Celebrating 17 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY™
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index G > Category: Grain

Grain Quotes (19 quotes)

A great discovery solves a great problem, but there is a grain of discovery in the solution of any problem. Your problem may be modest, but if it challenges your curiosity and brings into play your inventive faculties, and if you solve it by your own means, you may experience the tension and enjoy the triumph of discovery.
From Preface to the first printing, reprinted in How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Challenge (25)  |  Curiosity (71)  |  Discovery (496)  |  Enjoyment (23)  |  Experience (186)  |  Faculty (26)  |  Invention (239)  |  Means (45)  |  Modest (4)  |  Problem (250)  |  Solution (138)  |  Tension (4)  |  Triumph (29)

Already the steam-engine works our mines, impels our ships, excavates our ports and our rivers, forges iron, fashions wood, grinds grain, spins and weaves our cloths, transports the heaviest burdens, etc. It appears that it must some day serve as a universal motor, and be substituted for animal power, waterfalls, and air currents.
'Réflexions sur la puissance motrice du feu' (1824) translated by R.H. Thurston in Reflections on the Motive Power of Fire, and on Machines Fitted to Develop that Power (1890), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (116)  |  Animal (232)  |  Burden (15)  |  Cloth (4)  |  Current (24)  |  Energy (138)  |  Excavation (5)  |  Fashioning (2)  |  Grind (8)  |  Impelling (2)  |  Iron (49)  |  Mine (12)  |  Motor (9)  |  Power (173)  |  River (47)  |  Serving (4)  |  Ship (30)  |  Spinning (7)  |  Steam Engine (36)  |  Substitution (6)  |  Transport (6)  |  Universal (42)  |  Waterfall (2)  |  Weaving (2)  |  Wood (23)  |  Work (303)

Consider now the Milky Way. Here also we see an innumerable dust, only the grains of this dust are no longer atoms but stars; these grains also move with great velocities, they act at a distance one upon another, but this action is so slight at great distances that their trajectories are rectilineal; nevertheless, from time to time, two of them may come near enough together to be deviated from their course, like a comet that passed too close to Jupiter. In a word, in the eyes of a giant, to whom our Suns were what our atoms are to us, the Milky Way would only look like a bubble of gas.
Science and Method (1908), trans. Francis Maitland (1914), 254-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (91)  |  Atom (204)  |  Bubble (8)  |  Closeness (4)  |  Comet (34)  |  Course (36)  |  Deviation (9)  |  Distance (37)  |  Dust (30)  |  Gas (39)  |  Giant (23)  |  Greatness (33)  |  Innumerable (13)  |  Jupiter (14)  |  Milky Way (15)  |  Motion (101)  |  Nearness (3)  |  Passage (10)  |  Slightness (2)  |  Star (186)  |  Sun (144)  |  Trajectory (3)  |  Velocity (10)

For a stone, when it is examined, will be found a mountain in miniature. The fineness of Nature’s work is so great, that, into a single block, a foot or two in diameter, she can compress as many changes of form and structure, on a small scale, as she needs for her mountains on a large one; and, taking moss for forests, and grains of crystal for crags, the surface of a stone, in by far the plurality of instances, is more interesting than the surface of an ordinary hill; more fantastic in form and incomparably richer in colour—the last quality being, in fact, so noble in most stones of good birth (that is to say, fallen from the crystalline mountain ranges).
Modern Painters, 4, Containing part 5 of Mountain Beauty (1860), 311.
Science quotes on:  |  Block (7)  |  Change (203)  |  Color (58)  |  Compression (3)  |  Crag (4)  |  Crystal (39)  |  Fantastic (6)  |  Forest (72)  |  Form (124)  |  Hill (16)  |  Instance (12)  |  Interest (119)  |  Large (41)  |  Miniature (4)  |  Moss (7)  |  Mountain (90)  |  Nature (721)  |  Noble (23)  |  Ordinary (29)  |  Plurality (4)  |  Quality (45)  |  Range (20)  |  Richness (8)  |  Scale (34)  |  Small (51)  |  Stone (41)  |  Structure (145)  |  Surface (51)

Hast thou ever raised thy mind to the consideration of existence, in and by itself, as the mere act of existing?
Hast thou ever said to thyself thoughtfully it is! heedless, in that moment, whether it were a man before thee, or a flower, or a grain of sand;—without reference, in short, to this or that particular mode or form of existence? If thou hast, indeed, attained to this, thou wilt have felt the presence of a mystery, which must have fixed thy spirit in awe and wonder.
In 'Essay IX', The Friend: A Series of Essays (1818), Vol. 3, 250.
Science quotes on:  |  Awe (14)  |  Consideration (55)  |  Existence (188)  |  Fixed (9)  |  Flower (47)  |  Form (124)  |  Mode (14)  |  Moment (34)  |  Mystery (94)  |  Particular (37)  |  Reference (15)  |  Sand (18)  |  Spirit (75)  |  Thoughtful (7)  |  Wonder (96)

I feel like a white granular mass of amorphous crystals—my formula appears to be isomeric with Spasmotoxin. My aurochloride precipitates into beautiful prismatic needles. My Platinochloride develops octohedron crystals,—with fine blue florescence. My physiological action is not indifferent. One millionth of a grain injected under the skin of a frog produced instantaneous death accompanied by an orange blossom odor. The heart stopped in systole. A base—L3H9NG4—offers analogous reaction to phosmotinigstic acid.
In letter to George M. Gould (1889), collected in Elizabeth Bisland The Writings of Lafcadio Hearn (1922), Vol. 14, 89.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (17)  |  Amorphous (2)  |  Base (16)  |  Blossom (7)  |  Blue (16)  |  Crystal (39)  |  Death (227)  |  Fluorescence (2)  |  Formula (41)  |  Frog (28)  |  Granule (2)  |  Heart (76)  |  Injection (7)  |  Isomer (5)  |  Needle (4)  |  Odor (7)  |  Orange (5)  |  Physiology (56)  |  Prismatic (2)  |  Reaction (52)  |  White (24)

I have patiently born with abundance of Clamour and Ralary [raillery], for beginning a new Practice here (for the Good of the Publick) which comes well Recommended, from Gentlemen of Figure & Learning, and which well agrees to Reason, when try’d & duly considered, viz. Artificially giving the Small Pocks, by Inoculation, to One of my Children, and Two of my Slaves, in order to prevent the hazard of Life… . and they never took one grain or drop of Medicine since, & are perfectly well.
By “clamour” he is referring to the public commotion in Boston reacting to his introduction of smallpox inoculation. Public statement in the Gazette (Jul 10-17), No. 85, 1721. As quoted and cited in Reginald H. Fitz, 'Zabdiel Boylston, Inoculator, and the Epidemic of Smallpox in Boston in 1721', Bulletin of the Johns Hopkins Hospital (1911), 22, 319.
Science quotes on:  |  Clamor (3)  |  Hazard (11)  |  Healthy (9)  |  Inoculation (7)  |  Medicine (238)  |  Smallpox (9)

In Cairo, I secured a few grains of wheat that had slumbered for more than thirty centuries in an Egyptian tomb. As I looked at them this thought came into my mind: If one of those grains had been planted on the banks of the Nile the year after it grew, and all its lineal descendants had been planted and replanted from that time until now, its progeny would to-day be sufficiently numerous to feed the teeming millions of the world. An unbroken chain of life connects the earliest grains of wheat with the grains that we sow and reap. There is in the grain of wheat an invisible something which has power to discard the body that we see, and from earth and air fashion a new body so much like the old one that we cannot tell the one from the other.…This invisible germ of life can thus pass through three thousand resurrections.
In In His Image (1922), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (116)  |  Bank (4)  |  Body (144)  |  Century (66)  |  Chain (32)  |  Descendant (9)  |  Discard (12)  |  DNA (62)  |  Earth (356)  |  Egypt (16)  |  Fashion (17)  |  Feeding (7)  |  Germ (23)  |  Growth (92)  |  Invisible (19)  |  Life (642)  |  Million (54)  |  New (197)  |  Nile (2)  |  Old (53)  |  Pass (32)  |  Planting (3)  |  Power (173)  |  Progeny (5)  |  Reap (4)  |  Resurrection (2)  |  Slumber (3)  |  Sow (4)  |  Sufficient (18)  |  Teeming (2)  |  Thought (245)  |  Thousand (70)  |  Time (279)  |  Today (44)  |  Tomb (4)  |  Unbroken (5)  |  Wheat (6)  |  World (404)

In every outthrust headland, in every curving beach, in every grain of sand there is a story of the earth.
In 'Our Ever-Changing Shore', Holiday (Jul 1958). Collected in Lost Woods: The Discovered Writing of Rachel Carson (2011), 114.
Science quotes on:  |  Beach (11)  |  Coast (11)  |  Earth (356)  |  Geology (173)  |  Sand (18)  |  Story (32)

It is quite possible that mathematics was invented in the ancient Middle East to keep track of tax receipts and grain stores. How odd that out of this should come a subtle scientific language that can effectively describe and predict the most arcane aspects of the Universe.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Describe (9)  |  Invent (8)  |  Science And Mathematics (5)  |  Tax (17)  |  Universe (374)

One summer day, while I was walking along the country road on the farm where I was born, a section of the stone wall opposite me, and not more than three or four yards distant, suddenly fell down. Amid the general stillness and immobility about me the effect was quite startling. ... It was the sudden summing up of half a century or more of atomic changes in the material of the wall. A grain or two of sand yielded to the pressure of long years, and gravity did the rest.
Under the Apple-Trees (1916), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (204)  |  Change (203)  |  Country (71)  |  Effect (100)  |  Entropy (32)  |  Fall (51)  |  Farm (11)  |  Gravity (73)  |  Material (90)  |  Pressure (21)  |  Road (30)  |  Sand (18)  |  Section (3)  |  Startling (5)  |  Stillness (3)  |  Stone (41)  |  Suddenness (4)  |  Sum (22)  |  Summer (20)  |  Walk (33)  |  Wall (17)  |  Yielding (2)

Populations of bacteria live in the spumes of volcanic thermal vents on the ocean floor, multiplying in water above the boiling point. And far beneath Earth's surface, to a depth of 2 miles (3.2 km) or more, dwell the SLIMES (subsurface lithoautotrophic microbial ecosystems), unique assemblages of bacteria and fungi that occupy pores in the interlocking mineral grains of igneous rock and derive their energy from inorganic chemicals. The SLIMES are independent of the world above, so even if all of it were burned to a cinder, they would carry on and, given enough time, probably evolve new life-forms able to re-enter the world of air and sunlight.
'Vanishing Before Our Eyes', Time (26 Apr 2000).
Science quotes on:  |  Air (116)  |  Bacteria (28)  |  Cinder (5)  |  Energy (138)  |  Evolution (408)  |  Fungus (2)  |  Igneous (2)  |  Life (642)  |  Life-Form (4)  |  Microbe (12)  |  Ocean (83)  |  Population (56)  |  Pore (5)  |  Rock (77)  |  Slime (5)  |  Sunlight (14)  |  Volcano (30)

Science is simply the classification of the common knowledge of the common people. It is bringing together the things we all know and putting them together so we can use them. This is creation and finds its analogy in Nature, where the elements are combined in certain ways to give us fruits or flowers or grain.
In Elbert Hubbard (ed. and publ.), The Philistine (Dec 1907), 26, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (38)  |  Bringing (10)  |  Classification (71)  |  Combination (57)  |  Common (63)  |  Creation (177)  |  Element (94)  |  Flower (47)  |  Fruit (52)  |  Knowledge (928)  |  Nature (721)  |  People (90)  |  Science (1194)  |  Together (27)  |  Usefulness (65)

The more fodder, the more flesh; the more flesh, the more manure; the more manure, the more grain.
Letters on the Utilization of London Sewage (1865)
Science quotes on:  |  Fertilizer (9)  |  Flesh (16)  |  Manure (6)  |  Sewage (4)

To see a World in a grain of Sand,
And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand,
And Eternity in an hour.
William Blake and Alexander Gilchrist (ed.), Life of William Blake: with selections from his poems and other writings (1880), Vol. 2, 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Eternity (28)  |  Flower (47)  |  Hand (61)  |  Hold (32)  |  Hour (25)  |  Infinity (50)  |  Sand (18)  |  World (404)

Upon viewing the milt or semen Masculinum of a living Codfish with a Microscope, such Numbers of Animalcules with long Tails were found therein, that at least ten thousand of them were supposed to exist in the quantity of a Grain of Sand.
Science quotes on:  |  Animalcule (9)  |  Cod (2)  |  Fish (63)  |  Microbiology (8)  |  Microscope (56)  |  Sand (18)

We are consuming our forests three times faster than they are being reproduced. Some of the richest timber lands of this continent have already been destroyed, and not replaced, and other vast areas are on the verge of destruction. Yet forests, unlike mines, can be so handled as to yield the best results of use, without exhaustion, just like grain fields.
Address to the Deep Waterway Convention, Memphis, Tennessee (4 Oct 1907), 'Our National Inland Waterways Policy'. In American Waterways (1908), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Area (4)  |  Best (86)  |  Conservation (65)  |  Continent (33)  |  Deforestation (34)  |  Destruction (68)  |  Exhaustion (12)  |  Field (95)  |  Forest (72)  |  Land (48)  |  Management (9)  |  Mine (12)  |  Natural Resource (17)  |  Replacement (8)  |  Reproduction (48)  |  Result (180)  |  Richest (2)  |  Timber (7)  |  Vast (37)  |  Verge (2)  |  Yield (14)

We have several stones whose generation is incomprehensible unless it is supposed that they come from some kind of seed, if I may be permitted to use this term; that is to say, from a germ in which the organic particles of these stones are enclosed ‘en petit’, just as those of the largest plants are enclosed in the germs of their grains.
In Histoire de l' Académie Royale des Sciences Annee: Avec les Memoires de Mathematique et de Physique (1702), 230.
Science quotes on:  |  Generation (82)  |  Germ (23)  |  Incomprehensible (4)  |  Kind (47)  |  Largest (6)  |  Organic (33)  |  Particle (62)  |  Plant (131)  |  Seed (32)  |  Stone (41)  |  Supposed (3)  |  Term (56)

… our “Physick” and “Anatomy” have embraced such infinite varieties of being, have laid open such new worlds in time and space, have grappled, not unsuccessfully, with such complex problems, that the eyes of Vesalius and of Harvey might be dazzled by the sight of the tree that has grown out of their grain of mustard seed.
A Lay Sermon, delivered at St. Martin's Hall (7 Jan 1866), 'On the Advisableness of Improving Natural Knowledge', published in The Fortnightly Review (1866), Vol. 3, 629.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (46)  |  Complexity (65)  |  Dazzling (10)  |  Grappling (2)  |  William Harvey (24)  |  Problem (250)  |  Seed (32)  |  Time And Space (12)  |  Tree (113)  |  Variety (40)  |  Andreas Vesalius (14)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

who invites your feedback

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.