Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “God does not care about our mathematical difficulties. He integrates empirically.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: So-Called

So-Called Quotes (18 quotes)

In every department of physical science there is only so much science, properly so-called, as there is mathematics.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Department (33)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Physical Science (54)  |  Properly (14)  |  Science (1699)

Modern anthropology has taught us, through comparative investigation of so-called primitive cultures, that the social behavior of human beings may differ greatly, depending upon prevailing cultural patterns and the types of organisation which predominate in society. It is on this that those who are striving to improve the lot of man may ground their hopes: human beings are not condemned, because of their biological constitution, to annihilate each other or to be at the mercy of a cruel, self-inflicted fate.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Annihilate (6)  |  Anthropology (51)  |  Behavior (49)  |  Biological (21)  |  Comparative (8)  |  Condemn (6)  |  Constitution (26)  |  Cruel (10)  |  Cultural (16)  |  Culture (85)  |  Depend (56)  |  Differ (13)  |  Fate (38)  |  Greatly (7)  |  Ground (63)  |  Hope (129)  |  Human Beings (19)  |  Improve (39)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Lot (23)  |  Mercy (9)  |  Modern (104)  |  Organisation (5)  |  Pattern (56)  |  Predominate (2)  |  Prevail (13)  |  Primitive (37)  |  Social (93)  |  Society (188)  |  Strive (35)  |  Teach (102)  |  Type (34)

Our view is that there is a matter of the perceptible bodies, but that this is not separable but is always together with a contrariety, from which the so-called “elements” come to be.
Aristotle
As quoted in Christopher Shields, The Oxford Handbook of Aristotle (2012). 218.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (193)  |  Element (129)  |  Matter (270)  |  Perceptible (4)  |  Separable (3)

Science is not gadgetry. The desirable adjuncts of modern living, although in many instances made possible by science, certainly do not constitute science. Basic scientific knowledge often (but not always) is a prerequisite to such developments, but technology primarily deserves the credit for having the financial courage, the ingenuity, and the driving energy to see to it that so-called ‘pure knowledge’ is in fact brought to the practical service of man. And it should also be recognized that those who have the urge to apply knowledge usefully have themselves often made significant contribution to pure knowledge and have even more often served as a stimulation to the activities of a pure researcher.
Warren Weaver (1894–1978), U.S. mathematician, scientist, educator. Science and Imagination, ch. 1, Basic Books (1967).
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Adjunct (3)  |  Apply (38)  |  Basic (52)  |  Bring (53)  |  Certainly (18)  |  Constitute (19)  |  Contribution (49)  |  Courage (39)  |  Credit (16)  |  Deserve (14)  |  Desirable (5)  |  Development (228)  |  Drive (38)  |  Energy (185)  |  Fact (609)  |  Financial (5)  |  Ingenuity (27)  |  Instance (18)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Live (186)  |  Modern (104)  |  Often (69)  |  Possible (100)  |  Practical (93)  |  Prerequisite (4)  |  Primarily (9)  |  Pure (62)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Researcher (17)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Knowledge (5)  |  See (197)  |  Serve (34)  |  Service (54)  |  Significant (26)  |  Stimulation (12)  |  Technology (199)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Urge (10)

So-called extraordinary events always split into two extremes naturalists who have not witnessed them: those who believe blindly and those who do not believe at all. The latter have always in mind the story of the golden goose; if the facts lie slightly beyond the limits of their knowledge, they relegate them immediately to fables. The former have a secret taste for marvels because they seem to expand Nature; they use their imagination with pleasure to find explanations. To remain doubtful is given to naturalists who keep a middle path between the two extremes. They calmly examine facts; they refer to logic for help; they discuss probabilities; they do not scoff at anything, not even errors, because they serve at least the history of the human mind; finally, they report rather than judge; they rarely decide unless they have good evidence.
Quoted in Albert V. Carozzi, Histoire des sciences de la terre entre 1790 et 1815 vue à travers les documents inédités de la Societé de Physique et d'Histoire Naturelle de Genève, trans. Albert V. and Marguerite Carozzi. (1990), 175.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Blindness (8)  |  Decision (58)  |  Discussion (37)  |  Doubtful (5)  |  Error (230)  |  Event (97)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Expansion (25)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Extraordinary (32)  |  Extreme (36)  |  Fable (5)  |  Fact (609)  |  Final (33)  |  Find (248)  |  Gold (55)  |  Goose (9)  |  History (302)  |  Human (445)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Immediately (9)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Limit (86)  |  Marvel (24)  |  Mind (544)  |  Naturalist (49)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Probability (83)  |  Rare (31)  |  Relegation (2)  |  Remain (77)  |  Report (31)  |  Scoff (4)  |  Secret (98)  |  Service (54)  |  Split (11)  |  Story (58)  |  Taste (35)  |  Witness (18)

So-called psychoanalysis is the occupation of lustful rationalists who trace everything in the world to sexual causes—with the exception of their occupation.
Trans. by Harry Zohn, originally published in Beim Wort genommen (1955). Half-Truths and One-and-a-Half Truths, University of Chicago Press (1990)
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (231)  |  Everything (120)  |  Exception (33)  |  Occupation (37)  |  Psychoanalysis (37)  |  Rationalist (3)  |  Sexual (4)  |  Trace (39)  |  World (667)

So-called “common sense” is definitely detrimental to an understanding of the quantum realm!
Anonymous
As given in an epigraph, without citation, in David M. Harland (ed.), The Big Bang: A View from the 21st Century (2003), ix.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (69)  |  Definitely (3)  |  Quantum Theory (55)  |  Realm (40)  |  Understanding (317)

The fact that man produces a concept ‘I’ besides the totality of his mental and emotional experiences or perceptions does not prove that there must be any specific existence behind such a concept. We are succumbing to illusions produced by our self-created language, without reaching a better understanding of anything. Most of so-called philosophy is due to this kind of fallacy.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Behind (25)  |  Better (131)  |  Concept (102)  |  Due (4)  |  Emotional (13)  |  Existence (254)  |  Experience (268)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fallacy (19)  |  Illusion (38)  |  Kind (99)  |  Language (155)  |  Mental (57)  |  Perception (53)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Produce (63)  |  Prove (60)  |  Reach (68)  |  Specific (30)  |  Succumb (4)  |  Totality (9)  |  Understand (189)

The most ominous conflict of our time is the difference of opinion, of outlook, between men of letters, historians, philosophers, the so-called humanists, on the one side and scientists on the other. The gap cannot but increase because of the intolerance of both and the fact that science is growing by leaps and bounds.
The History of Science and the New Humanism (1931), 69.Omnious;Conflict;Difference;Opinion;Outlook;Men OfLetters;Historian;Philosopher;Humanist;So-Called;Scientist;Gap;Intolerance;Fact;Growth;Leap;Bound
Science quotes on:  |  Bound (12)  |  Conflict (49)  |  Difference (208)  |  Fact (609)  |  Gap (20)  |  Growth (111)  |  Historian (30)  |  Humanist (4)  |  Increase (107)  |  Intolerance (7)  |  Leap (23)  |  Man Of Letters (2)  |  Ominous (3)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Outlook (12)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Side (36)

The only difference between elements and compounds consists in the supposed impossibility of proving the so-called elements to be compounds.
'Faraday Lecture: Elements and Compounds', Journal of the Chemical Society (1904), 85, 520.
Science quotes on:  |  Compound (53)  |  Consist (22)  |  Difference (208)  |  Element (129)  |  Impossibility (50)  |  Proof (192)  |  Supposition (33)

The only thing you will ever be able to say in the so-called ‘social’ sciences is: some do, some don’t..
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Say (126)  |  Science (1699)  |  Social (93)

The so-called Marxian dialectic is simply an effort by third-rate men to give an air of profundity to balderdash. Christianity has gone the same way. There are some sound ideas in it, but its advocates always add a lot of preposterous nonsense. The result is theology.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Add (26)  |  Advocate (10)  |  Air (151)  |  Christianity (8)  |  Dialectic (3)  |  Effort (94)  |  Give (117)  |  Idea (440)  |  Lot (23)  |  Nonsense (32)  |  Preposterous (5)  |  Profundity (5)  |  Result (250)  |  Same (92)  |  Simply (34)  |  Sound (59)  |  Theology (35)

There are pessimists who hold that such a state of affairs is necessarily inherent in human nature; it is those who propound such views that are the enemies of true religion, for they imply thereby that religious teachings are utopian ideals and unsuited to afford guidance in human affairs. The study of the social patterns in certain so-called primitive cultures, however, seems to have made it sufficiently evident that such a defeatist view is wholly unwarranted.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Afford (11)  |  Certain (84)  |  Culture (85)  |  Enemy (52)  |  Evident (14)  |  Guidance (12)  |  Hold (56)  |  Human Affairs (5)  |  Human Nature (51)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Imply (12)  |  Inherent (27)  |  Necessarily (13)  |  Pattern (56)  |  Pessimist (5)  |  Primitive (37)  |  Propound (2)  |  Religion (210)  |  Religious (44)  |  Seem (89)  |  Social (93)  |  State Of affairs (5)  |  Study (331)  |  Sufficiently (6)  |  Teachings (2)  |  Thereby (4)  |  True (120)  |  Utopian (3)  |  View (115)  |  Wholly (7)

There is a science which investigates being as being and the attributes which belong to this in virtue of its own nature. Now this is not the same as any of the so-called special sciences; for none of these treats universally of being as being. They cut off a part of being and investigate the attribute of this part; this is what the mathematical sciences for instance do. Now since we are seeking the first principles and the highest causes, clearly there must be some thing to which these belong in virtue of its own nature. If then those who sought the elements of existing things were seeking these same principles, it is necessary that the elements must be elements of being not by accident but just because it is being. Therefore it is of being as being that we also must grasp the first causes.
Aristotle
'Book Gamma (1003a17-1011b23' in Metaphysics, trans. W.D. Ross (1924). Excerpt 'Being Qua Being', in Joseph Margolis and Jacques Catudal, The Quarrel between Invariance and Flux (2001), 18-19.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (54)  |  Attribute (22)  |  Being (39)  |  Belonging (12)  |  Cause (231)  |  Existence (254)  |  Grasp (43)  |  Investigate (49)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Part (146)  |  Principle (228)  |  Science (1699)  |  Special (51)  |  Treatment (88)  |  Universality (11)  |  Virtue (55)

There is no area in our minds reserved for superstition, such as the Greeks had in their mythology; and superstition, under cover of an abstract vocabulary, has revenged itself by invading the entire realm of thought. Our science is like a store filled with the most subtle intellectual devices for solving the most complex problems, and yet we are almost incapable of applying the elementary principles of rational thought. In every sphere, we seem to have lost the very elements of intelligence: the ideas of limit, measure, degree, proportion, relation, comparison, contingency, interdependence, interrelation of means and ends. To keep to the social level, our political universe is peopled exclusively by myths and monsters; all it contains is absolutes and abstract entities. This is illustrated by all the words of our political and social vocabulary: nation, security, capitalism, communism, fascism, order, authority, property, democracy. We never use them in phrases such as: There is democracy to the extent that... or: There is capitalism in so far as... The use of expressions like “to the extent that” is beyond our intellectual capacity. Each of these words seems to represent for us an absolute reality, unaffected by conditions, or an absolute objective, independent of methods of action, or an absolute evil; and at the same time we make all these words mean, successively or simultaneously, anything whatsoever. Our lives are lived, in actual fact, among changing, varying realities, subject to the casual play of external necessities, and modifying themselves according to specific conditions within specific limits; and yet we act and strive and sacrifice ourselves and others by reference to fixed and isolated abstractions which cannot possibly be related either to one another or to any concrete facts. In this so-called age of technicians, the only battles we know how to fight are battles against windmills. [p.222]
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (65)  |  Abstract (43)  |  Abstraction (29)  |  Accord (21)  |  Act (80)  |  Action (151)  |  Actual (34)  |  Age (137)  |  Apply (38)  |  Area (18)  |  Authority (50)  |  Battle (30)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Capitalism (7)  |  Casual (6)  |  Change (291)  |  Communism (8)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Complex (78)  |  Concrete (21)  |  Condition (119)  |  Contain (37)  |  Contingency (11)  |  Cover (23)  |  Degree (48)  |  Democracy (21)  |  Device (24)  |  Element (129)  |  Elementary (30)  |  End (141)  |  Entire (29)  |  Entity (23)  |  Evil (67)  |  Exclusively (8)  |  Expression (82)  |  Extent (30)  |  External (45)  |  Fact (609)  |  Far (77)  |  Fascism (3)  |  Fight (37)  |  Fill (35)  |  Fix (10)  |  Greek (46)  |  Idea (440)  |  Illustrate (5)  |  Incapable (11)  |  Independent (41)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Interrelation (6)  |  Invade (4)  |  Isolate (10)  |  Keep (47)  |  Know (321)  |  Level (51)  |  Limit (86)  |  Live (186)  |  Lose (53)  |  Mean (63)  |  Means (109)  |  Measure (70)  |  Method (154)  |  Mind (544)  |  Modify (11)  |  Monster (21)  |  Myth (43)  |  Mythology (11)  |  Nation (111)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Objective (49)  |  Order (167)  |  Ourselves (34)  |  P (2)  |  People (269)  |  Phrase (21)  |  Play (60)  |  Political (31)  |  Possibly (9)  |  Principle (228)  |  Problem (362)  |  Property (96)  |  Proportion (47)  |  Rational (42)  |  Reality (140)  |  Realm (40)  |  Reference (17)  |  Relate (5)  |  Relation (96)  |  Represent (27)  |  Reserve (7)  |  Revenge (6)  |  Sacrifice (24)  |  Same (92)  |  Science (1699)  |  Security (27)  |  Seem (89)  |  Simultaneous (12)  |  Social (93)  |  Solve (41)  |  Specific (30)  |  Sphere (40)  |  Store (17)  |  Strive (35)  |  Subject (129)  |  Subtle (26)  |  Superstition (50)  |  Technician (5)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Thought (374)  |  Time (439)  |  Unaffected (4)  |  Universe (563)  |  Vary (14)  |  Vocabulary (3)  |  Whatsoever (6)  |  Windmill (4)  |  Word (221)

Until man duplicates a blade of grass, nature can laugh at his so-called scientific knowledge.
Seen in several books, attributed without citation, for example, in Ann Wimore, The Wheatgrass Book (1985). If you know a primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Blade (5)  |  Grass (30)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Laughter (22)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Science (1699)

When you say A[tomic] P[ower] is ‘here to stay’ you remind me that Chesterton said that whenever he heard that, he knew that whatever it referred to would soon be replaced, and thought pitifully shabby and old-fashioned. So-called ‘atomic’ power is rather bigger than anything he was thinking of (I have heard it of trams, gas-light, steam-trains). But it surely is clear that there will have to be some ‘abnegation’ in its use, a deliberate refusal to do some of the things it is possible to do with it, or nothing will stay!
From Letter draft to Joanna de Bortadano (Apr 1956). In Humphrey Carpenter (ed.) assisted by Christopher Tolkien, The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien (1995, 2014), 246, Letter No. 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Power (7)  |  G. K. Chesterton (49)  |  Deliberate (10)  |  Gas Light (2)  |  Hear (33)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Old-Fashioned (5)  |  Refusal (20)  |  Replace (16)  |  Shabby (2)  |  Stay (15)  |  Tram (3)

While the method of the natural sciences is... analytic, the method of the social sciences is better described as compositive or synthetic. It is the so-called wholes, the groups of elements which are structurally connected, which we learn to single out from the totality of observed phenomena... Insofar as we analyze individual thought in the social sciences the purpose is not to explain that thought, but merely to distinguish the possible types of elements with which we shall have to reckon in the construction of different patterns of social relationships. It is a mistake... to believe that their aim is to explain conscious action ... The problems which they try to answer arise only insofar as the conscious action of many men produce undesigned results... If social phenomena showed no order except insofar as they were consciously designed, there would indeed be no room for theoretical sciences of society and there would be, as is often argued, only problems of psychology. It is only insofar as some sort of order arises as a result of individual action but without being designed by any individual that a problem is raised which demands a theoretical explanation... people dominated by the scientistic prejudice are often inclined to deny the existence of any such order... it can be shown briefly and without any technical apparatus how the independent actions of individuals will produce an order which is no part of their intentions... The way in which footpaths are formed in a wild broken country is such an instance. At first everyone will seek for himself what seems to him the best path. But the fact that such a path has been used once is likely to make it easier to traverse and therefore more likely to be used again; and thus gradually more and more clearly defined tracks arise and come to be used to the exclusion of other possible ways. Human movements through the region come to conform to a definite pattern which, although the result of deliberate decision of many people, has yet not be consciously designed by anyone.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Aim (58)  |  Analytic (4)  |  Analyze (3)  |  Answer (201)  |  Anyone (26)  |  Apparatus (30)  |  Argue (17)  |  Arise (32)  |  Belief (400)  |  Best (129)  |  Better (131)  |  Break (33)  |  Briefly (3)  |  Clearly (17)  |  Conform (5)  |  Connect (15)  |  Conscious (25)  |  Consciously (4)  |  Construction (69)  |  Country (121)  |  Decision (58)  |  Define (29)  |  Definite (27)  |  Deliberate (10)  |  Demand (52)  |  Deny (29)  |  Describe (38)  |  Design (92)  |  Different (110)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  Dominate (13)  |  Easy (56)  |  Element (129)  |  Everyone (20)  |  Exclusion (11)  |  Existence (254)  |  Explain (61)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Fact (609)  |  First (174)  |  Form (210)  |  Gradually (13)  |  Group (52)  |  Human (445)  |  Inclined (7)  |  Independent (41)  |  Individual (177)  |  Instance (18)  |  Intention (25)  |  Learn (160)  |  Likely (23)  |  Merely (35)  |  Method (154)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Movement (65)  |  Natural Sciences (3)  |  Observe (48)  |  Often (69)  |  Order (167)  |  Part (146)  |  Path (59)  |  Pattern (56)  |  People (269)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Possible (100)  |  Prejudice (58)  |  Problem (362)  |  Produce (63)  |  Psychology (125)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Raise (20)  |  Reckon (6)  |  Region (26)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Result (250)  |  Room (29)  |  Seek (57)  |  Seem (89)  |  Show (55)  |  Single (72)  |  Social (93)  |  Social Sciences (4)  |  Society (188)  |  Sort (32)  |  Structurally (2)  |  Synthetic (12)  |  Technical (26)  |  Theoretical (10)  |  Thought (374)  |  Totality (9)  |  Track (9)  |  Traverse (4)  |  Try (103)  |  Type (34)  |  Whole (122)  |  Wild (39)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.