Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I was going to record talking... the foil was put on; I then shouted 'Mary had a little lamb',... and the machine reproduced it perfectly.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Cure

Cure Quotes (122 quotes)

...on opening the incubator I experienced one of those rare moments of intense emotion which reward the research worker for all his pains: at first glance I saw that the broth culture, which the night before had been very turbid was perfectly clear: all the bacteria had vanished... as for my agar spread it was devoid of all growth and what caused my emotion was that in a flash I understood: what causes my spots was in fact an invisible microbe, a filterable virus, but a virus parasitic on bacteria. Another thought came to me also, If this is true, the same thing will have probably occurred in the sick man. In his intestine, as in my test-tube, the dysentery bacilli will have dissolved away under the action of their parasite. He should now be cured.
In Allan Chase, Magic Shots: A Human and Scientific Account of the Long and Continuing Struggle to Eradicated Infectious Diseases by Vaccination (1982), 249-250. Also in Allan J. Tobin and Jennie Dusheck, Asking About Life (2005), 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Bacteriophage (2)  |  Cause (541)  |  Culture (143)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Flash (49)  |  Glance (34)  |  Growth (187)  |  Intestine (14)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Man (2251)  |  Microbe (28)  |  Moment (253)  |  Pain (136)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Rare (89)  |  Research (664)  |  Reward (68)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sick (81)  |  Spread (83)  |  Test (211)  |  Test Tube (12)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Understood (156)  |  Virus (27)  |  Will (2355)

Quaedam remedia graviora ipsis periculis sunt.
Some cures are worse than the dangers they combat.
Controversiae, 6.7. In M. Winterbottom (ed.), The Elder Seneca (1974), Vol. 1, 520.
Science quotes on:  |  Combat (15)  |  Danger (115)  |  Worse (24)

Macbeth: How does your patient, doctor?
Doctor: Not so sick, my lord,
As she is troubled with thick-coming fancies,
That keep her from her rest.
Macbeth: Cure her of that.
Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,
Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
Raze out the written troubles of the brain,
And with some sweet oblivious antidote
Cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff
Which weighs upon the heart?
Doctor: Therein the patient
Must minister to himself.
Macbeth: Throw physic to the dogs; I'll none of it.
Macbeth (1606), V, iii.
Science quotes on:  |  Antidote (9)  |  Bosom (13)  |  Brain (270)  |  Cleanse (5)  |  Coming (114)  |  Disease (328)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Dog (70)  |  Heart (229)  |  Himself (461)  |  Lord (93)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minister (9)  |  Must (1526)  |  Oblivious (9)  |  Patient (199)  |  Peril (9)  |  Physic (517)  |  Pluck (5)  |  Psychiatry (26)  |  Rest (280)  |  Root (120)  |  Sick (81)  |  Small (477)  |  Sorrow (17)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Variant (9)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Writing (189)

A doctor is a man who writes prescriptions till the patient either dies or is cured by nature.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Die (86)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Patient (199)  |  Prescription (18)  |  Write (230)

A doctor who doesn’t say too many foolish things is a patient half-cured. (1921)
'Le Côté de Guermantes', À la recherche du temps perdu (1913-27).
Science quotes on:  |  Doctor (187)  |  Fool (116)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Patient (199)  |  Say (984)  |  Thing (1915)

A fool will not only pay for a “cure” that does him no good, but will write a testimonial to the effect that he was cured.
In Sinner Sermons: A Selection of the Best Paragraphs of E. W. Howe (1926), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Effect (393)  |  Fool (116)  |  Good (889)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Pay (43)  |  Testimonial (3)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)

A habit of basing convictions upon evidence, and of giving to them only that degree or certainty which the evidence warrants, would, if it became general, cure most of the ills from which the world suffers.
In Bertrand Russell and Paul Edwards (ed.), 'Preface', Why I Am Not a Christian: And Other Essays on Religion and Related Subjects (1957), vi.
Science quotes on:  |  Base (117)  |  Become (815)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Degree (276)  |  Evidence (248)  |  General (511)  |  Habit (168)  |  Most (1731)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Warrant (8)  |  World (1774)

A well-chosen anthology is a complete dispensary of medicine for the more common mental disorders, and may be used as much for prevention as cure.
'The Use of Poetry', On English Poetry (1922), 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Chosen (48)  |  Common (436)  |  Complete (204)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mental Disorder (2)  |  More (2559)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Well-Chosen (2)

All that Anatomie can doe is only to shew us the gross and sensible parts of the body, or the vapid and dead juices all which, after the most diligent search, will be noe more able to direct a physician how to cure a disease than how to make a man; for to remedy the defects of a part whose organicall constitution and that texture whereby it operates, he cannot possibly know, is alike hard, as to make a part which he knows not how is made. Now it is certaine and beyond controversy that nature performs all her operations on the body by parts so minute and insensible that I thinke noe body will ever hope or pretend, even by the assistance of glasses or any other intervention, to come to a sight of them, and to tell us what organicall texture or what kinde offerment (for whether it be done by one or both of these ways is yet a question and like to be soe always notwithstanding all the endeavours of the most accurate dissections) separate any part of the juices in any of the viscera, or tell us of what liquors the particles of these juices are, or if this could be donne (which it is never like to be) would it at all contribute to the cure of the diseases of those very parts which we so perfectly knew.
'Anatomie' (1668). Quoted in Kenneth Dewhurst (ed.), Dr. Thomas Sydenham (1624-1689): His Life and Original Writings (1966), 85-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Assistance (20)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Controversy (29)  |  Defect (31)  |  Diligence (20)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disease (328)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hope (299)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Juice (7)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Liquor (6)  |  Man (2251)  |  Minute (125)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Perform (121)  |  Physician (273)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Question (621)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Search (162)  |  Separate (143)  |  Sight (132)  |  Tell (340)  |  Viscera (2)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Almost every major systematic error which has deluded men for thousands of years relied on practical experience. Horoscopes, incantations, oracles, magic, witchcraft, the cures of witch doctors and of medical practitioners before the advent of modern medicine, were all firmly established through the centuries in the eyes of the public by their supposed practical successes. The scientific method was devised precisely for the purpose of elucidating the nature of things under more carefully controlled conditions and by more rigorous criteria than are present in the situations created by practical problems.
Personal Knowledge (1958), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Advent (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Care (186)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Century (310)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Condition (356)  |  Control (167)  |  Criteria (6)  |  Deluded (7)  |  Delusion (25)  |  Devising (7)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Elucidation (7)  |  Error (321)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Experience (467)  |  Eye (419)  |  Horoscope (4)  |  Incantation (5)  |  Magic (86)  |  Major (84)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Method (505)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Things (29)  |  Oracle (4)  |  Practical (200)  |  Practicality (6)  |  Practitioner (20)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Public (96)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reliance (10)  |  Rigor (27)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Situation (113)  |  Success (302)  |  Supposition (50)  |  System (537)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Witch Doctor (2)  |  Witchcraft (6)  |  Year (933)

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
Perhaps an older adage, but an example of its use appears in Pennsylvania Gazette (4 Feb 1734-5), about fire prevention, including taking care, moving live coals from a fireplace between rooms, for safety in a closed warming-pan. A midnight fire from a spilled ember might set your stairs on fire: “You may be forced, as I once was, to leap out of your windows, and hazard your necks to avoid being over-roasted.” As cited in Benjamin Franklin and J. Sparks (ed.), The Works of Benjamin Franklin (1840), Vol. 1, 134, footnote.
Science quotes on:  |  Ounce (8)  |  Pound (14)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Proverb (27)  |  Worth (169)

Any physician who advertises a positive cure for any disease, who issues nostrum testimonials, who sells his services to a secret remedy, or who diagnoses and treats by mail patients he has never seen, is a quack.
'The Sure-Cure School,' Collier’s Weekly (14 Jul 1906). Reprinted in The Great American Fraud (1907), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Advertising (9)  |  Disease (328)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Never (1087)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Positive (94)  |  Quack (18)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Secret (194)  |  Service (110)

As a scientist and geneticist I started to feel that science would probably soon reach the point where its interference into the life processes would be counterproductive if a properly designed governing policy was not implemented. A heavily overcrowded planet, ninety-five percent urbanized with nuclear energy as the main source of energy and with all aspects of life highly computerized, is not too pleasant a place for human life. The life of any individual soon will be predictable from birth to death. Medicine, able to cure almost everything, will make the load of accumulated defects too heavy in the next two or three centuries. The artificial prolongation of life, which looked like a very bright idea when I started research in aging about twenty-five years ago, has now lost its attractiveness for me. This is because I now know that the aging process is so multiform and complex that the real technology and chemistry of its prevention by artificial interference must be too complex and expensive. It would be the privilege of a few, not the method for the majority. I also was deeply concerned about the fact that most research is now either directly or indirectly related to military projects and objectives for power.
Quoted in 'Zhores A(leksandrovich) Medvedev', Contemporary Authors Online, Gale, 2002.
Science quotes on:  |  Aging (9)  |  All (4108)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Birth (147)  |  Bright (79)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Complex (188)  |  Concern (228)  |  Death (388)  |  Defect (31)  |  Design (195)  |  Energy (344)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feel (367)  |  Future (429)  |  Geneticist (16)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Governing (20)  |  Heavily (14)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Implement (13)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interference (21)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Majority (66)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Method (505)  |  Military (40)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Next (236)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Energy (15)  |  Objective (91)  |  Planet (356)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Process (423)  |  Project (73)  |  Reach (281)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Soon (186)  |  Start (221)  |  Technology (257)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

As soon as he ceased to be mad he became merely stupid. There are maladies we must not seek to cure because they alone protect us from others that are more serious.
'Le Côté de Guermantes', À la recherche du temps perdu (1913-27).
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Disease (328)  |  Mad (53)  |  Malady (8)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Protect (58)  |  Seek (213)  |  Serious (91)  |  Soon (186)  |  Stupid (35)

Better to hunt in fields, for health unbought, Than fee the doctor for a nauseous draught, The wise, for cure, on exercise depend; God never made his work for man to mend.
'To my Honoured Kinsman, John Dryden', The English Poets (1901), Vol. 2, 491.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Depend (228)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Field (364)  |  God (757)  |  Health (193)  |  Hunt (30)  |  Man (2251)  |  Money (170)  |  Never (1087)  |  Physician (273)  |  Wise (131)  |  Work (1351)

Building goes on briskly at the therapeutic Tower of Babel; what one recommends another condemns; what one gives in large doses another scarce dares to prescribe in small doses; and what one vaunts as a novelty another thinks not worth rescuing from merited oblivion. All is confusion, contradiction, inconceivable chaos. Every country, every place, almost every doctor, have their own pet remedies, without which they imagine their patients can not be cured; and all this changes every year, aye every mouth.
Weekly Medical Gazette, of Vienna
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Babel (3)  |  Briskly (2)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Change (593)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Country (251)  |  Dare (50)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Dose (16)  |  Give (202)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Inconceivable (12)  |  Large (394)  |  Merit (50)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Oblivion (10)  |  Patient (199)  |  Pet (8)  |  Place (177)  |  Prescribe (10)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Rescue (13)  |  Scarce (10)  |  Small (477)  |  Therapeutic (2)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tower (42)  |  Worth (169)  |  Year (933)

Cure the disease and kill the patient.
‘Of Friendship’, Essays.
Science quotes on:  |  Death (388)  |  Disease (328)  |  Kill (100)  |  Patient (199)

Doctor Johnson said, that in sickness there were three things that were material; the physician, the disease, and the patient: and if any two of these joined, then they get the victory; for, Ne Hercules quidem contra duos [Not even Hercules himself is a match for two]. If the physician and the patient join, then down goes the disease; for then the patient recovers: if the physician and the disease join, that is a strong disease; and the physician mistaking the cure, then down goes the patient: if the patient and the disease join, then down goes the physician; for he is discredited.
In 'A Collection of Apophthegms, New and Old' (1625). As given in Essays, Moral, Economical, and Political: A New Edition, With the Latin Quotations Translated (1813), No. 147, 308. The doctor is identified Ben Johnson by Forbes Winslow in his notes appended to Physic and Physicians (1842). Notes section, 39. Perhaps he means poet and playwright of stage comedy, Ben Jonson (1572-1637), also referred to in the book as “Benjamin Johnson” and once as “Dr. Johnson.” Note that Francis Bacon (1561-1626) died well before the life of writer Dr. Samuel Johnson (1709-1784).
Science quotes on:  |  Death (388)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Discredit (8)  |  Disease (328)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Down (456)  |  Hercules (9)  |  Himself (461)  |  Joined (3)  |  Ben Jonson (4)  |  Match (29)  |  Material (353)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Recovery (23)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Strong (174)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Two (937)  |  Victory (39)

Doctors are men who prescribe medicines of which they know little, to cure diseases of which they know less, in human beings of whom they know nothing. (1760)
In Robert Allan Weinberg, The Biology of Cancer (2006), 726. (Note: Webmaster has not yet found this quote, in this wording, in a major quotation reference book. If you know a primary print source, or correction, please contact Webmaster.)
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Disease (328)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Physician (273)  |  Prescribe (10)

Doctors can do almost anything nowadays, can't they, unless they kill you while they're trying to cure you.
Endless Night (2002), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Death (388)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Kill (100)  |  Physician (273)  |  Trying (144)

Doctors in all ages have made fortunes by killing their patients by means of their cures. The difference in psychiatry is that is the death of the soul.
From Address (Jul 1967), 'The Obvious', to the Congress on the Dialectics of Liberation, London, collected in David Cooper, The Dialectics of Liberation (2015), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Death (388)  |  Difference (337)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Kill (100)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Patient (199)  |  Psychiatry (26)  |  Soul (226)

Doctors think a lot of patients are cured who have simply quit in disgust.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Disgust (10)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Lot (151)  |  Patient (199)  |  Quit (10)  |  Simply (53)  |  Think (1086)

For what is that which we call evil but the absence of good? In the bodies of animals, disease and wounds mean nothing but the absence of health; for when a cure is effected, that does not mean that the evils which were present—namely, the diseases and wounds—go away from the body and dwell elsewhere: they altogether cease to exist; for the wound or disease is not a substance, but a defect in the fleshly substance,—the flesh itself being a substance, and therefore something good, of which those evils—that is, privations of the good which we call health—are accidents. Just in the same way, what are called vices in the soul are nothing but privations of natural good. And when they are cured, they are not transferred elsewhere: when they cease to exist in the healthy soul, they cannot exist anywhere else.
In Marcus Dods (ed.), J.F. Shaw (trans.), The Enchiridion of Augustine, Chap. 9, collected in The Works of Aurelius Augustine, Bishop of Hippo: A new translation (1873), Vol. 9, 181-182.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (18)  |  Accident (88)  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Call (769)  |  Cease (79)  |  Defect (31)  |  Disease (328)  |  Effect (393)  |  Evil (116)  |  Exist (443)  |  Good (889)  |  Health (193)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Mean (809)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Present (619)  |  Something (719)  |  Soul (226)  |  Substance (248)  |  Vice (40)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wound (26)

Good lawyers know that in many cases where the decisions are correct, the reasons that are given to sustain them may be entirely wrong. This is a thousand times more likely to be true in the practice of medicine than in that of the law, and hence the impropriety, not to say the folly, in spending your time in the discussion of medical belief and theories of cure that are more ingenious and seductive than they are profitable.
Introductory lecture (22 Sep 1885), Hahnemann Medical College, Chicago, printed in United States Medical Investigator (1885), 21, 526.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Correct (86)  |  Decision (91)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Folly (43)  |  Good (889)  |  Impropriety (4)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Lawyer (27)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Practice (204)  |  Profitable (28)  |  Reason (744)  |  Say (984)  |  Seductive (4)  |  Spending (24)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wrong (234)

Great healers, people of divine realization, do not cure by chance but by exact knowledge.
In Richard Alan Krieger, Civilization's Quotations (2002), 313.
Science quotes on:  |  Chance (239)  |  Divine (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Great (1574)  |  Healer (3)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  People (1005)  |  Realization (43)

He who cures a disease may be the skillfullest, but he who prevents it is the safest physician.
In Practical Spelling: A Text Book For Use in Commercial Schools (1902), 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Disease (328)  |  Physician (273)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Safest (7)  |  Skill (109)

He will manage the cure best who has foreseen what is to happen from the present state of matters.
In 'The Book of Prognostics', Part 1 (400 BC), as translated by Francis Adams, The Genuine Works of Hippocrates (1849), Vol. 1, 113. Also seen translated as “He will manage the cure best who foresees what is to happen from the present condition of the patient.”
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Condition (356)  |  Foresee (19)  |  Happen (274)  |  Manage (23)  |  Matter (798)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Present (619)  |  Prognosis (5)  |  State (491)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Will (2355)

HOMŒOPATHY, n. A school of medicine midway between Allopathy and Christian Science. To the last both the others are distinctly inferior, for Christian Science will cure imaginary diseases, and they can 
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  139.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Christian (43)  |  Christian Science (3)  |  Disease (328)  |  Homopathy (2)  |  Humour (116)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Last (426)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Other (2236)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Will (2355)

I boast nothing, but plainely say, we all labour against our owne cure, for death is the cure of all diseases.
Religio Medici (1642), Part I, Section 9. In L. C. Martin (ed.), Thomas Browne: Religio Medici and Other Works (1964), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Death (388)  |  Disease (328)  |  Labour (98)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Say (984)

I confess that Magic teacheth many superfluous things, and curious prodigies for ostentation; leave them as empty things, yet be not ignorant of their causes. But those things which are for the profit of men—for the turning away of evil events, for the destroying of sorceries, for the curing of diseases, for the exterminating of phantasms, for the preserving of life, honor, or fortune—may be done without offense to God or injury to religion, because they are, as profitable, so necessary.
In De Occulta Philosophia (1533), Vol. 1. Translation by J.F. (1651) reprinted as The Philosophy of Natural Magic (1913), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Confess (42)  |  Curious (91)  |  Disease (328)  |  Empty (80)  |  Event (216)  |  Evil (116)  |  Exterminate (8)  |  Fortune (49)  |  God (757)  |  Honor (54)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Injury (36)  |  Life (1795)  |  Magic (86)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Offense (4)  |  Phantasm (3)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Preserving (18)  |  Profit (52)  |  Profitable (28)  |  Religion (361)  |  Sorcery (5)  |  Superfluous (21)  |  Teach (277)  |  Thing (1915)

I prefer the spagyric chemical physicians, for they do not consort with loafers or go about gorgeous in satins, silks and velvets, gold rings on their fingers, silver daggers hanging at their sides and white gloves on their hands, but they tend their work at the fire patiently day and night. They do not go promenading, but seek their recreation in the laboratory, wear plain learthern dress and aprons of hide upon which to wipe their hands, thrust their fingers amongst the coals, into dirt and rubbish and not into golden rings. They are sooty and dirty like the smiths and charcoal burners, and hence make little show, make not many words and gossip with their patients, do not highly praise their own remedies, for they well know that the work must praise the master, not the master praise his work. They well know that words and chatter do not help the sick nor cure them... Therefore they let such things alone and busy themselves with working with their fires and learning the steps of alchemy. These are distillation, solution, putrefaction, extraction, calcination, reverberation, sublimination, fixation, separation, reduction, coagulation, tinction, etc.
Quoted in R. Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 150. [Spagyric is a form of herbalism based on alchemic procedures of preparation.]
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemy (30)  |  Alone (311)  |  Apron (2)  |  Busy (28)  |  Calcination (4)  |  Charcoal (10)  |  Chatter (3)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Coagulation (5)  |  Coal (57)  |  Dagger (3)  |  Day And Night (3)  |  Dirt (15)  |  Dirty (17)  |  Distillation (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Extraction (9)  |  Finger (44)  |  Fire (189)  |  Fixation (5)  |  Glove (4)  |  Gold (97)  |  Golden (45)  |  Gorgeous (2)  |  Gossip (8)  |  Hand (143)  |  Help (105)  |  Hide (69)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Learning (274)  |  Leather (4)  |  Little (707)  |  Loafer (2)  |  Master (178)  |  Must (1526)  |  Patience (56)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Praise (26)  |  Putrefaction (4)  |  Recreation (20)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Reverberation (3)  |  Ring (16)  |  Rubbish (12)  |  Satin (2)  |  Seek (213)  |  Separation (57)  |  Show (346)  |  Sick (81)  |  Side (233)  |  Silk (13)  |  Silver (46)  |  Smith (3)  |  Solution (267)  |  Soot (9)  |  Step (231)  |  Tend (124)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thrust (12)  |  Velvet (4)  |  White (127)  |  Wipe (6)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

If a lot of cures are suggested for a disease, it means that the disease is incurable.
The Cherry Orchard (1904), Act 1. Trans. Elisaveta Fen.
Science quotes on:  |  Disease (328)  |  Incurable (10)  |  Lot (151)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)

If a physician make a large incision with an operating knife and cure it, or if he open a tumor (over the eye) with an operating knife, and saves the eye, he shall receive ten shekels in money. …
If a physician make a large incision with an operating knife, and kill him, or open a tumor with an operating knife, and cut out the eye, his hands shall be cut off. ...
If a physician heal the broken bone or diseased soft part of a man, the patient shall pay the physician five shekels in money.
[The Code of Hammurabi (a king of ancient Babylon), the earliest well-preserved ancient law code, circa 1760 B.C.]
Hammurabi
In L. W. King (trans.), The Code of Hammurabi (1910), 22, No. 215, 218 and 221.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Babylon (7)  |  Bone (95)  |  Broken (56)  |  Code (31)  |  Cut (114)  |  Eye (419)  |  Kill (100)  |  Knife (23)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Money (170)  |  Open (274)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Receive (114)  |  Save (118)  |  Soft (29)  |  Surgery (51)

If Louis Pasteur were to come out of his grave because he heard that the cure for cancer still had not been found, NIH would tell him, “Of course we'll give you assistance. Now write up exactly what you will be doing during the three years of your grant.” Pasteur would say, “Thank you very much,” and would go back to his grave. Why? Because research means going into the unknown. If you know what you are going to do in science, then you are stupid! This is like telling Michelangelo or Renoir that he must tell you in advance how many reds and how many blues he will buy, and exactly how he will put those colors together.
Interview for Saturday Evening Post (Jan/Feb 1981), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Assistance (20)  |  Back (390)  |  Blue (56)  |  Buonarroti_Michelangelo (2)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Color (137)  |  Course (409)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Finding (30)  |  Giving (11)  |  Grant (73)  |  Grave (52)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Paint (22)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Red (35)  |  Research (664)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Still (613)  |  Stupid (35)  |  Stupidity (39)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thank You (8)  |  Together (387)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)  |  Year (933)  |  Years (5)

If more of our resources were invested in preventing sickness and accidents, fewer would have to be spent on costly cures. … In short, we should build a true “health” system—and not a “sickness” system alone.
'Special Message to the Congress Proposing a National Health Strategy' (18 Feb 1971), Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Richard M. Nixon (1972), 172.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Alone (311)  |  Build (204)  |  Cost (86)  |  Health (193)  |  Invest (18)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Resource (63)  |  Short (197)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Spent (85)  |  System (537)

If one purges the Judaism of the Prophets and Christianity as Jesus Christ taught it of all subsequent additions, especially those of the priests, one is left with a teaching which is capable of curing all the social ills of humanity.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Capable (168)  |  Christ (17)  |  Christianity (11)  |  Especially (31)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Jesus (9)  |  Judaism (2)  |  Leave (130)  |  Priest (28)  |  Prophet (21)  |  Purge (9)  |  Social (252)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)

If the doctor cures, the sun sees it; but if he kills, the earth hides it.
In John Wade, Select Proverbs of all Nations (1824), 124.
Science quotes on:  |  Death (388)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Earth (996)  |  Hide (69)  |  Kill (100)  |  Killing (14)  |  See (1081)  |  Sun (385)

If the just cure of a disease be full of peril, let the physician resort to palliation.
Nat. Hist. As quoted in entry for 'Palliation', Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language; in which the Words are Deduced from their Originals (1818), Vol. 3 (unpaginated).
Science quotes on:  |  Disease (328)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Peril (9)  |  Physician (273)  |  Treatment (130)

If you are too fond of new remedies, first you will not cure your patients; secondly, you will have no patients to cure.
Attributed. In Peter McDonald, Oxford Dictionary of Medical Quotations (2004), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  First (1283)  |  New (1216)  |  Patient (199)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Will (2355)

In a large proportion of cases treated by physicians the disease is cured by nature, not by them. In a lesser, but not a small proportion, the disease is cured by nature in spite of them.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Case (99)  |  Disease (328)  |  Large (394)  |  Lesser (5)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physician (273)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Small (477)  |  Spite (55)  |  Treat (35)

In the 1860s, Pasteur not only applied his germ theory to create “Pasteurization,” rescuing France’s wine and vinegar industries, but also found both the cause and cure of silkworm disease, saving growers millions of dollars. When Napoleon asked the scientist why he had not legitimately profited by his findings, Pasteur replied: “In France scientists would consider they lowered themselves by doing so.”
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 190.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Ask (411)  |  Boneparte_Napoleon (2)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Consider (416)  |  Create (235)  |  Discover (553)  |  Disease (328)  |  Doing (280)  |  Dollar (22)  |  France (27)  |  Germ (53)  |  Germ Theory (2)  |  Industry (137)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  Lower (11)  |  Million (114)  |  Napoleon (16)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Profit (52)  |  Reply (56)  |  Rescue (13)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Vinegar (7)  |  Why (491)  |  Wine (38)

In the mathematics I can report no deficience, except that it be that men do not sufficiently understand the excellent use of the pure mathematics, in that they do remedy and cure many defects in the wit and faculties intellectual. For if the wit be too dull, they sharpen it; if too wandering, they fix it; if too inherent in the sense, they abstract it. So that as tennis is a game of no use in itself, but of great use in respect it maketh a quick eye and a body ready to put itself into all postures; so in the mathematics, that use which is collateral and intervenient is no less worthy than that which is principal and intended.
As translated in John Fauvel and Jeremy Gray (eds.) A History of Mathematics: A Reader (1987), 290-291. From De Augmentis, Book 3, The Advancement of Learning (1605), Book 2. Reprinted in The Two Books of Francis Bacon: Of the Proficience and Advancement of Learning, Divine and Human (2009), 97.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Body (537)  |  Defect (31)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dull (54)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Game (101)  |  Great (1574)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Posture (7)  |  Principal (63)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Quick (13)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Respect (207)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Tennis (8)  |  Understand (606)  |  Use (766)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Wit (59)

Insulin is not a cure for diabetes; it is a treatment. It enables the diabetic to burn sufficient carbohydrates, so that proteins and fats may be added to the diet in sufficient quantities to provide energy for the economic burdens of life.
'Diabetes and Insulin', Nobel Lecture, 15 September 1925. In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine, 1922-1941 (1965), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Burn (87)  |  Carbohydrate (3)  |  Diabetes (5)  |  Diet (54)  |  Economic (81)  |  Enable (119)  |  Energy (344)  |  Insulin (9)  |  Life (1795)  |  Protein (54)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Therapy (13)  |  Treatment (130)

It amounts to a truism to say that progress in the practical arts of medicine in any of its branches, whether preventive or curative, only comes from the growth of accurate knowledge as it accumulates in the laboratories and studies of the various sciences.
From Norman Lockyer Lecture delivered before the British Science Guild (19 Nov 1929), 'Medical Research: The Tree and the Fruit', in The British Medical Journal (30 Nov 1929), Vol. 2, No. 3595, 995.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Amount (151)  |  Art (657)  |  Growth (187)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Practical (200)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Progress (465)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Study (653)  |  Truism (4)  |  Various (200)

It is better to have recourse to a Quack, if he can cure our disorder, although he cannot explain it than to a Physician, if he can explain our disease but cannot cure it.
Reflection 323, in Lacon: Or Many Things in Few Words, Addressed to Those who Think (1820), 166.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Disease (328)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Explain (322)  |  Physician (273)  |  Quack (18)  |  Recourse (12)

It is impossible to put together a single prescription that will cure all ailing bodies.
As quoted in Fred Rosner, The Medical Legacy of Moses Maimonides (1998), 51.
Science quotes on:  |  Ailment (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Aphorism (21)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Prescription (18)  |  Single (353)  |  Together (387)  |  Will (2355)

It is said to be the manner of hypochondriacs to change often their physician …For a physician who does not admit the reality of the disease cannot be supposed to take much pains to cure it.
First Lines of the Practice of Physic, (annoted by John Rotheram, 1796), Vol. 3, 297-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (593)  |  Disease (328)  |  Hypochondriac (9)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Pain (136)  |  Physician (273)  |  Reality (261)

It often happens that men, even of the best understandings and greatest circumspection, are guilty of that fault in reasoning which the writers on logick call the insufficient, or imperfect enumeration of parts, or cases: insomuch that I will venture to assert, that this is the chief, and almost the only, source of the vast number of erroneous opinions, and those too very often in matters of great importance, which we are apt to form on all the subjects we reflect upon, whether they relate to the knowledge of nature, or the merits and motives of human actions. It must therefore be acknowledged, that the art which affords a cure to this weakness, or defect, of our understandings, and teaches us to enumerate all the possible ways in which a given number of things may be mixed and combined together, that we may be certain that we have not omitted anyone arrangement of them that can lead to the object of our inquiry, deserves to be considered as most eminently useful and worthy of our highest esteem and attention. And this is the business of the art, or doctrine of combinations ... It proceeds indeed upon mathematical principles in calculating the number of the combinations of the things proposed: but by the conclusions that are obtained by it, the sagacity of the natural philosopher, the exactness of the historian, the skill and judgement of the physician, and the prudence and foresight of the politician, may be assisted; because the business of all these important professions is but to form reasonable conjectures concerning the several objects which engage their attention, and all wise conjectures are the results of a just and careful examination of the several different effects that may possibly arise from the causes that are capable of producing them.
Ars conjectandi (1713). In F. Maseres, The Doctrine of Permutations and Combinations (1795), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Art (657)  |  Assert (66)  |  Attention (190)  |  Best (459)  |  Business (149)  |  Call (769)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chief (97)  |  Circumspection (5)  |  Combination (144)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Consider (416)  |  Defect (31)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Different (577)  |  Effect (393)  |  Engage (39)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Error (321)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Examination (98)  |  Fault (54)  |  Form (959)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Happen (274)  |  Historian (54)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Importance (286)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Merit (50)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motive (59)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Physician (273)  |  Politician (38)  |  Possible (552)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Profession (99)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Result (677)  |  Sagacity (10)  |  Skill (109)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Together (387)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Useful (250)  |  Vast (177)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weakness (48)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wise (131)  |  Writer (86)

I’ll change my state with any wretch
Thou canst from gaol of dunghill fetch.
My pain’s past cure, another hell;
I may not in this torment dwell.
Now desperate I hate my life,
Lend me a halter or a knife!
All my griefs to this are jolly,
Naught so damned as melancholy.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Change (593)  |  Grief (18)  |  Hate (64)  |  Jail (4)  |  Knife (23)  |  Life (1795)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  Naught (10)  |  Pain (136)  |  Past (337)  |  Psychology (154)  |  State (491)  |  Torment (18)  |  Wretch (5)

Many dishes many diseases,
Many medicines few cures.
In Poor Richard’s Almanack (1734).
Science quotes on:  |  Diet (54)  |  Disease (328)  |  Dish (3)  |  Food (199)  |  Health (193)  |  Medicine (378)

Medical researchers have discovered a new disease that has no symptoms. It is impossible to detect, and there is no known cure. Fortunately, no cases have been reported thus far.
In Napalm and Silly Putty (2002), 104.
Science quotes on:  |  Case (99)  |  Detect (44)  |  Discover (553)  |  Disease (328)  |  Fortunately (8)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Known (454)  |  Medical (26)  |  New (1216)  |  Report (38)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Symptom (34)

Medical science has proven time and again that when the resources are provided, great progress in the treatment, cure and prevention of disease can occur.
Commencement Address, Medical School Convocation, University of Miami (10 May 2003). From website www.michaeljfox.org.
Science quotes on:  |  Disease (328)  |  Great (1574)  |  Medical Science (18)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Occur (150)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Progress (465)  |  Resource (63)  |  Science (3879)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatment (130)

Medicine cures the man who is fated not to die.
Chinese proverb.
Science quotes on:  |  Death (388)  |  Fate (72)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)

Medicine has been defined to be the art or science of amusing a sick man with frivolous speculations about his disorder, and of tampering ingeniously, till nature either kills or cures him.
Anonymous
In Tryon Edwards (ed.), A Dictionary of Thoughts (1908), 339.
Science quotes on:  |  Amusement (33)  |  Art (657)  |  Death (388)  |  Definition (221)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Frivolity (2)  |  Frivolous (7)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Kill (100)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sick (81)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Tampering (3)

Medicine is a science which hath been (as we have said) more professed than laboured, and yet more laboured than advanced: the labour having been, in my judgment, rather in circle than in progression. For I find much iteration, but small addition. It considereth causes of diseases, with the occasions or impulsions; the diseases themselves, with the accidents; and the cures, with the preservation.
The Advancement of Learning (1605) in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1887-1901), Vol. 3, 373.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Addition (66)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circle (110)  |  Disease (328)  |  Find (998)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Labour (98)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Profess (20)  |  Progression (23)  |  Science (3879)  |  Small (477)  |  Themselves (433)

Medicine may be defined as the art or the science of keeping a patient quiet with frivolous reasons for his illness and amusing him with remedies good or bad until nature kills him or cures him.
Ménagiana (1693).
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Bad (180)  |  Frivolous (7)  |  Good (889)  |  Illness (34)  |  Kill (100)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Patient (199)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)

Mere political reform will not cure the manifold evils which now afflict society. There requires a social reform, a domestic reform, an individual reform.
As quoted in Frank Daniels III (The Tennessean), 'Author Samuel Smiles thought reform started with ourselves', The Des Moines Register (22 Dec 2013). Also quoted in Timothy Travers, Samuel Smiles and the Victorian Work Ethic (1987),. 162.
Science quotes on:  |  Afflict (4)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Evil (116)  |  Individual (404)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  Reform (22)  |  Require (219)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  Will (2355)

My final word, before I'm done,
Is “Cancer can be rather fun”—
Provided one confronts the tumour
with a sufficient sense of humour.
I know that cancer often kills,
But so do cars and sleeping pills;
And it can hurt till one sweats,
So can bad teeth and unpaid debts.
A spot of laughter, I am sure,
Often accelerates one's cure;
So let us patients do our bit
To help the surgeons make us fit.
'Cancer's a Funny Thing'. Quoted in Richard Dawkins, The Oxford Book of Modern Science Writing (2008), 175-6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accelerate (11)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Bad (180)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Car (71)  |  Debt (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  Final (118)  |  Fit (134)  |  Humour (116)  |  Kill (100)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Patient (199)  |  Poem (96)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Word (619)

No disorders have employed so many quacks, as those that have no cure; and no sciences have exercised so many quills, as those that have no certainty.
Lacon: Many Things in Few Words (1820-22, 1866), 314.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (174)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Employ (113)  |  Quack (18)  |  Science (3879)

Nor bring, to see me cease to live,
Some doctor full of phrase and fame,
To shake his sapient head, and give
The ill he cannot cure a name.
'A Wish' (1867). In Kenneth Allot (ed.), Matthew Arnold: A Selection (1954), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Cease (79)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Fame (50)  |  Live (628)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Name (333)  |  Phrase (61)  |  See (1081)  |  Shake (41)

Nowhere is it more true that “prevention is better than cure,” than in the case of Parasitic Diseases.
From Author's Preface to English edition, trans. by William E. Hoyle, The Parasites of Man, and the Diseases which Proceed from Them: A Textbook for Students and Practitioners (1886), vii.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Disease (328)  |  More (2559)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Truth (1057)

Often a liberal antidote of experience supplies a sovereign cure for a paralyzing abstraction built upon a theory.
In The Paradoxes of Legal Science (1928).
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Antidote (9)  |  Experience (467)  |  Sovereign (5)  |  Theory (970)

Often the confidence of the patient in his physician does more for the cure of his disease than the physician with all his remedies.
Reasserting the statement by Avicenna.
In James Joseph Walsh, Old-Time Makers of Medicine (1911), 270.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Avicenna (19)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Disease (328)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Statement (142)

Philosophy, like medicine, has plenty of drugs, few good remedies, and hardly any specific cures.
Maximes et pensées (1796), Vol. 1, No. 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Drug (57)  |  Good (889)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Specific (95)

Physicians are some of them so pleasing and conformable to the humour of the patient, as they press not the true cure of the disease : and some other are so regular in proceeding according to art for the disease, as they respect not sufficiently the condition of the patient.
XXX. Of Regimen of Health,' Essays (1597). In Francis Bacon and Basil Montagu, The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England (1852), 39.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Art (657)  |  Condition (356)  |  Disease (328)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Humour (116)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Regular (46)  |  Respect (207)

Physicians get neither name nor fame by the pricking of wheals or the picking out thistles, or by laying of plaisters to the scratch of a pin; every old woman can do this. But if they would have a name and a fame, if they will have it quickly, they must do some great and desperate cures. Let them fetch one to life that was dead; let them recover one to his wits that was mad; let them make one that was born blind to see; or let them give ripe wits to a fool: these are notable cures, and he that can do thus, if he doth thus first, he shall have the name and fame he deserves; he may lie abed till noon.
In John Bunyan and Robert Philip (ed.), The Works of John Bunyan (1850), Vol. 1, 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Blind (95)  |  Blindness (11)  |  Death (388)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fame (50)  |  First (1283)  |  Fool (116)  |  Great (1574)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mad (53)  |  Madness (33)  |  Must (1526)  |  Name (333)  |  Noon (14)  |  Old (481)  |  Physician (273)  |  Pin (18)  |  Plaster (5)  |  Pricking (2)  |  Scratch (13)  |  See (1081)  |  Thistle (5)  |  Vision (123)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wit (59)  |  Woman (151)

Physicians of the Utmost Fame
Were called at once; but when they came
They answered, as they took their Fees,
“There is no Cure for this Disease.”
In 'Henry King', Cautionary Tales for Children (1907, 1908 edition), 18-19.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Call (769)  |  Disease (328)  |  Fame (50)  |  Physician (273)

Printer's ink, when it spells out a doctor's promise to cure, is one of the subtlest and most dangerous of poisons.
'The Sure-Cure School,' Collier’s Weekly (14 Jul 1906). Reprinted in The Great American Fraud (1907), 84.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Most (1731)  |  Newspaper (32)  |  Physician (273)  |  Poison (40)  |  Promise (67)

Psychoanalysis has changed American psychiatry from a diagnostic to a therapeutic science, not because so many patients are cured by the psychoanalytic technique, but because of the new understanding of psychiatric patients it has given us and the new and different concepts of illness and health.
News summaries 29 Apr 56
Science quotes on:  |  American (46)  |  Change (593)  |  Concept (221)  |  Diagnostic (2)  |  Different (577)  |  Give (202)  |  Health (193)  |  Illness (34)  |  New (1216)  |  Patient (199)  |  Psychiatry (26)  |  Psychoanalysis (37)  |  Psychoanalytic (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Technique (80)  |  Therapeutic (2)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

Removing the teeth will cure something, including the foolish belief that removing the teeth will cure everything.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Dentistry (3)  |  Everything (476)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Something (719)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Tooth (29)  |  Will (2355)

Science may have found a cure for most evils; but it has found no remedy for the worst of them all—the apathy of human beings.
In My Religion (2007), 162.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apathy (3)  |  Being (1278)  |  Evil (116)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Most (1731)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Science (3879)  |  Worst (57)

So, then, the Tincture of the Philosophers is a universal medicine, and consumes all diseases, by whatsoever name they are called, just like an invisible fire. The dose is very small, but its effect is most powerful. By means thereof I have cured the leprosy, venereal disease, dropsy, the falling sickness, colic, scab, and similar afflictions; also lupus, cancer, noli-metangere, fistulas, and the whole race of internal diseases, more surely than one could believe.
Quoted in Paracelsus and Arthur Edward Waite (ed.), The Hermetic and Alchemical Writings of Paracelsus (1894), Vol. 1, 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Affliction (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Colic (2)  |  Disease (328)  |  Dose (16)  |  Dropsy (2)  |  Effect (393)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fire (189)  |  Internal (66)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Leprosy (2)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Race (268)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Small (477)  |  Surely (101)  |  Tincture (5)  |  Universal (189)  |  Venereal Disease (2)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Whole (738)

Thanks to the freedom of our press and the electronic media, the voices of cranks are often louder and clearer than the voices of genuine scientists. Crank books—on how to lose weight without cutting down on calories, on how to talk to plants, on how to cure your ailments by rubbing your feet, on how to apply horoscopes to your pets, on how to use ESP in making business decisions, on how to sharpen razor blades by putting them under little models of the great Pyramid of Egypt—far outsell many books… I reserve the right of moral indignation.
As quoted, without citation, in obituary by Morton Schatzman, 'Martin Gardner: Scientific and Philosophical Writer Celebrated for his Ingenious Mathematical Puzzles and Games', Independent (28 May 2010).
Science quotes on:  |  Ailment (6)  |  Apply (160)  |  Blade (11)  |  Book (392)  |  Business (149)  |  Calorie (2)  |  Clear (100)  |  Crank (18)  |  Cut (114)  |  Decision (91)  |  Down (456)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Electronic (12)  |  Extrasensory Perception (2)  |  Foot (60)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Great (1574)  |  Horoscope (4)  |  Indignation (4)  |  Little (707)  |  Lose (159)  |  Loud (9)  |  Making (300)  |  Media (13)  |  Model (102)  |  Moral (195)  |  Pet (8)  |  Plant (294)  |  Razor (4)  |  Reserve (24)  |  Right (452)  |  Rub (4)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Talk (100)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thanks (26)  |  Use (766)  |  Voice (52)  |  Weight (134)

The art of medicine consists of amusing the patient while nature cures the disease.
Attributed. Webmaster has found no other citation. See, for example, Bill Swainson, Encarta Book of Quotations (2000), 961.
Science quotes on:  |  Amusement (33)  |  Art (657)  |  Consist (223)  |  Disease (328)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Patient (199)

The attitude of the intellectual community toward America is shaped not by the creative few but by the many who for one reason or another cannot transmute their dissatisfaction into a creative impulse, and cannot acquire a sense of uniqueness and of growth by developing and expressing their capacities and talents. There is nothing in contemporary America that can cure or alleviate their chronic frustration. They want power, lordship, and opportunities for imposing action. Even if we should banish poverty from the land, lift up the Negro to true equality, withdraw from Vietnam, and give half of the national income as foreign aid, they will still see America as an air-conditioned nightmare unfit for them to live in.
In 'Some Thoughts on the Present', The Temper of Our Time (1967), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Action (327)  |  Aid (97)  |  Air (347)  |  Alleviate (4)  |  America (127)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Banish (11)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Chronic (5)  |  Community (104)  |  Condition (356)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Creative (137)  |  Develop (268)  |  Dissatisfaction (10)  |  Equality (31)  |  Express (186)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Frustration (12)  |  Give (202)  |  Growth (187)  |  Half (56)  |  Impose (22)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Income (17)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Land (115)  |  Lift (55)  |  Live (628)  |  National (26)  |  Negro (7)  |  Nightmare (4)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Power (746)  |  Reason (744)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Shape (72)  |  Still (613)  |  Talent (94)  |  Toward (45)  |  Transmute (3)  |  True (212)  |  Unfit (12)  |  Uniqueness (11)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)  |  Withdraw (9)

The bitterness of the potion, and the abhorrence of the patient are necessary circumstances to the operation. It must be something to trouble and disturb the stomach that must purge and cure it.
In Tryon Edwards (ed.), A Dictionary of Thoughts (1908), 339.
Science quotes on:  |  Abhorrence (9)  |  Bitterness (3)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Disturb (28)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Operation (213)  |  Patient (199)  |  Potion (2)  |  Purge (9)  |  Something (719)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Trouble (107)

The Christian church, in its attitude toward science, shows the mind of a more or less enlightened man of the Thirteenth Century. It no longer believes that the earth is flat, but it is still convinced that prayer can cure after medicine fails.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Attitude (82)  |  Belief (578)  |  Century (310)  |  Christian (43)  |  Church (56)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enlightened (24)  |  Fail (185)  |  Flat (33)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Prayer (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Show (346)  |  Still (613)  |  Thirteenth (2)  |  Toward (45)

The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
The Demon Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark (1997), 429.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Better (486)  |  Fallacious (12)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Idea (843)  |  Suppression (9)

The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears or the sea.
Quoted in Reader's Digest (Apr 1964). In M. P. Singh, Quote Unquote (2007), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Salt (46)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sweat (15)  |  Tear (42)  |  Water (481)

The diseases which are hard to cure in neighborhoods… are catarrh, hoarseness, coughs, pleurisy, consumption, spitting of blood, and all others that are cured not by lowering the system but by building it up. They are hard to cure, first, because they are originally due to chills; secondly, because the patient's system being already exhausted by disease, the air there, which is in constant agitation owing to winds and therefore deteriorated, takes all the sap of life out of their diseased bodies and leaves them more meager every day. On the other hand, a mild, thick air, without drafts and not constantly blowing back and forth, builds up their frames by its unwavering steadiness, and so strengthens and restores people who are afflicted with these diseases.
Vitruvius
In De Architectura, Book 1, Chap 6, Sec. 3. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 25.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Agitation (9)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Back (390)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Blowing (22)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Catarrh (2)  |  Chill (9)  |  Constant (144)  |  Consumption (14)  |  Cough (8)  |  Disease (328)  |  Draft (6)  |  Due (141)  |  First (1283)  |  Hard (243)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mild (7)  |  More (2559)  |  Neighborhood (12)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owing (39)  |  Patient (199)  |  People (1005)  |  System (537)  |  Wind (128)

The Egyptian mummies, which Cambyses or time hath spared, avarice now consumeth. Mummy is become merchandise, Mizraim cures wounds, and Pharaoh is sold for balsams.
Science quotes on:  |  Archaeology (49)  |  Avarice (2)  |  Become (815)  |  Consume (9)  |  Egyptian (5)  |  Merchandise (2)  |  Mummy (7)  |  Pharaoh (4)  |  Sell (15)  |  Spare (9)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wound (26)

The expression Similia similibus is a Latin phrase and means that an imaginary disease can best be cured by an imaginary remedy.
In Elbert Hubbard (ed. and publ.), The Philistine (Mar 1908), 26, No. 4, 105. The reference is to the phrase “similia similibus curantur” (similar things take care of similar things; or, like cures like).
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Disease (328)  |  Expression (175)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Latin (38)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Remedy (62)

The forms of diseases are many and the healing of them is manifold.
Nature of Man, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1931), Vol. 4, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Disease (328)  |  Form (959)  |  Healing (25)  |  Manifold (22)

The main thing that induces me to question the safeness of the vulgar methodus medendi in many cases is the consideration of the nature of those Helps they usually employ, and some of which are honoured with the title of Generous Remedies. These helps are Bleeding, Vomiting, Purging, Sweating, and Spitting, of which I briefly observe in General, that they are sure to weaken or discompose when they are imployed, but do not certainly cure afterwards.
RSMS 199, Folio 177v. Michael Hunter identfies as passages or a suppressed work, Considerations and Doubts Touching the Vulgar Method of Physick. Quoted In Barbara Kaplan (ed.), Divulging of Useful Truths in Physick: The Medical Agenda of Robert Boyle (1993), 138.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainly (185)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Employ (113)  |  General (511)  |  Generous (17)  |  Honour (56)  |  Induce (22)  |  Main Thing (4)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observe (168)  |  Question (621)  |  Therapy (13)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Usually (176)  |  Vomiting (3)  |  Vulgar (33)

The only incurable diseases are those the doctor’s don’t know how to cure.
As quoted in book review, T.A. Boyd, 'Charles F. Kettering: Prophet of Progress', Science (30 Jan 1959), 255.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Disease (328)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Incurable (10)  |  Know (1518)

The patient does not care about your science; what he wants to know is, can you cure him?
Science quotes on:  |  Care (186)  |  Know (1518)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Patient (199)  |  Science (3879)  |  Want (497)

The Principle of Uncertainty is a bad name. In science or outside of it we are not uncertain; our knowledge is merely confined, within a certain tolerance. We should call it the Principle of Tolerance. And I propose that name in two senses: First, in the engineering sense, science has progressed, step by step, the most successful enterprise in the ascent of man, because it has understood that the exchange of information between man and nature, and man and man, can only take place with a certain tolerance. But second, I also use the word, passionately, about the real world. All knowledge, all information between human beings, can only be exchanged within a play of tolerance. And that is true whether the exchange is in science, or in literature, or in religion, or in politics, or in any form of thought that aspires to dogma. It’s a major tragedy of my lifetime and yours that scientists were refining, to the most exquisite precision, the Principle of Tolerance, and turning their backs on the fact that all around them, tolerance was crashing to the ground beyond repair. The Principle of Uncertainty or, in my phrase, the Principle of Tolerance, fixed once for all the realization that all knowledge is limited. It is an irony of history that at the very time when this was being worked out there should rise, under Hitler in Germany and other tyrants elsewhere, a counter-conception: a principle of monstrous certainty. When the future looks back on the 1930s it will think of them as a crucial confrontation of culture as I have been expounding it, the ascent of man, against the throwback to the despots’ belief that they have absolute certainty. It is said that science will dehumanize people and turn them into numbers. That is false: tragically false. Look for yourself. This is the concentration camp and crematorium at Auschwitz. This is where people were turned into numbers. Into this pond were flushed the ashes of four million people. And that was not done by gas. It was done by arrogance. It was done by dogma. It was done by ignorance. When people believe that they have absolute knowledge, with no test in reality this is how they behave. This is what men do when they aspire to the knowledge of gods. Science is a very human form of knowledge. We are always at the brink of the known; we always feel forward for what is to be hoped. Every judgment in science stands on the edge of error, and is personal. Science is a tribute to what we can know although we are fallible. In the end, the words were said by Oliver Cromwell: “I beseech you, in the bowels of Christ: Think it possible you may be mistaken.” We have to cure ourselves of the itch for absolute knowledge and power. We have to close the distance between the push-button order and the human act. We have to touch people. [Referring to Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle.]
'Knowledge or Certainty,' episode 11, The Ascent of Man (1972), BBC TV series.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absolute (145)  |  Act (272)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Arrogance (20)  |  Ascent Of Man (6)  |  Aspire (13)  |  Auschwitz (5)  |  Back (390)  |  Bad (180)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Beseech (3)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bowel (16)  |  Call (769)  |  Camp (10)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Christ (17)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Conception (154)  |  Confrontation (8)  |  Culture (143)  |  Distance (161)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Edge (47)  |  End (590)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Error (321)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fallible (6)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Forward (102)  |  Future (429)  |  Gas (83)  |  God (757)  |  Ground (217)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Information (166)  |  Itch (10)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Literature (103)  |  Look (582)  |  Major (84)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Outside (141)  |  People (1005)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Politics (112)  |  Pond (15)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Precision (68)  |  Principle (507)  |  Progress (465)  |  Push (62)  |  Reality (261)  |  Realization (43)  |  Refining (4)  |  Religion (361)  |  Rise (166)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Stand (274)  |  Step (231)  |  Step By Step (11)  |  Successful (123)  |  Test (211)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tolerance (10)  |  Touch (141)  |  Tragedy (29)  |  Tribute (10)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Uncertainty Principle (8)  |  Understood (156)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

The public blabbers about preventative medicine, but will neither appreciate nor pay for it. You get paid for what you cure.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Will (2355)

The rich man, gasping for breath … feels at last the impotence of gold; that death which he dreaded at a distance as an enemy, he now hails when he is near, as a friend; a friend that alone can bring the peace his treasures cannot purchase, and remove the pain his physicians cannot cure.
In Lacon: Or Many Things in Few Words, Addressed to Those who Think (1832), 125. [Part of this quote (after the semicolon) is often seen attributed to Mortimer Collins, who was born in 1827. That date makes it clearly impossible for Collins to be the author of this quote, published in 1832 by Colton.]
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Breath (59)  |  Death (388)  |  Distance (161)  |  Dread (13)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Feel (367)  |  Friend (168)  |  Gasp (6)  |  Gold (97)  |  Hail (4)  |  Impotence (8)  |  Last (426)  |  Man (2251)  |  Pain (136)  |  Peace (108)  |  Physician (273)  |  Purchase (7)  |  Remove (45)  |  Rich (62)  |  Treasure (57)

The value the world sets upon motives is often grossly unjust and inaccurate. Consider, for example, two of them: mere insatiable curiosity and the desire to do good. The latter is put high above the former, and yet it is the former that moves some of the greatest men the human race has yet produced: the scientific investigators. What animates a great pathologist? Is it the desire to cure disease, to save life? Surely not, save perhaps as an afterthought. He is too intelligent, deep down in his soul, to see anything praiseworthy in such a desire. He knows by life-long observation that his discoveries will do quite as much harm as good, that a thousand scoundrels will profit to every honest man, that the folks who most deserve to be saved will probably be the last to be saved. No man of self-respect could devote himself to pathology on such terms. What actually moves him is his unquenchable curiosity–his boundless, almost pathological thirst to penetrate the unknown, to uncover the secret, to find out what has not been found out before. His prototype is not the liberator releasing slaves, the good Samaritan lifting up the fallen, but the dog sniffing tremendously at an infinite series of rat-holes.
In 'Types of Men: The Scientist', Prejudices (1923), 269-70.
Science quotes on:  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Consider (416)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Deep (233)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dog (70)  |  Down (456)  |  Find (998)  |  Former (137)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Harm (39)  |  High (362)  |  Himself (461)  |  Honest (50)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Inaccurate (4)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinite Series (8)  |  Insatiable (7)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Liberator (2)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motive (59)  |  Move (216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Pathologist (5)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Praise (26)  |  Produced (187)  |  Profit (52)  |  Prototype (9)  |  Race (268)  |  Rat (37)  |  Rat-Hole (2)  |  Respect (207)  |  Save (118)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scoundrel (8)  |  Secret (194)  |  See (1081)  |  Self (267)  |  Series (149)  |  Set (394)  |  Slave (37)  |  Society (326)  |  Soul (226)  |  Surely (101)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thirst (11)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Two (937)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Unjust (6)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

The world always makes the assumption that the exposure of an error is identical with the discovery of truth that the error and truth are simply opposite. They are nothing of the sort. What the world turns to, when it is cured on one error, is usually simply another error, and maybe one worse than the first one.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (92)  |  Badly (32)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Error (321)  |  Exposure (7)  |  First (1283)  |  Identical (53)  |  Maybe (2)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Simply (53)  |  Sort (49)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turn (447)  |  Usually (176)  |  World (1774)

The … publicity is always the same; only the blanks need to be filled in: “It was announced today by scientists at [Harvard, Vanderbilt, Stanford] Medical School that a gene responsible for [some, many, a common form of] [schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s, arterio-sclerosis, prostate cancer] has been located and its DNA sequence determined. This exciting research, say scientists, is the first step in what may eventually turn out to be a possible cure for this disease.”
From review, 'Billions and Billions of Demons', of the book, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark, by Carl Sagan, in New York Review of Books (9 Jan 1997).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Announcement (15)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Common (436)  |  Determine (144)  |  Disease (328)  |  DNA (77)  |  Eventual (9)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Exciting (47)  |  First (1283)  |  First Step (3)  |  Form (959)  |  Gene (98)  |  Locate (7)  |  Medical School (2)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prostate (2)  |  Publicity (5)  |  Research (664)  |  Say (984)  |  Schizophrenia (4)  |  School (219)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Step (231)  |  Today (314)  |  Turn (447)  |  Turn Out (9)

There are no such things as incurables; there are only things for which man has not found a cure.
Address to the President's Committee on Employment of the Physically Handicapped (30 Apr 1954). In Alfred J. Kolatch, Great Jewish Quotations (1996), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Incurable (10)  |  Man (2251)  |  Thing (1915)

There are some modern practitioners, who declaim against medical theory in general, not considering that to think is to theorize; and that no one can direct a method of cure to a person labouring under disease, without thinking, that is, without theorizing; and happy therefore is the patient, whose physician possesses the best theory.
Zoonomia, or, The Laws Of Organic Life (1801), Vol. 2, ix.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Best (459)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disease (328)  |  General (511)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  Method (505)  |  Modern (385)  |  Patient (199)  |  Person (363)  |  Physician (273)  |  Practitioner (20)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Treatment (130)

There is not so contemptible a Plant or Animal that does not confound the most enlarged Understanding. Though the familiar use of Things, take off our Wonder; yet it cures not our Ignorance.
In An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding (1690), 211.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Confound (21)  |  Contemptible (8)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Plant (294)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Use (766)  |  Wonder (236)

There is only one reason why men become addicted to drugs — they are weak men. Only strong men are cured, and they cure themselves.
Martin H. Fischer, Howard Fabing (ed.) and Ray Marr (ed.), Fischerisms (1944).
Science quotes on:  |  Addict (4)  |  Become (815)  |  Drug (57)  |  Reason (744)  |  Self (267)  |  Strong (174)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Weak (71)  |  Why (491)

There is only one reason why men become addicted to drugs, they are weak me. Only strong men are cured, and they cure themselves.
Martin H. Fischer, Howard Fabing (ed.) and Ray Marr (ed.), Fischerisms (1944).
Science quotes on:  |  Addict (4)  |  Become (815)  |  Drug (57)  |  Reason (744)  |  Strong (174)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Weak (71)  |  Why (491)

There is still no cure for the common birthday.
Announcing his retirement from the Senate, as recorded in U.S. Government Printing Office, Tributes Delivered in Congress: John Glenn (1998), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  Birthday (8)  |  Common (436)  |  Still (613)

Think of a single problem confronting the world today. Disease, poverty, global warming… If the problem is going to be solved, it is science that is going to solve it. Scientists tend to be unappreciated in the world at large, but you can hardly overstate the importance of the work they do. If anyone ever cures cancer, it will be a guy with a science degree. Or a woman with a science degree.
Quoted in Max Davidson, 'Bill Bryson: Have faith, science can solve our problems', Daily Telegraph (26 Sep 2010)
Science quotes on:  |  Cancer (55)  |  Degree (276)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Global (35)  |  Global Warming (27)  |  Importance (286)  |  Large (394)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Problem (676)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Degree (2)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Single (353)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Tend (124)  |  Think (1086)  |  Today (314)  |  Warming (23)  |  Will (2355)  |  Woman (151)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Though Hippocrates understood not the Circulation of the Blood, yet by accurately observing the Effects of the Disease, which he looked upon as an unknown Entity, and by remarking the Endeavours of Nature, by which the Disease tended to either Health or Recovery, did from thence deduce a proper Method of Cure, namely by assisting the salutary Endeavours of Nature, and by resisting those of the Disease; and thus Hippocrates, ignorant of the Causes, cured Disease as well as ourselves, stocked with so many Discoveries.
In Dr. Boerhaave's Academical Lectures on the Theory of Physic (1746), Vol. 6, 352.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurately (7)  |  Blood (134)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circulation (24)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Disease (328)  |  Effect (393)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Entity (35)  |  Health (193)  |  Hippocrates (49)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Look (582)  |  Method (505)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observing (2)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Proper (144)  |  Recovery (23)  |  Salutary (5)  |  Tend (124)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Understood (156)  |  Unknown (182)

Time is a herb that cures all Diseases.
In Poor Richard's Almanack (1738). http://www. vlib.us/amdocs/texts/prichard38.html
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Disease (328)  |  Herb (5)  |  Time (1877)

Tis not always in a physician’s power to cure the sick; at times the disease is stronger than trained art.
Ovid and Arthur Leslie Wheeler (trans.), Ovid Tristia Ex Ponto (2007), 281.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Art (657)  |  Disease (328)  |  Physician (273)  |  Power (746)  |  Sick (81)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Time (1877)  |  Train (114)

To cure safely, swiftly and pleasantly.
Attributed.

To the north [of Armenia] lies Zorzania [Georgia], near the confines of which there is a fountain of oil which discharges so great a quantity as to furnish loading for many camels. The use made of it is not for the purpose of food, but as an unguent for the cure of cutaneous distempers in men and cattle, as well as other complaints, and it is also good for burning. In the surrounding country no other [oil] is used in their lamps, and people come from distant parts to procure it.
[An early Western report of petroleum seepage. He visited the city of Baku, Azerbaijan in 1264.]
In The Travels of Marco Polo (c.1300, trans. reprint 2007), 21-22. Eastern records of petroleum use date back many centuries earlier.
Science quotes on:  |  Burning (48)  |  Camel (11)  |  Cattle (18)  |  City (78)  |  Country (251)  |  Discharge (19)  |  Early (185)  |  Food (199)  |  Fountain (16)  |  Fuel (32)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Georgia (2)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Lie (364)  |  Oil (59)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Petroleum (7)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Trade (31)  |  Use (766)  |  Western (45)

Undeveloped though the science [of chemistry] is, it already has great power to bring benefits. Those accruing to physical welfare are readily recognized, as in providing cures, improving the materials needed for everyday living, moving to ameliorate the harm which mankind by its sheer numbers does to the environment, to say nothing of that which even today attends industrial development. And as we continue to improve our understanding of the basic science on which applications increasingly depend, material benefits of this and other kinds are secured for the future.
Speech at the Nobel Banquet (10 Dec 1983) for his Nobel Prize in Chemistry. In Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel: The Nobel Prizes (1984), 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Application (242)  |  Attend (65)  |  Basic (138)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Continue (165)  |  Depend (228)  |  Development (422)  |  Environment (216)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Future (429)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harm (39)  |  Improve (58)  |  Industrial (13)  |  Industrial Development (4)  |  Kind (557)  |  Living (491)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Material (353)  |  Need (290)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Power (746)  |  Provision (16)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Secured (18)  |  Today (314)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Undeveloped (6)  |  Welfare (25)

We all have private ails. The troublemakers are they who need public cures for their private ails.
In Reflections on the Human Condition (1973), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Ail (2)  |  All (4108)  |  Need (290)  |  Private (23)  |  Public (96)  |  Troublemaker (2)

We are a caring nation, and our values should also guide us on how we harness the gifts of science. New medical breakthroughs bring the hope of cures for terrible diseases and treatments that can improve the lives of millions. Our challenge is to make sure that science serves the cause of humanity instead of the other way around.
Telephone remarks to the March for Life, in Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: George W. Bush, 2007 (), Book I)President Calls March for Life Participants (22 Jan 2007), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Breakthrough (15)  |  Caring (6)  |  Cause (541)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Disease (328)  |  Gift (104)  |  Guide (97)  |  Harness (23)  |  Hope (299)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Improve (58)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Medical (26)  |  Million (114)  |  Nation (193)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Science (3879)  |  Serve (59)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Value (365)  |  Way (1217)

We are learning, too, that the love of beauty is one of Nature's greatest healers.
The Red Man's Continent: A Chronicle of Aboriginal America (1919), 86.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Health (193)  |  Learning (274)  |  Love (309)  |  Nature (1926)

We are, of course, extremely concerned that if this did, in fact, happen, that there is going to be a tremendous public outcry, and we will be concerned with what the Congress does, … Obviously, we are concerned about there being a backlash against the medical applications of this technology, which have, of course, the potential to cure millions of patients.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Application (242)  |  Being (1278)  |  Concern (228)  |  Congress (19)  |  Course (409)  |  Extremely (16)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Happen (274)  |  Medical (26)  |  Millions (17)  |  Obviously (11)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Outcry (3)  |  Patient (199)  |  Potential (69)  |  Public (96)  |  Technology (257)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Will (2355)

We cannot idealize technology. Technology is only and always the reflection of our own imagination, and its uses must be conditioned by our own values. Technology can help cure diseases, but we can prevent a lot of diseases by old-fashioned changes in behavior.
Remarks at Knoxville Auditorium Coliseum, Knoxville, Tennessee (10 Oct 1996) while seeking re-election. American Presidency Project web page.
Science quotes on:  |  Behavior (84)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Change (593)  |  Condition (356)  |  Disease (328)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Lot (151)  |  Must (1526)  |  Old (481)  |  Old-Fashioned (8)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Technology (257)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)

We divide the world…
Into things that give you cancer and the things that cure cancer
And the things that don't cause cancer, but there's a chance they will cause cancer in the future.
From song, 'The Fence' (2010).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chance (239)  |  Divide (75)  |  Future (429)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

We do not know what is disease, how remedies act, and still less how diseases are cured. We must abandon the way which has thus far been followed
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Act (272)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Far (154)  |  Follow (378)  |  Know (1518)  |  Less (103)  |  Must (1526)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Still (613)  |  Way (1217)

Were it my business to understand physic, would not the safe way be to consult nature herself in the history of diseases and their cures, than espouse the principles of the dogmatists, methodists, or chemists?
In Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1796, 20th ed.), Vol. 2, Book 4, 383.
Science quotes on:  |  Business (149)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Consult (6)  |  Disease (328)  |  Dogma (48)  |  History (673)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Methodist (2)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physic (517)  |  Principle (507)  |  Safe (54)  |  Understand (606)  |  Way (1217)

What animates a great pathologist? Is it the desire to cure disease, to save life? Surely not, save perhaps as an afterthought. He is too intelligent, deep in his soul, to see anything praiseworthy in such a desire. He knows from life-long observation that his discoveries will do quite as much harm as good, that a thousand scoundrels will profit to every honest man, that the folks who most deserve to be saved will probably be the last to be saved. ... What actually moves him is his unquenchable curiosity—his boundless, almost pathological thirst to penetrate the unknown, to uncover the secret, to find out what has not been found out before. ... [like] the dog sniffing tremendously at an infinite series of rat-holes. ... And yet he stands in the very front rank of the race
In 'The Scientist', Prejudices: third series (1922), 269-70.
Science quotes on:  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Deep (233)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dog (70)  |  Find (998)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harm (39)  |  Honest (50)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinite Series (8)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Move (216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Pathologist (5)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Praiseworthy (2)  |  Profit (52)  |  Race (268)  |  Rank (67)  |  Rat (37)  |  Rat-Hole (2)  |  Save (118)  |  Saving (20)  |  Scoundrel (8)  |  Secret (194)  |  See (1081)  |  Series (149)  |  Soul (226)  |  Stand (274)  |  Surely (101)  |  Thirst (11)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Uncovering (2)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Will (2355)

What makes philosophy so tedious is not the profundity of philosophers, but their lack of art; they are like physicians who sought to cure a slight hyperacidity by prescribing a carload of burned oyster-shells.
In A Mencken Chrestomathy (1949, 1956), 617.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Burn (87)  |  Burned (2)  |  Carload (2)  |  Lack (119)  |  Oyster (11)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physician (273)  |  Prescribe (10)  |  Prescribing (5)  |  Profundity (6)  |  Seek (213)  |  Shell (63)  |  Slight (31)  |  Tedious (14)

When a disease relapses there is no cure.
Chinese proverb.
Science quotes on:  |  Disease (328)  |  Relapse (5)

When all else fails as a cure for smoking cigarettes, try carrying wet matches.
Anonymous
In E.C. McKenzie, 14,000 Quips and Quotes for Speakers, Writers, Editors, Preachers, and Teachers (1990), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Carry (127)  |  Cigarette (24)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Match (29)  |  Quit (10)  |  Smoking (27)  |  Try (283)  |  Wet (6)

When men die of disease they are said to die from natural causes. When they recover (and mostly they do) the doctor gets the credit of curing them.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Credit (20)  |  Die (86)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Natural (796)  |  Recover (11)  |  Say (984)

When you do not know the nature of the malady, leave it to nature; do not strive to hasten matters. For either nature will bring about the cure or it will itself reveal clearly what the malady really is.
Avicenna
'General Therapeutics', in The Canon of Medicine, adapted byL. Bakhtiar (1999), 468.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Hasten (13)  |  Know (1518)  |  Malady (8)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Therapy (13)  |  Will (2355)

Wherever possible, scientists experiment. Which experiments suggest themselves often depends on which theories currently prevail. Scientists are intent of testing those theories to the breaking point. They do not trust what is intuitively obvious. That the Earth is flat was once obvious. That heavy bodies fall faster than light ones was once obvious. That bloodsucking leeches cure most diseases was once obvious. That some people are naturally and by divine decree slaves was once obvious. That there is such a place as the center of the Universe, and that the Earth sits in that exalted spot was once obvious. That there is an absolute standard of rest was once obvious. The truth may be puzzling or counterintuitive. It may contradict deeply held beliefs. Experiment is how we get a handle on it.
In The Demon-Haunted World: Science As A Candle in the Dark (1995), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Belief (578)  |  Contradict (40)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Counterintuitive (4)  |  Decree (8)  |  Depend (228)  |  Disease (328)  |  Divine (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Exalted (22)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fall (230)  |  Faster (50)  |  Flat (33)  |  Handle (28)  |  Leech (6)  |  Light (607)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obvious (126)  |  People (1005)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Prevailing (3)  |  Puzzling (8)  |  Rest (280)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Slave (37)  |  Test (211)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Trust (66)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wherever (51)

[Someone] remarked to me once: Physicians should not say, I have cured this man, but, This man didn’t die in my care. In physics too one might say, For such and such a phenomenon I have determined causes whose absurdity cannot finally be proved, instead of saying, I have explained it.
As quoted in Joseph Peter Stern, Lichtenberg: A Doctrine of Scattered Occasions: Reconstructed From His Aphorisms and Reflections (1959), 297.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurdity (32)  |  Care (186)  |  Cause (541)  |  Determine (144)  |  Die (86)  |  Explain (322)  |  Final (118)  |  Man (2251)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physician (273)  |  Physics (533)  |  Prove (250)  |  Say (984)

[William Gull] sought to teach his students not to think they could cure disease. “The best of all remedies,” he would say, “is a warm bed.” “ I can tell you something of how you get ill, but I cannot tell you how you get well.” “ Healing is accomplished ‘By an operation more divine Than tongue or pen can give expression to.’” “Remedies act best when there is a tendency to get well.”
Stated in Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), xxvi.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Bed (23)  |  Best (459)  |  Disease (328)  |  Divine (112)  |  Expression (175)  |  Sir William Withey Gull (39)  |  Healing (25)  |  More (2559)  |  Operation (213)  |  Pen (20)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Say (984)  |  Something (719)  |  Student (300)  |  Teach (277)  |  Tell (340)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Warm (69)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.