Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index D > Category: Deep

Deep Quotes (233 quotes)

...travel is more than the seeing of sights; it is a change that goes on, deep and permanent, in the ideas of living.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Change (593)  |  Idea (843)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  More (2559)  |  Permanent (64)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sight (132)  |  Travel (114)

Error has made man so deep, sensitive, and inventive that he has put forth such blossoms as religions and arts. Pure knowledge could not have been capable of it.
Human, All-To-Human, Vol. 1, 44-45. (1878), 140. In Willard Huntington Wright, What Nietzsche Taught? (1917), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Capability (41)  |  Capable (168)  |  Error (321)  |  Inventive (8)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Pure (291)  |  Religion (361)  |  Sensitive (14)

Un jour, en l'année 1666, Newton, retiré à la campagne, et voyant tomber des fruits d’un arbre, à ce que m'a conté sa nièce, (Mme Conduit) se laissa aller à une méditation profonde sur la cause qui entraîne ainsi tous les corps dans une ligne qui, si elle était prolongée, passerait à peu près par le centre de la Terre.
One day in the year 1666 Newton had gone to the country, and seeing the fall of an apple, [as his niece (Mme Conduit) told me,] let himself be led into a deep meditation on the cause which thus draws every object along a line whose extension would pass almost through the center of the Earth.
Original French from Éléments de Philosophie de Newton, Part 1, Chap. 3, in Oeuvres Completes de Voltaire (1785), Vol. 31, 175. Translation as given in an epigraph in Charles W. Misner, Kip S. Thorn and John Archibald Wheeler, Gravitation (1970, 1973), 47. An alternate translation is: “One day in the year 1666, Newton went into the country, and seeing fruit fall from a tree (as his niece, Madame Conduit, has informed me), entered into a profound train of thought as to the causes which could lead to such a drawing together or attraction.” As given in Robert Chambers (ed.), The Book of Days: A Miscellany of Popular Antiquities in Connection with the Calendar (1888), Vol. 2, 757. (Note: Voltaire originally published his Éléments in 1738, but Webmaster could not find the above quote in it.)
Science quotes on:  |  17th Century (16)  |  Apple (40)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Cause (541)  |  Conduit (3)  |  Country (251)  |  Draw (137)  |  Earth (996)  |  Extension (59)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Himself (461)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Object (422)  |  Pass (238)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Tree (246)  |  Year (933)

GLENDOWER: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
HOTSPUR: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
But will they come when you do call for them?
Henry IV, Part I (1597), III, i.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Do (1908)  |  Man (2251)  |  Small (477)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

A little Learning is a dang’rous Thing;
Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian Spring:
There shallow Draughts intoxicate the Brain,
And drinking largely sobers us again.
In An Essay on Criticism (Written 1709, published 1711), 14. (Written in 1709). Misquoted in The Monthly Miscellany; or Gentleman and Lady’s Complete Magazine (1774), as “Mr. Pope says, very truly, ‘A little knowledge is a dangerous thing.’” This latter version of the quote has, in modern times, been misattributed to Albert Einstein.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Danger (115)  |  Draught (2)  |  Drink (53)  |  Drinking (21)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Intoxication (5)  |  Learning (274)  |  Little (707)  |  Shallowness (2)  |  Sobriety (2)  |  Spring (133)  |  Taste (90)  |  Thing (1915)

A bewildering assortment of (mostly microscopic) life-forms has been found thriving in what were once thought to be uninhabitable regions of our planet. These hardy creatures have turned up in deep, hot underground rocks, around scalding volcanic vents at the bottom of the ocean, in the desiccated, super-cold Dry Valleys of Antarctica, in places of high acid, alkaline, and salt content, and below many meters of polar ice. ... Some deep-dwelling, heat-loving microbes, genetic studies suggest, are among the oldest species known, hinting that not only can life thrive indefinitely in what appear to us totally alien environments, it may actually originate in such places.
In Life Everywhere: the Maverick Science of Astrobiology (2002), xi.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Alien (34)  |  Alkali (6)  |  Antarctica (7)  |  Assortment (5)  |  Bewilderment (8)  |  Cold (112)  |  Creature (233)  |  Dry (57)  |  Environment (216)  |  Form (959)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Heat (174)  |  High (362)  |  Hot (60)  |  Ice (54)  |  Known (454)  |  Life (1795)  |  Life-Form (6)  |  Microbe (28)  |  Microbes (14)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Origin (239)  |  Originate (36)  |  Planet (356)  |  Polar (12)  |  Rock (161)  |  Salt (46)  |  Species (401)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thrive (18)  |  Thriving (2)  |  Turn (447)  |  Underground (11)  |  Valley (32)  |  Vent (2)  |  Volcano (39)

A great ball of fire about a mile in diameter, changing colors as it kept shooting upward, from deep purple to orange, expanding, growing bigger, rising as it was expanding, an elemental force freed from its bonds after being chained for billions of years.
On the first atomic explosion in New Mexico, 16 Jul 1945.
From 'Drama of the Atomic Bomb Found Climax in July 16 Test', in New York Times (26 Sep 1945). This was the first of a series of articles by Laurence, who was the only civilian witness of the first bomb test. He was on a flight to see the dropping of a bomb on Nagasaki. Laurence, science writer for the NYT, had been requested for service to the War Department to explain the atomic bomb to the lay public.
Science quotes on:  |  Ball (62)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bigger (5)  |  Billion (95)  |  Bond (45)  |  Chained (2)  |  Change (593)  |  Color (137)  |  Diameter (28)  |  Elemental (3)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Growing (98)  |  Mile (39)  |  New (1216)  |  Orange (14)  |  Purple (3)  |  Rising (44)  |  Shooting (6)  |  Upward (43)  |  Year (933)

A life on the ocean wave,
A home on the rolling deep,
For the spark that nature gave
I have the right to keep.
Science quotes on:  |  Home (170)  |  Life (1795)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Oceanography (17)  |  Right (452)  |  Rolling (3)  |  Spark (31)  |  Wave (107)

A man reserves his true and deepest love not for the species of woman in whose company he finds himself electrified and enkindled, but for that one in whose company he may feel tenderly drowsy.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Company (59)  |  Enkindle (2)  |  Feel (367)  |  Find (998)  |  Himself (461)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Reserve (24)  |  Species (401)  |  True (212)  |  Woman (151)

A mouse can fall down a mine shaft a third of a mile deep without injury. A rat falling the same distance would break his bones; a man would simply splash ... Elephants have their legs thickened to an extent that seems disproportionate to us, but this is necessary if their unwieldly bulk is to be moved at all ... A 60-ft. man would weigh 1000 times as much as a normal man, but his thigh bone would have its area increased by only 100 times ... Consequently such an unfortunate monster would break his legs the moment he tried to move.
Expressing, in picturesque terms, the strength of an organism relative to its bulk.
Address at the annual congress of the British Association for the Advancement of Science. Quoted in 'On the Itchen', Time Magazine (Mon. 14 Sep 1925).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bone (95)  |  Break (99)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Distance (161)  |  Down (456)  |  Elephant (31)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fall (230)  |  Injury (36)  |  Leg (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mine (76)  |  Moment (253)  |  Monster (31)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Move (216)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Organism (220)  |  Rat (37)  |  Strength (126)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  Weigh (49)

A quarter-horse jockey learns to think of a twenty-second race as if it were occurring across twenty minutes—in distinct parts, spaced in his consciousness. Each nuance of the ride comes to him as he builds his race. If you can do the opposite with deep time, living in it and thinking in it until the large numbers settle into place, you can sense how swiftly the initial earth packed itself together, how swiftly continents have assembled and come apart, how far and rapidly continents travel, how quickly mountains rise and how quickly they disintegrate and disappear.
Annals of the Former World
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Assemble (13)  |  Build (204)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Continent (76)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disintegrate (3)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Far (154)  |  Horse (74)  |  Initial (17)  |  Jockey (2)  |  Large (394)  |  Learn (629)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Minute (125)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nuance (4)  |  Number (699)  |  Occur (150)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Pack (5)  |  Part (222)  |  Place (177)  |  Quickly (18)  |  Race (268)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Ride (21)  |  Rise (166)  |  Sense (770)  |  Settle (19)  |  Space (500)  |  Swiftly (5)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Travel (114)

A theory is the more impressive the greater the simplicity of its premises is, the more different kinds of things it relates, and the more extended is its area of applicability. Therefore the deep impression which classical thermodynamics made upon me. It is the only physical theory of universal content concerning which I am convinced that within the framework of the applicability of its basic concepts, it will never be overthrown.
Autobiographical Notes (1946), 33. Quoted in Gerald Holton and Yehuda Elkana, Albert Einstein: Historical and Cultural Perspectives (1997), 227.
Science quotes on:  |  Applicability (6)  |  Area (31)  |  Basic (138)  |  Classical (45)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concern (228)  |  Content (69)  |  Convincing (9)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extension (59)  |  Framework (31)  |  Greater (288)  |  Impression (114)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Impressiveness (2)  |  Kind (557)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Overthrown (8)  |  Physical (508)  |  Premise (37)  |  Relation (157)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Universal (189)  |  Will (2355)

According to this view of the matter, there is nothing casual in the formation of Metamorphic Rocks. All strata, once buried deep enough, (and due TIME allowed!!!) must assume that state,—none can escape. All records of former worlds must ultimately perish.
Letter to Mr Murchison, In explanation of the views expressed in his previous letter to Mr Lyell, 15 Nov 1836. Quoted in the Appendix to Charles Babbage, The Ninth Bridgewater Treatise: A Fragment (1838), 240.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Due (141)  |  Enough (340)  |  Escape (80)  |  Formation (96)  |  Former (137)  |  Geology (220)  |  Matter (798)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Perish (50)  |  Record (154)  |  Rock (161)  |  State (491)  |  Strata (35)  |  Time (1877)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

All rivers, small or large, agree in one character; they like to lean a little on one side; they cannot bear to have their channels deepest in the middle, but will always, if they can, have one bank to sun themselves upon, and another to get cool under.
In 'Water', The True and the Beautiful in Nature, Art, Morals, and Religion (1872), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Agree (26)  |  All (4108)  |  Bank (31)  |  Bear (159)  |  Channel (21)  |  Character (243)  |  Cool (13)  |  Hydrology (9)  |  Large (394)  |  Lean (6)  |  Little (707)  |  River (119)  |  Side (233)  |  Small (477)  |  Sun (385)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Will (2355)

As a single footstep will not make a path on the earth, so a single thought will not make a pathway in the mind. To make a deep physical path, we walk again and again. To make a deep mental path, we must think over and over the kind of thoughts we wish to dominate our lives.
From The Art of Living, Day by Day 91972), 77. Frequently misattributed to Henry David Thoreau.
Science quotes on:  |  Dominate (20)  |  Earth (996)  |  Footstep (5)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Path (144)  |  Pathway (15)  |  Physical (508)  |  Single (353)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Walk (124)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

As they discover, from strata to strata and from layer to layer, deep in the quarries of Montmartre or the schists of the Urals, these creatures whose fossilized remains belong to antediluvian civilizations, it will strike terror into your soul to see many millions of years, many thousands of races forgotten by the feeble memory of mankind and by the indestructible divine tradition, and whose piles of ashes on the surface of our globe form the two feet of soil which gives us our bread and our flowers.
From 'La Peau de Chagrin' (1831). As translated as by Helen Constantine The Wild Ass’s Skin (2012), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Antediluvian (5)  |  Ash (20)  |  Belong (162)  |  Bread (39)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Creature (233)  |  Discover (553)  |  Divine (112)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Flower (106)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Form (959)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Globe (47)  |  Indestructible (12)  |  Layer (40)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Memory (134)  |  Million (114)  |  Montmartre (3)  |  Pile (12)  |  Piles (7)  |  Quarry (13)  |  Race (268)  |  Remain (349)  |  Schist (4)  |  See (1081)  |  Soil (86)  |  Soul (226)  |  Strata (35)  |  Stratum (10)  |  Strike (68)  |  Surface (209)  |  Terror (30)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Two (937)  |  Urals (2)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

As usual, nature’s imagination far surpasses our own, as we have seen from the other theories which are subtle and deep.
In The Character of Physical Law (1965, 2001), 162.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Subtle (35)  |  Surpassing (12)  |  Theory (970)

At the heart of science is an essential balance between two seemingly contradictory attitudes—an openness to new ideas, no matter how bizarre or counterintuitive they may be, and the most ruthless skeptical scrutiny of all ideas, old and new. This is how deep truths are winnowed from deep nonsense.
The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark (1997), 304.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Balance (77)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Counterintuitive (4)  |  Essential (199)  |  Heart (229)  |  Idea (843)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Old (481)  |  Openness (7)  |  Ruthless (10)  |  Scepticism (16)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scrutiny (15)  |  Seemingly (28)  |  Skeptical (20)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Winnow (4)

Boundaries which mark off one field of science from another are purely artificial, are set up only for temporary convenience. Let chemists and physicists dig deep enough, and they reach common ground.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-Book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Artificial (33)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Ground (4)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Dig (21)  |  Enough (340)  |  Field (364)  |  Ground (217)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Purely (109)  |  Reach (281)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Temporary (23)

Champions aren’t made in gyms. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them—a desire, a dream, a vision. They have to have last-minute stamina, they have to be a little faster, they have to have the skill and the will. But the will must be stronger than the skill.
As co-author with Richard Durham, in The Greatest: My Own Story (1975), 365.
Science quotes on:  |  Champion (5)  |  Desire (204)  |  Dream (208)  |  Fast (45)  |  Faster (50)  |  Gym (2)  |  Inside (26)  |  Last (426)  |  Little (707)  |  Make (25)  |  Minute (125)  |  Must (1526)  |  Skill (109)  |  Something (719)  |  Strong (174)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Vision (123)  |  Will (2355)

Complex organisms cannot be construed as the sum of their genes, nor do genes alone build particular items of anatomy or behavior by them selves. Most genes influence several aspects of anatomy and behavior–as they operate through complex interactions with other genes and their products, and with environmental factors both within and outside the developing organism. We fall into a deep error, not just a harmful oversimplification, when we speak of genes ‘for’ particular items of anatomy or behavior.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Both (493)  |  Build (204)  |  Complex (188)  |  Construe (2)  |  Develop (268)  |  Do (1908)  |  Environment (216)  |  Error (321)  |  Factor (46)  |  Fall (230)  |  Gene (98)  |  Harmful (12)  |  Influence (222)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Item (4)  |  Most (1731)  |  Operate (17)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outside (141)  |  Particular (76)  |  Product (160)  |  Self (267)  |  Several (32)  |  Speak (232)  |  Sum (102)  |  Through (849)

Deep beneath the surface of the Sun, enormous forces were gathering. At any moment, the energies of a million hydrogen bombs might burst forth in the awesome explosion…. Climbing at millions of miles per hour, an invisible fireball many times the size of Earth would leap from the Sun and head out across space.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Awesome (14)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Burst (39)  |  Climb (35)  |  Earth (996)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Fireball (3)  |  Force (487)  |  Forth (13)  |  Gather (72)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Head (81)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Hydrogen Bomb (16)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Leap (53)  |  Mile (39)  |  Million (114)  |  Millions (17)  |  Moment (253)  |  Size (60)  |  Space (500)  |  Sun (385)  |  Surface (209)  |  Time (1877)

Describing laughter: The sound is produced by a deep inspiration followed by short, interrupted, spasmodic contractions of the chest, and especially the diaphragm... the mouth is open more or less widely, with the corners drawn much backwards, as well as a little upwards; and the upper lip is somewhat raised.
The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals
Science quotes on:  |  Backwards (17)  |  Contraction (15)  |  Corner (57)  |  Follow (378)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Little (707)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Open (274)  |  Produced (187)  |  Short (197)  |  Sound (183)  |  Upward (43)

Dirichlet was not satisfied to study Gauss’ Disquisitiones arithmetical once or several times, but continued throughout life to keep in close touch with the wealth of deep mathematical thoughts which it contains by perusing it again and again. For this reason the book was never placed on the shelf but had an abiding place on the table at which he worked. … Dirichlet was the first one, who not only fully understood this work, but made it also accessible to others.
In Dirichlet, Werke, Bd. 2, 315. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 159.
Science quotes on:  |  Abide (12)  |  Accessible (25)  |  Book (392)  |  Close (69)  |  Contain (68)  |  Continue (165)  |  Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet (3)  |  Disquisitiones Arithmeticae (2)  |  First (1283)  |  Fully (21)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Keep (101)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peruse (2)  |  Place (177)  |  Reason (744)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Shelf (8)  |  Study (653)  |  Table (104)  |  Thought (953)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Touch (141)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Work (1351)

Einstein has not ... given the lie to Kant’s deep thoughts on the idealization of space and time; he has, on the contrary, made a large step towards its accomplishment.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Give (202)  |  Idealization (3)  |  Kants (2)  |  Large (394)  |  Lie (364)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Step (231)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)

Etna presents us not merely with an image of the power of subterranean heat, but a record also of the vast period of time during which that power has been exerted. A majestic mountain has been produced by volcanic action, yet the time of which the volcanic forms the register, however vast, is found by the geologist to be of inconsiderable amount, even in the modern annals of the earth's history. In like manner, the Falls of Niagara teach us not merely to appreciate the power of moving water, but furnish us at the same time with data for estimating the enormous lapse of ages during which that force has operated. A deep and long ravine has been excavated, and the river has required ages to accomplish the task, yet the same region affords evidence that the sum of these ages is as nothing, and as the work of yesterday, when compared to the antecedent periods, of which there are monuments in the same district.
Travels in North America (1845), Vol. 1, 28-9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  Age (499)  |  Amount (151)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Data (156)  |  Earth (996)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Etna (5)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exert (39)  |  Fall (230)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Heat (174)  |  History (673)  |  Image (96)  |  Lava (9)  |  Long (790)  |  Merely (316)  |  Modern (385)  |  Monument (45)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Niagara (8)  |  Niagara Falls (4)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Period (198)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Produced (187)  |  Ravine (5)  |  Record (154)  |  Register (21)  |  Required (108)  |  River (119)  |  Sum (102)  |  Task (147)  |  Teach (277)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vast (177)  |  Volcano (39)  |  Water (481)  |  Work (1351)  |  Yesterday (36)

Every great scientist becomes a great scientist because of the inner self-abnegation with which he stands before truth, saying: “Not my will, but thine, be done.” What, then, does a man mean by saying, Science displaces religion, when in this deep sense science itself springs from religion?
In 'The Real Point of Conflict between Science and Religion', collected in Living Under Tension: Sermons On Christianity Today (1941), 148.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Displace (8)  |  Done (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Inner (71)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Religion (361)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Spring (133)  |  Stand (274)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)

Far must thy researches go
Wouldst thou learn the world to know;
Thou must tempt the dark abyss
Wouldst thou prove what Being is;
Naught but firmness gains the prize,—
Naught but fullness makes us wise,—
Buried deep truth ever lies!
In Edgar A. Bowring (trans.), The Poems of Schiller (1875), 260.
Science quotes on:  |  Abyss (29)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bury (16)  |  Dark (140)  |  Fullness (2)  |  Gain (145)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lie (364)  |  Must (1526)  |  Naught (10)  |  Prize (13)  |  Prove (250)  |  Research (664)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Wise (131)  |  World (1774)

Few men during their lifetime come anywhere near exhausting the resources dwelling within them. There are deep wells of strength that are never used.
In Alone (1938), 189.
Science quotes on:  |  Dwelling (11)  |  Lifetime (31)  |  Never (1087)  |  Resource (63)  |  Strength (126)  |  Well (14)

Genuine religion has its root deep down in the heart of humanity and in the reality of things. It is not surprising that by our methods we fail to grasp it: the actions of the Deity make no appeal to any special sense, only a universal appeal; and our methods are, as we know, incompetent to detect complete uniformity. There is a principle of Relativity here, and unless we encounter flaw or jar or change, nothing in us responds; we are deaf and blind therefore to the Immanent Grandeur, unless we have insight enough to recognise in the woven fabric of existence, flowing steadily from the loom in an infinite progress towards perfection, the ever-growing garment of a transcendent God.
Continuity: The Presidential Address to the British Association (1913), 92-93.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Blind (95)  |  Change (593)  |  Complete (204)  |  Deity (22)  |  Detect (44)  |  Down (456)  |  Enough (340)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Fail (185)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Garment (13)  |  Genuine (52)  |  God (757)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Growing (98)  |  Heart (229)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Insight (102)  |  Know (1518)  |  Loom (20)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Principle (507)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reality (261)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Religion (361)  |  Root (120)  |  Sense (770)  |  Special (184)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Universal (189)

He plucks the pearls that stud the deep Admiring Beauty’s lap to fill;
He breaks the stubborn Marble’s sleep,
Rocks disappear before his skill:
With thoughts that swell his glowing soul
He bids the ore illume the page,
And, proudly scorning Time’s control,
Commences with an unborn age.
Written for the Mechanics Celebration (1824). In 'Art—An Ode', as quoted and cited in Alpheus Cary, An Address Delivered Before the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association (October 7th, 1824) (1824), 49.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Break (99)  |  Control (167)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Geology (220)  |  Lap (9)  |  Marble (20)  |  Ore (12)  |  Pearl (6)  |  Rock (161)  |  Skill (109)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Soul (226)  |  Stubborn (13)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unborn (5)

He plucks the pearls that stud the deep Admiring Beauty’s lap to fill;
He breaks the stubborn Marble’s sleep,
Rocks disappear before his skill:
With thoughts that swell his glowing soul
He bids the ore illume the page,
And, proudly scorning Time’s control,
Commences with an unborn age.
Written for the Mechanics Celebration (1824). In 'Art—An Ode', as quoted and cited in Alpheus Cary, An Address Delivered Before the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association (October 7th, 1824) (1824), 49.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Break (99)  |  Control (167)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Lap (9)  |  Marble (20)  |  Ore (12)  |  Rock (161)  |  Skill (109)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Soul (226)  |  Stubborn (13)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)

He who finds a thought that lets us even a little deeper into the eternal mystery of nature has been granted great peace.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Eternal (110)  |  Find (998)  |  Grant (73)  |  Great (1574)  |  Let (61)  |  Little (707)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Peace (108)  |  Thought (953)

Hence, a generative grammar must be a system of rules that can iterate to generate an indefinitely large number of structures. This system of rules can be analyzed into the three major components of a generative grammar: the syntactic, phonological, and semantic components... the syntactic component of a grammar must specify, for each sentence, a deep structure that determines its semantic interpretation and a surface structure that determines its phonetic interpretation. The first of these is interpreted by the semantic component; the second, by the phonological component.
Aspects of the Theory of Syntax (1965), 15-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Component (48)  |  Determine (144)  |  First (1283)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Language (293)  |  Large (394)  |  Major (84)  |  Must (1526)  |  Number (699)  |  Rule (294)  |  Structure (344)  |  Surface (209)  |  System (537)

Herschel removed the speckled tent-roof from the world and exposed the immeasurable deeps of space, dim-flecked with fleets of colossal suns sailing their billion-leagued remoteness.
'The Secret History of Eddypus', in Mark Twain and David Ketterer (ed.), Tales of Wonder (2003), 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Billion (95)  |  Colossal (15)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Sir William Herschel (14)  |  Remoteness (9)  |  Roof (13)  |  Sailing (14)  |  Space (500)  |  Speckled (3)  |  Sun (385)  |  Tent (11)  |  World (1774)

His mind illumined the Past and the Future and wrought greatly for the present. By his genius distant lands converse and men sail unafraid upon the deep.
Epitaph
Inscription on the tomb of Reginald and Helen Fessenden in Bermuda. In Frederick Seitz, The Cosmic Inventor: Reginald Aubrey Fessenden (1866-1932) (1999), 61, being Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, Held at Philadelphia For Promoting Useful Knowledge, Vol. 86, Pt. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Converse (8)  |  Distance (161)  |  Fear (197)  |  Future (429)  |  Genius (284)  |  Illumination (15)  |  Land (115)  |  Men (20)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Past (337)  |  Present (619)  |  Sail (36)  |  Sailor (16)

Histories make men wise; poets, witty; the mathematics, subtle; natural philosophy, deep; moral, grave; logic and rhetoric, able to contend.
'L. Of Studies,' Essays (1597). In Francis Bacon and Basil Montagu, The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England (1852), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Grave (52)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Moral (195)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Rhetoric (12)  |  Science (3879)  |  Wise (131)

How mysterious this life was, how deep and muddy its waters ran, yet how clear and noble what emerged from them.
Narcissus and Goldmund. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 23
Science quotes on:  |  Clear (100)  |  Emerge (22)  |  Life (1795)  |  Muddy (3)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Noble (90)  |  Run (174)  |  Water (481)

How strange is the lot of us mortals! Each of us is here for a brief sojourn; for what purpose he knows not, though he sometimes thinks he senses it. But without deeper reflection one knows from daily life that one exists for other people–first of all for those upon whose smiles and well-being our own happiness is wholly dependent, and then for the many, unknown to us, to whose destinies we are bound by the ties of sympathy. A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Base (117)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bind (25)  |  Bound (119)  |  Brief (36)  |  Daily (87)  |  Daily Life (17)  |  Dead (59)  |  Dependent (24)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Exert (39)  |  Exist (443)  |  First (1283)  |  Give In (3)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Inner (71)  |  Know (1518)  |  Labor (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Lot (151)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Must (1526)  |  Myself (212)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  People (1005)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Receive (114)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Remind (13)  |  Same (157)  |  Sense (770)  |  Smile (31)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Still (613)  |  Strange (157)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tie (38)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Well-Being (5)  |  Wholly (88)

Husserl has shown that man’s prejudices go a great deal deeper than his intellect or his emotions. Consciousness itself is “prejudiced”—that is to say, intentional.
In Introduction to the New Existentialism (1966), 54.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Deal (188)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Great (1574)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intentional (4)  |  Man (2251)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Say (984)

I am of the decided opinion, that mathematical instruction must have for its first aim a deep penetration and complete command of abstract mathematical theory together with a clear insight into the structure of the system, and doubt not that the instruction which accomplishes this is valuable and interesting even if it neglects practical applications. If the instruction sharpens the understanding, if it arouses the scientific interest, whether mathematical or philosophical, if finally it calls into life an esthetic feeling for the beauty of a scientific edifice, the instruction will take on an ethical value as well, provided that with the interest it awakens also the impulse toward scientific activity. I contend, therefore, that even without reference to its applications mathematics in the high schools has a value equal to that of the other subjects of instruction.
In 'Ueber das Lehrziel im mathemalischen Unterricht der höheren Realanstalten', Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung, 2, 192. (The Annual Report of the German Mathematical Association. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Activity (210)  |  Aim (165)  |  Application (242)  |  Arouse (12)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Call (769)  |  Clear (100)  |  Command (58)  |  Complete (204)  |  Contend (6)  |  Decide (41)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Edifice (26)  |  Equal (83)  |  Esthetic (3)  |  Ethical (34)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Finally (26)  |  First (1283)  |  High (362)  |  High School (11)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Insight (102)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Must (1526)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Practical (200)  |  Provide (69)  |  Reference (33)  |  School (219)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Structure (344)  |  Subject (521)  |  System (537)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Theory (970)  |  Together (387)  |  Toward (45)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)

I do not believe that a real understanding of the nature of elementary particles can ever be achieved without a simultaneous deeper understanding of the nature of spacetime itself.
From 'Structure of Spacetime', in Cécile DeWitt-Morette and John Archibald Wheeler (eds.), Battelles Rencontres: Lectures in Mathematics and Physics (1968), 122.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Belief (578)  |  Do (1908)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Particle (194)  |  Real (149)  |  Simultaneous (22)  |  Spacetime (4)  |  Understanding (513)

I had a feeling of exhilaration that the 'gadget' had gone off properly followed by one of deep relief. I wouldn't have to go to the tower to see what had gone wrong.
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (1975)
Science quotes on:  |  Exhilaration (6)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Follow (378)  |  Relief (30)  |  See (1081)  |  Tower (42)  |  Wrong (234)

I have before mentioned mathematics, wherein algebra gives new helps and views to the understanding. If I propose these it is not to make every man a thorough mathematician or deep algebraist; but yet I think the study of them is of infinite use even to grown men; first by experimentally convincing them, that to make anyone reason well, it is not enough to have parts wherewith he is satisfied, and that serve him well enough in his ordinary course. A man in those studies will see, that however good he may think his understanding, yet in many things, and those very visible, it may fail him. This would take off that presumption that most men have of themselves in this part; and they would not be so apt to think their minds wanted no helps to enlarge them, that there could be nothing added to the acuteness and penetration of their understanding.
In The Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Acuteness (3)  |  Add (40)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Apt (9)  |  Convince (41)  |  Course (409)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Enough (340)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fail (185)  |  First (1283)  |  Good (889)  |  Grow (238)  |  Help (105)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mention (82)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Part (222)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Presumption (15)  |  Propose (23)  |  Reason (744)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  See (1081)  |  Serve (59)  |  Study (653)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Use (766)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  View (488)  |  Visible (84)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)

I have deep faith that the principle of the universe will be beautiful and simple.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Faith (203)  |  Principle (507)  |  Simple (406)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

I have known silence: the cold earthy silence at the bottom of a newly dug well; the implacable stony silence of a deep cave; the hot, drugged midday silence when everything is hypnotised and stilled into silence by the eye of the sun;… I have heard summer cicadas cry so that the sound seems stitched into your bones. I have heard tree frogs in an orchestration as complicated as Bach singing in a forest lit by a million emerald fireflies. I have heard the Keas calling over grey glaciers that groaned to themselves like old people as they inched their way to the sea. I have heard the hoarse street vendor cries of the mating Fur seals as they sang to their sleek golden wives, the crisp staccato admonishment of the Rattlesnake, the cobweb squeak of the Bat and the belling roar of the Red deer knee-deep in purple heather.
Letter to Lee McGeorge (31 Jul 1978). Collected in Letters of Note: Volume 2: An Eclectic Collection of Correspondence (2016), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Bach (7)  |  Bat (10)  |  Bone (95)  |  Cave (15)  |  Cicada (3)  |  Cobweb (6)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Cry (29)  |  Deer (9)  |  Everything (476)  |  Eye (419)  |  Firefly (7)  |  Forest (150)  |  Frog (38)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Golden (45)  |  Groan (5)  |  Hot (60)  |  Implacable (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Midday (4)  |  Old (481)  |  Orchestration (2)  |  People (1005)  |  Rattlesnake (2)  |  Roar (5)  |  Sea (308)  |  Seal (18)  |  Silence (56)  |  Sing (26)  |  Singing (19)  |  Sound (183)  |  Squeak (2)  |  Staccato (2)  |  Still (613)  |  Summer (54)  |  Sun (385)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Tree (246)  |  Tree Frog (2)  |  Way (1217)

I have mentioned mathematics as a way to settle in the mind a habit of reasoning closely and in train; not that I think it necessary that all men should be deep mathematicians, but that, having got the way of reasoning which that study necessarily brings the mind to, they might be able to transfer it to other parts of knowledge, as they shall have occasion. For in all sorts of reasoning, every single argument should be managed as a mathematical demonstration; the connection and dependence of ideas should be followed till the mind is brought to the source on which it bottoms, and observes the coherence all along; …
In The Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 7.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Bring (90)  |  Closely (12)  |  Coherence (13)  |  Connection (162)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Follow (378)  |  Habit (168)  |  Idea (843)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Manage (23)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mention (82)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Observe (168)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Settle (19)  |  Single (353)  |  Sort (49)  |  Source (93)  |  Study (653)  |  Think (1086)  |  Train (114)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Way (1217)

I like a deep and difficult investigation when I happen to have made it easy to myself, if not to all others; and there is a spirit of gambling in this, whether, as by the cast of a die, a calculation è perte de vue shall bring out a beautiful and perfect result or shall be wholly thrown away. Scientific investigations are a sort of warfare carried on in the closet or on the couch against all one's contemporaries and predecessors; I have often gained a signal victory when I have been half asleep, but more frequently have found, upon being thoroughly awake, that the enemy had still the advantage of me, when I thought I had him fast in a corner, and all this you see keeps me alive.
Letter to Hudson Gurney, quoted in George Peacock, The Life of Thomas Young (1855), 239.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Against (332)  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Asleep (3)  |  Awake (19)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Being (1278)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Cast (66)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Corner (57)  |  Couch (2)  |  Dice (21)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Gain (145)  |  Happen (274)  |  Investigation (230)  |  More (2559)  |  Myself (212)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Result (677)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Signal (27)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Still (613)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Thought (953)  |  Throw Away (4)  |  Victory (39)  |  Warfare (11)  |  Wholly (88)

I never could do anything with figures, never had any talent for mathematics, never accomplished anything in my efforts at that rugged study, and to-day the only mathematics I know is multiplication, and the minute I get away up in that, as soon as I reach nine times seven— [He lapsed into deep thought, trying to figure nine times seven. Mr. McKelway whispered the answer to him.] I’ve got it now. It’s eighty-four. Well, I can get that far all right with a little hesitation. After that I am uncertain, and I can’t manage a statistic.
Speech at the New York Association for Promoting the Interests of the Blind (29 Mar 1906). In Mark Twain and William Dean Howells (ed.), Mark Twain’s Speeches? (1910), 323.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effort (227)  |  Figure (160)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Manage (23)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Minute (125)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Reach (281)  |  Right (452)  |  Rugged (7)  |  Soon (186)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Study (653)  |  Talent (94)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trying (144)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Whisper (11)

I recognize that many physicists are smarter than I am—most of them theoretical physicists. A lot of smart people have gone into theoretical physics, therefore the field is extremely competitive. I console myself with the thought that although they may be smarter and may be deeper thinkers than I am, I have broader interests than they have.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Broad (27)  |  Competitive (8)  |  Console (2)  |  Extremely (16)  |  Field (364)  |  Interest (386)  |  Lot (151)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  People (1005)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Smart (26)  |  Theoretical Physicist (19)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Thought (953)

I should rejoice to see … Euclid honourably shelved or buried “deeper than did ever plummet sound” out of the schoolboys’ reach; morphology introduced into the elements of algebra; projection, correlation, and motion accepted as aids to geometry; the mind of the student quickened and elevated and his faith awakened by early initiation into the ruling ideas of polarity, continuity, infinity, and familiarization with the doctrines of the imaginary and inconceivable.
From Presidential Address (1869) to the British Association, Exeter, Section A, collected in Collected Mathematical Papers of Lames Joseph Sylvester (1908), Vol. 2, 657. Also in George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 93. [Note: “plummet sound” refers to ocean depth measurement (sound) from a ship using a line dropped with a weight (plummet). —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Aid (97)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Bury (16)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Early (185)  |  Element (310)  |  Elevate (12)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Faith (203)  |  Familiarization (2)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imaginary (16)  |  Inconceivable (12)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Initiation (7)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Morphology (22)  |  Motion (310)  |  Plummet (2)  |  Polarity (5)  |  Projection (5)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rejoice (11)  |  Rule (294)  |  Schoolboy (9)  |  See (1081)  |  Shelve (2)  |  Sound (183)  |  Student (300)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)

I tell my students, with a feeling of pride that I hope they will share, that the carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen that make up ninety-nine per cent of our living substance were cooked in the deep interiors of earlier generations of dying stars. Gathered up from the ends of the universe, over billions of years, eventually they came to form, in part, the substance of our sun, its planets, and ourselves. Three billion years ago, life arose upon the earth. It is the only life in the solar system.
From speech given at an anti-war teach-in at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, (4 Mar 1969) 'A Generation in Search of a Future', as edited by Ron Dorfman for Chicago Journalism Review, (May 1969).
Science quotes on:  |  Billion (95)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Cooking (11)  |  Death (388)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Gather (72)  |  Generation (242)  |  Hope (299)  |  Interior (32)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Planet (356)  |  Pride (78)  |  Share (75)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Student (300)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sun (385)  |  System (537)  |  Tell (340)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

I think we are beginning to suspect that man is not a tiny cog that doesn’t really make much difference to the running of the huge machine but rather that there is a much more intimate tie between man and the universe than we heretofore suspected. … [Consider if] the particles and their properties are not somehow related to making man possible. Man, the start of the analysis, man, the end of the analysis—because the physical world is, in some deep sense, tied to the human being.
In The Intellectual Digest (Jun 1973), as quoted and cited in Mark Chandos, 'Philosophical Essay: Story Theory", Kosmoautikon: Exodus From Sapiens (2015).
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cog (7)  |  Consider (416)  |  Difference (337)  |  End (590)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Intimate (15)  |  Machine (257)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Particle (194)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical World (28)  |  Possible (552)  |  Property (168)  |  Running (61)  |  Sense (770)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Start (221)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tie (38)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Universe (857)  |  World (1774)

I took a good clear piece of Cork and with a Pen-knife sharpen'd as keen as a Razor, I cut a piece of it off, and thereby left the surface of it exceeding smooth, then examining it very diligently with a Microscope, me thought I could perceive it to appear a little porous; but I could not so plainly distinguish them, as to be sure that they were pores, much less what Figure they were of: But judging from the lightness and yielding quality of the Cork, that certainly the texture could not be so curious, but that possibly, if I could use some further diligence, I might find it to be discernable with a Microscope, I with the same sharp Penknife, cut off from the former smooth surface an exceeding thin piece of it with a deep plano-convex Glass, I could exceedingly plainly perceive it to be all perforated and porous, much like a Honey-comb, but that the pores of it were not regular; yet it was not unlike a Honey-comb in these particulars.
First, in that it had a very little solid substance, in comparison of the empty cavity that was contain'd between, ... for the Interstitia or walls (as I may so call them) or partitions of those pores were neer as thin in proportion to their pores as those thin films of Wax in a Honey-comb (which enclose and constitute the sexangular cells) are to theirs.
Next, in that these pores, or cells, were not very deep, but constituted of a great many little Boxes, separated out of one continued long pore, by certain Diaphragms...
I no sooner discerned these (which were indeed the first microscopical pores I ever saw, and perhaps, that were ever seen, for I had not met with any Writer or Person, that had made any mention of them before this) but me thought I had with the discovery of them, presently hinted to me the true and intelligible reason of all the Phænomena of Cork.
Micrographia, or some Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies made by Magnifying Glasses with Observations and Inquiries thereupon (1665), 112-6.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Cavity (8)  |  Cell (138)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Convex (6)  |  Cork (2)  |  Curious (91)  |  Cut (114)  |  Diligence (20)  |  Discern (33)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Empty (80)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Former (137)  |  Glass (92)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hint (21)  |  Honey (15)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Knife (23)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Mention (82)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Next (236)  |  Pen (20)  |  Person (363)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Quality (135)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regular (46)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Solid (116)  |  Substance (248)  |  Surface (209)  |  Thought (953)  |  Use (766)  |  Wall (67)  |  Wax (13)  |  Writer (86)

I wanted to be a scientist from my earliest school days. The crystallizing moment came when I first caught on that stars are mighty suns, and how staggeringly far away they must be to appear to us as mere points of light. I’m not sure I even knew the word science then, but I was gripped by the prospect of understanding how things work, of helping to uncover deep mysteries, of exploring new worlds.
In 'With Science on Our Side', Washington Post (9 Jan 1994).
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Biography (240)  |  Earliest (3)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Far (154)  |  First (1283)  |  Light (607)  |  Mere (84)  |  Moment (253)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mystery (177)  |  New (1216)  |  Point (580)  |  Prospect (30)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Staggering (2)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Want (497)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

I was sitting in a chair in the patent office at Bern when all of a sudden a thought occurred to me: “If a person falls freely he will not feel his own weight.” I was startled. This simple thought made a deep impression on me. It impelled me toward a theory of gravitation.
Lecture in Japan (1922). The quote is footnoted in Michael White, John Gribbin, Einstein: a Life in Science (1995), 128, saying the talk is known as the 'Kyoto address', reported in J. Ishiwara, Einstein Koen-Roku (1977).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Chair (24)  |  Fall (230)  |  Falling (6)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Free (232)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Impelling (2)  |  Impression (114)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Office (71)  |  Patent (33)  |  Patent Office (3)  |  Person (363)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Startling (15)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Gravitation (6)  |  Thought (953)  |  Weight (134)  |  Will (2355)

I've known rivers:
I've known rivers ancient as the world and older than the flow of human blood in human veins.
My soul has grown deep like the rivers.
The Negro Speaks of Rivers (1926).
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Blood (134)  |  Depth (94)  |  Flow (83)  |  Human (1468)  |  Known (454)  |  Old (481)  |  River (119)  |  Soul (226)  |  Vein (25)  |  World (1774)

If it were possible for us to have so deep an insight into a man's character as shown both in inner and in outer actions, that every, even the least, incentive to these actions and all external occasions which affect them were so known to us that his future conduct could be predicted with as great a certainty as the occurrence of a solar or lunar eclipse, we could nevertheless still assert that the man is free.
Critique of Practical Reason (1788). In L. W. Beck (ed. & trans.), Critique of Practical Reason and Other Writings in Moral Philosophy (1949), 204-5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Assert (66)  |  Both (493)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Character (243)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Eclipse (23)  |  Free (232)  |  Future (429)  |  Great (1574)  |  Incentive (9)  |  Inner (71)  |  Insight (102)  |  Known (454)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Possible (552)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Still (613)

If others would but reflect on mathematical truths as deeply and as continuously as I have, they would make my discoveries.
As quoted, without citation, in Eric Temple Bell, Men of Mathematics (1945), 254.
Science quotes on:  |  Continuous (82)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Truth (1057)

If the Weismann idea triumphs, it will be in a sense a triumph of fatalism; for, according to it, while we may indefinitely improve the forces of our education and surroundings, and this civilizing nurture will improve the individuals of each generation, its actual effects will not be cumulative as regards the race itself, but only as regards the environment of the race; each new generation must start de novo, receiving no increment of the moral and intellectual advance made during the lifetime of its predecessors. It would follow that one deep, almost instinctive motive for a higher life would be removed if the race were only superficially benefited by its nurture, and the only possible channel of actual improvement were in the selection of the fittest chains of race plasma.
'The Present Problem of Heredity', The Atlantic Monthly (1891), 57, 363.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Actual (117)  |  Advance (280)  |  Advancement (62)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Chain (50)  |  Channel (21)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Cumulative (14)  |  Education (378)  |  Effect (393)  |  Environment (216)  |  Fatalism (2)  |  Fit (134)  |  Follow (378)  |  Force (487)  |  Generation (242)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Idea (843)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Increment (2)  |  Indefinitely (10)  |  Individual (404)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lifetime (31)  |  Moral (195)  |  Motive (59)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Nurture (16)  |  Plasma (8)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Race (268)  |  Regard (305)  |  Removal (11)  |  Selection (128)  |  Sense (770)  |  Start (221)  |  Superficial (12)  |  Surrounding (13)  |  Triumph (73)  |  August Weismann (11)  |  Will (2355)

If there had been a computer in 1872 it would have predicted that by now there would be so many horse-drawn vehicles that the entire surface of the earth would be ten feet deep in horse manure.
Karl Kapp
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Computer (127)  |  Earth (996)  |  Entire (47)  |  Foot (60)  |  Horse (74)  |  Manure (8)  |  Predict (79)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Vehicle (11)

If there were some deep principle that drove organic systems towards living systems, the operation of the principle should easily be demonstrable in a test tube in half a morning. Needless to say, no such demonstration has ever been given. Nothing happens when organic materials are subjected to the usual prescription of showers of electrical sparks or drenched in ultraviolet light, except the eventual production of a tarry sludge.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Drench (2)  |  Drive (55)  |  Easily (35)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Eventual (9)  |  Give (202)  |  Half (56)  |  Happen (274)  |  Light (607)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Material (353)  |  Morning (94)  |  Needless (4)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Operation (213)  |  Organic (158)  |  Prescription (18)  |  Principle (507)  |  Production (183)  |  Say (984)  |  Shower (6)  |  Sludge (3)  |  Spark (31)  |  Subject (521)  |  System (537)  |  Test (211)  |  Test Tube (12)  |  Ultraviolet (2)

In biology, nothing is clear, everything is too complicated, everything is a mess, and just when you think you understand something, you peel off a layer and find deeper complications beneath. Nature is anything but simple.
The Hot Zone
Science quotes on:  |  Beneath (64)  |  Biology (216)  |  Clear (100)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Complication (29)  |  Everything (476)  |  Find (998)  |  Layer (40)  |  Mess (13)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Peel (5)  |  Simple (406)  |  Something (719)  |  Think (1086)  |  Understand (606)

In my first publication I might have claimed that I had come to the conclusion, as a result of serious study of the literature and deep thought, that valuable antibacterial substances were made by moulds and that I set out to investigate the problem. That would have been untrue and I preferred to tell the truth that penicillin started as a chance observation. My only merit is that I did not neglect the observation and that I pursued the subject as a bacteriologist. My publication in 1929 was the starting-point of the work of others who developed penicillin especially in the chemical field.
'Penicillin', Nobel Lecture, 11 Dec 1945. In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1942-1962 (1964), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Bacteriologist (5)  |  Bacteriology (5)  |  Chance (239)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Claim (146)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Develop (268)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Literature (103)  |  Merit (50)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Penicillin (17)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Publication (101)  |  Result (677)  |  Serious (91)  |  Set (394)  |  Start (221)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Substance (248)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Untrue (12)  |  Work (1351)

In our concern for the whooping crane we are at once symbolizing and concealing a far deeper anxiety—namely, the prospective total extermination of all species.
In My Works and Days: A Personal Chronicle (1979), 452.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Conceal (18)  |  Concern (228)  |  Extermination (14)  |  Far (154)  |  Namely (11)  |  Prospective (7)  |  Species (401)  |  Symbolize (8)  |  Total (94)  |  Whooping Crane (2)

In the beginning God created Heaven and Earth … Which beginning of time, according to our Cronologie, fell upon the entrance of the night preceding the twenty third day of Octob. in the year of the Julian Calendar, 710 [or 4004 B.C.]. Upon the first day therefore of the world, or Octob. 23. being our Sunday, God, together with the highest Heaven, created the Angels. Then having finished, as it were, the roofe of this building, he fell in hand with the foundation of this wonderfull Fabrick of the World, he fashioned this lowermost Globe, consisting of the Deep, and of the Earth; all the Quire of Angels singing together and magnifying his name therefore … And when the Earth was void and without forme, and darknesse covered the face of the Deepe, on the very middle of the first day, the light was created; which God severing from the darknesses, called the one day, and the other night.
In 'Annals of the Old Testament', The Annals of the World (1658), excerpted in Louis A. Ruprecht, God Gardened East: A Gardener's Meditation on the Dynamics of Genesis (2008), 53-54.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Angel (44)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Building (156)  |  Calendar (9)  |  Call (769)  |  Creation (327)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Day (42)  |  Earth (996)  |  Entrance (15)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Face (212)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Finish (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Globe (47)  |  God (757)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Light (607)  |  Magnifying (2)  |  Name (333)  |  Night (120)  |  October (4)  |  Other (2236)  |  Roof (13)  |  Singing (19)  |  Sunday (7)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Void (31)  |  Wonder (236)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

In the beginning God created the heaven and earth. And the earth was waste and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep: and the spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. … God said, “Let there be a vault in the waters to divide the waters in two.” And so it was. God made the vault, and it divided the waters above the vault from the waters under the vault. God called the vault “heaven.”
Bible
Genesis 1:1 in The Holy Bible Containing the Old and New Testaments Translated Out of the Original Tongues. Printed for the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge (1895), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (305)  |  Call (769)  |  Creation (327)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Divide (75)  |  Divided (50)  |  Earth (996)  |  Face (212)  |  God (757)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Two (937)  |  Void (31)  |  Waste (101)  |  Water (481)

It appears to be law that you cannot have a deep sympathy with both man and nature.
Journal entry (11 Apr 1852).
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Both (493)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Sympathy (30)

It has the property of detonating very violently in certain circumstances. On one occasion a small amount of ether solution of pyroglycerin condensed in a glass bowl. ... When the bowl was heated over a spirit lamp, an extremely violent explosion occurred, which shattered it into small fragments. On another occasion a drop was heated in a test-tube, and exploded with such violence that the glass splinters cut deep into my face and hands, and hurt other people who were standing some distance off in the room.
[Describing early experiments on his discovery of nitroglycerin.]
From speech to the Royal Academy of Turin (1847). In Robert Shaplen, 'Annals of Science, Adventures of a Pacifist,' The New Yorker (15 Mar 1958), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Amount (151)  |  Certain (550)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Cut (114)  |  Detonation (2)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distance (161)  |  Drop (76)  |  Early (185)  |  Ether (35)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Exploded (11)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Explosive (23)  |  Face (212)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Glass (92)  |  Heat (174)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Property (168)  |  Shattered (8)  |  Small (477)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Test (211)  |  Test Tube (12)  |  Violence (34)

It is a curious and painful fact that almost all the completely futile treatments that have been believed in during the long history of medical folly have been such as caused acute suffering to the patient. When anesthetics were discovered, pious people considered them an attempt to evade the will of God. It was pointed out, however, that when God extracted Adam's rib He put him into a deep sleep. This proved that anesthetics are all right for men; women, however, ought to suffer, because of the curse of Eve.
In An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish (1943), 13.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acute (7)  |  Adam And Eve (4)  |  All (4108)  |  Anesthetic (3)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Completely (135)  |  Consider (416)  |  Curious (91)  |  Curse (17)  |  Discover (553)  |  Extract (40)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Folly (43)  |  Futile (11)  |  God (757)  |  History (673)  |  Long (790)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Pain (136)  |  Patient (199)  |  People (1005)  |  Pious (4)  |  Point (580)  |  Rib (6)  |  Right (452)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Will (2355)

It is a profound and necessary truth that the deep things in science are not found because they are useful; they are found because it was possible to find them.
Epigraph in Richard Rhodes, The Making of the Atomic Bomb (1986), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Find (998)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Possible (552)  |  Profound (104)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Useful (250)

It is curious to observe with what different degrees of architectonic skill Providence has endowed birds of the same genus, and so nearly correspondent in their general mode of life! for while the swallow and the house-martin discover the greatest address in raising and securely fixing crusts or shells of loam as cunabula for their young, the bank-martin terebrates a round and regular hole in the sand or earth, which is serpentine, horizontal, and about two feet deep. At the inner end of this burrow does this bird deposit, in a good degree of safety, her rude nest, consisting of fine grasses and feathers, usually goose-feathers, very inartificially laid together.
In Letter to Daines Barrington, (26 Feb 1774), in The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne (1789), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Bank (31)  |  Bird (149)  |  Crust (38)  |  Curious (91)  |  Degree (276)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Feather (12)  |  General (511)  |  Genus (25)  |  Good (889)  |  Goose (12)  |  Grass (46)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Horizontal (9)  |  House (140)  |  Inner (71)  |  Life (1795)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Nest (23)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Providence (18)  |  Regular (46)  |  Safety (54)  |  Sand (62)  |  Shell (63)  |  Skill (109)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Usually (176)  |  Young (227)

It is exceptional that one should be able to acquire the understanding of a process without having previously acquired a deep familiarity with running it, with using it, before one has assimilated it in an instinctive and empirical way. Thus any discussion of the nature of intellectual effort in any field is difficult, unless it presupposes an easy, routine familiarity with that field. In mathematics this limitation becomes very severe.
In 'The Mathematician', Works of the Mind (1947), 1, No. 1. Collected in James Roy Newman (ed.), The World of Mathematics (1956), Vol. 4, 2053.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Assimilate (9)  |  Become (815)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effort (227)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Exceptional (18)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Field (364)  |  Instinctive (4)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Presuppose (15)  |  Previously (11)  |  Process (423)  |  Routine (25)  |  Running (61)  |  Severe (16)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Way (1217)

It is in the exploration of this vast deep-sea region that the finest field for submarine discovery yet remains.
In The Natural History of the European Seas (1859), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Deep Sea (10)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Field (364)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Marine Biology (24)  |  Remain (349)  |  Sea (308)  |  Submarine (12)  |  Vast (177)

It is necessary that a surgeon should have a temperate and moderate disposition. That he should have well-formed hands, long slender fingers, a strong body, not inclined to tremble and with all his members trained to the capable fulfilment of the wishes of his mind. He should be of deep intelligence and of a simple, humble, brave, but not audacious disposition. He should be well grounded in natural science, and should know not only medicine but every part of philosophy; should know logic well, so as to be able to understand what is written, to talk properly, and to support what he has to say by good reasons.
Chirurgia Magna (1296, printed 1479), as translated by James Joseph Walsh in Old-Time Makers of Medicine (1911), 261.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Body (537)  |  Brave (12)  |  Capable (168)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Form (959)  |  Good (889)  |  Ground (217)  |  Humble (50)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Know (1518)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Reason (744)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Strong (174)  |  Support (147)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Train (114)  |  Understand (606)

It is only at the beginning of the age of the dinosaurs that the deep sea, hitherto bare of organisms, was finally invaded by life.
(1965). In Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 136.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Bare (33)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Deep Sea (10)  |  Dinosaur (26)  |  Life (1795)  |  Marine Biology (24)  |  Organism (220)  |  Sea (308)

It is therefore easy to see why the churches have always fought science and persecuted its devotees. On the other hand, I maintain that the cosmic religious feeling is the strongest and noblest motive for scientific research. Only those who realize the immense efforts and, above all, the devotion without which pioneer work in theoretical science cannot be achieved are able to grasp the strength of the emotion out of which alone such work, remote as it is from the immediate realities of life, can issue. What a deep conviction of the rationality of the universe and what a yearning to understand, were it but a feeble reflection of the mind revealed in this world, Kepler and Newton must have had to enable them to spend years of solitary labor in disentangling the principles of celestial mechanics! Those whose acquaintance with scientific research is derived chiefly from its practical results easily develop a completely false notion of the mentality of the men who, surrounded by a skeptical world, have shown the way to kindred spirits scattered wide through the world and through the centuries. Only one who has devoted his life to similar ends can have a vivid realization of what has inspired these men and given them the strength to remain true to their purpose in spite of countless failures. It is cosmic religious feeling that gives a man such strength. A contemporary has said, not unjustly, that in this materialistic age of ours the serious scientific workers are the only profoundly religious people.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Celestial Mechanics (4)  |  Century (310)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Church (56)  |  Completely (135)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Countless (36)  |  Derive (65)  |  Develop (268)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Disentangle (4)  |  Easily (35)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effort (227)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Enable (119)  |  End (590)  |  Failure (161)  |  False (100)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fight (44)  |  Give (202)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Issue (42)  |  Kepler (4)  |  Kindred (12)  |  Labor (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Man (2251)  |  Materialistic (2)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mentality (5)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motive (59)  |  Must (1526)  |  Newton (10)  |  Nobl (4)  |  Notion (113)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ours (4)  |  People (1005)  |  Persecute (4)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Practical (200)  |  Principle (507)  |  Profoundly (13)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Reality (261)  |  Realization (43)  |  Realize (147)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Religious (126)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remote (83)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Say (984)  |  Scatter (6)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Serious (91)  |  Show (346)  |  Similar (36)  |  Skeptical (20)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spite (55)  |  Strength (126)  |  Strong (174)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Surround (30)  |  Theoretical Science (4)  |  Through (849)  |  True (212)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unjustly (2)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Wide (96)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worker (31)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)  |  Yearn (12)  |  Yearning (12)

It is with theories as with wells: you may see to the bottom of the deepest if there be any water there, while another shall pass for wondrous profound when ‘tis merely shallow, dark, and empty.
As quoted, citing only the author, in 'New Publications: Dr. Wigan', The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal (Oct 1844), 80, 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Bottom (33)  |  Dark (140)  |  Empty (80)  |  Merely (316)  |  Pass (238)  |  Profound (104)  |  See (1081)  |  Shallow (8)  |  Theory (970)  |  Water (481)  |  Wondrous (21)

It seems a miracle that young children easily learn the language of any environment into which they were born. The generative approach to grammar, pioneered by Chomsky, argues that this is only explicable if certain deep, universal features of this competence are innate characteristics of the human brain. Biologically speaking, this hypothesis of an inheritable capability to learn any language means that it must somehow be encoded in the DNA of our chromosomes. Should this hypothesis one day be verified, then lingusitics would become a branch of biology.
'The Generative Grammar of the Immune System', Nobel Lecture, 8 Dec 1984. In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1981-1990 (1993), 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (108)  |  Become (815)  |  Biology (216)  |  Birth (147)  |  Brain (270)  |  Branch (150)  |  Capability (41)  |  Certain (550)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Avram Noam Chomsky (7)  |  Chromosome (23)  |  Chromosomes (17)  |  Competence (11)  |  DNA (77)  |  Environment (216)  |  Grammar (14)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Innate (14)  |  Language (293)  |  Learn (629)  |  Linguistics (30)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Must (1526)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Universal (189)  |  Young (227)

It seems to me that the poet has only to perceive that which others do not perceive, to look deeper than others look. And the mathematician must do the same thing.
In a letter to Madame Schabelskoy, quoted in Sónya Kovalévsky: Her Recollections of Childhood, translated by Isabel F. Hapgood (1895), 317.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Look (582)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perception (97)  |  Poet (83)  |  Thing (1915)

It turns out that an eerie type of chaos can lurk just behind a façade of order—and yet, deep inside the chaos lurks an even eerier type of order.
Metamagical Themas: Questing for the Essence of Mind and Pattern (1985, 1996), 299.
Science quotes on:  |  Behind (137)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Facade (2)  |  Order (632)  |  Turn (447)  |  Type (167)

J. J. Sylvester was an enthusiastic supporter of reform [in the teaching of geometry]. The difference in attitude on this question between the two foremost British mathematicians, J. J. Sylvester, the algebraist, and Arthur Cayley, the algebraist and geometer, was grotesque. Sylvester wished to bury Euclid “deeper than e’er plummet sounded” out of the schoolboy’s reach; Cayley, an ardent admirer of Euclid, desired the retention of Simson’s Euclid. When reminded that this treatise was a mixture of Euclid and Simson, Cayley suggested striking out Simson’s additions and keeping strictly to the original treatise.
In History of Elementary Mathematics (1910), 285.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Addition (66)  |  Admirer (9)  |  Ardent (6)  |  Attitude (82)  |  British (41)  |  Bury (16)  |  Arthur Cayley (17)  |  Desire (204)  |  Difference (337)  |  Enthusiastic (6)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Foremost (11)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Grotesque (6)  |  Keep (101)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Original (58)  |  Plummet (2)  |  Question (621)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reform (22)  |  Remind (13)  |  Retention (5)  |  Schoolboy (9)  |  Sound (183)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Strike (68)  |  Striking (48)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Supporter (4)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Two (937)  |  Wish (212)

Jupiter is the largest of all the solar system’s planets, more than ten times bigger and three hundred times as massive as Earth. Jupiter is so immense it could swallow all the other planets easily. Its Great Red Spot, a storm that has raged for centuries, is itself wider than Earth. And the Spot is merely one feature visible among the innumerable vortexes and streams of Jupiter’s frenetically racing cloud tops. Yet Jupiter is composed mainly of the lightest elements, hydrogen and helium, more like a star than a planet. All that size and mass, yet Jupiter spins on its axis in less than ten hours, so fast that the planet is clearly not spherical: Its poles are noticeably flattened. Jupiter looks like a big, colorfully striped beach ball that’s squashed down as if some invisible child were sitting on it. Spinning that fast, Jupiter’s deep, deep atmosphere is swirled into bands and ribbons of multihued clouds: pale yellow, saffron orange, white, tawny yellow-brown, dark brown, bluish, pink and red. Titanic winds push the clouds across the face of Jupiter at hundreds of kilometers per hour.
Ben Bova
Jupiter
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Across (32)  |  All (4108)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Axis (9)  |  Ball (62)  |  Band (9)  |  Beach (21)  |  Big (48)  |  Brown (23)  |  Century (310)  |  Child (307)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Compose (17)  |  Dark (140)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easily (35)  |  Element (310)  |  Face (212)  |  Fast (45)  |  Feature (44)  |  Great (1574)  |  Helium (11)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Hundreds (6)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Immense (86)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Jupiter (26)  |  Kilometer (10)  |  Large (394)  |  Largest (39)  |  Less (103)  |  Light (607)  |  Look (582)  |  Mainly (9)  |  Mass (157)  |  Massive (9)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Orange (14)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pale (9)  |  Pink (4)  |  Planet (356)  |  Pole (46)  |  Push (62)  |  Race (268)  |  Rage (9)  |  Red (35)  |  Ribbon (2)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Size (60)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Solar Systems (3)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Spin (26)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Spot (17)  |  Squash (4)  |  Star (427)  |  Storm (51)  |  Stream (81)  |  Stripe (4)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Swirl (10)  |  System (537)  |  Tawny (3)  |  Time (1877)  |  Titanic (4)  |  Top (96)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vortex (9)  |  White (127)  |  Wide (96)  |  Wind (128)  |  Yellow (30)

Just a rock, a dome of snow, the deep blue sky, and a hunk of orange-painted metal from which a shredded American flag cracked in the wind. Nothing more. Except two tiny figures walking together those last few feet to the top of the Earth.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  American (46)  |  Blue (56)  |  Crack (15)  |  Dome (8)  |  Earth (996)  |  Figure (160)  |  Flag (11)  |  Foot (60)  |  Last (426)  |  Metal (84)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Orange (14)  |  Rock (161)  |  Shred (7)  |  Sky (161)  |  Snow (37)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Together (387)  |  Top (96)  |  Two (937)  |  Walk (124)  |  Wind (128)

Just as the musician is able to form an acoustic image of a composition which he has never heard played by merely looking at its score, so the equation of a curve, which he has never seen, furnishes the mathematician with a complete picture of its course. Yea, even more: as the score frequently reveals to the musician niceties which would escape his ear because of the complication and rapid change of the auditory impressions, so the insight which the mathematician gains from the equation of a curve is much deeper than that which is brought about by a mere inspection of the curve.
In Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereiningung, 13, 864. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 190
Science quotes on:  |  Acoustic (3)  |  Auditory (2)  |  Change (593)  |  Complete (204)  |  Complication (29)  |  Composition (84)  |  Course (409)  |  Curve (49)  |  Ear (68)  |  Equation (132)  |  Escape (80)  |  Form (959)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Gain (145)  |  Hear (139)  |  Image (96)  |  Impression (114)  |  Insight (102)  |  Inspection (7)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Mere (84)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Musician (21)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nice (13)  |  Picture (143)  |  Play (112)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Score (8)

Lavoisier was right in the deepest, almost holy, way. His passion harnessed feeling to the service of reason; another kind of passion was the price. Reason cannot save us and can even persecute us in the wrong hands; but we have no hope of salvation without reason. The world is too complex, too intransigent; we cannot bend it to our simple will.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bend (12)  |  Complex (188)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Hand (143)  |  Harness (23)  |  Holy (34)  |  Hope (299)  |  Kind (557)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  Passion (114)  |  Persecute (4)  |  Price (51)  |  Reason (744)  |  Right (452)  |  Salvation (11)  |  Save (118)  |  Service (110)  |  Simple (406)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Wrong (234)

Learn to reverence night and to put away the vulgar fear of it, for, with the banishment of night from the experience of man, there vanishes as well a religious emotion, a poetic mood, which gives depth to the adventure of humanity. By day, space is one with the earth and with man - it is his sun that is shining, his clouds that are floating past; at night, space is his no more. When the great earth, abandoning day, rolls up the deeps of the heavens and the universe, a new door opens for the human spirit, and there are few so clownish that some awareness of the mystery of being does not touch them as they gaze. For a moment of night we have a glimpse of ourselves and of our world islanded in its stream of stars - pilgrims of mortality, voyaging between horizons across eternal seas of space and time. Fugitive though the instant be, the spirit of man is, during it, ennobled by a genuine moment of emotional dignity, and poetry makes its own both the human spirit and experience.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Across (32)  |  Adventure (56)  |  Awareness (36)  |  Banishment (3)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Clown (2)  |  Depth (94)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Door (93)  |  Earth (996)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Ennoble (8)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fear (197)  |  Float (30)  |  Fugitive (3)  |  Gaze (21)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Give (202)  |  Glimpse (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Spirit (12)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Instant (45)  |  Island (46)  |  Learn (629)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moment (253)  |  Mood (13)  |  More (2559)  |  Mortality (15)  |  Mystery (177)  |  New (1216)  |  Night (120)  |  Open (274)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Past (337)  |  Pilgrim (4)  |  Poetic (7)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Religious (126)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Roll (40)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shine (45)  |  Shining (35)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stream (81)  |  Sun (385)  |  Time (1877)  |  Touch (141)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vanish (18)  |  Voyage (11)  |  Vulgar (33)  |  World (1774)

Little can be understood of even the simplest phenomena of nature without some knowledge of mathematics, and the attempt to penetrate deeper into the mysteries of nature compels simultaneous development of the mathematical processes.
In Teaching of Mathematics in the Elementary and the Secondary School (1906), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Compel (30)  |  Development (422)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Process (423)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simultaneous (22)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)

Littlewood, on Hardy’s own estimate, is the finest mathematician he has ever known. He was the man most likely to storm and smash a really deep and formidable problem; there was no one else who could command such a combination of insight, technique and power.
(1943). In Béla Bollobás, Littlewood's Miscellany (1986), Foreward, 22.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Biography (240)  |  Combination (144)  |  Command (58)  |  Estimate (57)  |  G. H. Hardy (71)  |  Insight (102)  |  Known (454)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Most (1731)  |  Power (746)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proof (287)  |  Smash (4)  |  Storm (51)  |  Technique (80)

Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Everything (476)  |  Look (582)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Understand (606)  |  Will (2355)

Looking through the telescope, one saw a circle of deep blue and the little round planet swimming in the field. It seemed such a little thing, so bright and small and still, faintly marked with transverse stripes, and slightly flattened from the perfect round. But so little it was, so silvery warm—a pin’s-head of light! It was as if it quivered, but really this was the telescope vibrating with the activity of the clockwork that kept the planet in view.
As I watched, the planet seemed to grow larger and smaller and to advance and recede, but that was simply that my eye was tired. Forty millions of miles it was from us—more than forty millions of miles of void. Few people realise the immensity of vacancy in which the dust of the material universe swims.
The War of the Worlds (1898), editted by Frank D. McConnell (1977), 128.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Activity (210)  |  Advance (280)  |  Bright (79)  |  Circle (110)  |  Dust (64)  |  Eye (419)  |  Field (364)  |  Grow (238)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Looking (189)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mars (44)  |  Material (353)  |  More (2559)  |  People (1005)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Pin (18)  |  Planet (356)  |  Recede (11)  |  Saw (160)  |  Small (477)  |  Still (613)  |  Swim (30)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Universe (857)  |  View (488)  |  Void (31)  |  Warm (69)  |  Watch (109)

Magic and all that is ascribed to it is a deep presentiment of the powers of science. The shoes of swiftness, the sword of sharpness, the power of subduing the elements, of using the secret virtues of minerals, of understanding the voices of birds, are the obscure efforts of the mind in a right direction.
From 'History', collected in The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1903), 34.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bird (149)  |  Direction (175)  |  Effort (227)  |  Element (310)  |  Magic (86)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Power (746)  |  Presentiment (2)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Secret (194)  |  Sharpness (8)  |  Shoe (11)  |  Swiftness (4)  |  Sword (15)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Using (6)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Voice (52)

Mathematicians create by acts of insight and intuition. Logic then sanctions the conquests of intuition. It is the hygiene that mathematics practices to keep its ideas healthy and strong. Moreover, the whole structure rests fundamentally on uncertain ground, the intuition of humans. Here and there an intuition is scooped out and replaced by a firmly built pillar of thought; however, this pillar is based on some deeper, perhaps less clearly defined, intuition. Though the process of replacing intuitions with precise thoughts does not change the nature of the ground on which mathematics ultimately rests, it does add strength and height to the structure.
In Mathematics in Western Culture (1964), 408.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Add (40)  |  Base (117)  |  Build (204)  |  Change (593)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Conquest (28)  |  Create (235)  |  Define (49)  |  Firmly (6)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Ground (217)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Height (32)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hygiene (12)  |  Idea (843)  |  Insight (102)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Keep (101)  |  Less (103)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Moreover (3)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Pillar (9)  |  Practice (204)  |  Precise (68)  |  Process (423)  |  Replace (31)  |  Rest (280)  |  Sanction (7)  |  Strength (126)  |  Strong (174)  |  Structure (344)  |  Thought (953)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Whole (738)

Millions of our race are now supported by lands situated where deep seas once prevailed in earlier ages. In many districts not yet occupied by man, land animals and forests now abound where the anchor once sank into the oozy bottom.
Principles of Geology (1837), Vol. 1, 237.
Science quotes on:  |  Abound (17)  |  Age (499)  |  Anchor (10)  |  Animal (617)  |  Deep Sea (10)  |  Forest (150)  |  Geology (220)  |  Land (115)  |  Man (2251)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Race (268)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Support (147)

Moreover, within the hollows of the earth,
When from one quarter the wind builds up, lunges,
Muscles the deep caves with its headstrong power,
The earth leans hard where the force of wind has pressed it;
Then above ground, the higher the house is built,
The nearer it rises to the sky, the worse
Will it lean that way and jut out perilously,
The beams wrenched loose and hanging ready to fall.
And to think, men can't believe that for this world
Some time of death and ruin lies in wait,
Yet they see so great a mass of earth collapse!
And the winds pause for breath—that's lucky, for else
No force could rein things galloping to destruction.
But since they pause for breath, to rally their force,
Come building up and then fall driven back,
More often the earth will threaten ruin than
Perform it. The earth will lean and then sway back,
Its wavering mass restored to the right poise.
That explains why all houses reel, top floor
Most then the middle, and ground floor hardly at all.
On the Nature of Things, trans. Anthony M. Esolen (1995), Book 6, lines 558-77, 216.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Beam (24)  |  Breath (59)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Cave (15)  |  Death (388)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Earth (996)  |  Earthquake (34)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fall (230)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hard (243)  |  House (140)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mass (157)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Perform (121)  |  Power (746)  |  Right (452)  |  Rise (166)  |  Ruin (42)  |  See (1081)  |  Sky (161)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Time (1877)  |  Top (96)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  World (1774)

My first view - a panorama of brilliant deep blue ocean, shot with shades of green and gray and white - was of atolls and clouds. Close to the window I could see that this Pacific scene in motion was rimmed by the great curved limb of the Earth. It had a thin halo of blue held close, and beyond, black space. I held my breath, but something was missing - I felt strangely unfulfilled. Here was a tremendous visual spectacle, but viewed in silence. There was no grand musical accompaniment; no triumphant, inspired sonata or symphony. Each one of us must write the music of this sphere for ourselves.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Black (42)  |  Blue (56)  |  Breath (59)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Close (69)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Curve (49)  |  Earth (996)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Grand (27)  |  Gray (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Green (63)  |  Halo (7)  |  Hold (95)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Limb (8)  |  Miss (51)  |  Missing (21)  |  Motion (310)  |  Music (129)  |  Musical (10)  |  Must (1526)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Pacific (2)  |  Panorama (5)  |  Rim (5)  |  Scene (36)  |  See (1081)  |  Shade (31)  |  Shoot (19)  |  Silence (56)  |  Something (719)  |  Sonata (2)  |  Space (500)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Strangely (5)  |  Symphony (9)  |  Thin (16)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Triumphant (10)  |  Unfulfilled (3)  |  View (488)  |  Visual (15)  |  White (127)  |  Window (58)  |  Write (230)

My Opinion is this—that deep Thinking is attainable only by a man of deep Feeling, and that all Truth is a species of Revelation. The more I understand of Sir Isaac Newton’s works, the more boldly I dare utter to my own mind … that I believe the Souls of 500 Sir Isaac Newtons would go to the making up of a Shakspere [sic] or a Milton… Mind in his system is always passive—a lazy Looker-on on an external World. If the mind be not passive, if it be indeed made in God's Image, & that too in the sublimest sense—the image of the Creator—there is ground for suspicion, that any system built on the passiveness of the mind must be false, as a system.
Letter to Thomas Poole, 23 March 1801. In Earl Leslie Griggs (ed.), The Collected Letters of Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1956), Vol. 2, 709.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Creator (91)  |  Dare (50)  |  Feeling (250)  |  God (757)  |  Ground (217)  |  Image (96)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Sense (770)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  Soul (226)  |  Species (401)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  System (537)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Nature seems to take advantage of the simple mathematical representations of the symmetry laws. When one pauses to consider the elegance and the beautiful perfection of the mathematical reasoning involved and contrast it with the complex and far-reaching physical consequences, a deep sense of respect for the power of the symmetry laws never fails to develop.
Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1957). In Nobel Lectures: Physics, 1981-1990) (1998), 394-395.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Complex (188)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Develop (268)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Fail (185)  |  Involved (90)  |  Law (894)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Physical (508)  |  Power (746)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Representation (53)  |  Respect (207)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Symmetry (43)

Nature vibrates with rhythms, climatic and diastrophic, those finding stratigraphic expression ranging in period from the rapid oscillation of surface waters, recorded in ripple-mark, to those long-deferred stirrings of the deep imprisoned titans which have divided earth history into periods and eras. The flight of time is measured by the weaving of composite rhythms- day and night, calm and storm, summer and winter, birth and death such as these are sensed in the brief life of man. But the career of the earth recedes into a remoteness against which these lesser cycles are as unavailing for the measurement of that abyss of time as would be for human history the beating of an insect's wing. We must seek out, then, the nature of those longer rhythms whose very existence was unknown until man by the light of science sought to understand the earth. The larger of these must be measured in terms of the smaller, and the smaller must be measured in terms of years.
'Rhythm and the Measurement of Geologic Time', Bulletin of the Geological Society of America, 1917, 28,746.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abyss (29)  |  Against (332)  |  Birth (147)  |  Brief (36)  |  Calm (31)  |  Career (75)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Death (388)  |  Divided (50)  |  Earth (996)  |  Era (51)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expression (175)  |  Flight (98)  |  Geology (220)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imprison (10)  |  Insect (77)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Oscillation (13)  |  Period (198)  |  Recede (11)  |  Record (154)  |  Remoteness (9)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Ripple (9)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Storm (51)  |  Summer (54)  |  Surface (209)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Vibrate (7)  |  Water (481)  |  Weaving (5)  |  Wing (75)  |  Winter (44)  |  Year (933)

Never leave an unsolved difficulty behind. I mean, don’t go any further in that book till the difficulty is conquered. In this point, Mathematics differs entirely from most other subjects. Suppose you are reading an Italian book, and come to a hopelessly obscure sentence—don’t waste too much time on it, skip it, and go on; you will do very well without it. But if you skip a mathematical difficulty, it is sure to crop up again: you will find some other proof depending on it, and you will only get deeper and deeper into the mud.
From letter to Edith Rix with hints for studying (about Mar 1885), in Stuart Dodgson Collingwood, The Life and Letters of Lewis Carroll (1898), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Behind (137)  |  Book (392)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Crop (25)  |  Depend (228)  |  Differ (85)  |  Difference (337)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Do (1908)  |  Find (998)  |  Hopeless (16)  |  Italian (12)  |  Learning (274)  |  Leave (130)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mud (26)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Proof (287)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Skip (4)  |  Studying (70)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unsolved (15)  |  Waste (101)  |  Will (2355)

No more harmful nonsense exists than the common supposition that deepest insight into great questions about the meaning of life or the structure of reality emerges most readily when a free, undisciplined, and uncluttered (read, rather, ignorant and uneducated) mind soars above mere earthly knowledge and concern.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Common (436)  |  Concern (228)  |  Earthly (8)  |  Emerge (22)  |  Exist (443)  |  Free (232)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harmful (12)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Insight (102)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Question (621)  |  Read (287)  |  Readily (10)  |  Reality (261)  |  Soar (23)  |  Structure (344)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Undisciplined (2)  |  Uneducated (9)

Non-standard analysis frequently simplifies substantially the proofs, not only of elementary theorems, but also of deep results. This is true, e.g., also for the proof of the existence of invariant subspaces for compact operators, disregarding the improvement of the result; and it is true in an even higher degree in other cases. This state of affairs should prevent a rather common misinterpretation of non-standard analysis, namely the idea that it is some kind of extravagance or fad of mathematical logicians. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Rather, there are good reasons to believe that non-standard analysis, in some version or other, will be the analysis of the future.
In 'Remark on Non-standard Analysis' (1974), in S. Feferman (ed.), Kurt Gödel Collected Works: Publications 1938-1974 (1990), Vol. 2, 311.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Common (436)  |  Compact (13)  |  Degree (276)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fad (10)  |  Farther (51)  |  Future (429)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Invariant (10)  |  Kind (557)  |  Logician (17)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Proof (287)  |  Reason (744)  |  Result (677)  |  State (491)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)

Not greatly moved with awe am I
To learn that we may spy
Five thousand firmaments beyond our own.
The best that's known
Of the heavenly bodies does them credit small.
View'd close, the Moon's fair ball
Is of ill objects worst,
A corpse in Night's highway, naked, fire-scarr'd, accurst;
And now they tell
That the Sun is plainly seen to boil and burst
Too horribly for hell.
So, judging from these two,
As we must do,
The Universe, outside our living Earth,
Was all conceiv'd in the Creator's mirth,
Forecasting at the time Man's spirit deep,
To make dirt cheap.
Put by the Telescope!
Better without it man may see,
Stretch'd awful in the hush'd midnight,
The ghost of his eternity.
'The Two Deserts' (1880-85). Poems, Introduction Basil Champneys (1906), 302.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Awe (43)  |  Ball (62)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Boil (23)  |  Burst (39)  |  Cheap (11)  |  Conception (154)  |  Corpse (6)  |  Creator (91)  |  Dirt (15)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Fire (189)  |  Firmament (18)  |  Forecast (13)  |  Ghost (36)  |  Hell (32)  |  Highway (13)  |  Horrible (10)  |  Judge (108)  |  Known (454)  |  Learn (629)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Midnight (11)  |  Moon (237)  |  Must (1526)  |  Naked (10)  |  Night (120)  |  Object (422)  |  Outside (141)  |  Poem (96)  |  Scar (7)  |  See (1081)  |  Small (477)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spy (8)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Sun (385)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  View (488)  |  Worst (57)

Not in the ground of need, not in bent and painful toil, but in the deep-centred play-instinct of the world, in the joyous mood of the eternal Being, which is always young, science has her origin and root; and her spirit, which is the spirit of genius in moments of elevation, is but a sublimated form of play, the austere and lofty analogue of the kitten playing with the entangled skein or of the eaglet sporting with the mountain winds.
In Mathematics (1907), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogue (7)  |  Austere (7)  |  Being (1278)  |  Eagle (19)  |  Elevation (13)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Form (959)  |  Genius (284)  |  Ground (217)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Joy (107)  |  Lofty (13)  |  Moment (253)  |  Mood (13)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Need (290)  |  Origin (239)  |  Painful (11)  |  Play (112)  |  Playing (42)  |  Root (120)  |  Science (3879)  |  Skein (2)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Sublimate (4)  |  Tangle (6)  |  Toil (25)  |  Wind (128)  |  World (1774)  |  Young (227)

Nothing is really small; whoever is open to the deep penetration of nature knows this.
Victor Hugo and Charles E. Wilbour (trans.), Les Misérables (1862), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Open (274)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Small (477)  |  Whoever (42)

Nothing is rich but the inexhaustible wealth of nature. She shows us only surfaces, but she is a million fathoms deep.
In 'Resources', Letters and Social Aims (1875, 1894), 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Depth (94)  |  Fathom (15)  |  Inexhaustible (24)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Show (346)  |  Surface (209)  |  Wealth (94)

Nuclear energy and foreign policy cannot coexist on the planet. The more deep the secret, the greater the determination of every nation to discover and exploit it. Nuclear energy insists on global government, on law, on order, and on the willingness of the community to take the responsibility for the acts of the individual. And to what end? Why, for liberty, first of blessings. Soldier, we await you, and if the
In 'The Talk of the Town', The New Yorker (18 Aug 1945), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Blessing (24)  |  Blessings (16)  |  Coexist (4)  |  Community (104)  |  Determination (78)  |  Discover (553)  |  End (590)  |  Energy (344)  |  Exploit (19)  |  First (1283)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Global (35)  |  Government (110)  |  Greater (288)  |  Individual (404)  |  Insist (20)  |  Law (894)  |  More (2559)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Energy (15)  |  Order (632)  |  Planet (356)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Secret (194)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Why (491)  |  Willingness (10)

Objective conscience is the function of a normal being; the representative of God in the essence. Buried so deeply that it remains relatively indestructible.
In On Love & Psychological Exercises: With Some Aphorisms & Other Essays (1998), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Bury (16)  |  Conscience (50)  |  Essence (82)  |  Function (228)  |  God (757)  |  Indestructible (12)  |  Normal (28)  |  Objective (91)  |  Relative (39)  |  Remain (349)  |  Representative (14)

October 9, 1863
Always, however great the height of the balloon, when I have seen the horizon it has roughly appeared to be on the level of the car though of course the dip of the horizon is a very appreciable quantity or the same height as the eye. From this one might infer that, could the earth be seen without a cloud or anything to obscure it, and the boundary line of the plane approximately the same height as the eye, the general appearance would be that of a slight concavity; but I have never seen any part of the surface of the earth other than as a plane.
Towns and cities, when viewed from the balloon are like models in motion. I shall always remember the ascent of 9th October, 1863, when we passed over London about sunset. At the time when we were 7,000 feet high, and directly over London Bridge, the scene around was one that cannot probably be equalled in the world. We were still so low as not to have lost sight of the details of the spectacle which presented itself to our eyes; and with one glance the homes of 3,000,000 people could be seen, and so distinct was the view, that every large building was easily distinguishable. In fact, the whole of London was visible, and some parts most clearly. All round, the suburbs were also very distinct, with their lines of detached villas, imbedded as it were in a mass of shrubs; beyond, the country was like a garden, its fields, well marked, becoming smaller and smaller as the eye wandered farther and farther away.
Again looking down, there was the Thames, throughout its whole length, without the slightest mist, dotted over its winding course with innumerable ships and steamboats, like moving toys. Gravesend was visible, also the mouth of the Thames, and the coast around as far as Norfolk. The southern shore of the mouth of the Thames was not so clear, but the sea beyond was seen for many miles; when at a higher elevation, I looked for the coast of France, but was unable to see it. On looking round, the eye was arrested by the garden-like appearance of the county of Kent, till again London claimed yet more careful attention.
Smoke, thin and blue, was curling from it, and slowly moving away in beautiful curves, from all except one part, south of the Thames, where it was less blue and seemed more dense, till the cause became evident; it was mixed with mist rising from the ground, the southern limit of which was bounded by an even line, doubtless indicating the meeting of the subsoils of gravel and clay. The whole scene was surmounted by a canopy of blue, everywhere free from cloud, except near the horizon, where a band of cumulus and stratus extended all round, forming a fitting boundary to such a glorious view.
As seen from the earth, the sunset this evening was described as fine, the air being clear and the shadows well defined; but, as we rose to view it and its effects, the golden hues increased in intensity; their richness decreased as the distance from the sun increased, both right and left; but still as far as 90º from the sun, rose-coloured clouds extended. The remainder of the circle was completed, for the most part, by pure white cumulus of well-rounded and symmetrical forms.
I have seen London by night. I have crossed it during the day at the height of four miles. I have often admired the splendour of sky scenery, but never have I seen anything which surpassed this spectacle. The roar of the town heard at this elevation was a deep, rich, continuous sound the voice of labour. At four miles above London, all was hushed; no sound reached our ears.
Travels in the Air (1871), 99-100.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Attention (190)  |  Balloon (15)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Both (493)  |  Bound (119)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Building (156)  |  Canopy (6)  |  Car (71)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circle (110)  |  Claim (146)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Completed (30)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Country (251)  |  Course (409)  |  Curve (49)  |  Detail (146)  |  Distance (161)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Down (456)  |  Ear (68)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Elevation (13)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Evident (91)  |  Extend (128)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Farther (51)  |  Field (364)  |  Flight (98)  |  Form (959)  |  Forming (42)  |  Free (232)  |  Garden (60)  |  General (511)  |  Glance (34)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Golden (45)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  High (362)  |  Home (170)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Labour (98)  |  Large (394)  |  Limit (280)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Low (80)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mist (14)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  People (1005)  |  Present (619)  |  Pure (291)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Reach (281)  |  Remainder (7)  |  Remember (179)  |  Right (452)  |  Rising (44)  |  Rose (34)  |  Scene (36)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Ship (62)  |  Shrub (5)  |  Sight (132)  |  Sky (161)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Sound (183)  |  South (38)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Splendour (8)  |  Steamboat (6)  |  Still (613)  |  Suburb (6)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunset (26)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Thames (6)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Toy (19)  |  View (488)  |  Visible (84)  |  Wander (35)  |  White (127)  |  Whole (738)  |  Winding (8)  |  World (1774)

Of all obstacles to a thoroughly penetrating account of existence, none looms up more dismayingly than “time.” Explain time? Not without explaining existence. Explain existence? Not without explaining time. To uncover the deep and hidden connection between time and existence, to close on itself our quartet of questions, is a task for the future.
In article, 'Hermann Weyl and the Unity of Knowledge', American Scientist (Jul-Aug 1986), 74, 372. In the online pdf on the website weylmann.com, p. 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Connection (162)  |  Dismay (5)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explain (322)  |  Future (429)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Loom (20)  |  More (2559)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Question (621)  |  Task (147)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Time (1877)  |  Uncover (20)

Old King Coal was a merry old soul:
“I’ll move the world,” quoth he;
“My England’s high, and rich, and great,
But greater she shall be !”
And he call’d for the pick, and he call’d for the spade,
And he call’d for his miners bold;
“ And it’s dig,” he said, “in the deep, deep earth;
You’ll find my treasures better worth
Than mines of Indian gold!”

Old King Coal was a merry old soul,
Yet not content was he;
And he said, “I’ve found what I’ve desired,
Though ’tis but one of three.”
And he call’d for water, he call’d for fire,
For smiths and workmen true:
“Come, build me engines great and strong ;
We’ll have,” quoth he, “a change ere long;
We’ll try what Steam can do.”

Old King Coal was a merry old soul:
“’Tis fairly done,” quoth he,
When he saw the myriad wheels at work
O’er all the land and sea.
They spared the bones and strength of men,
They hammer’d, wove, and spun;
There was nought too great, too mean, or small,
The giant Steam had power for all;—
His task was never done.
From song, 'Old King Coal' (1846), collected in The Poetical Works of Charles Mackay: Now for the First Time Collected Complete in One Volume (1876), 565. To the melody of 'Old King Cole'.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Better (486)  |  Blacksmith (5)  |  Bold (22)  |  Bone (95)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Coal (57)  |  Dig (21)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Engine (98)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  Giant (67)  |  Gold (97)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hammer (25)  |  High (362)  |  Indian (27)  |  Industrial Revolution (10)  |  Long (790)  |  Loom (20)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mine (76)  |  Miner (9)  |  Move (216)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Never (1087)  |  Old (481)  |  Pick (16)  |  Power (746)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sea (308)  |  Small (477)  |  Soul (226)  |  Spade (3)  |  Steam (80)  |  Strength (126)  |  Strong (174)  |  Task (147)  |  Transport (30)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Try (283)  |  Water (481)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Work (1351)  |  Workman (13)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

One of the grandest figures that ever frequented Eastern Yorkshire was William Smith, the distinguished Father of English Geology. My boyish reminiscence of the old engineer, as he sketched a triangle on the flags of our yard, and taught me how to measure it, is very vivid. The drab knee-breeches and grey worsted stockings, the deep waistcoat, with its pockets well furnished with snuff—of which ample quantities continually disappeared within the finely chiselled nostril—and the dark coat with its rounded outline and somewhat quakerish cut, are all clearly present to my memory.
From Reminiscences of a Yorkshire Naturalist (1896), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Biography (240)  |  Coat (5)  |  Cut (114)  |  Dark (140)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Engineer (121)  |  English (35)  |  Father (110)  |  Figure (160)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Geology (220)  |  Grandest (10)  |  Grey (10)  |  Measure (232)  |  Memory (134)  |  Nostril (4)  |  Old (481)  |  Outline (11)  |  Pocket (11)  |  Present (619)  |  Quaker (2)  |  Reminiscence (4)  |  Sketch (8)  |  William Smith (5)  |  Snuff (2)  |  Teach (277)  |  Triangle (18)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Worst (57)  |  Yorkshire (2)

One of the most curious and interesting reptiles which I met with in Borneo was a large tree-frog, which was brought me by one of the Chinese workmen. He assured me that he had seen it come down in a slanting direction from a high tree, as if it flew. On examining it, I found the toes very long and fully webbed to their very extremity, so that when expanded they offered a surface much larger than the body. The forelegs were also bordered by a membrane, and the body was capable of considerable inflation. The back and limbs were of a very deep shining green colour, the undersurface and the inner toes yellow, while the webs were black, rayed with yellow. The body was about four inches long, while the webs of each hind foot, when fully expanded, covered a surface of four square inches, and the webs of all the feet together about twelve square inches. As the extremities of the toes have dilated discs for adhesion, showing the creature to be a true tree frog, it is difficult to imagine that this immense membrane of the toes can be for the purpose of swimming only, and the account of the Chinaman, that it flew down from the tree, becomes more credible. This is, I believe, the first instance known of a “flying frog,” and it is very interesting to Darwinians as showing that the variability of the toes which have been already modified for purposes of swimming and adhesive climbing, have been taken advantage of to enable an allied species to pass through the air like the flying lizard. It would appear to be a new species of the genus Rhacophorus, which consists of several frogs of a much smaller size than this, and having the webs of the toes less developed.
Malay Archipelago
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Adhesion (6)  |  Adhesive (2)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Ally (6)  |  Already (222)  |  Appear (118)  |  Assure (15)  |  Back (390)  |  Become (815)  |  Belief (578)  |  Black (42)  |  Body (537)  |  Border (9)  |  Borneo (3)  |  Bring (90)  |  Capable (168)  |  Chinese (22)  |  Climb (35)  |  Color (137)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Consist (223)  |  Cover (37)  |  Creature (233)  |  Credible (3)  |  Curious (91)  |  Darwinian (9)  |  Develop (268)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direction (175)  |  Disk (3)  |  Down (456)  |  Enable (119)  |  Examine (78)  |  Expand (53)  |  Extremity (7)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Foot (60)  |  Frog (38)  |  Fully (21)  |  Genus (25)  |  Green (63)  |  High (362)  |  Hind (3)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inch (9)  |  Inflation (5)  |  Inner (71)  |  Instance (33)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Large (394)  |  Less (103)  |  Limb (8)  |  Lizard (7)  |  Long (790)  |  Meet (31)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Modify (15)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Offer (141)  |  Pass (238)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Ray (114)  |  Reptile (29)  |  See (1081)  |  Several (32)  |  Shine (45)  |  Shining (35)  |  Show (346)  |  Size (60)  |  Small (477)  |  Species (401)  |  Square (70)  |  Surface (209)  |  Swim (30)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Through (849)  |  Toe (7)  |  Together (387)  |  Tree (246)  |  Tree Frog (2)  |  True (212)  |  Underside (2)  |  Variability (5)  |  Web (16)  |  Workman (13)  |  Yellow (30)

Our abiding belief is that just as the workmen in the tunnel of St. Gothard, working from either end, met at last to shake hands in the very central root of the mountain, so students of nature and students of Christianity will yet join hands in the unity of reason and faith, in the heart of their deepest mysteries.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abide (12)  |  Belief (578)  |  Central (80)  |  Christianity (11)  |  End (590)  |  Faith (203)  |  Hand (143)  |  Heart (229)  |  Join (26)  |  Last (426)  |  Meet (31)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Reason (744)  |  Root (120)  |  Shake (41)  |  St (2)  |  Student (300)  |  Tunnel (13)  |  Unity (78)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Workman (13)

Our earth is very old, an old warrior that has lived through many battles. Nevertheless, the face of it is still changing, and science sees no certain limit of time for its stately evolution. Our solid earth, apparently so stable, inert, and finished, is changing, mobile, and still evolving. Its major quakings are largely the echoes of that divine far-off event, the building of our noble mountains. The lava floods and intriguing volcanoes tell us of the plasticity, mobility, of the deep interior of the globe. The slow coming and going of ancient shallow seas on the continental plateaus tell us of the rhythmic distortion of the deep interior-deep-seated flow and changes of volume. Mountain chains prove the earth’s solid crust itself to be mobile in high degree. And the secret of it all—the secret of the earthquake, the secret of the “temple of fire,” the secret of the ocean basin, the secret of the highland—is in the heart of the earth, forever invisible to human eyes.
In Our Mobile Earth (1926), 320.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Building (156)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Coming (114)  |  Crust (38)  |  Degree (276)  |  Distortion (13)  |  Divine (112)  |  Earth (996)  |  Earthquake (34)  |  Event (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  Face (212)  |  Finish (59)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flood (50)  |  Flow (83)  |  Forever (103)  |  Heart (229)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Inert (14)  |  Interior (32)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Lava (9)  |  Limit (280)  |  Lithosphere (2)  |  Magma (3)  |  Major (84)  |  Mobility (11)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Noble (90)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Old (481)  |  Plasticity (7)  |  Prove (250)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Secret (194)  |  See (1081)  |  Slow (101)  |  Solid (116)  |  Stable (30)  |  Stately (12)  |  Still (613)  |  Tell (340)  |  Temple (42)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Volcano (39)

Ploughing deep, your recipe for killing weeds, is also the recipe for almost every good thing in farming. … We now plough horizontally following the curvatures of the hills and hollows, on the dead level, however crooked the lines may be. Every furrow thus acts as a reservoir to receive and retain the waters, all of which go to the benefit of the growing plant, instead of running off into streams … In point of beauty nothing can exceed that of the waving lines and rows winding along the face of the hills and vallies.
In letter (17 Apr 1813) from Jefferson at Monticello to Charles Willson Peale. Collected in The Jefferson Papers: 1770-1826 (1900), 178-180.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Crooked (3)  |  Curvature (8)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Face (212)  |  Farming (8)  |  Following (16)  |  Furrow (4)  |  Good (889)  |  Growing (98)  |  Hill (20)  |  Hollow (4)  |  Horizontal (9)  |  Killing (14)  |  Level (67)  |  Line (91)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Plant (294)  |  Plough (13)  |  Ploughing (3)  |  Point (580)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recipe (7)  |  Reservoir (7)  |  Retain (56)  |  Row (9)  |  Running (61)  |  Stream (81)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Valley (32)  |  Water (481)  |  Water Conservation (3)  |  Weed (18)  |  Winding (8)

Pure mathematics is, in its way, the poetry of logical ideas. One seeks the most general ideas of operation which will bring together in simple, logical and unified form the largest possible circle of formal relationships. In this effort toward logical beauty spiritual formulas are discovered necessary for the deeper penetration into the laws of nature.
In letter (1 May 1935), Letters to the Editor, 'The Late Emmy Noether: Professor Einstein Writes in Appreciation of a Fellow-Mathematician', New York Times (4 May 1935), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Circle (110)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Effort (227)  |  Form (959)  |  Formula (98)  |  General (511)  |  Idea (843)  |  Largest (39)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Operation (213)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Possible (552)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Seek (213)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Simple (406)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Together (387)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Reach high, for stars lie hidden in your soul. Dream deep, for every dream precedes the goal.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Dream (208)  |  Goal (145)  |  Hide (69)  |  High (362)  |  Lie (364)  |  Precede (23)  |  Reach (281)  |  Soul (226)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)

Reality is never skin-deep. The true nature of the earth and its full wealth of hidden treasures cannot be argued from the visible rocks, the rocks upon which we live and out of which we make our living. The face of the earth, with its upstanding continents and depressed ocean-deeps, its vast ornament of plateau and mountain-chain, is molded by structure and process in hidden depths.
Science quotes on:  |  Continent (76)  |  Deep Sea (10)  |  Depressed (2)  |  Depth (94)  |  Earth (996)  |  Face (212)  |  Geology (220)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Mold (33)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Ornament (20)  |  Plateau (6)  |  Process (423)  |  Reality (261)  |  Rock (161)  |  Skin (47)  |  Structure (344)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Vast (177)  |  Visible (84)  |  Wealth (94)

Religion and science ... constitute deep-rooted and ancient efforts to find richer experience and deeper meaning than are found in the ordinary biological and social satisfactions. As pointed out by Whitehead, religion and science have similar origins and are evolving toward similar goals. Both started from crude observations and fanciful concepts, meaningful only within a narrow range of conditions for the people who formulated them of their limited tribal experience. But progressively, continuously, and almost simultaneously, religious and scientific concepts are ridding themselves of their coarse and local components, reaching higher and higher levels of abstraction and purity. Both the myths of religion and the laws of science, it is now becoming apparent, are not so much descriptions of facts as symbolic expressions of cosmic truths.
'On Being Human,' A God Within, Scribner (1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Biological (137)  |  Both (493)  |  Coarse (4)  |  Component (48)  |  Concept (221)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Continuously (7)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Crude (31)  |  Description (84)  |  Effort (227)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Experience (467)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fanciful (6)  |  Find (998)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Goal (145)  |  High (362)  |  Law (894)  |  Level (67)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Local (19)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meaningful (17)  |  Myth (56)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Observation (555)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Origin (239)  |  People (1005)  |  Point (580)  |  Progressively (3)  |  Purity (14)  |  Range (99)  |  Reach (281)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Rich (62)  |  Rid (13)  |  Root (120)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Similar (36)  |  Simultaneous (22)  |  Social (252)  |  Start (221)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Toward (45)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Whitehead (2)

Religion is the antithesis of science; science is competent to illuminate all the deep questions of existence, and does so in a manner that makes full use of, and respects the human intellect. I see neither need nor sign of any future reconciliation.
In 'Religion - The Antithesis to Science', Chemistry & Industry (Feb 1997).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Antithesis (7)  |  Competent (20)  |  Existence (456)  |  Future (429)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Intellect (31)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Need (290)  |  Question (621)  |  Reconciliation (10)  |  Religion (361)  |  Respect (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  See (1081)  |  Sign (58)  |  Use (766)

Roll on, thou deep and dark blue ocean—roll!
In 'Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage', The Complete Works of Lord Byron: Reprinted from the Last London Edition (1841), CLXXIX, 146.
Science quotes on:  |  Blue (56)  |  Dark (140)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Roll (40)  |  Wave (107)

Science advances through tentative answers to a series of more and more subtle questions which reach deeper and deeper into the essence of natural phenomena.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Answer (366)  |  Essence (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Question (621)  |  Reach (281)  |  Science (3879)  |  Series (149)  |  Subtle (35)  |  Tentative (16)  |  Through (849)

Science cannot answer the deepest questions. As soon as you ask why is there something instead of nothing, you have gone beyond science.
As quoted in John Noble Wilford, 'Sizing up the Cosmos: An Astronomers Quest', New York Times (12 Mar 1991), C10.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Instead (21)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Something (719)  |  Soon (186)  |  Why (491)

Science has blown to atoms, as she can rend and rive in the rocks themselves; but in those rocks she has found, and read aloud, the great stone book which is the history of the earth, even when darkness sat upon the face of the deep. Along their craggy sides she has traced the footprints of birds and beasts, whose shapes were never seen by man. From within them she has brought the bones, and pieced together the skeletons, of monsters that would have crushed the noted dragons of the fables at a blow.
Book review of Robert Hunt, Poetry of Science (1848), in the London Examiner (1848). Although uncredited in print, biographers identified his authorship from his original handwritten work. Collected in Charles Dickens and Frederic George Kitton (ed.) Old Lamps for New Ones: And Other Sketches and Essays (1897), 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Beast (55)  |  Bird (149)  |  Blow (44)  |  Bone (95)  |  Book (392)  |  Crag (4)  |  Crush (18)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Dragon (5)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fable (12)  |  Face (212)  |  Footprint (15)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Man (2251)  |  Monster (31)  |  Never (1087)  |  Piece (38)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Rock (161)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shape (72)  |  Side (233)  |  Skeleton (22)  |  Stone (162)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Together (387)  |  Tracing (3)

Science has done much for us; but it is a poor science that would hide from us the great deep sacred infinitude of Nescience, on which all science swims as a mere superficial film.
In James Wood, Dictionary of Quotations from Ancient and Modern, English and Foreign Sources (1893), 382:31 .
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hide (69)  |  Poor (136)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Science (3879)  |  Swim (30)

Science has gone down into the mines and coal-pits, and before the safety-lamp the Gnomes and Genii of those dark regions have disappeared… Sirens, mermaids, shining cities glittering at the bottom of quiet seas and in deep lakes, exist no longer; but in their place, Science, their destroyer, shows us whole coasts of coral reef constructed by the labours of minute creatures; points to our own chalk cliffs and limestone rocks as made of the dust of myriads of generations of infinitesimal beings that have passed away; reduces the very element of water into its constituent airs, and re-creates it at her pleasure.
Book review of Robert Hunt, Poetry of Science (1848), in the London Examiner (1848). Although uncredited in print, biographers identified his authorship from his original handwritten work. Collected in Charles Dickens and Frederic George Kitton (ed.) Old Lamps for New Ones: And Other Sketches and Essays (1897), 86-87.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Chalk (8)  |  City (78)  |  Cliff (19)  |  Coal (57)  |  Coast (13)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Construct (124)  |  Constructing (3)  |  Coral (10)  |  Coral Reef (12)  |  Create (235)  |  Creature (233)  |  Dark (140)  |  Destroyer (4)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Down (456)  |  Dust (64)  |  Element (310)  |  Exist (443)  |  Generation (242)  |  Genius (284)  |  Glitter (8)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Labour (98)  |  Lake (32)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Limestone (6)  |  Mermaid (5)  |  Mine (76)  |  Minute (125)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Pass (238)  |  Pit (19)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Pointing (4)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reef (7)  |  Region (36)  |  Rock (161)  |  Safety (54)  |  Safety Lamp (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shining (35)  |  Show (346)  |  Siren (4)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)

Science is in a literal sense constructive of new facts. It has no fixed body of facts passively awaiting explanation, for successful theories allow the construction of new instruments—electron microscopes and deep space probes—and the exploration of phenomena that were beyond description—the behavior of transistors, recombinant DNA, and elementary particles, for example. This is a key point in the progressive nature of science—not only are there more elegant or accurate analyses of phenomena already known, but there is also extension of the range of phenomena that exist to be described and explained.
Co-author with Michael A. Arbib, English-born professor of computer science and biomedical engineering (1940-)
Michael A. Arbib and Mary B. Hesse, The Construction of Reality (1986), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Already (222)  |  Author (167)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Body (537)  |  Computer (127)  |  Computer Science (11)  |  Construction (112)  |  Constructive (14)  |  DNA (77)  |  Electron (93)  |  Electron Microscope (2)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Exist (443)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Extension (59)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Known (454)  |  Literal (11)  |  Microscope (80)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Particle (194)  |  Point (580)  |  Probe (12)  |  Professor (128)  |  Range (99)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Space (500)  |  Successful (123)  |  Theory (970)  |  Transistor (5)

Science makes people reach selflessly for truth and objectivity; it teaches people to accept reality, with wonder and admiration, not to mention the deep awe and joy that the natural order of things brings to the true scientist.
Lecture, Austrian UNESCO Commision (30 Mar 1953), in Atomenergie und Frieden: Lise Meitner und Otto Hahn (1953), 23-4. Trans. Ruth Sime, Lise Meitner: A Life in Physics (1996), 375.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Admiration (59)  |  Awe (43)  |  Joy (107)  |  Mention (82)  |  Natural (796)  |  Objectivity (16)  |  Order (632)  |  People (1005)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reality (261)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Teach (277)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Wonder (236)

Science through its physical technological consequences is now determining the relations which human beings, severally and in groups, sustain to one another. If it is incapable of developing moral techniques which will also determine those relations, the split in modern culture goes so deep that not only democracy but all civilized values are doomed.
In Freedom and Culture (1939).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Culture (143)  |  Democracy (33)  |  Determine (144)  |  Doom (32)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Modern (385)  |  Moral (195)  |  Physical (508)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Technique (80)  |  Technological (61)  |  Through (849)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)

Scientists are as gregarious a species as termites. If the lives of scientists are on the whole joyful, it is because our friendships are deep and lasting. Our friendships are lasting because we are engaged in a collective enterprise.
In From Eros to Gaia (1992), 197.
Science quotes on:  |  Collective (24)  |  Engage (39)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Friendship (18)  |  Gregarious (3)  |  Joy (107)  |  Lasting (7)  |  Live (628)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Species (401)  |  Termite (7)  |  Whole (738)

Scientists come in two varieties, hedgehogs and foxes. I borrow this terminology from Isaiah Berlin (1953), who borrowed it from the ancient Greek poet Archilochus. Archilochus told us that foxes know many tricks, hedgehogs only one. Foxes are broad, hedgehogs are deep. Foxes are interested in everything and move easily from one problem to another. Hedgehogs are only interested in a few problems that they consider fundamental, and stick with the same problems for years or decades. Most of the great discoveries are made by hedgehogs, most of the little discoveries by foxes. Science needs both hedgehogs and foxes for its healthy growth, hedgehogs to dig deep into the nature of things, foxes to explore the complicated details of our marvelous universe. Albert Einstein and Edwin Hubble were hedgehogs. Charley Townes, who invented the laser, and Enrico Fermi, who built the first nuclear reactor in Chicago, were foxes.
In 'The Future of Biotechnology', A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2007), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Archilochus (3)  |  Borrow (30)  |  Both (493)  |  Broad (27)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Complication (29)  |  Consider (416)  |  Decade (59)  |  Detail (146)  |  Dig (21)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Everything (476)  |  Enrico Fermi (19)  |  First (1283)  |  Fox (9)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greek (107)  |  Growth (187)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Hedgehog (4)  |  Edwin Powell Hubble (20)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invention (369)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laser (5)  |  Little (707)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Marvelous (29)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Things (29)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Problem (676)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Terminology (12)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Charles Townes (3)  |  Trick (35)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Variety (132)  |  Year (933)

See, thro' this air, this ocean, and this earth,
All matter quick, and bursting into birth.
Above, how high progressive life may go!
Around, how wide! how deep extend below!
Vast chain of being, which from God began,
Natures ethereal, human, angel, man,
Beast, bird, fish, insect! what no eye can see,
No glass can reach! from Infinite to thee,
From thee to Nothing—On superior pow'rs
Were we to press, inferior might on ours:
Or in the full creation leave a void,
Where, one step broken, the great scale's destroy'd:
From Nature's chain whatever link you strike,
Tenth or ten thousandth, breaks the chain alike.
'An Essay on Man' (1733-4), Epistle I. In John Butt (ed.), The Poems of Alexander Pope (1965), 513.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Angel (44)  |  Beast (55)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Below (24)  |  Bird (149)  |  Birth (147)  |  Break (99)  |  Broken (56)  |  Burst (39)  |  Chain (50)  |  Creation (327)  |  Depth (94)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Earth (996)  |  Ether (35)  |  Ethereal (8)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extension (59)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fish (120)  |  Glass (92)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Inferiority (7)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Insect (77)  |  Life (1795)  |  Link (43)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Might (3)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Power (746)  |  Press (21)  |  Progress (465)  |  Quickness (5)  |  Reach (281)  |  Scale (121)  |  See (1081)  |  Step (231)  |  Strike (68)  |  Superior (81)  |  Superiority (19)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vastness (15)  |  Void (31)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Wide (96)  |  Width (5)

Sir Isaac Newton, though so deep in algebra and fluxions, could not readily make up a common account: and, when he was Master of the Mint, used to get somebody else to make up his accounts for him.
As recalled and recorded in Joseph Spence and Edmund Malone (ed.) Anecdotes, Observations, and Characters of Books and Men (1858), 132.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Common (436)  |  Fluxion (7)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mint (4)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)

Skeptical scrutiny is the means, in both science and religion, by which deep insights can be winnowed from deep nonsense.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Insight (102)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scrutiny (15)  |  Skeptical (20)  |  Winnow (4)

So the Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall upon the man, and while he slept took one of his ribs and closed up its place with flesh; and the rib which the Lord God had taken from the man he made into a woman and brought her to the man.
Bible
(circa 725 B.C.)
Science quotes on:  |  Closed (38)  |  Fall (230)  |  God (757)  |  Lord (93)  |  Man (2251)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Rib (6)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Woman (151)

Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; other to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. Some books also may be read by deputy, and extracts made of them by others; but that would be only in the less important arguments, and the meaner sort of books; else distilled books are like common distilled waters, flashy things. Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit: and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets witty; the mathematics subtile; natural philosophy deep; moral grave; logic and rhetoric able to contend. Abeunt studia in mores. [The studies pass into the manners.]
'Of Studies' (1625) in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1887-1901), Vol. 6, 498.
Science quotes on:  |  Abeunt Studia In Mores (2)  |  Argument (138)  |  Attention (190)  |  Book (392)  |  Common (436)  |  Conference (17)  |  Cunning (16)  |  Diligence (20)  |  Extract (40)  |  Grave (52)  |  Great (1574)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Logic (287)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Memory (134)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Present (619)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Rhetoric (12)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Water (481)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Wise (131)  |  Wit (59)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

Speaking of libraries: A big open-stack academic or public library is no small pleasure to work in. You’re, say, trying to do a piece on something in Nevada, and you go down to C Floor, deep in the earth, and out to what a miner would call a remote working face. You find 10995.497S just where the card catalog and the online computer thought it would be, but that is only the initial nick. The book you knew about has led you to others you did not know about. To the ceiling the shelves are loaded with books about Nevada. You pull them down, one at a time, and sit on the floor and look them over until you are sitting on a pile five feet high, at which point you are late home for dinner and you get up and walk away. It’s an incomparable boon to research, all that; but it is also a reason why there are almost no large open-stack libraries left in the world.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Academic (18)  |  All (4108)  |  Big (48)  |  Book (392)  |  Boon (7)  |  C (3)  |  Call (769)  |  Card (4)  |  Catalog (5)  |  Ceiling (5)  |  Computer (127)  |  Dinner (15)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Face (212)  |  Find (998)  |  Five (16)  |  Floor (20)  |  Foot (60)  |  Get Up (5)  |  High (362)  |  Home (170)  |  Incomparable (12)  |  Initial (17)  |  Know (1518)  |  Large (394)  |  Late (118)  |  Lead (384)  |  Leave (130)  |  Library (48)  |  Load (11)  |  Look (582)  |  Miner (9)  |  Nick (2)  |  Online (4)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Piece (38)  |  Pile (12)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Public (96)  |  Pull (43)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remote (83)  |  Research (664)  |  Say (984)  |  Shelve (2)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Small (477)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Walk (124)  |  Why (491)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Standing now in diffused light, with the wind at my back, I experience suddenly a feeling of completeness–not a feeling of having achieved something or of being stronger than everyone who was ever here before, not a feeling of having arrived at the ultimate point, not a feeling of supremacy. Just a breath of happiness deep inside my mind and my breast. The summit seemed suddenly to me to be a refuge, and I had not expected to find any refuge up here. Looking at the steep, sharp ridges below us, I have the impression that to have come later would have been too late. Everything we now say to one another, we only say out of embarrassment. I don’t think anymore. As I pull the tape recorder, trancelike, from my rucksack, and switch it on wanting to record a few appropriate phrases, tears again well into my eyes. “Now we are on the summit of Everest,” I begin, “it is so cold that we cannot take photographs…” I cannot go on, I am immediately shaken with sobs. I can neither talk nor think, feeling only how this momentous experience changes everything. To reach only a few meters below the summit would have required the same amount of effort, the same anxiety and burden of sorrow, but a feeling like this, an eruption of feeling, is only possible on the summit itself.
In Everest: Expedition to the Ultimate (1979), 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Amount (151)  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Anymore (5)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Back (390)  |  Begin (260)  |  Being (1278)  |  Below (24)  |  Breast (9)  |  Breath (59)  |  Burden (27)  |  Change (593)  |  Cold (112)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Diffuse (4)  |  Effort (227)  |  Embarrassment (5)  |  Eruption (9)  |  Everest (10)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Everything (476)  |  Expect (200)  |  Experience (467)  |  Eye (419)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Find (998)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impression (114)  |  Inside (26)  |  Late (118)  |  Light (607)  |  Looking (189)  |  Meter (9)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Momentous (5)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Pull (43)  |  Reach (281)  |  Record (154)  |  Recorder (4)  |  Refuge (15)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Ridge (7)  |  Rucksack (3)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Seem (145)  |  Shake (41)  |  Sharp (14)  |  Something (719)  |  Sorrow (17)  |  Stand (274)  |  Steep (5)  |  Strong (174)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Summit (25)  |  Supremacy (4)  |  Switch (10)  |  Talk (100)  |  Tape (5)  |  Tear (42)  |  Think (1086)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Want (497)  |  Wind (128)

String theory is revealing the deepest understanding of the Universe we have ever had.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Reveal (148)  |  String Theory (10)  |  Theory (970)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)

Study is like the heaven’s glorious sun,
That will not be deep-search’d with saucy looks:
Small have continual plodders ever won,
Save base authority from others’ books.
In Love’s Labour Lost (1598), Act 1, Scene 1, line 74-77.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Authority (95)  |  Base (117)  |  Book (392)  |  Continual (43)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Look (582)  |  Other (2236)  |  Research (664)  |  Save (118)  |  Search (162)  |  Small (477)  |  Study (653)  |  Sun (385)  |  Will (2355)  |  Win (52)

Suppose then I want to give myself a little training in the art of reasoning; suppose I want to get out of the region of conjecture and probability, free myself from the difficult task of weighing evidence, and putting instances together to arrive at general propositions, and simply desire to know how to deal with my general propositions when I get them, and how to deduce right inferences from them; it is clear that I shall obtain this sort of discipline best in those departments of thought in which the first principles are unquestionably true. For in all our thinking, if we come to erroneous conclusions, we come to them either by accepting false premises to start with—in which case our reasoning, however good, will not save us from error; or by reasoning badly, in which case the data we start from may be perfectly sound, and yet our conclusions may be false. But in the mathematical or pure sciences,—geometry, arithmetic, algebra, trigonometry, the calculus of variations or of curves,— we know at least that there is not, and cannot be, error in our first principles, and we may therefore fasten our whole attention upon the processes. As mere exercises in logic, therefore, these sciences, based as they all are on primary truths relating to space and number, have always been supposed to furnish the most exact discipline. When Plato wrote over the portal of his school. “Let no one ignorant of geometry enter here,” he did not mean that questions relating to lines and surfaces would be discussed by his disciples. On the contrary, the topics to which he directed their attention were some of the deepest problems,— social, political, moral,—on which the mind could exercise itself. Plato and his followers tried to think out together conclusions respecting the being, the duty, and the destiny of man, and the relation in which he stood to the gods and to the unseen world. What had geometry to do with these things? Simply this: That a man whose mind has not undergone a rigorous training in systematic thinking, and in the art of drawing legitimate inferences from premises, was unfitted to enter on the discussion of these high topics; and that the sort of logical discipline which he needed was most likely to be obtained from geometry—the only mathematical science which in Plato’s time had been formulated and reduced to a system. And we in this country [England] have long acted on the same principle. Our future lawyers, clergy, and statesmen are expected at the University to learn a good deal about curves, and angles, and numbers and proportions; not because these subjects have the smallest relation to the needs of their lives, but because in the very act of learning them they are likely to acquire that habit of steadfast and accurate thinking, which is indispensable to success in all the pursuits of life.
In Lectures on Teaching (1906), 891-92.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Accepting (22)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Acquire (39)  |  Act (272)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Angle (20)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Art (657)  |  Attention (190)  |  Badly (32)  |  Base (117)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Case (99)  |  Clear (100)  |  Clergy (4)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Country (251)  |  Curve (49)  |  Data (156)  |  Deal (188)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Department (92)  |  Desire (204)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disciple (7)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Duty (68)  |  England (40)  |  Enter (141)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Error (321)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Expect (200)  |  False (100)  |  First (1283)  |  Follower (11)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Free (232)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Habit (168)  |  High (362)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Inference (45)  |  Instance (33)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lawyer (27)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Least (75)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  Let (61)  |  Life (1795)  |  Likely (34)  |  Line (91)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Logic (287)  |  Logical (55)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  Need (290)  |  Number (699)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Perfectly (10)  |  Plato (76)  |  Political (121)  |  Portal (7)  |  Premise (37)  |  Primary (80)  |  Principle (507)  |  Probability (130)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Region (36)  |  Relate (21)  |  Relation (157)  |  Respect (207)  |  Right (452)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Same (157)  |  Save (118)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simply (53)  |  Small (477)  |  Social (252)  |  Sort (49)  |  Sound (183)  |  Space (500)  |  Stand (274)  |  Start (221)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Steadfast (3)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Surface (209)  |  System (537)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Task (147)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Topic (21)  |  Training (80)  |  Trigonometry (6)  |  True (212)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Try (283)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Unfitted (3)  |  University (121)  |  Unquestionably (3)  |  Unseen (22)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Variation (90)  |  Want (497)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Write (230)

That ability to impart knowledge … what does it consist of? … a deep belief in the interest and importance of the thing taught, a concern about it amounting to a sort of passion. A man who knows a subject thoroughly, a man so soaked in it that he eats it, sleeps it and dreams it—this man can always teach it with success, no matter how little he knows of technical pedagogy. That is because there is enthusiasm in him, and because enthusiasm is almost as contagious as fear or the barber’s itch. An enthusiast is willing to go to any trouble to impart the glad news bubbling within him. He thinks that it is important and valuable for to know; given the slightest glow of interest in a pupil to start with, he will fan that glow to a flame. No hollow formalism cripples him and slows him down. He drags his best pupils along as fast as they can go, and he is so full of the thing that he never tires of expounding its elements to the dullest.
This passion, so unordered and yet so potent, explains the capacity for teaching that one frequently observes in scientific men of high attainments in their specialties—for example, Huxley, Ostwald, Karl Ludwig, Virchow, Billroth, Jowett, William G. Sumner, Halsted and Osler—men who knew nothing whatever about the so-called science of pedagogy, and would have derided its alleged principles if they had heard them stated.
In Prejudices: third series (1922), 241-2.
For a longer excerpt, see H.L. Mencken on Teaching, Enthusiasm and Pedagogy.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Barber (5)  |  Belief (578)  |  Best (459)  |  Theodor Billroth (2)  |  Call (769)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consist (223)  |  Contagion (9)  |  Derision (8)  |  Down (456)  |  Dream (208)  |  Eat (104)  |  Element (310)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Enthusiast (7)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fan (2)  |  Fear (197)  |  Flame (40)  |  Formalism (7)  |  Glow (14)  |  William Stewart Halsted (2)  |  High (362)  |  Thomas Henry Huxley (126)  |  Impart (23)  |  Imparting (6)  |  Importance (286)  |  Interest (386)  |  Itch (10)  |  Benjamin Jowett (11)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Carl Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwig (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  News (36)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observe (168)  |  Sir William Osler (35)  |  Ostwald_Carl (2)  |  Passion (114)  |  Pedagogy (2)  |  Potent (12)  |  Principle (507)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Slow (101)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Specialty (12)  |  Start (221)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Value (365)  |  Rudolf Virchow (50)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)

The belief that mathematics, because it is abstract, because it is static and cold and gray, is detached from life, is a mistaken belief. Mathematics, even in its purest and most abstract estate, is not detached from life. It is just the ideal handling of the problems of life, as sculpture may idealize a human figure or as poetry or painting may idealize a figure or a scene. Mathematics is precisely the ideal handling of the problems of life, and the central ideas of the science, the great concepts about which its stately doctrines have been built up, are precisely the chief ideas with which life must always deal and which, as it tumbles and rolls about them through time and space, give it its interests and problems, and its order and rationality. That such is the case a few indications will suffice to show. The mathematical concepts of constant and variable are represented familiarly in life by the notions of fixedness and change. The concept of equation or that of an equational system, imposing restriction upon variability, is matched in life by the concept of natural and spiritual law, giving order to what were else chaotic change and providing partial freedom in lieu of none at all. What is known in mathematics under the name of limit is everywhere present in life in the guise of some ideal, some excellence high-dwelling among the rocks, an “ever flying perfect” as Emerson calls it, unto which we may approximate nearer and nearer, but which we can never quite attain, save in aspiration. The supreme concept of functionality finds its correlate in life in the all-pervasive sense of interdependence and mutual determination among the elements of the world. What is known in mathematics as transformation—that is, lawful transfer of attention, serving to match in orderly fashion the things of one system with those of another—is conceived in life as a process of transmutation by which, in the flux of the world, the content of the present has come out of the past and in its turn, in ceasing to be, gives birth to its successor, as the boy is father to the man and as things, in general, become what they are not. The mathematical concept of invariance and that of infinitude, especially the imposing doctrines that explain their meanings and bear their names—What are they but mathematicizations of that which has ever been the chief of life’s hopes and dreams, of that which has ever been the object of its deepest passion and of its dominant enterprise, I mean the finding of the worth that abides, the finding of permanence in the midst of change, and the discovery of a presence, in what has seemed to be a finite world, of being that is infinite? It is needless further to multiply examples of a correlation that is so abounding and complete as indeed to suggest a doubt whether it be juster to view mathematics as the abstract idealization of life than to regard life as the concrete realization of mathematics.
In 'The Humanization of Teaching of Mathematics', Science, New Series, 35, 645-46.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abide (12)  |  Abound (17)  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attention (190)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Birth (147)  |  Boy (94)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Case (99)  |  Cease (79)  |  Central (80)  |  Change (593)  |  Chaotic (2)  |  Chief (97)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Constant (144)  |  Content (69)  |  Correlate (6)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Deal (188)  |  Detach (5)  |  Determination (78)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Dream (208)  |  Element (310)  |  Ralph Waldo Emerson (150)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Equation (132)  |  Especially (31)  |  Estate (5)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Example (94)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Explain (322)  |  Far (154)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Father (110)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  Finite (59)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Flux (21)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Functionality (2)  |  General (511)  |  Give (202)  |  Gray (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guise (5)  |  Handle (28)  |  High (362)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Idealization (3)  |  Impose (22)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indication (33)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinitude (3)  |  Interdependence (4)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invariance (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Lawful (7)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Match (29)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Needless (4)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notion (113)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Painting (44)  |  Partial (10)  |  Passion (114)  |  Past (337)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Pervasive (5)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Presence (63)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Provide (69)  |  Pure (291)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Realization (43)  |  Regard (305)  |  Represent (155)  |  Restriction (11)  |  Rock (161)  |  Roll (40)  |  Save (118)  |  Scene (36)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sculpture (12)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serve (59)  |  Serving (15)  |  Show (346)  |  Space (500)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Stately (12)  |  Static (8)  |  Successor (14)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Supreme (71)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Transmutation (22)  |  Tumble (2)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unto (8)  |  Variability (5)  |  Variable (34)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

The breaking up of the terrestrial globe, this it is we witness. It doubtless began a long time ago, and the brevity of human life enables us to contemplate it without dismay. It is not only in the great mountain ranges that the traces of this process are found. Great segments of the earth's crust have sunk hundreds, in some cases, even thousands, of feet deep, and not the slightest inequality of the surface remains to indicate the fracture; the different nature of the rocks and the discoveries made in mining alone reveal its presence. Time has levelled all.
The Face of the Earth (1904), Vol. 1, 604.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Break (99)  |  Brevity (8)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Crust (38)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Dismay (5)  |  Doubtless (8)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enable (119)  |  Enabling (7)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Fracture (6)  |  Globe (47)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Indication (33)  |  Inequality (9)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Mining (18)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Presence (63)  |  Process (423)  |  Range (99)  |  Remain (349)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Rock (161)  |  Segment (6)  |  Sinking (6)  |  Surface (209)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Witness (54)

The deep study of nature is the most fruitful source of mathematical discoveries. By offering to research a definite end, this study has the advantage of excluding vague questions and useless calculations; besides it is a sure means of forming analysis itself and of discovering the elements which it most concerns us to know, and which natural science ought always to conserve.
Théorie Analytique de la Chaleur, Discours Préliminaire. Translation as in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath's Quotation-book (1914), 89.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Concern (228)  |  Definite (110)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Element (310)  |  End (590)  |  Forming (42)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Question (621)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Study (653)  |  Vague (47)

The deepest intelligence of philosophy and science are inseparable from a religious view of the world.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Inseparable (16)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Religious (126)  |  Science (3879)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

The desire to reach for the sky runs deep in our human psyche.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Desire (204)  |  Human (1468)  |  Psyche (9)  |  Reach (281)  |  Run (174)  |  Sky (161)

The dropping of the Atomic Bomb is a very deep problem... Instead of commemorating Hiroshima we should celebrate... man's triumph over the problem [of transmutation], and not its first misuse by politicians and military authorities.
Address to New Europe Group meeting on the third anniversary of the Hiroshima bomb. Quoted in New Europe Group, In Commemoration of Professor Frederick Soddy (1956), 6-7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Authority (95)  |  Celebrate (19)  |  Celebration (7)  |  Commemoration (2)  |  Dropping (8)  |  First (1283)  |  Hiroshima (18)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Military (40)  |  Misuse (13)  |  Politician (38)  |  Problem (676)  |  Transmutation (22)  |  Triumph (73)

The earth itself assures us it is a living entity. Deep below surface one can hear its slow pulse, feel its vibrant rhythm. The great breathing mountains expand and contract. The vast sage desert undulates with almost imperceptible tides like the oceans. From the very beginning, throughout all its cataclysmic upthrusts and deep sea submergences, the planet Earth seems to have maintained an ordered rhythm.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Assure (15)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Below (24)  |  Breathe (45)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Contract (11)  |  Deep Sea (10)  |  Desert (56)  |  Earth (996)  |  Entity (35)  |  Expand (53)  |  Feel (367)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hear (139)  |  Imperceptible (8)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Order (632)  |  Planet (356)  |  Pulse (20)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Sage (23)  |  Sea (308)  |  Seem (145)  |  Slow (101)  |  Surface (209)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Tide (34)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vibrant (2)

The edge of the sea is a strange and beautiful place. All through the long history of Earth it has been an area of unrest where waves have broken heavily against the land, where the tides have pressed forward over the continents, receded, and then returned. For no two successive days is the shore line precisely the same. Not only do the tides advance and retreat in their eternal rhythms, but the level of the sea itself is never at rest. It rises or falls as the glaciers melt or grow, as the floor of the deep ocean basins shifts under its increasing load of sediments, or as the Earth’s crust along the continental margins warps up or down in adjustment to strain and tension. Today a little more land may belong to the sea, tomorrow a little less. Always the edge of the sea remains an elusive and indefinable boundary.
Opening paragraph in The Edge of the Sea (1955), 1.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adjustment (20)  |  Advance (280)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Area (31)  |  Basin (2)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Belong (162)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Break (99)  |  Broken (56)  |  Continent (76)  |  Continental (2)  |  Crust (38)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Edge (47)  |  Elusive (8)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Fall (230)  |  Floor (20)  |  Forward (102)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Grow (238)  |  Heavily (14)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Earth (2)  |  Increase (210)  |  Indefinable (5)  |  Land (115)  |  Less (103)  |  Level (67)  |  Line (91)  |  Little (707)  |  Load (11)  |  Long (790)  |  Margin (6)  |  Melt (16)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Place (177)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Press (21)  |  Recede (11)  |  Remain (349)  |  Rest (280)  |  Retreat (11)  |  Return (124)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Rise (166)  |  Same (157)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sediment (8)  |  Shift (44)  |  Shore (24)  |  Strain (11)  |  Strange (157)  |  Successive (73)  |  Tension (24)  |  Through (849)  |  Tide (34)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Two (937)  |  Unrest (2)  |  Warp (5)  |  Wave (107)

The electric light invades the dunnest deep of Hades.
Cries Pluto, ‘twixt his snores: “O temporal O mores!”
Science quotes on:  |  Electric (76)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Hades (3)  |  Light (607)  |  More (2559)  |  Pluto (6)

The fact that stares one in the face is that people of the greatest sincerity and of all levels of intelligence differ and have always differed in their religious beliefs. Since at most one faith can be true, it follows that human beings are extremely liable to believe firmly and honestly in something untrue in the field of revealed religion. One would have expected this obvious fact to lead to some humility, to some thought that however deep one's faith, one may conceivably be mistaken. Nothing is further from the believer, any believer, than this elementary humility. All in his power … must have his faith rammed down their throats. In many cases children are indeed indoctrinated with the disgraceful thought that they belong to the one group with superior knowledge who alone have a private wire to the office of the Almighty, all others being less fortunate than they themselves.
From 'Religion is a Good Thing', collected in R. Duncan and M. Wesson-Smith (eds.) Lying Truths: A Critical Scruting of Current Beliefs and Conventions (1979), 205. As quoted in Paul Davies, God and the New Physics (1984), 6-7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Almighty (23)  |  Alone (311)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Believer (25)  |  Belong (162)  |  Children (200)  |  Differ (85)  |  Down (456)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Expect (200)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Faith (203)  |  Field (364)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Honestly (10)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Humility (28)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lead (384)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Office (71)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Power (746)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Sincerity (6)  |  Something (719)  |  Superior (81)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Untrue (12)  |  Wire (35)

The fact that this chain of life existed [at volcanic vents on the seafloor] in the black cold of the deep sea and was utterly independent of sunlight—previously thought to be the font of all Earth's life—has startling ramifications. If life could flourish there, nurtured by a complex chemical process based on geothermal heat, then life could exist under similar conditions on planets far removed from the nurturing light of our parent star, the Sun.
Quoted in Peter Douglas Ward and Donald Brownlee, Rare Earth: Why Complex Life is Uncommon in the Universe (2000), 1, without citation.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Chain (50)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complex (188)  |  Condition (356)  |  Deep Sea (10)  |  Earth (996)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Far (154)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Heat (174)  |  Independence (34)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Nurture (16)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Parent (76)  |  Planet (356)  |  Process (423)  |  Ramification (7)  |  Sea (308)  |  Star (427)  |  Startling (15)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunlight (23)  |  Thought (953)

The fact that we live at the bottom of a deep gravity well, on the surface of a gas covered planet going around a nuclear fireball 90 million miles away and think this to be normal is obviously some indication of how skewed our perspective tends to be.
In The Salmon of Doubt: Hitchhiking the Galaxy One Last Time (2002), 132.
Science quotes on:  |  Bottom (33)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fireball (3)  |  Gas (83)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Indication (33)  |  Live (628)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Perspective (28)  |  Planet (356)  |  Sun (385)  |  Surface (209)  |  Tend (124)  |  Think (1086)  |  Well (14)

The frillshark has many anatomical features similar to those of the ancient sharks that lived 25 to 30 million years ago. It has too many gills and too few dorsal fins for a modern shark, and its teeth, like those of fossil sharks, are three-pronged and briarlike. Some ichthyologists regard it as a relic derived from very ancient shark ancestors that have died out in the upper waters but, through this single species, are still carrying on their struggle for earthly survival, in the quiet of the deep sea.
In The Sea Around Us (1951), 54.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Deep Sea (10)  |  Fin (3)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Gill (3)  |  Ichthyologist (2)  |  Marine Biology (24)  |  Million (114)  |  Modern (385)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Regard (305)  |  Relic (6)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shark (10)  |  Single (353)  |  Species (401)  |  Still (613)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Survival (94)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Through (849)  |  Tooth (29)  |  Water (481)  |  Year (933)

The genuine spirit of Mathesis is devout. No intellectual pursuit more truly leads to profound impressions of the existence and attributes of a Creator, and to a deep sense of our filial relations to him, than the study of these abstract sciences. Who can understand so well how feeble are our conceptions of Almighty Power, as he who has calculated the attraction of the sun and the planets, and weighed in his balance the irresistible force of the lightning? Who can so well understand how confused is our estimate of the Eternal Wisdom, as he who has traced out the secret laws which guide the hosts of heaven, and combine the atoms on earth? Who can so well understand that man is made in the image of his Creator, as he who has sought to frame new laws and conditions to govern imaginary worlds, and found his own thoughts similar to those on which his Creator has acted?
In 'The Imagination in Mathematics', North American Review, 85, 226.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Act (272)  |  Almighty (23)  |  Atom (355)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Balance (77)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Combine (57)  |  Conception (154)  |  Condition (356)  |  Confused (12)  |  Creator (91)  |  Devout (5)  |  Earth (996)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Existence (456)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Frame (26)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Govern (64)  |  Guide (97)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Host (16)  |  Image (96)  |  Imaginary (16)  |  Impression (114)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Irresistible (16)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  New (1216)  |  Planet (356)  |  Power (746)  |  Profound (104)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Relation (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Secret (194)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sense (770)  |  Similar (36)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Study (653)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trace (103)  |  Truly (116)  |  Understand (606)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  World (1774)

The Grand Canyon is carven deep by the master hand; it is the gulf of silence, widened in the desert; it is all time inscribing the naked rock; it is the book of earth.
In The Road of a Naturalist (1941), 206.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arizona (2)  |  Book (392)  |  Desert (56)  |  Earth (996)  |  Grand Canyon (4)  |  Gulf (18)  |  Master (178)  |  Naked (10)  |  Rock (161)  |  Silence (56)  |  Time (1877)  |  Widen (10)

The greatest scientists have always looked on scientific materialism as a kind of religion, as a mythology. They are impelled by a great desire to explore mystery, to celebrate mystery in the universe, to open it up, to read the stars, to find the deeper meaning.
In Pamela Weintraub (ed.), 'E. O. Wilson', The Omni Interviews (1984), 231.
Science quotes on:  |  Celebrate (19)  |  Desire (204)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Find (998)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Kind (557)  |  Look (582)  |  Materialism (11)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Mythology (18)  |  Open (274)  |  Read (287)  |  Religion (361)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Universe (857)

The humble knowledge of thyself is a surer way to God than the deepest search after science.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  God (757)  |  Humble (50)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Science (3879)  |  Search (162)  |  Thyself (2)  |  Way (1217)

The influence of modern physics goes beyond technology. It extends to the realm of thought and culture where it has led to a deep revision in man’s conception of the universe and his relation to it
In The Tao of Physics (1975), 17.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Conception (154)  |  Culture (143)  |  Extend (128)  |  Influence (222)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Physics (23)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Realm (85)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Revision (6)  |  Technology (257)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universe (857)

The legends of fieldwork locate all important site s deep in inaccessible jungles inhabited by fierce beasts and restless natives, and surrounded by miasmas of putrefaction and swarms of tsetse flies. (Alternative models include the hundredth dune after the death of all camels, or the thousandth crevasse following the demise of all sled dogs.)
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Alternative (29)  |  Beast (55)  |  Camel (11)  |  Crevasse (2)  |  Death (388)  |  Demise (2)  |  Dog (70)  |  Dune (4)  |  Fieldwork (3)  |  Fierce (7)  |  Fly (146)  |  Follow (378)  |  Hundredth (2)  |  Important (209)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Include (90)  |  Inhabit (16)  |  Jungle (22)  |  Legend (17)  |  Locate (7)  |  Model (102)  |  Native (38)  |  Putrefaction (4)  |  Restless (11)  |  Site (14)  |  Sled (2)  |  Surround (30)  |  Swarm (14)

The mathematical take-over of physics has its dangers, as it could tempt us into realms of thought which embody mathematical perfection but might be far removed, or even alien to, physical reality. Even at these dizzying heights we must ponder the same deep questions that troubled both Plato and Immanuel Kant. What is reality? Does it lie in our mind, expressed by mathematical formulae, or is it “out there”.
In Book Review 'Pulling the Strings,' of Lawrence Krauss's Hiding in the Mirror: The Mysterious Lure of Extra Dimensions, from Plato to String Theory and Beyond in Nature (22 Dec 2005), 438, 1081.
Science quotes on:  |  Alien (34)  |  Both (493)  |  Danger (115)  |  Express (186)  |  Formula (98)  |  Immanuel Kant (49)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Plato (76)  |  Ponder (14)  |  Question (621)  |  Reality (261)  |  Realm (85)  |  Thought (953)

The most beautiful and deepest experience a man can have is the sense of the mysterious. It is the underlying principle of religion as well as all serious endeavour in art and science. He who never had this experience seems to me, if not dead, then at least blind. To sense that behind anything that can be experienced there is a something that our mind cannot grasp and whose beauty and sublimity reaches us only indirectly and as a feeble reflection, this is religiousness.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Behind (137)  |  Blind (95)  |  Dead (59)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Indirectly (7)  |  Least (75)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Never (1087)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religiousness (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serious (91)  |  Something (719)  |  Sublimity (5)  |  Underlying (30)

The night spread out of the east in a great flood, quenching the red sunlight in a single minute. We wriggled by breathless degrees deep into our sleeping bags. Our sole thought was of comfort; we were not alive to the beauty or the grandeur of our position; we did not reflect on the splendor of our elevation. A regret I shall always have is that I did not muster up the energy to spend a minute or two stargazing. One peep I did make between the tent flaps into the night, and I remember dimly an appalling wealth of stars, not pale and remote as they appear when viewed through the moisture-laden air of lower levels, but brilliant points of electric blue fire standing out almost stereoscopically. It was a sight an astronomer would have given much to see, and here were we lying dully in our sleeping bags concerned only with the importance of keeping warm and comfortable.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Alive (90)  |  Appalling (10)  |  Appear (118)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Bag (3)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Blue (56)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Comfortable (10)  |  Concern (228)  |  Degree (276)  |  Dimly (6)  |  East (18)  |  Electric (76)  |  Elevation (13)  |  Energy (344)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flap (2)  |  Flood (50)  |  Give (202)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Great (1574)  |  Importance (286)  |  Keep (101)  |  Level (67)  |  Lie (364)  |  Low (80)  |  Lying (55)  |  Minute (125)  |  Moisture (20)  |  Muster (2)  |  Night (120)  |  Pale (9)  |  Peep (3)  |  Point (580)  |  Position (77)  |  Red (35)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Regret (30)  |  Remember (179)  |  Remote (83)  |  See (1081)  |  Sight (132)  |  Single (353)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Sole (49)  |  Spend (95)  |  Splendor (17)  |  Spread (83)  |  Stand (274)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sunlight (23)  |  Tent (11)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)  |  Warm (69)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Wriggle (2)

The nuclear arms race is like two sworn enemies standing waist deep in gasoline, one with three matches, the other with five.
[A summary version; not verbatim.]
A summary version, as written by Kristen Ghodsee in Lost in Transition: Ethnographies of Everyday Life After Communism (2011), 2-3. Note the author states it as “I remember,” and the wording is not verbatim from Sagan's original remark made during a panel discussion in ABC News Viewpoint following the TV movie The Day After (20 Nov 1983). The verbatim quote is also on this page. It begins, “Imagine a room…”
Science quotes on:  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Arms Race (2)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Gasoline (4)  |  Match (29)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Race (268)  |  Standing (11)  |  Summary (11)  |  Two (937)  |  Verbatim (4)

The old saying of the two kinds of truth. To the one kind belongs statements so simple and clear that the opposite assertion obviously could not be defended. The other kind, the so-called “deep truths”, are statements in which the opposite also contains deep truth.
Niels Bohr, 'Discussion with Einstein on Epistemological Problems in Atomic Physics', in P. A. Schilpp (ed.), Albert Einstein: Philosopher-Scientist (1949), 240.
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (162)  |  Call (769)  |  Kind (557)  |  Old (481)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Simple (406)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Statement (142)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)

The one who stays in my mind as the ideal man of science is, not Huxley or Tyndall, Hooker or Lubbock, still less my friend, philosopher and guide Herbert Spencer, but Francis Galton, whom I used to observe and listen to—I regret to add, without the least reciprocity—with rapt attention. Even to-day. I can conjure up, from memory’s misty deep, that tall figure with its attitude of perfect physical and mental poise; the clean-shaven face, the thin, compressed mouth with its enigmatical smile; the long upper lip and firm chin, and, as if presiding over the whole personality of the man, the prominent dark eyebrows from beneath which gleamed, with penetrating humour, contemplative grey eyes. Fascinating to me was Francis Galton’s all-embracing but apparently impersonal beneficence. But, to a recent and enthusiastic convert to the scientific method, the most relevant of Galton’s many gifts was the unique contribution of three separate and distinct processes of the intellect; a continuous curiosity about, and rapid apprehension of individual facts, whether common or uncommon; the faculty for ingenious trains of reasoning; and, more admirable than either of these, because the talent was wholly beyond my reach, the capacity for correcting and verifying his own hypotheses, by the statistical handling of masses of data, whether collected by himself or supplied by other students of the problem.
In My Apprenticeship (1926), 134-135.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Admirable (19)  |  All (4108)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Attention (190)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Beneficence (3)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Clean (50)  |  Collected (2)  |  Common (436)  |  Compressed (3)  |  Conjuring (3)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Convert (22)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Dark (140)  |  Data (156)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Enigma (14)  |  Enthusiastic (6)  |  Eye (419)  |  Eyebrow (2)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Figure (160)  |  Firm (47)  |  Friend (168)  |  Sir Francis Galton (18)  |  Gift (104)  |  Grey (10)  |  Guide (97)  |  Handling (7)  |  Himself (461)  |  Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (12)  |  Humour (116)  |  Thomas Henry Huxley (126)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Impersonal (5)  |  Individual (404)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Lip (4)  |  Listen (73)  |  Long (790)  |  John Lubbock (Lord Avebury) (26)  |  Man (2251)  |  Memory (134)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Misty (6)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Other (2236)  |  Penetrating (3)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Personality (62)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Physical (508)  |  Poise (4)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Prominent (6)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Rapt (5)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Recent (77)  |  Reciprocity (2)  |  Regret (30)  |  Relevant (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Separate (143)  |  Smile (31)  |  Herbert Spencer (37)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Still (613)  |  Student (300)  |  Talent (94)  |  Tall (11)  |  Thin (16)  |  Train (114)  |  Uncommon (14)  |  Unique (67)  |  Upper (4)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wholly (88)

The path isn’t a straight line; it’s a spiral. You continually come back to things you thought you understood and see deeper truths.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 246
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Back (390)  |  Continually (16)  |  Path (144)  |  See (1081)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)

The poet alone knows astronomy, chemistry, vegetation, and animation, for he does not stop at these facts, but employs them as signs. He knows why the plain, or meadow of space, was strown with these flowers we call suns, and moons, and stars; why the deep is adorned with animals, with men, and gods; for, in every word he speaks he rides on them as the horses of thought.
Essay, 'The Poet', in Ralph Waldo Emerson, Alfred Riggs Ferguson (ed.) and Jean Ferguson Carr (ed.), The Collected Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Volume III, Essays: Second Series (1984), 104.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animation (6)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Call (769)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Employ (113)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Flower (106)  |  God (757)  |  Horse (74)  |  Know (1518)  |  Meadow (18)  |  Moon (237)  |  Ride (21)  |  Space (500)  |  Speak (232)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Why (491)  |  Word (619)

The primary rocks, ... I regard as the deposits of a period in which the earth's crust had sufficiently cooled down to permit the existence of a sea, with the necessary denuding agencies,—waves and currents,—and, in consequence, of deposition also; but in which the internal heat acted so near the surface, that whatever was deposited came, matter of course, to be metamorphosed into semi-plutonic forms, that retained only the stratification. I dare not speak of the scenery of the period. We may imagine, however, a dark atmosphere of steam and vapour, which for age after age conceals the face of the sun, and through which the light of moon or star never penetrates; oceans of thermal water heated in a thousand centres to the boiling point; low, half-molten islands, dim through the log, and scarce more fixed than the waves themselves, that heave and tremble under the impulsions of the igneous agencies; roaring geysers, that ever and anon throw up their intermittent jets of boiling fluid, vapour, and thick steam, from these tremulous lands; and, in the dim outskirts of the scene, the red gleam of fire, shot forth from yawning cracks and deep chasms, and that bears aloft fragments of molten rock and clouds of ashes. But should we continue to linger amid a scene so featureless and wild, or venture adown some yawning opening into the abyss beneath, where all is fiery and yet dark,—a solitary hell, without suffering or sin,—we would do well to commit ourselves to the guidance of a living poet of the true faculty,—Thomas Aird and see with his eyes.
Lecture Sixth, collected in Popular Geology: A Series of Lectures Read Before the Philosophical Institution of Edinburgh, with Descriptive Sketches from a Geologist's Portfolio (1859), 297-298.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abyss (29)  |  Act (272)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Ash (20)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Bear (159)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Chasm (8)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Commit (41)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Continue (165)  |  Course (409)  |  Crack (15)  |  Crust (38)  |  Current (118)  |  Dare (50)  |  Dark (140)  |  Deposition (4)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Era (51)  |  Existence (456)  |  Eye (419)  |  Face (212)  |  Fire (189)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Form (959)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Guidance (28)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hell (32)  |  Igneous (3)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Internal (66)  |  Island (46)  |  Light (607)  |  Linger (14)  |  Living (491)  |  Low (80)  |  Matter (798)  |  Metamorphosis (5)  |  Molten (2)  |  Moon (237)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Period (198)  |  Permit (58)  |  Poet (83)  |  Point (580)  |  Primary (80)  |  Regard (305)  |  Retain (56)  |  Rock (161)  |  Scene (36)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Sin (42)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Speak (232)  |  Star (427)  |  Steam (80)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Sun (385)  |  Surface (209)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thermal (15)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Vapour (16)  |  Water (481)  |  Wave (107)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Wild (87)

The problem [evolution] presented itself to me, and something led me to think of the positive checks described by Malthus in his Essay on Population, a work I had read several years before, and which had made a deep and permanent impression on my mind. These checks—war, disease, famine, and the like—must, it occurred to me, act on animals as well as man. Then I thought of the enormously rapid multiplication of animals, causing these checks to be much more effective in them than in the case of man; and while pondering vaguely on this fact, there suddenly flashed upon me the idea of the survival of the fittest—that the individuals removed by these checks must be on the whole inferior to those that survived. I sketched the draft of my paper … and sent it by the next post to Mr. Darwin.
In 'Introductory Note to Chapter II in Present Edition', Natural Selection and Tropical Nature Essays on Descriptive and Theoretical Biology (1891, New ed. 1895), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Animal (617)  |  Cause (541)  |  Check (24)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Disease (328)  |  Draft (6)  |  Effective (59)  |  Essay (27)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Famine (15)  |  Flash (49)  |  Idea (843)  |  Impression (114)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Thomas Robert Malthus (13)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Must (1526)  |  Next (236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Ponder (14)  |  Population (110)  |  Positive (94)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Read (287)  |  Remove (45)  |  Something (719)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Survival (94)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (40)  |  Survive (79)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  War (225)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

The ridge of the Lammer-muir hills... consists of primary micaceous schistus, and extends from St Abb's head westward... The sea-coast affords a transverse section of this alpine tract at its eastern extremity, and exhibits the change from the primary to the secondary strata... Dr HUTTON wished particularly to examine the latter of these, and on this occasion Sir JAMES HALL and I had the pleasure to accompany him. We sailed in a boat from Dunglass ... We made for a high rocky point or head-land, the SICCAR ... On landing at this point, we found that we actually trode [sic] on the primeval rock... It is here a micaceous schistus, in beds nearly vertical, highly indurated, and stretching from S.E. to N. W. The surface of this rock... has thin covering of red horizontal sandstone laid over it, ... Here, therefore, the immediate contact of the two rocks is not only visible, but is curiously dissected and laid open by the action of the waves... On us who saw these phenomena for the first time, the impression will not easily be forgotten. The palpable evidence presented to us, of one of the most extraordinary and important facts in the natural history of the earth, gave a reality and substance to those theoretical speculations, which, however probable had never till now been directly authenticated by the testimony of the senses... What clearer evidence could we have had of the different formation of these rocks, and of the long interval which separated their formation, had we actually seen them emerging from the bosom of the deep? ... The mind seemed to grow giddy by looking so far into the abyss of time; and while we listened with earnestness and admiration to the philosopher who was now unfolding to us the order and series of these wonderful events, we became sensible how much farther reason may sometimes go than imagination can venture to follow.
'Biographical Account of the Late Dr James Hutton, F.R.S. Edin.' (read 1803), Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1805), 5, 71-3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abyss (29)  |  Accompany (22)  |  Action (327)  |  Admiration (59)  |  Bosom (13)  |  Change (593)  |  Consist (223)  |  Contact (65)  |  Covering (14)  |  Different (577)  |  Earnestness (3)  |  Earth (996)  |  Event (216)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Examine (78)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Extremity (7)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Farther (51)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Formation (96)  |  Grow (238)  |  High (362)  |  History (673)  |  Horizontal (9)  |  James Hutton (20)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Impression (114)  |  Listen (73)  |  Long (790)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Open (274)  |  Order (632)  |  Palpable (8)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Primary (80)  |  Primeval (15)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rock (161)  |  Sail (36)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Strata (35)  |  Stratum (10)  |  Substance (248)  |  Surface (209)  |  Testimony (21)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Unfolding (16)  |  Visible (84)  |  Wave (107)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Wonderful (149)

The sky seems to be a pure, a cooler blue, the trees a deeper green. The whole world is charged with the glory of God and I feel fire and music under my feet.
On reading the scriptures. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 166
Science quotes on:  |  Blue (56)  |  Charge (59)  |  Cool (13)  |  Feel (367)  |  Fire (189)  |  Foot (60)  |  Glory (58)  |  God (757)  |  Green (63)  |  Music (129)  |  Pure (291)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sky (161)  |  Tree (246)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

The specific qualities in diseases also tend more rapidly to the skin than to the deeper-seated parts, except the cancer; although even in this disease the progress towards the superficies is more quick than its progress towards the centre. In short, this is a law in nature, and it probably is upon the same principle by which vegetables always approach the surface of the earth.
In A Treatise on the Blood, Inflammation and Gun-shot Wounds (1794, 1828), 299-300.
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (108)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Centre (28)  |  Disease (328)  |  Earth (996)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Principle (507)  |  Progress (465)  |  Quality (135)  |  Quick (13)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Short (197)  |  Skin (47)  |  Specific (95)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Tend (124)  |  Toward (45)  |  Vegetable (46)

The Sun truly “comes up like thunder,” and it sets just as fast. Each sunrise and sunset lasts only a few seconds. But in that time you see at least eight different bands of color come and go, from a brilliant red to the brightest and deepest blue. And you see sixteen sunrises and sixteen sunsets every day you’re in space. No sunrise or sunset is ever the same.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Band (9)  |  Blue (56)  |  Bright (79)  |  Brightest (12)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Color (137)  |  Different (577)  |  Fast (45)  |  Last (426)  |  Least (75)  |  Red (35)  |  Same (157)  |  Second (62)  |  See (1081)  |  Set (394)  |  Space (500)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunrise (13)  |  Sunset (26)  |  Thunder (20)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truly (116)

The true man of science will know nature better by his finer organization; he will smell, taste, see, hear, feel, better than other men. His will be a deeper and finer experience.
In 'Natural history of Massachusetts', The Dial: A Magazine for Literature, Philosophy, and Religion (Jul 1842), 3, No. 1, 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Direct (225)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feel (367)  |  Hear (139)  |  Intercourse (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Man (2251)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organization (114)  |  Other (2236)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Smell (27)  |  Taste (90)  |  True (212)  |  Will (2355)

The value the world sets upon motives is often grossly unjust and inaccurate. Consider, for example, two of them: mere insatiable curiosity and the desire to do good. The latter is put high above the former, and yet it is the former that moves some of the greatest men the human race has yet produced: the scientific investigators. What animates a great pathologist? Is it the desire to cure disease, to save life? Surely not, save perhaps as an afterthought. He is too intelligent, deep down in his soul, to see anything praiseworthy in such a desire. He knows by life-long observation that his discoveries will do quite as much harm as good, that a thousand scoundrels will profit to every honest man, that the folks who most deserve to be saved will probably be the last to be saved. No man of self-respect could devote himself to pathology on such terms. What actually moves him is his unquenchable curiosity–his boundless, almost pathological thirst to penetrate the unknown, to uncover the secret, to find out what has not been found out before. His prototype is not the liberator releasing slaves, the good Samaritan lifting up the fallen, but the dog sniffing tremendously at an infinite series of rat-holes.
In 'Types of Men: The Scientist', Prejudices (1923), 269-70.
Science quotes on:  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Consider (416)  |  Cure (122)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dog (70)  |  Down (456)  |  Find (998)  |  Former (137)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Harm (39)  |  High (362)  |  Himself (461)  |  Honest (50)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Inaccurate (4)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinite Series (8)  |  Insatiable (7)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Liberator (2)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motive (59)  |  Move (216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Pathologist (5)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Praise (26)  |  Produced (187)  |  Profit (52)  |  Prototype (9)  |  Race (268)  |  Rat (37)  |  Rat-Hole (2)  |  Respect (207)  |  Save (118)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scoundrel (8)  |  Secret (194)  |  See (1081)  |  Self (267)  |  Series (149)  |  Set (394)  |  Slave (37)  |  Society (326)  |  Soul (226)  |  Surely (101)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thirst (11)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Two (937)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Unjust (6)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

The very deep did rot: O Christ!
That ever this should be!
Yea, slimy things did crawl with legs
Upon the slimy sea.
Science quotes on:  |  Christ (17)  |  Crawl (9)  |  Creature (233)  |  Leg (34)  |  Marine Biology (24)  |  Rot (9)  |  Sea (308)  |  Thing (1915)

The world probably being of much greater antiquity than physical science has thought to be possible, it is interesting and harmless to speculate whether man has shared with the world its more remote history. … Some of the beliefs and legends which have come down to us from antiquity are so universal and deep-rooted that we have are accustomed to consider them almost as old as the race itself. One is tempted to inquire how far the unsuspected aptness of some of these beliefs and sayings to the point of view so recently disclosed is the result of mere chance or coincidence, and how far it may be evidence of a wholly unknown and unsuspected ancient civilization of which all other relic has disappeared.
In 'The Elixir of Life', The Interpretation of Radium: Being the Substance of Six Free Popular Lectures Delivered at the University of Glasgow (1909, 1912), 248-250. The original lectures of early 1908, were greatly edited, rearranged and supplemented by the author for the book form.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Chance (239)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Coincidence (19)  |  Consider (416)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Down (456)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Greater (288)  |  Harmless (8)  |  History (673)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Legend (17)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  More (2559)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Possible (552)  |  Race (268)  |  Relic (6)  |  Remote (83)  |  Result (677)  |  Root (120)  |  Science (3879)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universal (189)  |  Unknown (182)  |  View (488)  |  Wholly (88)  |  World (1774)

The wound is granulating well, the matter formed is diminishing in quantity and is laudable. But the wound is still deep and must be dressed from the bottom to ensure sound healing. … In view of the fact that sinister stories continue to be manufactured and to be printed, it may again be stated, as emphatically as possible, that during the operation no trace of malignant disease was observed, … His Majesty will leave Buckingham Palace for change of air shortly, and the date of the Coronation will be announced almost immediately.
Anonymous
In 'The King’s Progress Towards Recovery', British Medical Journal (1902), 144. The appendectomy caused the coronation of King Edward VII to be postponed.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Change (593)  |  Continue (165)  |  Disease (328)  |  Emphatically (8)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Form (959)  |  Healing (25)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Majesty (21)  |  Matter (798)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observed (149)  |  Operation (213)  |  Possible (552)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Royalty (3)  |  Sound (183)  |  Still (613)  |  Trace (103)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wound (26)

There are dark, hard, cherty silt-stones from some deep ocean trench full of rapidly accumulating Pennsylvanian guck.
In Basin and Range (1981), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Dark (140)  |  Full (66)  |  Hard (243)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Stone (162)  |  Trench (6)

There are many arts and sciences of which a miner should not be ignorant. First there is Philosophy, that he may discern the origin, cause, and nature of subterranean things; for then he will be able to dig out the veins easily and advantageously, and to obtain more abundant results from his mining. Secondly there is Medicine, that he may be able to look after his diggers and other workman ... Thirdly follows astronomy, that he may know the divisions of the heavens and from them judge the directions of the veins. Fourthly, there is the science of Surveying that he may be able to estimate how deep a shaft should be sunk … Fifthly, his knowledge of Arithmetical Science should be such that he may calculate the cost to be incurred in the machinery and the working of the mine. Sixthly, his learning must comprise Architecture, that he himself may construct the various machines and timber work required underground … Next, he must have knowledge of Drawing, that he can draw plans of his machinery. Lastly, there is the Law, especially that dealing with metals, that he may claim his own rights, that he may undertake the duty of giving others his opinion on legal matters, that he may not take another man’s property and so make trouble for himself, and that he may fulfil his obligations to others according to the law.
In De Re Metallica (1556), trans. H.C. and L.H. Hoover (1950), 3-4.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abundant (22)  |  According (237)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Art (657)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Cause (541)  |  Claim (146)  |  Construct (124)  |  Cost (86)  |  Dig (21)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discern (33)  |  Division (65)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Estimate (57)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Judge (108)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Learning (274)  |  Look (582)  |  Machine (257)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Metal (84)  |  Mine (76)  |  Mining (18)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Next (236)  |  Obligation (25)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plan (117)  |  Property (168)  |  Required (108)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Surveying (6)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Underground (11)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Various (200)  |  Vein (25)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

There are many points in the history of an invention which the inventor himself is apt to overlook as trifling, but in which posterity never fail to take a deep interest. The progress of the human mind is never traced with such a lively interest as through the steps by which it perfects a great invention; and there is certainly no invention respecting which this minute information will be more eagerly sought after, than in the case of the steam-engine.
Quoted in The Origin and Progress of the Mechanical Inventions of James Watt (1854), Vol.1, 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainly (185)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Engine (98)  |  Fail (185)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Information (166)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invention (369)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Lively (17)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Point (580)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Progress (465)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Step (231)  |  Through (849)  |  Will (2355)

There are no deep theorems—only theorems that we have not understood very well.
In 'Reflections on Bishops Philosophy of Mathematics', Constructive Mathematics: Proceedings of the New Mexico State University Conference Held at Las Cruces, New Mexico, August 11-15, 1980 (1981), 137.
Science quotes on:  |  Theorem (112)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)

There can be no real conflict between the two Books of the Great Author. Both are revelations made by Him to man,—the earlier telling of God-made harmonies coming up from the deep past, and rising to their height when man appeared, the later teaching man's relations to his Maker, and speaking of loftier harmonies in the eternal future.
Conclusion of 'Cosmogony', the last chapter in Manual of Geology, Treating of the Principles of the Science (1863), 746.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Author (167)  |  Bible (91)  |  Book (392)  |  Both (493)  |  Coming (114)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Future (429)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Maker (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Past (337)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Rising (44)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Two (937)

There is a moral or metaphysical part of nature as well as a physical. A man who denies this is deep in the mire of folly. ’Tis the crown and glory of organic science that it does through final cause, link material and moral; and yet does not allow us to mingle them in our first conception of laws, and our classification of such laws, whether we consider one side of nature or the other. You have ignored this link; and, if I do not mistake your meaning, you have done your best in one or two pregnant cases to break it. Were it possible (which, thank God, it is not) to break it, humanity, in my mind, would suffer a damage that might brutalize it, and sink the human race into a lower grade of degradation than any into which it has fallen since its written records tell us of its history.
Letter to Charles Darwin (Nov 1859). In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of His Published Letters (1892), 217.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Break (99)  |  Cause (541)  |  Classification (97)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consider (416)  |  Crown (38)  |  Damage (34)  |  Degradation (17)  |  Do (1908)  |  Final (118)  |  First (1283)  |  Folly (43)  |  Glory (58)  |  God (757)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mingle (9)  |  Mire (2)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Moral (195)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organic (158)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possible (552)  |  Race (268)  |  Record (154)  |  Science (3879)  |  Side (233)  |  Sink (37)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thank (46)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)

There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, there is a rapture on the lonely shore, there is society, where none intrudes. By the deep sea, and music in its roars; I love not man the less, but nature more.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Deep Sea (10)  |  Intrude (3)  |  Less (103)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Music (129)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Rapture (7)  |  Roar (5)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shore (24)  |  Society (326)  |  Wood (92)

There is always more in one of Ramanujan’s formulae than meets the eye, as anyone who sets to work to verify those which look the easiest will soon discover. In some the interest lies very deep, in others comparatively near the surface; but there is not one which is not curious and entertaining.
Commenting on the formulae in the letters sent by Ramanujan from India, prior to going to England. Footnote in obituary notice by G.H. Hardy in the Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society (2) (1921), 19, xl—lviii. The same notice was printed, with slight changes, in the Proceedings of the Royal Society (A) (1921), 94, xiii—xxix. Reprinted in G.H. Hardy, P.V. Seshu Aiyar and B.M. Wilson (eds.) Collected Papers of Srinivasa Ramanujan (1927), xxi.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Curious (91)  |  Discover (553)  |  Easiest (2)  |  Entertaining (9)  |  Eye (419)  |  Formula (98)  |  Interest (386)  |  Lie (364)  |  Look (582)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Srinivasa Ramanujan (17)  |  Set (394)  |  Soon (186)  |  Surface (209)  |  Verify (23)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

There is no instrument for measuring the pressure of the Ether, which is probably millions of times greater: it is altogether too uniform for direct apprehension. A deep-sea fish has probably no means of apprehending the existence of water, it is too uniformly immersed in it: and that is our condition in regard to the Ether.
Ether and Reality: A Series of Discourses on the Many Functions of the Ether of Space (1925), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Condition (356)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Direct (225)  |  Ether (35)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fish (120)  |  Greater (288)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Regard (305)  |  Sea (308)  |  Time (1877)  |  Water (481)

There is probably no other science which presents such different appearances to one who cultivates it and to one who does not, as mathematics. To this person it is ancient, venerable, and complete; a body of dry, irrefutable, unambiguous reasoning. To the mathematician, on the other hand, his science is yet in the purple bloom of vigorous youth, everywhere stretching out after the “attainable but unattained” and full of the excitement of nascent thoughts; its logic is beset with ambiguities, and its analytic processes, like Bunyan’s road, have a quagmire on one side and a deep ditch on the other and branch off into innumerable by-paths that end in a wilderness.
In 'The Theory of Transformation Groups', (A review of Erster Abschnitt, Theorie der Transformationsgruppen (1888)), Bulletin New York Mathematical Society (1893), 2 (First series), 61.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ambiguity (17)  |  Analytic (10)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Attain (125)  |  Bloom (9)  |  Body (537)  |  Branch (150)  |  John Bunyan (5)  |  Complete (204)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Different (577)  |  Dry (57)  |  End (590)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Irrefutable (4)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nascent (3)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Person (363)  |  Present (619)  |  Process (423)  |  Purple (3)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Road (64)  |  Science (3879)  |  Side (233)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Thought (953)  |  Unambiguous (5)  |  Venerable (7)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Wilderness (45)  |  Youth (101)

There rolls the deep where grew the tree.
O earth, what changes hast thou seen!
There where the long street roars, hath been
The stillness of the central sea.
The hills are shadows, and they flow
From form to form, and nothing stands;
They melt like mist, the solid lands,
Like clouds they shape themselves and go.
In Memoriam A. H. H. (1850), canto 123. Collected in Alfred Tennyson and William James Rolfe (ed.) The Poetic and Dramatic works of Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1898), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Central (80)  |  Change (593)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Earth (996)  |  Flow (83)  |  Form (959)  |  Hill (20)  |  Land (115)  |  Long (790)  |  Melting (6)  |  Mist (14)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Roar (5)  |  Roll (40)  |  Sea (308)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Shape (72)  |  Solid (116)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stillness (5)  |  Street (23)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Tree (246)

There’s Nature and she’s going to come out the way She is. So therefore when we go to investigate we shouldn’t predecide what it is we’re looking for only to find out more about it. Now you ask: “Why do you try to find out more about it?” If you began your investigation to get an answer to some deep philosophical question, you may be wrong. It may be that you can’t get an answer to that particular question just by finding out more about the character of Nature. But that’s not my interest in science; my interest in science is to simply find out about the world and the more I find out the better it is, I like to find out...
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Begin (260)  |  Better (486)  |  Character (243)  |  Do (1908)  |  Find (998)  |  Find Out (21)  |  Finding Out (5)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Looking (189)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Particular (76)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simply (53)  |  Try (283)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)  |  Wrong (234)

There’s no value in digging shallow wells in a hundred places. Decide on one place and dig deep ... If you leave that to dig another well, all the first effort is wasted and there is no proof you won’t hit rock again.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 258
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Decide (41)  |  Dig (21)  |  Digging (11)  |  Effort (227)  |  First (1283)  |  Hit (20)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Leave (130)  |  Place (177)  |  Proof (287)  |  Rock (161)  |  Shallow (8)  |  Value (365)  |  Waste (101)

They were very different men. Or boys. Someone said they were both like curious children—Einstein the merry boy, Rutherford the boisterous one. They were looking and working in different directions—Einstein looking outward, rather dreamily trying to discover where we came from, and Rutherford drilling deep to discover what we were.
A Force of Nature: The Frontier Genius of Ernest Rutherford (2007), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Boy (94)  |  Children (200)  |  Curious (91)  |  Different (577)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discover (553)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Looking (189)  |  Sir Ernest Rutherford (53)  |  Trying (144)

Think, In mounting higher,
The angels would press on us, and aspire
To drop some golden orb of perfect song
Into our deep, dear silence.
From poem, 'Sonnets From the Portuguese' (1826), XXII. In Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Harriet Waters Preston (ed.), The Complete Poetical Works of Mrs. Browning (1900), 219.
Science quotes on:  |  Angel (44)  |  Aspire (13)  |  Drop (76)  |  Golden (45)  |  High (362)  |  Mount (42)  |  Orb (20)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Press On (2)  |  Silence (56)  |  Song (37)  |  Think (1086)

This Academy [at Lagado] is not an entire single Building, but a Continuation of several Houses on both Sides of a Street; which growing waste, was purchased and applied to that Use.
I was received very kindly by the Warden, and went for many Days to the Academy. Every Room hath in it ' one or more Projectors; and I believe I could not be in fewer than five Hundred Rooms.
The first Man I saw was of a meagre Aspect, with sooty Hands and Face, his Hair and Beard long, ragged and singed in several Places. His Clothes, Shirt, and Skin were all of the same Colour. He had been Eight Years upon a Project for extracting Sun-Beams out of Cucumbers, which were to be put into Vials hermetically sealed, and let out to warm the Air in raw inclement Summers. He told me, he did not doubt in Eight Years more, that he should be able to supply the Governor's Gardens with Sunshine at a reasonable Rate; but he complained that his Stock was low, and interested me to give him something as an Encouragement to Ingenuity, especially since this had been a very dear Season for Cucumbers. I made him a small Present, for my Lord had furnished me with Money on purpose, because he knew their Practice of begging from all who go to see them.
I saw another at work to calcine Ice into Gunpowder; who likewise shewed me a Treatise he had written concerning the Malleability of Fire, which he intended to publish.
There was a most ingenious Architect who had contrived a new Method for building Houses, by beginning at the Roof, and working downwards to the Foundation; which he justified to me by the life Practice of those two prudent Insects the Bee and the Spider.
In another Apartment I was highly pleased with a Projector, who had found a device of plowing the Ground with Hogs, to save the Charges of Plows, Cattle, and Labour. The Method is this: In an Acre of Ground you bury at six Inches Distance, and eight deep, a quantity of Acorns, Dates, Chestnuts, and other Masts or Vegetables whereof these Animals are fondest; then you drive six Hundred or more of them into the Field, where in a few Days they will root up the whole Ground in search of their Food, and make it fit for sowing, at the same time manuring it with their Dung. It is true, upon Experiment they found the Charge and Trouble very great, and they had little or no Crop. However, it is not doubted that this Invention may be capable of great Improvement.
I had hitherto seen only one Side of the Academy, the other being appropriated to the Advancers of speculative Learning.
Some were condensing Air into a dry tangible Substance, by extracting the Nitre, and letting the acqueous or fluid Particles percolate: Others softening Marble for Pillows and Pin-cushions. Another was, by a certain Composition of Gums, Minerals, and Vegetables outwardly applied, to prevent the Growth of Wool upon two young lambs; and he hoped in a reasonable Time to propagate the Breed of naked Sheep all over the Kingdom.
Gulliver's Travels (1726, Penguin ed. 1967), Part III, Chap. 5, 223.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Academy (35)  |  Acorn (4)  |  Acre (12)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Applied (177)  |  Architect (29)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Beam (24)  |  Bee (40)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Breed (24)  |  Building (156)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cattle (18)  |  Certain (550)  |  Charge (59)  |  Chestnut (2)  |  Composition (84)  |  Continuation (20)  |  Crop (25)  |  Cucumber (4)  |  Date (13)  |  Device (70)  |  Distance (161)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Dry (57)  |  Dung (7)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Face (212)  |  Field (364)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Fit (134)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Food (199)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Garden (60)  |  Governor (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Growing (98)  |  Growth (187)  |  Gunpowder (16)  |  Hermetic Seal (2)  |  Hog (4)  |  House (140)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Ice (54)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Ingenuity (39)  |  Insect (77)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invention (369)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Labour (98)  |  Lamb (6)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Lord (93)  |  Low (80)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marble (20)  |  Mast (3)  |  Method (505)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Money (170)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Pillow (4)  |  Pin (18)  |  Plow (7)  |  Practice (204)  |  Present (619)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Project (73)  |  Projector (3)  |  Publish (36)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Raw (28)  |  Root (120)  |  Save (118)  |  Saw (160)  |  Seal (18)  |  Search (162)  |  Season (47)  |  See (1081)  |  Sheep (11)  |  Side (233)  |  Single (353)  |  Skin (47)  |  Small (477)  |  Something (719)  |  Soot (9)  |  Sowing (9)  |  Spider (14)  |  Substance (248)  |  Summer (54)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunbeam (3)  |  Supply (93)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Vial (4)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Waste (101)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wool (4)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)

This is the forest primeval. The murmuring pines and the hemlocks,
Bearded with moss, and in garments green, indistinct in the twilight,
Stand like Druids of eld, with voices sad and prophetic,
Stand like harpers hoar, with beards that rest on their bosoms.
Loud from its rocky caverns, the deep-voiced neighboring ocean
Speaks, and in accents disconsolate answers the wail of the forest.
From poem 'Evangeline: A Tale of Acadie' (1847), as collected in The Poetical Works of H.W. Longfellow (1855), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Accent (5)  |  Answer (366)  |  Beard (7)  |  Bosom (13)  |  Cavern (9)  |  Forest (150)  |  Garment (13)  |  Green (63)  |  Indistinct (2)  |  Loud (9)  |  Moss (10)  |  Murmur (4)  |  Neighboring (5)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Pine (9)  |  Primeval (15)  |  Prophetic (4)  |  Rest (280)  |  Rocky (3)  |  Sadness (35)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Stand (274)  |  Twilight (6)  |  Voice (52)

This is the reason why all attempts to obtain a deeper knowledge of the foundations of physics seem doomed to me unless the basic concepts are in accordance with general relativity from the beginning. This situation makes it difficult to use our empirical knowledge, however comprehensive, in looking for the fundamental concepts and relations of physics, and it forces us to apply free speculation to a much greater extent than is presently assumed by most physicists.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accordance (10)  |  All (4108)  |  Apply (160)  |  Assume (38)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Basic (138)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Concept (221)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Doom (32)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Extent (139)  |  Force (487)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Free (232)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  General (511)  |  General Relativity (10)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Looking (189)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Reason (744)  |  Relation (157)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Seem (145)  |  Situation (113)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Use (766)  |  Why (491)

Thus the great drama of universal life is perpetually sustained; and though the individual actors undergo continual change, the same parts are ever filled by another and another generation; renewing the face of the earth, and the bosom of the deep, with endless successions of life and happiness.
Geology and Mineralogy, Considered with Reference to Natural Theology (1836), Vol. I, 134.
Science quotes on:  |  Bosom (13)  |  Change (593)  |  Continual (43)  |  Drama (21)  |  Earth (996)  |  Endless (56)  |  Face (212)  |  Generation (242)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Individual (404)  |  Life (1795)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Perpetually (20)  |  Succession (77)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Universal (189)

To encounter the sacred is to be alive at the deepest center of human existence.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 164
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Center (33)  |  Encounter (22)  |  Existence (456)  |  Human (1468)  |  Sacred (45)

To my deep mortification my father once said to me, “You care for nothing but shooting, dogs, and rat-catching, and you will be a disgrace to yourself and all your family.”
Despite this, perhaps rare, angry or unjust outburst, Darwin regarded his father as “the kindest man I ever knew and whose memory I love with all my heart.” In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), 'Autobiography', The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1887, 1896), Vol. 1, 30.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Biography (240)  |  Care (186)  |  Disgrace (12)  |  Dog (70)  |  Family (94)  |  Father (110)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Rat (37)  |  Will (2355)

To prove to an indignant questioner on the spur of the moment that the work I do was useful seemed a thankless task and I gave it up. I turned to him with a smile and finished, 'To tell you the truth we don't do it because it is useful but because it's amusing.' The answer was thought of and given in a moment: it came from deep down in my soul, and the results were as admirable from my point of view as unexpected. My audience was clearly on my side. Prolonged and hearty applause greeted my confession. My questioner retired shaking his head over my wickedness and the newspapers next day, with obvious approval, came out with headlines 'Scientist Does It Because It's Amusing!' And if that is not the best reason why a scientist should do his work, I want to know what is. Would it be any good to ask a mother what practical use her baby is? That, as I say, was the first evening I ever spent in the United States and from that moment I felt at home. I realised that all talk about science purely for its practical and wealth-producing results is as idle in this country as in England. Practical results will follow right enough. No real knowledge is sterile. The most useless investigation may prove to have the most startling practical importance: Wireless telegraphy might not yet have come if Clerk Maxwell had been drawn away from his obviously 'useless' equations to do something of more practical importance. Large branches of chemistry would have remained obscure had Willard Gibbs not spent his time at mathematical calculations which only about two men of his generation could understand. With this faith in the ultimate usefulness of all real knowledge a man may proceed to devote himself to a study of first causes without apology, and without hope of immediate return.
A.V. Hill
Quoted in Larry R. Squire (ed.), The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography (1996), Vol. I, 351.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Apology (7)  |  Ask (411)  |  Audience (26)  |  Baby (28)  |  Best (459)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Clerk (13)  |  Confession (8)  |  Country (251)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Enough (340)  |  Equation (132)  |  Faith (203)  |  Finish (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Generation (242)  |  J. Willard Gibbs (8)  |  Good (889)  |  Headline (6)  |  Himself (461)  |  Home (170)  |  Hope (299)  |  Idle (33)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Importance (286)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Man (2251)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mother (114)  |  Next (236)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Practical (200)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Prove (250)  |  Purely (109)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remain (349)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Return (124)  |  Right (452)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Side (233)  |  Smile (31)  |  Something (719)  |  Soul (226)  |  Spent (85)  |  Startling (15)  |  State (491)  |  Sterile (21)  |  Study (653)  |  Task (147)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Understand (606)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  View (488)  |  Want (497)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

We are not very pleased when we are forced to accept a mathematical truth by virtue of a complicated chain of formal conclusions and computations, which we traverse blindly, link by link, feeling our way by touch. We want first an overview of the aim and of the road; we want to understand the idea of the proof, the deeper context.
Unterrichtsblätter für Mathematik und Naturwissenschaften (1932), 38, 177-188. As translated by Abe Shenitzer, in 'Part I. Topology and Abstract Algebra as Two Roads of Mathematical Comprehension', The American Mathematical Monthly (May 1995), 102, No. 7, 453.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Aim (165)  |  Blind (95)  |  Chain (50)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Computation (24)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Context (29)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Formal (33)  |  Idea (843)  |  Link (43)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Overview (2)  |  Please (65)  |  Proof (287)  |  Road (64)  |  Touch (141)  |  Traverse (5)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)

We have reached the end of our journey into the depths of matter. We have sought for firm ground and found none. The deeper we penetrate, the more restless becomes the universe…: all is rushing about and vibrating in a wild dance.
Max Born
In The Restless Universe (2013), Chap. 5, 277.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Dance (32)  |  Depth (94)  |  End (590)  |  Find (998)  |  Firm (47)  |  Ground (217)  |  Journey (42)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Reach (281)  |  Restless (11)  |  Rush (18)  |  Seek (213)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vibrate (7)  |  Vibration (20)  |  Wild (87)

We must take the abiding spiritual values which inhere in the deep experiences of religion in all ages and give them new expression in terms of the framework which our new knowledge gives us. Science forces religion to deal with new ideas in the theoretical realm and new forces in the practical realm.
Address to Seventh Annual Midsummer Conferences of Ministers and Other Christian Workers, held by Union Theological Seminary, at Columbia University gymnasium (19 Jul 1927), as quoted in 'Fosdick Sees Bible Outrun by Science', New York Times (20 Jul 1927), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Abiding (2)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Deal (188)  |  Experience (467)  |  Expression (175)  |  Force (487)  |  Framework (31)  |  Idea (843)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Practical (200)  |  Realm (85)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Theoretical (22)  |  Value (365)

We need people who can see straight ahead and deep into the problems. Those are the experts. But we also need peripheral vision and experts are generally not very good at providing peripheral vision.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ahead (19)  |  Expert (65)  |  Generally (15)  |  Good (889)  |  Need (290)  |  People (1005)  |  Peripheral (3)  |  Problem (676)  |  Provide (69)  |  See (1081)  |  Straight (73)  |  Vision (123)

We often think, naïvely, that missing data are the primary impediments to intellectual progress–just find the right facts and all problems will dissipate. But barriers are often deeper and more abstract in thought. We must have access to the right metaphor, not only to the requisite information. Revolutionary thinkers are not, primarily, gatherers of fact s, but weavers of new intellectual structures.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Access (20)  |  All (4108)  |  Barrier (32)  |  Data (156)  |  Dissipate (8)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (998)  |  Gather (72)  |  Impediment (11)  |  Information (166)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Iuml (3)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Miss (51)  |  Missing (21)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Na (3)  |  New (1216)  |  Often (106)  |  Primarily (12)  |  Primary (80)  |  Problem (676)  |  Progress (465)  |  Requisite (11)  |  Revolutionary (31)  |  Right (452)  |  Structure (344)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Thought (953)  |  Will (2355)

We regard as 'scientific' a method based on deep analysis of facts, theories, and views, presupposing unprejudiced, unfearing open discussion and conclusions. The complexity and diversity of all the phenomena of modern life, the great possibilities and dangers linked with the scientific-technical revolution and with a number of social tendencies demand precisely such an approach, as has been acknowledged in a number of official statements.
Progress, Coexistence and Intellectual Freedom (1968), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledgment (12)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Approach (108)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Danger (115)  |  Demand (123)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Great (1574)  |  Life (1795)  |  Method (505)  |  Modern (385)  |  Number (699)  |  Official (6)  |  Open (274)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Regard (305)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  Statement (142)  |  Technology (257)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Theory (970)  |  View (488)

We’re inquiring into the deepest nature of our constitutions: How we inherit from each other. How we can change. How our minds think. How our will is related to our thoughts. How our thoughts are related to our molecules.
Newsweek 4 Jul 76
Science quotes on:  |  Change (593)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Inherit (33)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Relate (21)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Will (2355)

What a deep faith in the rationality of the structure of the world and what a longing to understand even a small glimpse of the reason revealed in the world there must have been in Kepler and Newton to enable them to unravel the mechanism of the heavens in long years of lonely work!
'Religion and Science', The New York Times (9 Nov 1930), Sunday Magazine, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Enable (119)  |  Faith (203)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Long (790)  |  Longing (19)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Must (1526)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Small (477)  |  Structure (344)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unravel (14)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

What a splendid perspective contact with a profoundly different civilization might provide! In a cosmic setting vast and old beyond ordinary human understanding we are a little lonely, and we ponder the ultimate significance, if any, of our tiny but exquisite blue planet, the Earth… In the deepest sense the search for extraterrestrial intelligence is a search for ourselves.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Blue (56)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Contact (65)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Different (577)  |  Earth (996)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Extraterrestrial (5)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Little (707)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Old (481)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Perspective (28)  |  Planet (356)  |  Ponder (14)  |  Profoundly (13)  |  Provide (69)  |  Search (162)  |  Sense (770)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Significance (113)  |  Splendid (23)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vast (177)

What about the magical number seven? What about the seven wonders of the world, the seven seas, the seven deadly sins, the seven daughters of Atlas in the Pleiades, the seven ages of man, the seven levels of hell, the seven primary colors, the seven notes of the musical scale, and the seven days of the week? What about the seven-point rating scale, the seven categories for absolute judgment, the seven objects in the span of attention, and the seven digits in the span of immediate memory? For the present I propose to withhold judgment. Perhaps there is something deep and profound behind all these sevens, something just calling out for us to discover it. But I suspect that it is only a pernicious, Pythagorean coincidence.
The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two (1956), 42-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Attention (190)  |  Behind (137)  |  Coincidence (19)  |  Color (137)  |  Daughter (29)  |  Deadly (21)  |  Discover (553)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Magic (86)  |  Man (2251)  |  Memory (134)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Pernicious (7)  |  Pleiades (3)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Primary (80)  |  Profound (104)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Scale (121)  |  Sea (308)  |  Seven (5)  |  Sin (42)  |  Something (719)  |  Week (70)  |  Wonder (236)  |  World (1774)

What animates a great pathologist? Is it the desire to cure disease, to save life? Surely not, save perhaps as an afterthought. He is too intelligent, deep in his soul, to see anything praiseworthy in such a desire. He knows from life-long observation that his discoveries will do quite as much harm as good, that a thousand scoundrels will profit to every honest man, that the folks who most deserve to be saved will probably be the last to be saved. ... What actually moves him is his unquenchable curiosity—his boundless, almost pathological thirst to penetrate the unknown, to uncover the secret, to find out what has not been found out before. ... [like] the dog sniffing tremendously at an infinite series of rat-holes. ... And yet he stands in the very front rank of the race
In 'The Scientist', Prejudices: third series (1922), 269-70.
Science quotes on:  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Cure (122)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dog (70)  |  Find (998)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harm (39)  |  Honest (50)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinite Series (8)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Move (216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Pathologist (5)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Praiseworthy (2)  |  Profit (52)  |  Race (268)  |  Rank (67)  |  Rat (37)  |  Rat-Hole (2)  |  Save (118)  |  Saving (20)  |  Scoundrel (8)  |  Secret (194)  |  See (1081)  |  Series (149)  |  Soul (226)  |  Stand (274)  |  Surely (101)  |  Thirst (11)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Uncovering (2)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Will (2355)

What clearer evidence could we have had of the different formation of these rocks, and of the long interval which separated their formation, had we actually seen them emerging from the bosom of the deep? … The mind seemed to grow giddy by looking so far into the abyss of time.
As quoted in Dennis R. Dean, James Hutton and the History of Geology (1992), 122.
Science quotes on:  |  Abyss (29)  |  Bosom (13)  |  Clear (100)  |  Different (577)  |  Emerge (22)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Far (154)  |  Formation (96)  |  Geology (220)  |  Giddy (3)  |  Grow (238)  |  Interval (13)  |  Long (790)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Rock (161)  |  Seem (145)  |  Separate (143)  |  Time (1877)

What is a scientist?… We give the name scientist to the type of man who has felt experiment to be a means guiding him to search out the deep truth of life, to lift a veil from its fascinating secrets, and who, in this pursuit, has felt arising within him a love for the mysteries of nature, so passionate as to annihilate the thought of himself.
The Montessori Method, trans. Anne E. George,(1964), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Annihilate (9)  |  Arising (22)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Guide (97)  |  Himself (461)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lift (55)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Passion (114)  |