Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Genius is two percent inspiration, ninety-eight percent perspiration.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index O > Category: Opposite

Opposite Quotes (39 quotes)

A great truth is a truth whose opposite is also a great truth.
Essay on Freud (1937). Quoted in Charles W. Misner, Kip S. Thorne and John Archibald Wheeler, Gravitation (1973), 1208.
Science quotes on:  |  Truth (750)

A quarter-horse jockey learns to think of a twenty-second race as if it were occurring across twenty minutes—in distinct parts, spaced in his consciousness. Each nuance of the ride comes to him as he builds his race. If you can do the opposite with deep time, living in it and thinking in it until the large numbers settle into place, you can sense how swiftly the initial earth packed itself together, how swiftly continents have assembled and come apart, how far and rapidly continents travel, how quickly mountains rise and how quickly they disintegrate and disappear.
Annals of the Former World
Science quotes on:  |  Across (9)  |  Assemble (8)  |  Build (80)  |  Consciousness (71)  |  Continent (39)  |  Deep (81)  |  Disappear (22)  |  Disintegrate (3)  |  Distinct (29)  |  Earth (487)  |  Far (77)  |  Initial (13)  |  Jockey (2)  |  Large (82)  |  Learn (160)  |  Live (186)  |  Minute (25)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Number (179)  |  Occur (26)  |  Pack (3)  |  Part (146)  |  Place (111)  |  Quickly (9)  |  Race (76)  |  Rapidly (10)  |  Ride (6)  |  Rise (51)  |  Sense (240)  |  Settle (10)  |  Space (154)  |  Swiftly (4)  |  Think (205)  |  Time (439)  |  Together (48)  |  Travel (40)

Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius - and a lot of courage - to move in the opposite direction.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Big (33)  |  Complex (78)  |  Courage (39)  |  Direction (56)  |  Fool (70)  |  Genius (186)  |  Intelligent (35)  |  Lot (23)  |  Move (58)  |  Touch (48)  |  Violent (15)

Borel makes the amusing supposition of a million monkeys allowed to play upon the keys of a million typewriters. What is the chance that this wanton activity should reproduce exactly all of the volumes which are contained in the library of the British Museum? It certainly is not a large chance, but it may be roughly calculated, and proves in fact to be considerably larger than the chance that a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen will separate into the two pure constituents. After we have learned to estimate such minute chances, and after we have overcome our fear of numbers which are very much larger or very much smaller than those ordinarily employed, we might proceed to calculate the chance of still more extraordinary occurrences, and even have the boldness to regard the living cell as a result of random arrangement and rearrangement of its atoms. However, we cannot but feel that this would be carrying extrapolation too far. This feeling is due not merely to a recognition of the enormous complexity of living tissue but to the conviction that the whole trend of life, the whole process of building up more and more diverse and complex structures, which we call evolution, is the very opposite of that which we might expect from the laws of chance.
The Anatomy of Science (1926), 158-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Émile Borel (2)  |  Calculate (15)  |  Cell (125)  |  Chance (122)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Conviction (57)  |  Diversity (46)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Extraordinary (32)  |  Extrapolation (3)  |  Library (37)  |  Life (917)  |  Monkey (37)  |  Nitrogen (18)  |  Number (179)  |  Oxygen (49)  |  Structure (191)  |  Tissue (24)  |  Typewriter (6)

Even happiness itself may become habitual. There is a habit of looking at the bright side of things, and also of looking at the dark side. Dr. Johnson has said that the habit of looking at the best side of a thing is worth more to a man than a thousand pounds a year. And we possess the power, to a great extent, of so exercising the will as to direct the thoughts upon objects calculated to yield happiness and improvement rather than their opposites.
In Self-help: With Illustrations of Character and Conduct (1859, 1861), 405-406.
Science quotes on:  |  Bright (26)  |  Dark (49)  |  Habit (78)  |  Happiness (82)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Samuel Johnson (44)  |  Side (36)  |  Yield (23)

Everything which comes to be, comes to be out of, and everything which passes away passes away into, its opposite or something in between. And the things in between come out of the opposites—thus colors come out of pale and dark. So the things which come to be naturally all are or are out of opposites.
Aristotle
In 'Physics', Book 1, Chapter 2, 188b22, as translated by William Charlton, Physics: Books I and II (1983), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Color (78)  |  Dark (49)  |  Everything (120)  |  Exist (89)  |  Natural (128)  |  Natural Law (26)  |  Pale (4)  |  Pass (60)

For every expert there is an equal and opposite expert, but for every fact there is not necessarily an equal and opposite fact.
'Penetrating the Rhetoric', The Vision of the Anointed (1996), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Expert (42)  |  Fact (609)

Heroes and scholars represent the opposite extremes... The scholar struggles for the benefit of all humanity, sometimes to reduce physical effort, sometimes to reduce pain, and sometimes to postpone death, or at least render it more bearable. In contrast, the patriot sacrifices a rather substantial part of humanity for the sake of his own prestige. His statue is always erected on a pedestal of ruins and corpses... In contrast, all humanity crowns a scholar, love forms the pedestal of his statues, and his triumphs defy the desecration of time and the judgment of history.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999) 41-42.
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (54)  |  Contrast (16)  |  Corpse (5)  |  Crown (19)  |  Death (270)  |  Defiance (5)  |  Effort (94)  |  Hero (29)  |  History (302)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Love (164)  |  Pain (82)  |  Part (146)  |  Patriot (3)  |  Pedestal (2)  |  Prestige (9)  |  Reduction (35)  |  Render (17)  |  Ruin (23)  |  Sacrifice (24)  |  Sake (17)  |  Scholar (31)  |  Statue (9)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Substantial (7)  |  Time (439)  |  Triumph (33)

I have just received copies of “To-day” containing criticisms of my letter. I am in no way surprised to find that these criticisms are not only unfair and misleading in the extreme. They are misleading in so far that anyone reading them would be led to believe the exact opposite of the truth. It is quite possible that I, an old and trained engineer and chronic experimenter, should put an undue value upon truth; but it is common to all scientific men. As nothing but the truth is of any value to them, they naturally dislike things that are not true. ... While my training has, perhaps, warped my mind so that I put an undue value upon truth, their training has been such as to cause them to abhor exact truth and logic.
[Replying to criticism by Colonel Acklom and other religious parties attacking Maxim's earlier contribution to the controversy about the modern position of Christianity.]
In G.K. Chesterton, 'The Maxims of Maxim', Daily News (25 Feb 1905). Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Abhorrence (8)  |  Belief (400)  |  Cause (231)  |  Chronic (5)  |  Content (39)  |  Copy (13)  |  Criticism (52)  |  Dislike (11)  |  Engineer (72)  |  Exactness (18)  |  Experimenter (18)  |  Leading (14)  |  Letter (36)  |  Logic (187)  |  Mind (544)  |  Misleading (12)  |  Naturally (7)  |  Old (104)  |  Reading (51)  |  Receive (39)  |  Surprise (44)  |  Today (86)  |  Training (39)  |  Truth (750)  |  Undue (3)  |  Unfair (6)  |  Value (180)

I have often been amused by our vulgar tendency to take complex issues, with solutions at neither extreme of a continuum of possibilities, and break them into dichotomies, assigning one group to one pole and the other to an opposite end, with no acknowledgment of subtleties and intermediate positions–and nearly always with moral opprobrium attached to opponents.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledgment (10)  |  Amused (2)  |  Assign (5)  |  Attach (8)  |  Break (33)  |  Complex (78)  |  Continuum (5)  |  Dichotomy (4)  |  End (141)  |  Extreme (36)  |  Group (52)  |  Intermediate (16)  |  Issue (37)  |  Moral (100)  |  Nearly (19)  |  Often (69)  |  Opponent (10)  |  Pole (14)  |  Position (54)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Solution (168)  |  Subtlety (9)  |  Tendency (40)  |  Vulgar (11)

If catastrophic geology had at times pushed Nature to almost indecent extremes of haste, uniformitarian geology, on the other hand, had erred in the opposite direction, and pictured Nature when she was 'young and wantoned [sic] in her prime', as moving with the lame sedateness of advanced middle age. It became necessary, therefore, as Dr. [Samuel] Haughton expresses it, 'to hurry up the phenomena'.
The Age of the Earth and other Geological Studies (1908), 303.
Science quotes on:  |  Age Of The Earth (10)  |  Catastrophe (17)  |  Err (4)  |  Extreme (36)  |  Geology (187)  |  Haste (4)  |  Hurry (5)  |  Lame (3)  |  Middle Age (6)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Uniformitarianism (7)  |  Wanton (2)

In science one tries to tell people, in such a way as to be understood by everyone, something that no one ever knew before. But in poetry, it’s the exact opposite.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Everyone (20)  |  Exact (38)  |  Know (321)  |  People (269)  |  Poetry (96)  |  Science (1699)  |  Tell (67)  |  Try (103)  |  Understand (189)

Nature! … She is the only artist; working-up the most uniform material into utter opposites; arriving, without a trace of effort, at perfection, at the most exact precision, though always veiled under a certain softness.
As quoted by T.H. Huxley, in Norman Lockyer (ed.), 'Nature: Aphorisms by Goethe', Nature (1870), 1, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrive (17)  |  Artist (46)  |  Effort (94)  |  Exact (38)  |  Forming (6)  |  Material (124)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Precision (38)  |  Softness (2)  |  Trace (39)  |  Uniform (14)  |  Utter (3)  |  Veil (12)

Ninety-nine and nine-tenths of the earth’s volume must forever remain invisible and untouchable. Because more than 97 per cent of it is too hot to crystallize, its body is extremely weak. The crust, being so thin, must bend, if, over wide areas, it becomes loaded with glacial ice, ocean water or deposits of sand and mud. It must bend in the opposite sense if widely extended loads of such material be removed. This accounts for … the origin of chains of high mountains … and the rise of lava to the earth’s surface.
Presidential speech to the Geological Society of America at Cambridge, Mass. (1932). As quoted in New York Times (20 Sep 1957), 23. Also summarized in Popular Mechanics (Apr 1933), 513.
Science quotes on:  |  Bend (8)  |  Chain (38)  |  Crust (17)  |  Crystal (47)  |  Deposit (9)  |  Earth (487)  |  Glacier (13)  |  Ice (29)  |  Lava (3)  |  Load (8)  |  Material (124)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Mud (14)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Origin (77)  |  Removal (10)  |  Rise (51)  |  Sand (25)  |  Surface (74)  |  Water (244)

Pavlov’s data on the two fundamental antagonistic nervous processes—stimulation and inhibition—and his profound generalizations regarding them, in particular, that these processes are parts of a united whole, that they are in a state of constant conflict and constant transition of the one to the other, and his views on the dominant role they play in the formation of the higher nervous activity—all those belong to the most established natural—scientific validation of the Marxist dialectal method. They are in complete accord with the Leninist concepts on the role of the struggle between opposites in the evolution, the motion of matter.
In E. A. Asratyan, I. P. Pavlov: His Life and Work (1953), 153.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (21)  |  Activity (97)  |  Belonging (12)  |  Concept (102)  |  Conflict (49)  |  Constancy (4)  |  Data (100)  |  Dominance (5)  |  Establishment (29)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Formation (54)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Generalization (26)  |  Higher (28)  |  Inhibition (10)  |  Lenin_Vladimir (3)  |  Karl Marx (21)  |  Matter (270)  |  Motion (127)  |  Natural (128)  |  Nerve (66)  |  Part (146)  |  Particular (54)  |  Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (18)  |  Play (60)  |  Process (201)  |  Profoundness (2)  |  Regard (58)  |  Role (35)  |  Stimulation (12)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Transition (15)  |  Union (16)  |  Whole (122)

Psychologism is, I believe, correct only in so far as it insists upon what may be called 'methodological individualism' as opposed to 'methodological collectivism'; it rightly insists that the 'behaviour' and the 'actions' of collectives, such as states or social groups, must be reduced to the behaviour and to the actions of human individuals. But the belief that the choice of such an individualist method implies the choice of a psychological method is mistaken.
The Open Society and Its Enemies (1945), Vol. 22, 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Behaviour (24)  |  Belief (400)  |  Choice (64)  |  Collective (16)  |  Collectivism (2)  |  Correctness (11)  |  Group (52)  |  Human (445)  |  Implication (14)  |  Individual (177)  |  Individualism (2)  |  Insistence (9)  |  Method (154)  |  Methodology (8)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Psychological (10)  |  Society (188)  |  State (96)

Scientists have long been baffled by the existence of spontaneous order in the universe. The laws of thermodynamics seem to dictate the opposite, that nature should inexorably degenerate toward a state of greater disorder, greater entropy. Yet all around
John Mitchinson and John Lloyd, If Ignorance Is Bliss, Why Aren't There More Happy People?: Smart Quotes for Dumb Times (2009), 274.
Science quotes on:  |  Baffle (4)  |  Degenerate (8)  |  Dictate (9)  |  Disorder (19)  |  Entropy (40)  |  Existence (254)  |  Great (300)  |  Law (418)  |  Long (95)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Order (167)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Seem (89)  |  Spontaneous (12)  |  State (96)  |  Thermodynamics (27)  |  Toward (29)  |  Universe (563)

The difference between science and Congress is that in science facts mean everything and the illusions mean nothing. And in politics, it's just the opposite.
Anonymous
Seen attributed on the NPR website to perhaps congressman Rush Holt (Verification pending). Also seen recalled by NPR's Ira Flatow as: “I think it was Rush Holt who was quoted when he got into Congress, his saying, when I was a scientist, facts meant everything and illusions meant nothing. When I became a politician, illusions meant everything and facts meant nothing.” From program transcript for Science Friday (11 May 2012).
Science quotes on:  |  Congress (9)  |  Difference (208)  |  Everything (120)  |  Fact (609)  |  Illusion (38)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Politics (77)  |  Science (1699)

The engineer is concerned to travel from the abstract to the concrete. He begins with an idea and ends with an object. He journeys from theory to practice. The scientist’s job is the precise opposite. He explores nature with his telescopes or microscopes, or much more sophisticated techniques, and feeds into a computer what he finds or sees in an attempt to define mathematically its significance and relationships. He travels from the real to the symbolic, from the concrete to the abstract. The scientist and the engineer are the mirror image of each other.
In The Development of Design (1981), 19-20.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (43)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Beginning (114)  |  Computer (84)  |  Concrete (21)  |  Definition (152)  |  End (141)  |  Engineer (72)  |  Exploration (93)  |  Idea (440)  |  Image (38)  |  Job (33)  |  Journey (19)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Microscope (68)  |  Mirror (21)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Object (110)  |  Practice (67)  |  Real (95)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Science And Engineering (11)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Significance (60)  |  Sophistication (8)  |  Symbolic (6)  |  Technique (41)  |  Telescope (74)  |  Theory (582)  |  Travelling (3)

The excessive increase of anything causes a reaction in the opposite direction.
Plato
The Republic
Science quotes on:  |  Reaction (59)

The harmony of the universe knows only one musical form - the legato; while the symphony of number knows only its opposite - the staccato. All attempts to reconcile this discrepancy are based on the hope that an accelerated staccato may appear to our senses as a legato.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accelerate (5)  |  Appear (55)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Base (43)  |  Discrepancy (5)  |  Form (210)  |  Harmony (55)  |  Hope (129)  |  Know (321)  |  Musical (3)  |  Number (179)  |  Reconcile (10)  |  Sense (240)  |  Symphony (4)  |  Universe (563)

The inventor and the research man are confused because they both examine results of physical or chemical operations. But they are exact opposites, mirror images of one another. The research man does something and does not care [exactly] what it is that happens, he measures whatever it is. The inventor wants something to happen, but does not care how it happens or what it is that happens if it is not what he wants.
Aphorism listed Frederick Seitz, The Cosmic Inventor: Reginald Aubrey Fessenden (1866-1932) (1999), 54, being Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, Held at Philadelphia For Promoting Useful Knowledge, Vol. 86, Pt. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (73)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Exactness (18)  |  Examination (60)  |  Happening (32)  |  Image (38)  |  Inventor (49)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Mirror (21)  |  Operation (96)  |  Physical (94)  |  Researcher (17)  |  Result (250)  |  Want (120)

The law of nature is alternation for evermore. Each electrical state superinduces the opposite.
In Self-Reliance (1888, 1991), 111.
Science quotes on:  |  Alternation (5)  |  Electrical (10)  |  Law Of Nature (52)  |  State (96)

The next time you make an assumption, see what happens when you do the opposite.
As originally composed on Twitter. Posted on the copyblogger web page 'What's the Ultimate Creativity Killer', 21 May 2008.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (49)  |  Creativity (66)

The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement. But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Correct (53)  |  False (79)  |  Profound (46)  |  Statement (56)  |  Truth (750)

The same set of statistics can produce opposite conclusions at different levels of aggregation.
'Penetrating the Rhetoric', The Vision of the Anointed (1996), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Statistics (125)

The way of pure research is opposed to all the copy-book maxims concerning the virtues of industry and a fixed purpose, and the evils of guessing, but it is damned useful when it comes off. It is the diametrical opposite of Edison’s reputed method of trying every conceivable expedient until he hit the right one. It requires, not diligence, but experience, information, and a good nose for the essence of a problem.
Letter to Paul de Kruif (3 Aug 1933), as quoted in Nathan Reingold, Science in America: A Documentary History 1900-1939 (1981), 409.
Science quotes on:  |  Diligence (14)  |  Thomas Edison (74)  |  Evil (67)  |  Expedience (2)  |  Experience (268)  |  Guess (36)  |  Industry (91)  |  Information (102)  |  Maxim (13)  |  Method (154)  |  Nose (9)  |  Opposed (2)  |  Problem (362)  |  Pure (62)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Requirement (45)  |  Research (517)  |  Right (144)  |  Trying (18)  |  Usefulness (70)  |  Virtue (55)

The world always makes the assumption that the exposure of an error is identical with the discovery of truth that the error and truth are simply opposite. They are nothing of the sort. What the world turns to, when it is cured on one error, is usually simply another error, and maybe one worse than the first one.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (49)  |  Badly (9)  |  Cure (88)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Error (230)  |  Exposure (5)  |  First (174)  |  Identical (17)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Simply (34)  |  Sort (32)  |  Truth (750)  |  Turn (72)  |  Usually (20)  |  World (667)

There are also two kinds of truths, those of reasoning and those of fact. Truths of reasoning are necessary and their opposite is impossible: truths of fact are contingent and their opposite is possible. When a truth is necessary, reason can be found by analysis, resolving it into more simple ideas and truths, until we come to those which are primary.
The Monadology and Other Philosophical Writings (1714), trans. Robert Latta (1898), 235-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (123)  |  Fact (609)  |  Idea (440)  |  Impossible (68)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Truth (750)

Things may be opposite without being contrary.
Opposite, though one could not exist without the other. The North Pole is opposite to the South, but there could be no North Pole without a South.
In Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), lxiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Contrary (22)  |  Exist (89)  |  North Pole (3)  |  South Pole (2)

To do just the opposite is also a form of imitation.
Aphorisms (1775-1779) trans. Franz H. Mautner and Henry Hatfield. In Fred R. Shapiro and Joseph Epstein, The Yale Book of Quotations (2006), 459:1.
Science quotes on:  |  Imitation (17)

To regulate something always requires two opposing factors. You cannot regulate by a single factor. To give an example, the traffic in the streets could not be controlled by a green light or a red light alone. It needs a green light and a red light as well. The ratio between retine and promine determines whether there is any motion, any growth, or not. Two different inclinations have to be there in readiness to make the cells proliferate.
In Ralph W. Moss, Free Radical (1988), 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Cell (125)  |  Determination (53)  |  Green (23)  |  Growth (111)  |  Inclination (20)  |  Motion (127)  |  Readiness (5)  |  Red (25)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Street (17)  |  Traffic (5)

Truth can only be found by the human intellect, exercised in perfect freedom, and trained to submit itself to the facts of nature. This is the essence of the Scientific Method, which is the exact opposite of the Theological Method. Science teaches men to think with absolute independence of all arbitrary authority, but to submit all their thoughts to the test of actual experiences of Nature. Christianity teaches them to think only according to its own foregone dogmatic conclusions, and to stick to these dogmatic conclusion in defiance of all possible experience.
Leading article in Francis Ellingwood Abbot (ed.), The Index (1 Jan 1880), Volume 11, No. 523, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (65)  |  Actual (34)  |  Arbitrary (16)  |  Authority (50)  |  Christianity (8)  |  Defiance (5)  |  Dogma (25)  |  Experience (268)  |  Fact (609)  |  Freedom (76)  |  Human (445)  |  Independence (32)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Submit (12)  |  Teach (102)  |  Test (96)  |  Theology (35)  |  Think (205)  |  Thought (374)  |  Train (25)  |  Truth (750)

Unfortunately, the study of organic remains is beset with two evils, which, though of an opposite character, do not neutralize each other so much as at first sight might be anticipated: the one consisting of a strong desire to find similar organic remains in supposed equivalent deposits, even at great distances; the other being an equally strong inclination to discover new species, often as it would seem for the sole purpose of appending the apparently magical word nobis.
In Geological Manual (1832), Preface, iii.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparently (11)  |  Character (82)  |  Consisting (5)  |  Deposit (9)  |  Desire (101)  |  Discover (115)  |  Distance (54)  |  Equally (18)  |  Equivalent (14)  |  Evil (67)  |  Find (248)  |  First Sight (3)  |  Inclination (20)  |  Magic (67)  |  New (340)  |  Organic (48)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Remains (9)  |  Seem (89)  |  Similar (22)  |  Sole (9)  |  Species (181)  |  Strong (47)  |  Study (331)  |  Supposed (3)  |  Unfortunately (14)  |  Word (221)

What opposite discoveries we have seen!
(Signs of true genius, and of empty pockets.)
One makes new noses, one a guillotine,
One breaks your bones, one sets them in their sockets;
But vaccination certainly has been
A kind antithesis to Congreve's rockets, ...
Don Juan (1819, 1858), Canto I, CCXXIX, 35. Referring to Edward Jenner's work on vaccination (started 14 May 1796), later applied by Napoleon who caused his soldiers to be vaccinated. Sir William Congreve's shells, invented in 1804, proved very effective at the battle of Leipzig (1813).
Science quotes on:  |  Antithesis (5)  |  Bone (57)  |  Break (33)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Emptiness (6)  |  Genius (186)  |  New (340)  |  Nose (9)  |  Pocket (5)  |  Rocket (29)  |  Setting (6)  |  Socket (2)  |  Vaccination (5)

George Washington Carver quote: When our thoughts—which bring actions—are filled with hate against anyone, Negro or white
Image credit: Fugue cc-by-2.0 (source)
When our thoughts—which bring actions—are filled with hate against anyone, Negro or white, we are in a living hell. That is as real as hell will ever be.
While hate for our fellow man puts us in a living hell, holding good thoughts for them brings us an opposite state of living, one of happiness, success, peace. We are then in heaven.
In Alvin D. Smith, George Washington Carver: Man of God (1954), 27-28. Cited in Linda O. McMurry, George Washington Carver, Scientist and Symbol (1982), 107. Smith's book is about his recollections of G.W. Carver's Sunday School classes at Tuskegee, some 40 years earlier. Webmaster, who has not yet been able to see the original book, cautions this quote may be the gist of Carver's words, rather than a verbatim quote.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Fellow (29)  |  Good (228)  |  Happiness (82)  |  Hate (26)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Hell (29)  |  Peace (58)  |  Success (202)  |  Thought (374)

William James used to preach the “will to believe.” For my part, I should wish to preach the “will to doubt.” … What is wanted is not the will to believe, but the wish to find out, which is the exact opposite.
From Conway Memorial Lecture, South Place Institute, London (24 Mar 1922), printed as Free Thought and Official Propaganda (1922), 14. Collected in Sceptical Essays (1928, 2004), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Doubt (121)  |  Enquiry (75)  |  Will (29)  |  Wish (62)

[The Elements] are mutually bound together, the lighter being restrained by the heavier, so that they cannot fly off; while, on the contrary, from the lighter tending upwards, the heavier are so suspended, that they cannot fall down. Thus, by an equal tendency in an opposite direction, each of them remains in its appropriate place, bound together by the never-ceasing revolution of the world.
In The Natural History of Pliny (1855), Vol. 1, 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Direction (56)  |  Element (129)  |  Heavier (2)  |  Lighter (2)  |  Revolution (56)  |  Suspended (4)  |  Upwards (4)  |  World (667)

[The Niagara Falls] would be more impressive if it flowed the other way.
Quoted in 'Professors, Politics, and Palaver', Science (19 Aug 1977), 197, 742.
Science quotes on:  |  Flow (31)  |  Impressive (11)  |  Niagara Falls (4)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.