condition of heat, warming up imperceptibly the air moved by the running and the blood of the runner. 'Such is life,' although rarely is it described in this manner: an inserting itself, a drawing off to its advantage, a parasitizing of the downward course of energy, from its noble solar form to the degraded one of low-temperature heat. In this downward course, which leads to equilibrium and thus death, life draws a bend and nests in it.
The Periodic Table (1975), trans. Raymond Rosenthal (1984), 192-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Air (347)  |  Alcohol (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Blood (134)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Carbon Dioxide (22)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Energy (3)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conservation Of Energy (29)  |  Course (409)  |  Death (388)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Down (456)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Drunk (10)  |  Effort (227)  |  Energy (344)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Fatigue (12)  |  Fiber (16)  |  Form (959)  |  Glucose (2)  |  Heat (174)  |  Horse (74)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Instant (45)  |  Lactic Acid (2)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Liver (19)  |  Low (80)  |  Lung (34)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Minute (125)  |  Molecule (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nest (23)  |  New (1216)  |  Noble (90)  |  Oxidation (7)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Pass (238)  |  Plant (294)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Return (124)  |  Running (61)  |  Settled (34)  |  Space (500)  |  State (491)  |  Structure (344)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Sun (385)  |  Supply (93)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Two (937)  |  Warming (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Week (70)  |  Wine (38)

It must happen that in some cases the author is not understood, or is very imperfectly understood; and the question is what is to be done. After giving a reasonable amount of attention to the passage, let the student pass on, reserving the obscurity for future efforts. … The natural tendency of solitary students, I believe, is not to hurry away prematurely from a hard passage, but to hang far too long over it; the just pride that does not like to acknowledge defeat, and the strong will that cannot endure to be thwarted, both urge to a continuance of effort even when success seems hopeless. It is only by experience we gain the conviction that when the mind is thoroughly fatigued it has neither the power to continue with advantage its course in .an assigned direction, nor elasticity to strike out a new path; but that, on the other hand, after being withdrawn for a time from the pursuit, it may return and gain the desired end.
In 'Private Study of Mathematics', Conflict of Studies and other Essays (1873), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Amount (151)  |  Assign (13)  |  Attention (190)  |  Author (167)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Both (493)  |  Case (99)  |  Continuance (2)  |  Continue (165)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Course (409)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Desire (204)  |  Direction (175)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elasticity (8)  |  End (590)  |  Endure (20)  |  Experience (467)  |  Far (154)  |  Fatigue (12)  |  Future (429)  |  Gain (145)  |  Give (202)  |  Hang (45)  |  Happen (274)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hopeless (16)  |  Hurry (15)  |  Imperfectly (2)  |  Let (61)  |  Long (790)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  New (1216)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passage (50)  |  Path (144)  |  Power (746)  |  Premature (20)  |  Pride (78)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Return (124)  |  Seem (145)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Strike (68)  |  Strong (174)  |  Student (300)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Success (302)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Urge (17)  |  Will (2355)  |  Withdraw (9)

Let us seek to fathom those things that are fathomable and reserve those things which are unfathomable for reverence in quietude.

…...
Science quotes on:  |  Fathom (15)  |  Let (61)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Seek (213)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Unfathomable (10)

Man must at all costs overcome the Earth’s gravity and have, in reserve, the space at least of the Solar System. All kinds of danger wait for him on the Earth… We are talking of disaster that can destroy the whole of mankind or a large part of it… For instance, a cloud of bolides [meteors] or a small planet a few dozen kilometers in diameter could fall on the Earth, with such an impact that the solid, liquid or gaseous blast produced by it could wipe off the face of the Earth all traces of man and his buildings. The rise of temperature accompanying it could alone scorch or kill all living beings… We are further compelled to take up the struggle against gravity, and for the utilization of celestial space and all its wealth, because of the overpopulation of our planet. Numerous other terrible dangers await mankind on the Earth, all of which suggest that man should look for a way into the Cosmos. We have said a great deal about the advantages of migration into space, but not all can be said or even imagined.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blast (13)  |  Building (156)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Cost (86)  |  Danger (115)  |  Deal (188)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Diameter (28)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Earth (996)  |  Face (212)  |  Fall (230)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impact (42)  |  Kill (100)  |  Kilometer (10)  |  Kind (557)  |  Large (394)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Living (491)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Meteor (18)  |  Migration (11)  |  Must (1526)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Overpopulation (5)  |  Planet (356)  |  Produced (187)  |  Rise (166)  |  Small (477)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Solid (116)  |  Space (500)  |  Struggle (105)  |  System (537)  |  Talking (76)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Trace (103)  |  Utilization (15)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Whole (738)

Nature reserves some of her choice rewards for days when her mood may appear to be somber.
In The Sense of Wonder (1956, 1965), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Choice (110)  |  Mood (13)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Reserve (2)  |  Reward (68)

Scientific studies on marine reserves around the world show that if you close a place to fishing, the number of species increases 20 percent, the average size of a fish increases by a third, and the total weight of fish per hectare increases almost five times—in less than a decade.
From interview with Terry Waghorn, 'Can We Eat Our Fish and Protect Them Too?', Forbes (21 Feb 2012)
Science quotes on:  |  Average (82)  |  Close (69)  |  Decade (59)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fishing (19)  |  Increase (210)  |  Marine (9)  |  Number (699)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Show (346)  |  Size (60)  |  Species (401)  |  Study (653)  |  Time (1877)  |  Total (94)  |  Weight (134)  |  World (1774)

Since the princes take the Earth for their own, it’s fair that the philosophers reserve the sky for themselves and rule there, but they should never permit the entry of others.
Conversations on the Plurality of Words (1686), trans. H. A. Hargreaves (1990), 51.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Earth (996)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Permit (58)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Rule (294)  |  Sky (161)  |  Themselves (433)

Thanks to the freedom of our press and the electronic media, the voices of cranks are often louder and clearer than the voices of genuine scientists. Crank books—on how to lose weight without cutting down on calories, on how to talk to plants, on how to cure your ailments by rubbing your feet, on how to apply horoscopes to your pets, on how to use ESP in making business decisions, on how to sharpen razor blades by putting them under little models of the great Pyramid of Egypt—far outsell many books… I reserve the right of moral indignation.
As quoted, without citation, in obituary by Morton Schatzman, 'Martin Gardner: Scientific and Philosophical Writer Celebrated for his Ingenious Mathematical Puzzles and Games', Independent (28 May 2010).
Science quotes on:  |  Ailment (6)  |  Apply (160)  |  Blade (11)  |  Book (392)  |  Business (149)  |  Calorie (2)  |  Clear (100)  |  Crank (18)  |  Cure (122)  |  Cut (114)  |  Decision (91)  |  Down (456)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Electronic (12)  |  Extrasensory Perception (2)  |  Foot (60)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Great (1574)  |  Horoscope (4)  |  Indignation (4)  |  Little (707)  |  Lose (159)  |  Loud (9)  |  Making (300)  |  Media (13)  |  Model (102)  |  Moral (195)  |  Pet (8)  |  Plant (294)  |  Razor (4)  |  Right (452)  |  Rub (4)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Talk (100)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thanks (26)  |  Use (766)  |  Voice (52)  |  Weight (134)

The maintenance of biological diversity requires special measures that extend far beyond the establishment of nature reserves. Several reasons for this stand out. Existing reserves have been selected according to a number of criteria, including the desire to protect nature, scenery, and watersheds, and to promote cultural values and recreational opportunities. The actual requirements of individual species, populations, and communities have seldom been known, nor has the available information always been employed in site selection and planning for nature reserves. The use of lands surrounding nature reserves has typically been inimical to conservation, since it has usually involved heavy use of pesticides, industrial development, and the presence of human settlements in which fire, hunting, and firewood gathering feature as elements of the local economy.
The Fragmented Forest: Island Biogeography Theory and the Preservation of Biotic Diversity (1984), xii.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Actual (117)  |  Available (78)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Biodiversity (11)  |  Biological (137)  |  Community (104)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Criteria (6)  |  Cultural (25)  |  Desire (204)  |  Development (422)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Economy (55)  |  Element (310)  |  Employ (113)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Extend (128)  |  Far (154)  |  Fire (189)  |  Gather (72)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Heavy (23)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hunting (23)  |  Individual (404)  |  Industrial Development (4)  |  Information (166)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  Known (454)  |  Land (115)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Measure (232)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Reserve (2)  |  Number (699)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Pesticide (5)  |  Plan (117)  |  Planning (20)  |  Population (110)  |  Presence (63)  |  Promote (29)  |  Protect (58)  |  Reason (744)  |  Recreation (20)  |  Require (219)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Scenery (7)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Select (44)  |  Selection (128)  |  Settlement (3)  |  Site (14)  |  Special (184)  |  Species (401)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stand Out (5)  |  Surround (30)  |  Typical (13)  |  Use (766)  |  Usually (176)  |  Value (365)  |  Watershed (3)

The observing mind is not a physical system, it cannot interact with any physical system. And it might be better to reserve the term ‘subject ‘ for the observing mind ... For the subject, if anything, is the thing that senses and thinks. Sensations and thoughts do not belong to the ‘world of energy.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (162)  |  Better (486)  |  Do (1908)  |  Energy (344)  |  Interact (8)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Observe (168)  |  Physical (508)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Sense (770)  |  Subject (521)  |  System (537)  |  Term (349)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  World (1774)

The patient has two sleeves, one containing a diagnostic and the other a therapeutic armamentarium; these sleeves should rarely be emptied in one move; keep some techniques in reserve; time your manoeuvres to best serve the status and special needs of your patient.
Chinese proverb.
Science quotes on:  |  Armamentarium (3)  |  Best (459)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Move (216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patient (199)  |  Special (184)  |  Status (35)  |  Technique (80)  |  Therapy (13)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Two (937)

There is no area in our minds reserved for superstition, such as the Greeks had in their mythology; and superstition, under cover of an abstract vocabulary, has revenged itself by invading the entire realm of thought. Our science is like a store filled with the most subtle intellectual devices for solving the most complex problems, and yet we are almost incapable of applying the elementary principles of rational thought. In every sphere, we seem to have lost the very elements of intelligence: the ideas of limit, measure, degree, proportion, relation, comparison, contingency, interdependence, interrelation of means and ends. To keep to the social level, our political universe is peopled exclusively by myths and monsters; all it contains is absolutes and abstract entities. This is illustrated by all the words of our political and social vocabulary: nation, security, capitalism, communism, fascism, order, authority, property, democracy. We never use them in phrases such as: There is democracy to the extent that… or: There is capitalism in so far as… The use of expressions like “to the extent that” is beyond our intellectual capacity. Each of these words seems to represent for us an absolute reality, unaffected by conditions, or an absolute objective, independent of methods of action, or an absolute evil; and at the same time we make all these words mean, successively or simultaneously, anything whatsoever. Our lives are lived, in actual fact, among changing, varying realities, subject to the casual play of external necessities, and modifying themselves according to specific conditions within specific limits; and yet we act and strive and sacrifice ourselves and others by reference to fixed and isolated abstractions which cannot possibly be related either to one another or to any concrete facts. In this so-called age of technicians, the only battles we know how to fight are battles against windmills.
From 'The Power of Words', collected in Siân Miles (ed.), Simone Weil: An Anthology (2000), 222-223.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Actual (117)  |  Against (332)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Apply (160)  |  Area (31)  |  Authority (95)  |  Battle (34)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Call (769)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Capitalism (10)  |  Casual (7)  |  Change (593)  |  Communism (11)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Complex (188)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Condition (356)  |  Contain (68)  |  Contingency (11)  |  Cover (37)  |  Degree (276)  |  Democracy (33)  |  Device (70)  |  Element (310)  |  Elementary (96)  |  End (590)  |  Entire (47)  |  Entity (35)  |  Evil (116)  |  Exclusively (10)  |  Expression (175)  |  Extent (139)  |  External (57)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Far (154)  |  Fascism (4)  |  Fight (44)  |  Fill (61)  |  Fix (25)  |  Greek (107)  |  Idea (843)  |  Illustrate (10)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Independent (67)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Interdependence (4)  |  Interrelation (8)  |  Invade (5)  |  Isolate (22)  |  Keep (101)  |  Know (1518)  |  Level (67)  |  Limit (280)  |  Live (628)  |  Lose (159)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Measure (232)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modify (15)  |  Monster (31)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myth (56)  |  Mythology (18)  |  Nation (193)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Never (1087)  |  Objective (91)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  P (2)  |  People (1005)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Play (112)  |  Political (121)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Property (168)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reality (261)  |  Realm (85)  |  Reference (33)  |  Relate (21)  |  Relation (157)  |  Represent (155)  |  Revenge (10)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Security (47)  |  Seem (145)  |  Simultaneous (22)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Social (252)  |  Solve (130)  |  Specific (95)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Store (48)  |  Strive (46)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subtle (35)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Technician (9)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unaffected (6)  |  Universe (857)  |  Use (766)  |  Vary (27)  |  Vocabulary (8)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Windmill (4)  |  Word (619)

Those who dwell as scientists … among the beauties and mysteries of the earth are never alone or weary of life. Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life lasts.
In The Sense of Wonder (1956, 1965), 88-89.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Contemplate (18)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Earth (996)  |  Endure (20)  |  Find (998)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Never (1087)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Strength (126)  |  Weary (11)  |  Will (2355)

Why, then, are we surprised that comets, such a rare spectacle in the universe, are not known, when their return is at vast intervals?. … The time will come when diligent research over long periods will bring to light things which now lie hidden. A single lifetime, even though entirely devoted to the sky, would not be enough for the investigation of so vast a subject … And so this knowledge will be unfolded only through long successive ages. There will come a time when our descendants will be amazed that we did not know things that are so plain to them …. Many discoveries are reserved for ages still to come, when memory of us will have been effaced. Our universe is a sorry little affair unless it has in it something for every age to investigate … Nature does not reveal her mysteries once and for all. Someday there will be a man who will show in what regions comets have their orbit, why they travel so remote from other celestial bodies, how large they are and what sort they are.
Natural Questions, Book 7. As translated by Thomas H. Corcoran in Seneca in Ten Volumes: Naturales Quaestiones II (1972), 279 and 293.
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (29)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Amaze (4)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Comet (54)  |  Descendant (17)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Efface (6)  |  Enough (340)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Large (394)  |  Lie (364)  |  Lifetime (31)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Other (2236)  |  Period (198)  |  Plain (33)  |  Rare (89)  |  Remote (83)  |  Research (664)  |  Return (124)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Show (346)  |  Single (353)  |  Sky (161)  |  Someday (14)  |  Something (719)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Still (613)  |  Subject (521)  |  Successive (73)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Travel (114)  |  Unfold (12)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

With all reserve we advance the view that a supernova represents the transition of an ordinary star into a neutron star consisting mainly of neutrons. Such a star may possess a very small radius and an extremely high density. As neutrons can be packed much more closely than ordinary nuclei and electrons, the gravitational packing energy in a cold neutron star may become very large, and under certain conditions may far exceed the ordinary nuclear packing fractions...
[Co-author with Walter Baade]
Paper presented to American Physical Society meeting at Stanford (15-16 Dec 1933). Published in Physical Review (15 Jan 1934). Cited in P. Haensel, Paweł Haensel and A. Y. Potekhin, D. G. Yakovlev, Neutron Stars: Equation of State and Structure (2007), 2-3. Longer version of quote from Freeman Dyson, From Eros to Gaia (1992), 34. The theoretical prediction of neutron stars was made after analyzing observations of supernovae and proposed as an explanation of the enormous energy released in such explosions. It was written just two years after Chadwick discovered the neutron.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Author (167)  |  Become (815)  |  Certain (550)  |  Closely (12)  |  Cold (112)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consisting (5)  |  Density (25)  |  Electron (93)  |  Energy (344)  |  Final (118)  |  High (362)  |  Large (394)  |  More (2559)  |  Neutron (17)  |  Neutron Star (3)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Packing (3)  |  Possess (156)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Represent (155)  |  Representation (53)  |  Small (477)  |  Stage (143)  |  Star (427)  |  Supernova (7)  |  Theory (970)  |  Transition (26)  |  View (488)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.