Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Truth is ever to be found in simplicity, and not in the multiplicity and confusion of things.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Transport

Transport Quotes (30 quotes)

...for the animals, which we resemble and which would be our equals if we did not have reason, do not reflect upon the actions or the passions of their external or internal senses, and do not know what is color, odor or sound, or if there is any differences between these objects, to which they are moved rather than moving themselves there. This comes about by the force of the impression that the different objects make on their organs and on their senses, for they cannot discern if it is more appropriate to go and drink or eat or do something else, and they do not eat or drink or do anything else except when the presence of objects or the animal imagination [l'imagination brutalle], necessitates them and transports them to their objects, without their knowing what they do, whether good or bad; which would happen to us just as to them if we were destitute of reason, for they have no enlightenment except what they must have to take their nourishment and to serve us for the uses to which God has destined them.
[Arguing the uniqueness of man by regarding animals to be merely automatons.].
Les Préludes de l'Harmonie Universelle (1634), 135-139. In Charles Coulston Gillespie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1974), Vol. 9, 318.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Animal (617)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Automaton (12)  |  Bad (180)  |  Color (137)  |  Destined (42)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Destitution (2)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Discern (33)  |  Discerning (16)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drink (53)  |  Eat (104)  |  Enlightenment (20)  |  Equal (83)  |  Force (487)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Happen (274)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Impression (114)  |  Internal (66)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Object (422)  |  Odor (10)  |  Organ (115)  |  Passion (114)  |  Presence (63)  |  Reason (744)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serve (59)  |  Something (719)  |  Sound (183)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Uniqueness (11)  |  Use (766)

Already the steam-engine works our mines, impels our ships, excavates our ports and our rivers, forges iron, fashions wood, grinds grain, spins and weaves our cloths, transports the heaviest burdens, etc. It appears that it must some day serve as a universal motor, and be substituted for animal power, waterfalls, and air currents.
'Réflexions sur la puissance motrice du feu' (1824) translated by R.H. Thurston in Reflections on the Motive Power of Fire, and on Machines Fitted to Develop that Power (1890), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Already (222)  |  Animal (617)  |  Burden (27)  |  Cloth (6)  |  Current (118)  |  Energy (344)  |  Engine (98)  |  Excavation (8)  |  Fashioning (2)  |  Forge (9)  |  Grain (50)  |  Grind (11)  |  Impelling (2)  |  Iron (96)  |  Mine (76)  |  Motor (23)  |  Must (1526)  |  Port (2)  |  Power (746)  |  River (119)  |  Serving (15)  |  Ship (62)  |  Spin (26)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Substitution (13)  |  Universal (189)  |  Waterfall (4)  |  Weave (19)  |  Weaving (5)  |  Wood (92)  |  Work (1351)

As regards railways, it is certain that nothing is so profitable, because nothing is so cheaply transported, as passenger traffic. Goods traffic, of whatsoever description, must be more or less costly. Every article conveyed by railway requires handling and conveyance beyond the limit of the railway stations; but passengers take care of themselves, and find their own way.
From 'Railway System and its Results' (Jan 1856) read to the Institution of Civil Engineers, reprinted in Samuel Smiles, Life of George Stephenson (1857), 520.
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Care (186)  |  Certain (550)  |  Cheap (11)  |  Convey (16)  |  Conveyance (2)  |  Find (998)  |  Good (889)  |  Goods (8)  |  Handling (7)  |  Limit (280)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Passenger (10)  |  Profit (52)  |  Profitable (28)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Railway (18)  |  Regard (305)  |  Require (219)  |  Station (29)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Traffic (10)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatsoever (41)

Genetics is to biology what atomic theory is to physics. Its principle is clear: that inheritance is based on particles and not on fluids. Instead of the essence of each parent mixing, with each child the blend of those who made him, information is passed on as a series of units. The bodies of successive generations transport them through time, so that a long-lost character may emerge in a distant descendant. The genes themselves may be older than the species that bear them.
Almost Like a Whale: The Origin of Species Updated (1999), 115.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Theory (15)  |  Bear (159)  |  Biology (216)  |  Character (243)  |  Child (307)  |  Descendant (17)  |  Essence (82)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Gene (98)  |  Generation (242)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Information (166)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Long (790)  |  Parent (76)  |  Particle (194)  |  Pass (238)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Principle (507)  |  Series (149)  |  Species (401)  |  Successive (73)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)

Have you ever plunged into the immensity of time and space by reading the geological tracts of Cuvier? Transported by his genius, have you hovered over the limitless abyss of the past, as if held aloft by a magician’s hand?
From 'La Peau de Chagrin' (1831). As translated as by Helen Constantine The Wild Ass’s Skin (2012), 19.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abyss (29)  |  Aloft (5)  |  Baron Georges Cuvier (30)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geological (11)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hold (95)  |  Hover (8)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Limitless (12)  |  Magician (14)  |  Past (337)  |  Plunge (11)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Space (500)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Tract (5)

Here we come to a new and peculiar street railway … There is no steam on board. You ask how is this train propelled? Between the track and under ground is a cable running upon rollers for the length of the road…
In Travels with Jottings: From Midland to the Pacific (1880), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Cable (11)  |  Ground (217)  |  Andrew Smith Hallidie (2)  |  Length (23)  |  New (1216)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Railway (18)  |  Road (64)  |  Roller (3)  |  Running (61)  |  San Francisco (3)  |  Steam (80)  |  Street (23)  |  Track (38)  |  Train (114)

I always rejoice to hear of your being still employed in experimental researches into nature, and of the success you meet with. The rapid progress true science now makes, occasions my regretting sometimes that I was born so soon: it is impossible to imagine the height to which may be carried, in a thousand years, the power of man over matter; we may perhaps learn to deprive large masses of their gravity, and give them absolute levity for the sake of easy transport. Agriculture may diminish its labour and double its produce; all diseases may by sure means be prevented or cured (not excepting even that of old age), and our lives lengthened at pleasure even beyond the antediluvian standard. Oh! that moral science were in as fair a way of improvement; that men would cease to be wolves to one another; and that human beings would at length learn what they now improperly call humanity!
Letter to Dr Priestley, 8 Feb 1780. In Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin (1845), Vol. 2, 152.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Age (499)  |  Agriculture (68)  |  All (4108)  |  Antediluvian (5)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Call (769)  |  Cease (79)  |  Disease (328)  |  Easy (204)  |  Employ (113)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Hear (139)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Labour (98)  |  Large (394)  |  Learn (629)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Moral (195)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Old (481)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Power (746)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Progress (465)  |  Sake (58)  |  Science (3879)  |  Soon (186)  |  Still (613)  |  Success (302)  |  Thousand (331)  |  True Science (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Year (933)

I can certainly wish for new, large, and properly constructed instruments, and enough of them, but to state where and by what means they are to be procured, this I cannot do. Tycho Brahe has given Mastlin an instrument of metal as a present, which would be very useful if Mastlin could afford the cost of transporting it from the Baltic, and if he could hope that it would travel such a long way undamaged… . One can really ask for nothing better for the observation of the sun than an opening in a tower and a protected place underneath.
As quoted in James Bruce Ross and Mary Martin McLaughlin, The Portable Renaissance Reader (1968), 605.
Science quotes on:  |  Afford (17)  |  Ask (411)  |  Better (486)  |  Tycho Brahe (23)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Construct (124)  |  Cost (86)  |  Damage (34)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enough (340)  |  Hope (299)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Large (394)  |  Long (790)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Metal (84)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observation (555)  |  Opening (15)  |  Place (177)  |  Present (619)  |  Procure (5)  |  Protect (58)  |  State (491)  |  Sun (385)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Tower (42)  |  Travel (114)  |  Underneath (4)  |  Useful (250)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wish (212)

I don’t think we’ll go there [Mars] until we go back to the Moon and develop a technology base for living and working and transporting ourselves through space.
As quoted on the nmspacemuseum.org website of the New Mexico Museum of Space History.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Base (117)  |  Develop (268)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Mars (44)  |  Moon (237)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Space (500)  |  Technology (257)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Work (1351)

If any one should ask me what I consider the most distinctive, progressive feature of California, I should answer promptly, its cable-car system. And it is not alone its system which seems to have reached a point of perfection, but the amazing length of the ride that is given you for the chink of a nickel. I have circled this city of San Francisco, … for this smallest of Southern coins.
In Letters from California (1888), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Amazing (35)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Cable (11)  |  California (9)  |  Car (71)  |  Circle (110)  |  City (78)  |  Coin (12)  |  Consider (416)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Feature (44)  |  Andrew Smith Hallidie (2)  |  Invention (369)  |  Length (23)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nickel (3)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Point (580)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reach (281)  |  Ride (21)  |  San Francisco (3)  |  Southern (3)  |  System (537)

It is interesting to transport one’s self back to the times when Astronomy began; to observe how discoveries were connected together, how errors have got mixed up with truth, have delayed the knowledge of it, and retarded its progress; and, after having followed the various epochs and traversed every climate, finally to contemplate the edifice founded on the labours of successive centuries and of various nations.
Description of Bailly’s plan when writing his history of astronomy books, quoted by François Arago, trans. by William Henry Smyth, Baden Powell and Robert Grant, in 'Bailly', Biographies of Distinguished Scientific Men (1859), Vol. 1, 114. Arago first presented this biography of Bailly when he read it to the Academy of Sciences (26 Feb 1844).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Back (390)  |  Century (310)  |  Climate (97)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Delay (20)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Edifice (26)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Error (321)  |  Follow (378)  |  Founded (20)  |  History Of Astronomy (2)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labour (98)  |  Mixed (6)  |  Nation (193)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Progress (465)  |  Retarded (5)  |  Self (267)  |  Successive (73)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Various (200)

Nothing afflicted Marcellus so much as the death of Archimedes, who was then, as fate would have it, intent upon working out some problem by a diagram, and having fixed his mind alike and his eyes upon the subject of his speculation, he never noticed the incursion of the Romans, nor that the city was taken. In this transport of study and contemplation, a soldier, unexpectedly coming up to him, commanded him to follow to Marcellus, which he declined to do before he had worked out his problem to a demonstration; the soldier, enraged, drew his sword and ran him through. Others write, that a Roman soldier, running upon him with a drawn sword, offered to kill him; and that Archimedes, looking back, earnestly besought him to hold his hand a little while, that he might not leave what he was at work upon inconclusive and imperfect; but the soldier, nothing moved by his entreaty, instantly killed him. Others again relate, that as Archimedes was carrying to Marcellus mathematical instruments, dials, spheres, and angles, by which the magnitude of the sun might be measured to the sight, some soldiers seeing him, and thinking that he carried gold in a vessel, slew him. Certain it is, that his death was very afflicting to Marcellus; and that Marcellus ever after regarded him that killed him as a murderer; and that he sought for his kindred and honoured them with signal favours.
Plutarch
In John Dryden (trans.), Life of Marcellus.
Science quotes on:  |  Afflict (4)  |  Alike (60)  |  Angle (20)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Back (390)  |  Beseech (3)  |  Carry (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  City (78)  |  Coming (114)  |  Command (58)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Death (388)  |  Decline (26)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Dial (9)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Earnestly (4)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fate (72)  |  Favor (63)  |  Fix (25)  |  Follow (378)  |  Gold (97)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hold (95)  |  Honour (56)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Inconclusive (3)  |  Incursion (2)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Intent (8)  |  Kill (100)  |  Kindred (12)  |  Leave (130)  |  Little (707)  |  Looking (189)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Marcellus (2)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Move (216)  |  Murderer (3)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notice (77)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (676)  |  Regard (305)  |  Relate (21)  |  Roman (36)  |  Run (174)  |  Running (61)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sight (132)  |  Signal (27)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sword (15)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Through (849)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)

Nothing afflicted Marcellus so much as the death of Archimedes, who was then, as fate would have it, intent upon working out some problem by a diagram, and having fixed his mind alike and his eyes upon the subject of his speculation, he never noticed the incursion of the Romans, nor that the city was taken. In this transport of study and contemplation, a soldier, unexpectedly coming up to him, commanded him to follow to Marcellus, which he declined to do before he had worked out his problem to a demonstration; the soldier, enraged, drew his sword and ran him through. Others write, that a Roman soldier, running upon him with a drawn sword, offered to kill him; and that Archimedes, looking back, earnestly besought him to hold his hand a little while, that he might not leave what he was at work upon inconclusive and imperfect; but the soldier, nothing moved by his entreaty, instantly killed him. Others again relate, that as Archimedes was carrying to Marcellus mathematical instruments, dials, spheres, and angles, by which the magnitude of the sun might be measured to the sight, some soldiers seeing him, and thinking that he carried gold in a vessel, slew him. Certain it is, that his death was very afflicting to Marcellus; and that Marcellus ever after regarded him that killed him as a murderer; and that he sought for his kindred and honoured them with signal favours.
Plutarch
In John Dryden (trans.), Life of Marcellus.
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  Back (390)  |  Certain (550)  |  City (78)  |  Coming (114)  |  Command (58)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Death (388)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Dial (9)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fate (72)  |  Follow (378)  |  Gold (97)  |  Honour (56)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Kill (100)  |  Kindred (12)  |  Little (707)  |  Looking (189)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (676)  |  Regard (305)  |  Roman (36)  |  Running (61)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sight (132)  |  Signal (27)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Through (849)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)

Old King Coal was a merry old soul:
“I’ll move the world,” quoth he;
“My England’s high, and rich, and great,
But greater she shall be !”
And he call’d for the pick, and he call’d for the spade,
And he call’d for his miners bold;
“ And it’s dig,” he said, “in the deep, deep earth;
You’ll find my treasures better worth
Than mines of Indian gold!”

Old King Coal was a merry old soul,
Yet not content was he;
And he said, “I’ve found what I’ve desired,
Though ’tis but one of three.”
And he call’d for water, he call’d for fire,
For smiths and workmen true:
“Come, build me engines great and strong ;
We’ll have,” quoth he, “a change ere long;
We’ll try what Steam can do.”

Old King Coal was a merry old soul:
“’Tis fairly done,” quoth he,
When he saw the myriad wheels at work
O’er all the land and sea.
They spared the bones and strength of men,
They hammer’d, wove, and spun;
There was nought too great, too mean, or small,
The giant Steam had power for all;—
His task was never done.
From song, 'Old King Coal' (1846), collected in The Poetical Works of Charles Mackay: Now for the First Time Collected Complete in One Volume (1876), 565. To the melody of 'Old King Cole'.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Better (486)  |  Blacksmith (5)  |  Bold (22)  |  Bone (95)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Coal (57)  |  Deep (233)  |  Dig (21)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Engine (98)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  Giant (67)  |  Gold (97)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hammer (25)  |  High (362)  |  Indian (27)  |  Industrial Revolution (10)  |  Long (790)  |  Loom (20)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mine (76)  |  Miner (9)  |  Move (216)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Never (1087)  |  Old (481)  |  Pick (16)  |  Power (746)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sea (308)  |  Small (477)  |  Soul (226)  |  Spade (3)  |  Steam (80)  |  Strength (126)  |  Strong (174)  |  Task (147)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Try (283)  |  Water (481)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Work (1351)  |  Workman (13)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

The helicopter approaches closer than any other [transport] to fulfillment of mankind’s ancient dream of the flying horse and the magic carpet.
In The Story of the Winged-S: The Autobiography of Igor I. Sikorsky (2011).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Carpet (3)  |  Closer (43)  |  Dream (208)  |  Flying (72)  |  Fulfillment (18)  |  Helicopter (2)  |  Horse (74)  |  Magic (86)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Other (2236)

The historian of science may be tempted to claim that when paradigms change, the world itself changes with them. Led by a new paradigm, scientists adopt new instruments and look in new places. even more important, during revolutions, scientists see new and different things when looking with familiar instruments in places they have looked before. It is rather as if the professional community had been suddenly transported to another planet where familiar objects are seen in a different light and are joined by unfamiliar ones as well.
In The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962, 2nd ed. 1970). Excerpt 'Revolutions as Changes of World View', in Joseph Margolis and Jacques Catudal, The Quarrel between Invariance and Flux (2001), 35-36.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (593)  |  Claim (146)  |  Community (104)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Historian (54)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Light (607)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Object (422)  |  Paradigm (14)  |  Place (177)  |  Planet (356)  |  Profession (99)  |  Professional (70)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  See (1081)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Temptation (11)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Transportation (14)  |  Unfamiliar (16)  |  Unfamiliarity (5)  |  World (1774)

The microbial global brain—gifted with long-range transport, data trading, genetic variants … and the ability to reinvent genomes—began its operations some 91 trillion bacterial generations before the birth of the Internet. Ancient bacteria, if they functioned like those today, had mastered the art of worldwide information exchange. … The earliest microorganisms would have used planet-sweeping currents of wind and water to carry the scraps of genetic code…
In 'Creative Nets in the Precambrian Era', Global Brain: The Evolution of Mass Mind from the Big Bang to the 21st Century (2000), 18-19.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Art (657)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Begin (260)  |  Birth (147)  |  Brain (270)  |  Carry (127)  |  Code (31)  |  Current (118)  |  Data (156)  |  Early (185)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Function (228)  |  Generation (242)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genome (15)  |  Gift (104)  |  Gifted (23)  |  Global (35)  |  Information (166)  |  Internet (17)  |  Long (790)  |  Master (178)  |  Microbe (28)  |  Microorganism (28)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Planet (356)  |  Range (99)  |  Scrap (3)  |  Today (314)  |  Trade (31)  |  Trillion (4)  |  Variant (9)  |  Water (481)  |  Wind (128)  |  Worldwide (16)

The Sun is no lonelier than its neighbors; indeed, it is a very common-place star,—dwarfish, though not minute,—like hundreds, nay thousands, of others. By accident the brighter component of Alpha Centauri (which is double) is almost the Sun's twin in brightness, mass, and size. Could this Earth be transported to its vicinity by some supernatural power, and set revolving about it, at a little less than a hundred million miles' distance, the star would heat and light the world just as the Sun does, and life and civilization might go on with no radical change. The Milky Way would girdle the heavens as before; some of our familiar constellations, such as Orion, would be little changed, though others would be greatly altered by the shifting of the nearer stars. An unfamiliar brilliant star, between Cassiopeia and Perseus would be—the Sun. Looking back at it with our telescopes, we could photograph its spectrum, observe its motion among the stars, and convince ourselves that it was the same old Sun; but what had happened to the rest of our planetary system we would not know.
The Solar System and its Origin (1935), 2-3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accident (88)  |  Alpha Centauri (2)  |  Alter (62)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Altered (32)  |  Back (390)  |  Brightness (12)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Cassiopeia (2)  |  Change (593)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Common (436)  |  Component (48)  |  Constellation (17)  |  Convince (41)  |  Distance (161)  |  Double (15)  |  Dwarf (7)  |  Earth (996)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Heat (174)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Loneliness (5)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mile (39)  |  Milky Way (26)  |  Million (114)  |  Minute (125)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Nearness (3)  |  Neighbor (11)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Perseus (2)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Planet (356)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Power (746)  |  Radical (25)  |  Rest (280)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Set (394)  |  Shift (44)  |  Size (60)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Supernatural (25)  |  System (537)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Transportation (14)  |  Twin (15)  |  Unfamiliar (16)  |  Unfamiliarity (5)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

The supersonic transport (SST) summarizes, in one project, our society’s demented priorities. It is a virtual catalog of the reasons why the United States is ailing in the midst of its affluence—nationalistic vanity, pandering to corporate profit, the worship of technology, and the deteriorating human environment.
In Garrett De Bell, ed., The Environmental Handbook (1970), 177.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Affluence (3)  |  Catalog (5)  |  Corporate (3)  |  Deteriorate (3)  |  Environment (216)  |  Human (1468)  |  Midst (7)  |  Nationalistic (2)  |  Pander (3)  |  Priority (10)  |  Profit (52)  |  Project (73)  |  Reason (744)  |  Society (326)  |  State (491)  |  Summarize (10)  |  Supersonic (4)  |  Technology (257)  |  United States (23)  |  Vanity (19)  |  Virtual (5)  |  Why (491)  |  Worship (32)

To appreciate a work of art we need bring with us nothing from life, no knowledge of its ideas and affairs, no familiarity with its emotions. Art transports us from the world of man’s activity to a world of æsthetic exaltation. For a moment we are shut off from human interests; our anticipations and memories are arrested; we are lifted above the stream of life. The pure mathematician rapt in his studies knows a state of mind which I take to be similar, if not identical. He feels an emotion for his speculations which arises from no perceived relation between them and the lives of men, but springs, inhuman or super-human, from the heart of an abstract science. I wonder, sometimes, whether the appreciators of art and of mathematical solutions are not even more closely allied.
In Art (1913), 25.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Activity (210)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Arise (158)  |  Art (657)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Exaltation (5)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Feel (367)  |  Heart (229)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Identical (53)  |  Interest (386)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lift (55)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Pure (291)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shut (41)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Spring (133)  |  State (491)  |  Stream (81)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Victory [in war] is the beautiful, bright-coloured flower. Transport is the stem without which it could never have blossomed. (1899)
In The River War (2004), 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Bright (79)  |  Flower (106)  |  Never (1087)  |  Stem (31)  |  Victory (39)  |  War (225)

We need to substitute for the book a device that will make it easy to transmit information without transporting material.
In Libraries of the Future (1965), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Device (70)  |  Easy (204)  |  Information (166)  |  Material (353)  |  Need (290)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Transmit (11)  |  Will (2355)

When I read an Italian letter [Saggio by Voltaire] on changes which had occurred on the surface of the earth, published in Paris this year (1746), I believed that these facts were reported by La Loubère. Indeed, they correspond perfectly with the author’s ideas. Petrified fish are according to him merely rare fish thrown away by Roman cooks because they were spoiled; and with respect to shells, he said that they were from the sea of the Levant and brought back by pilgrims from Syria at the time of the crusades. These shells are found today petrified in France, in Italy and in other Christian states. Why did he not add that monkeys transported shells on top of high mountains and to every place where humans cannot live? It would not have harmed his story but made his explanation even more plausible.
In 'Preuves de la Théorie de la Terre', Histoire Naturelle, Générale et Particuliere, Avec la Description du Cabinet du Roi (1749), Vol. I, 281. Trans. Albert V. and Marguerite Carozzi.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  According (237)  |  Author (167)  |  Back (390)  |  Change (593)  |  Christian (43)  |  Earth (996)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fossil (136)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Italian (12)  |  Letter (109)  |  Live (628)  |  Merely (316)  |  Monkey (52)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plausible (22)  |  Rare (89)  |  Read (287)  |  Respect (207)  |  Roman (36)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shell (63)  |  State (491)  |  Story (118)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Top (96)  |  Francois Marie Arouet Voltaire (38)  |  Why (491)  |  Year (933)

When the aggregate amount of solid matter transported by rivers in a given number of centuries from a large continent, shall be reduced to arithmetical computation, the result will appear most astonishing to those...not in the habit of reflecting how many of the mightiest of operations in nature are effected insensibly, without noise or disorder.
Principles of Geology (1837), Vol. 1, 230.
Science quotes on:  |  Aggregate (23)  |  Amount (151)  |  Astonishing (27)  |  Computation (24)  |  Continent (76)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Effect (393)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Habit (168)  |  Large (394)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Noise (37)  |  Number (699)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Result (677)  |  River (119)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solid (116)  |  Will (2355)

While a glacier is moving, it rubs and wears down the bottom on which it moves, scrapes its surface (now smooth), triturates the broken-off material that is found between the ice and the rock, pulverizes or reduces it to a clayey paste, rounds angular blocks that resist its pressure, and polishes those having a larger surface. At the surface of the glacier, other processes occur. Fragments of rocks that are broken-off from the neighbouring walls and fall on the ice, remain there or can be transported to the sides; they advance in this way on the top of the glacier, without moving or rubbing against each other … and arrive at the extremity of the glacier with their angles, sharp edges, and their uneven surfaces intact.
La théorie des glaciers et ses progrès les plus récents. Bibl. universelle de Genève, (3), Vol. 41, p.127. Trans. Karin Verrecchia.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Against (332)  |  Broken (56)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Edge (47)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Extremity (7)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Geology (220)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Ice (54)  |  Intact (8)  |  Material (353)  |  Move (216)  |  Occur (150)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paste (4)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Remain (349)  |  Rock (161)  |  Side (233)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Surface (209)  |  Top (96)  |  Wall (67)  |  Way (1217)

Who … is not familiar with Maxwell’s memoirs on his dynamical theory of gases? … from one side enter the equations of state; from the other side, the equations of motion in a central field. Ever higher soars the chaos of formulae. Suddenly we hear, as from kettle drums, the four beats “put n=5.” The evil spirit v vanishes; and … that which had seemed insuperable has been overcome as if by a stroke of magic … One result after another follows in quick succession till at last … we arrive at the conditions for thermal equilibrium together with expressions for the transport coefficients.
In Ceremonial Speech (15 Nov 1887) celebrating the 301st anniversary of the Karl-Franzens-University Graz. Published as Gustav Robert Kirchhoff: Festrede zur Feier des 301. Gründungstages der Karl-Franzens-Universität zu Graz (1888), 29, as translated in In Michael Dudley Sturge, Statistical and Thermal Physics (2003), 343. A more complete alternate translation also appears on the Ludwig Boltzmann Quotes page of this website.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beat (41)  |  Central (80)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Coefficient (5)  |  Condition (356)  |  Drum (8)  |  Dynamical (15)  |  Enter (141)  |  Equation (132)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Evil (116)  |  Expression (175)  |  Field (364)  |  Follow (378)  |  Formula (98)  |  Hear (139)  |  Kettle (3)  |  Last (426)  |  Magic (86)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  Motion (310)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Result (677)  |  Side (233)  |  Soar (23)  |  Spirit (265)  |  State (491)  |  Stroke (18)  |  Succession (77)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thermal (15)  |  Together (387)

Why may not the present generation, who have already good turnpikes, make the experiment of using steam carriages upon them? They will assuredly effect the movement of heavy burthens; with a slow motion of two and a half miles an hour, and as their progress need not be interrupted, they may travel fifty or sixty miles in the 24 hours.
From 'On the Origin of Steam Boats and Steam Wagons', Thomas Cooper (ed.), The Emporium of Arts and Sciences (Feb 1814), 2, No. 2, 215.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Carriage (10)  |  Effect (393)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Generation (242)  |  Good (889)  |  Hour (186)  |  Motion (310)  |  Movement (155)  |  Present (619)  |  Progress (465)  |  Slow (101)  |  Speed (65)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Power (8)  |  Travel (114)  |  Turnpike (2)  |  Two (937)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

Without natural resources life itself is impossible. From birth to death, natural resources, transformed for human use, feed, clothe, shelter, and transport us. Upon them we depend for every material necessity, comfort, convenience, and protection in our lives. Without abundant resources prosperity is out of reach.
Breaking New Ground (1998), 505.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundant (22)  |  Birth (147)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Death (388)  |  Depend (228)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Material (353)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Resource (22)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Prosperity (21)  |  Protection (36)  |  Reach (281)  |  Shelter (22)  |  Transform (73)  |  Use (766)

You may perceive something of the distinction which I think necessary to keep in view between art and science, between the artist and the man of knowledge, or the philosopher. The man of knowledge, the philosopher, is he who studies and acquires knowledge in order to improve his own mind; and with a desire of extending the department of knowledge to which he turns his attention, or to render it useful to the world, by discoveries, or by inventions, which may be the foundation of new arts, or of improvements in those already established. Excited by one or more of these motives, the philosopher employs himself in acquiring knowledge and in communicating it. The artist only executes and practises what the philosopher or man of invention has discovered or contrived, while the business of the trader is to retail the productions of the artist, exchange some of them for others, and transport them to distant places for that purpose.
From the first of a series of lectures on chemistry, collected in John Robison (ed.), Lectures on the Elements of Chemistry: Delivered in the University of Edinburgh (1807), Vol. 1, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Already (222)  |  Art (657)  |  Artist (90)  |  Attention (190)  |  Business (149)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Contrive (10)  |  Definition (221)  |  Department (92)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distant (33)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Employ (113)  |  Establish (57)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Excite (15)  |  Execute (7)  |  Extend (128)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Himself (461)  |  Improve (58)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Invention (369)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Motive (59)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Place (177)  |  Practise (7)  |  Production (183)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Render (93)  |  Retail (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Something (719)  |  Study (653)  |  Think (1086)  |  Turn (447)  |  Useful (250)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

[King Hiero II] requested Archimedes to consider [whether a crown was pure gold or alloyed with silver]. The latter, while the case was still on his mind, happened to go to the bath, and on getting into a tub observed that the more his body sank into it the more water ran out over the tub. As this pointed out the way to explain the case in question, without a moment’s delay, and transported with joy, he jumped out of the tub and rushed home naked, crying with a loud voice that he had found what he was seeking; for as he ran he shouted repeatedly in Greek, “Eὕρηκα, εὕρηκα.”
Vitruvius
This famous anecdote, being written about two centuries after Archimedes, is of questionable authenticity, but Vitruvius provided the origin of the story as we know it. In De Architectura, Book 9, Introduction, Sec. 10. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 254. Also seen translated as “While Archimedes was turning the problem over, he chanced to come to the place of bathing, and there, as he was sitting down in the tub, he noticed that the amount of water which flowed over the tub was equal to the amount by which his body was immersed. This showed him a means of solving the problem. … In his joy, he leapt out of the tub and, rushing naked towards his home, he cried out with a loud voice that he had found what he sought.” In Ivor Bulmer-Thomas, Selections Illustrating the History of Greek Mathematics (1939), 37.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alloy (4)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Bath (10)  |  Body (537)  |  Buoyancy (7)  |  Consider (416)  |  Crown (38)  |  Delay (20)  |  Eureka (11)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Explain (322)  |  Gold (97)  |  Greek (107)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Home (170)  |  Joy (107)  |  Jump (29)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Naked (10)  |  Observed (149)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pure (291)  |  Question (621)  |  Research (664)  |  Shout (25)  |  Silver (46)  |  Still (613)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.