Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Separation

Separation Quotes (57 quotes)

A few days ago, a Master of Arts, who is still a young man, and therefore the recipient of a modern education, stated to me that until he had reached the age of twenty he had never been taught anything whatever regarding natural phenomena, or natural law. Twelve years of his life previously had been spent exclusively amongst the ancients. The case, I regret to say, is typical. Now we cannot, without prejudice to humanity, separate the present from the past.
'On the Study of Physics', From a Lecture delivered in the Royal Institution of Great Britain in the Spring of 1854. Fragments of Science for Unscientific People: A Series of Detached Essays, Lectures, and Reviews (1892), Vol. 1, 284-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Art (657)  |  Education (378)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Modern (385)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Law (41)  |  Never (1087)  |  Past (337)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Present (619)  |  Previous (12)  |  Reach (281)  |  Recipient (3)  |  Regret (30)  |  Say (984)  |  Separate (143)  |  Spent (85)  |  Statement (142)  |  Still (613)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Twelve (4)  |  Twenty (4)  |  Typical (13)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)

Alchemy is the art that separates what is useful from what is not by transforming it into its ultimate matter and essence.
In Labyrinthus Medicorum. Cap. V. Von dem Buch der alchimei, wie on dasselbig der arzt kein arzt sein mag. Ed. Sudhoff, vol. XI, 188-189. As cited in Walter Pagel, Paracelsus: An Introduction to Philosophical Medicine in the Era of the Renaissance (2nd rev. ed., 1982), 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemy (30)  |  Art (657)  |  Essence (82)  |  Matter (798)  |  Separate (143)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)

All the different classes of beings which taken together make up the universe are, in the ideas of God who knows distinctly their essential gradations, only so many ordinates of a single curve so closely united that it would be impossible to place others between any two of them, since that would imply disorder and imperfection. Thus men are linked with the animals, these with the plants and these with the fossils which in turn merge with those bodies which our senses and our imagination represent to us as absolutely inanimate. And, since the law of continuity requires that when the essential attributes of one being approximate those of another all the properties of the one must likewise gradually approximate those of the other, it is necessary that all the orders of natural beings form but a single chain, in which the various classes, like so many rings, are so closely linked one to another that it is impossible for the senses or the imagination to determine precisely the point at which one ends and the next begins?all the species which, so to say, lie near the borderlands being equivocal, at endowed with characters which might equally well be assigned to either of the neighboring species. Thus there is nothing monstrous in the existence zoophytes, or plant-animals, as Budaeus calls them; on the contrary, it is wholly in keeping with the order of nature that they should exist. And so great is the force of the principle of continuity, to my thinking, that not only should I not be surprised to hear that such beings had been discovered?creatures which in some of their properties, such as nutrition or reproduction, might pass equally well for animals or for plants, and which thus overturn the current laws based upon the supposition of a perfect and absolute separation of the different orders of coexistent beings which fill the universe;?not only, I say, should I not be surprised to hear that they had been discovered, but, in fact, I am convinced that there must be such creatures, and that natural history will perhaps some day become acquainted with them, when it has further studied that infinity of living things whose small size conceals them for ordinary observation and which are hidden in the bowels of the earth and the depth of the sea.
Lettre Prétendue de M. De Leibnitz, à M. Hermann dont M. Koenig a Cité le Fragment (1753), cxi-cxii, trans. in A. O. Lovejoy, Great Chain of Being: A Study of the History of an Idea (1936), 144-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Being (1278)  |  Borderland (6)  |  Bowel (16)  |  Call (769)  |  Character (243)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Creature (233)  |  Current (118)  |  Curve (49)  |  Depth (94)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Equally (130)  |  Essential (199)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Fossil (136)  |  God (757)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hear (139)  |  History (673)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Lie (364)  |  Living (491)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Next (236)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Nutrition (23)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Plant (294)  |  Point (580)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Principle (507)  |  Represent (155)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Require (219)  |  Say (984)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sense (770)  |  Single (353)  |  Small (477)  |  Species (401)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Various (200)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Will (2355)

As our researches have made clear, an animal high in the organic scale only reaches this rank by passing through all the intermediate states which separate it from the animals placed below it. Man only becomes man after traversing transitional organisatory states which assimilate him first to fish, then to reptiles, then to birds and mammals.
Annales des Sciences Naturelles (1834), 2 (ii), 248. Trans. in E. S. Russell, Form and Function (1916), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Assimilation (13)  |  Become (815)  |  Below (24)  |  Bird (149)  |  Clarification (7)  |  First (1283)  |  Fish (120)  |  High (362)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Man (2251)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organization (114)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passing (76)  |  Rank (67)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reptile (29)  |  Research (664)  |  Scale (121)  |  Separate (143)  |  State (491)  |  Through (849)

At fertilization, these two 'haploid' nuclei are added together to make a 'diploid' nucleus that now contains 2a, 2b and so on; and, by the splitting of each chromosome and the regulated karyokinetic separation of the daughter chromosomes, this double series is inherited by both of the primary blastomeres. In the resulting resting nuclei the individual chromosomes are apparently destroyed. But we have the strongest of indications that, in the stroma of the resting nucleus, every one of the chromosomes that enters the nucleus survives as a well-defined region; and as the cell prepares for its next division this region again gives rise to the same chromosome (Theory of the Individuality of the Chromosomes). In this way the two sets of chromosomes brought together at fertilization are inherited by all the cells of the new individual. It is only in the germinal cells that the so called reduction division converts the double series into a single one. Out of the diploid state, the haploid is once again generated.
Arch. Zellforsch, 1909, 3, 181, trans. Henry Harris, The Birth of the Cell (1999), 171-2.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Both (493)  |  Call (769)  |  Cell (138)  |  Chromosome (23)  |  Chromosomes (17)  |  Daughter (29)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Division (65)  |  Enter (141)  |  Fertilization (15)  |  Indication (33)  |  Individual (404)  |  Individuality (22)  |  Inherit (33)  |  Inherited (21)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Primary (80)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Rise (166)  |  Series (149)  |  Set (394)  |  Single (353)  |  State (491)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Survive (79)  |  Theory (970)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Way (1217)  |  Well-Defined (8)

By the classification of any series of objects, is meant the actual or ideal arrangement together of those which are like and the separation of those which are unlike ; the purpose of this arrangement being to facilitate the operations of the mind in clearly conceiving and retaining in the memory the characters of the objects in question.‎
In 'Lecture I: On the Classification of Animals', Lectures on the Elements of Comparative Anatomy: On the ... - (1864), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Being (1278)  |  Character (243)  |  Classification (97)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Facilitate (5)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Like (22)  |  Mean (809)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Object (422)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Retain (56)  |  Series (149)  |  Together (387)  |  Unlike (8)

Chemical analysis and synthesis go no farther than to the separation of particles one from another, and to their reunion. No new creation or destruction of matter is within the reach of chemical agency. We might as well attempt to introduce a new planet into the solar system, or to annihilate one already in existence, as to create or destroy a particle of hydrogen.
A New System of Chemical Philosophy (1808), Vol. 1, 212.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Annihilate (9)  |  Atomic Theory (15)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Conservation Of Matter (7)  |  Create (235)  |  Creation (327)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Existence (456)  |  Farther (51)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Matter (798)  |  New (1216)  |  Particle (194)  |  Planet (356)  |  Reach (281)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  System (537)

Do not the Rays which differ in Refrangibility differ also in Flexibity; and are they not by their different Inflexions separated from one another, so as after separation to make the Colours in the three Fringes above described? And after what manner are they inflected to make those Fringes?
Opticks (1704), Book 3, Query 2, 132-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Color (137)  |  Description (84)  |  Differ (85)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fringe (6)  |  Inflection (3)  |  Manner (58)  |  Ray (114)  |  Refrangibility (2)

Everywhere science is enriched by unscientific methods and unscientific results, ... the separation of science and non-science is not only artificial but also detrimental to the advancement of knowledge. If we want to understand nature, if we want to master our physical surroundings, then we must use all ideas, all methods, and not just a small selection of them.
Against Method: Outline of an Anarchistic Theory of Knowledge (1975), 305-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (62)  |  All (4108)  |  Enrich (24)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Idea (843)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Master (178)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physical (508)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Selection (128)  |  Small (477)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unscientific (13)  |  Use (766)  |  Want (497)

From what has been said it is also evident, that the Whiteness of the Sun's Light is compounded all the Colours wherewith the several sorts of Rays whereof that Light consists, when by their several Refrangibilities they are separated from one another, do tinge Paper or any other white Body whereon they fall. For those Colours ... are unchangeable, and whenever all those Rays with those their Colours are mix'd again, they reproduce the same white Light as before.
Opticks (1704), Book 1, Part 2, Exper. XV, 114.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Body (537)  |  Color (137)  |  Compound (113)  |  Consist (223)  |  Do (1908)  |  Evident (91)  |  Fall (230)  |  Light (607)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Ray (114)  |  Refrangibility (2)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Sun (385)  |  Whenever (81)  |  White (127)  |  White Light (5)

Historically the most striking result of Kant's labors was the rapid separation of the thinkers of his own nation and, though less completely, of the world, into two parties;—the philosophers and the scientists.
The Order of Nature: An Essay (1917), 69.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Completely (135)  |  Immanuel Kant (49)  |  Labor (107)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nation (193)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Result (677)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Striking (48)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Two (937)  |  World (1774)

I feel that the recent ruling of the United States Army and Navy regarding the refusal of colored blood donors is an indefensible one from any point of view. As you know, there is no scientific basis for the separation of the bloods of different races except on the basis of the individual blood types or groups. (1942)
Spencie Love, One Blood: The Death and Resurrection of Charles R. Drew (1996), 155-56, quoting as it appeared in Current Biography (1944), 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Army (33)  |  Basis (173)  |  Blood (134)  |  Color (137)  |  Different (577)  |  Feel (367)  |  Group (78)  |  Individual (404)  |  Know (1518)  |  Navy (9)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Race (268)  |  Recent (77)  |  Refusal (22)  |  Scientific (941)  |  State (491)  |  Type (167)  |  United States (31)  |  View (488)

I may finally call attention to the probability that the association of paternal and maternal chromosomes in pairs and their subsequent separation during the reducing division as indicated above may constitute the physical basis of the Mendelian law of heredity.
'On the Morphology of the Chromosome Group in Brachystola Magna', Biological Bulletin (1902), 4, 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Association (46)  |  Attention (190)  |  Basis (173)  |  Call (769)  |  Chromosome (23)  |  Chromosomes (17)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Division (65)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Indication (33)  |  Law (894)  |  Maternal (2)  |  Gregor Mendel (21)  |  Pair (9)  |  Paternal (2)  |  Physical (508)  |  Probability (130)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Subsequent (33)

I prefer the spagyric chemical physicians, for they do not consort with loafers or go about gorgeous in satins, silks and velvets, gold rings on their fingers, silver daggers hanging at their sides and white gloves on their hands, but they tend their work at the fire patiently day and night. They do not go promenading, but seek their recreation in the laboratory, wear plain learthern dress and aprons of hide upon which to wipe their hands, thrust their fingers amongst the coals, into dirt and rubbish and not into golden rings. They are sooty and dirty like the smiths and charcoal burners, and hence make little show, make not many words and gossip with their patients, do not highly praise their own remedies, for they well know that the work must praise the master, not the master praise his work. They well know that words and chatter do not help the sick nor cure them... Therefore they let such things alone and busy themselves with working with their fires and learning the steps of alchemy. These are distillation, solution, putrefaction, extraction, calcination, reverberation, sublimination, fixation, separation, reduction, coagulation, tinction, etc.
Quoted in R. Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 150. [Spagyric is a form of herbalism based on alchemic procedures of preparation.]
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemy (30)  |  Alone (311)  |  Apron (2)  |  Busy (28)  |  Calcination (4)  |  Charcoal (10)  |  Chatter (3)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Coagulation (5)  |  Coal (57)  |  Cure (122)  |  Dagger (3)  |  Day And Night (3)  |  Dirt (15)  |  Dirty (17)  |  Distillation (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Extraction (9)  |  Finger (44)  |  Fire (189)  |  Fixation (5)  |  Glove (4)  |  Gold (97)  |  Golden (45)  |  Gorgeous (2)  |  Gossip (8)  |  Hand (143)  |  Help (105)  |  Hide (69)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Learning (274)  |  Leather (4)  |  Little (707)  |  Loafer (2)  |  Master (178)  |  Must (1526)  |  Patience (56)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Praise (26)  |  Putrefaction (4)  |  Recreation (20)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Reverberation (3)  |  Ring (16)  |  Rubbish (12)  |  Satin (2)  |  Seek (213)  |  Show (346)  |  Sick (81)  |  Side (233)  |  Silk (13)  |  Silver (46)  |  Smith (3)  |  Solution (267)  |  Soot (9)  |  Step (231)  |  Tend (124)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thrust (12)  |  Velvet (4)  |  White (127)  |  Wipe (6)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

If someone separated the art of counting and measuring and weighing from all the other arts, what was left of each (of the others) would be, so to speak, insignificant.
Plato
Philebus 55e. Trans. R. W. Sharples.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Counting (26)  |  Insignificance (10)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Left (13)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Other (2236)  |  Someone (22)  |  Speak (232)  |  Weight (134)

Immediately after the separation of the formative materials into the two layers of the germ-primule, there appears in the ectoderm a groove, open above, at the bottom of which is a streak of darker tissue.
Science quotes on:  |  Embryo (28)  |  Germ (53)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Layer (40)  |  Material (353)  |  Open (274)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Two (937)

In my opinion the separation of the c- and ac-stars is the most important advancement in stellar classification since the trials by Vogel and Secchi ... To neglect the c-properties in classifying stellar spectra, I think, is nearly the same thing as if a zoologist, who has detected the deciding differences between a whale and a fish, would continue classifying them together.
Letter to Edward Pickering (22 Jul 1908). In Charles Coulston Gillespie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1974), Vol. 9, 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (62)  |  Classification (97)  |  Continue (165)  |  Detect (44)  |  Difference (337)  |  Fish (120)  |  Importance (286)  |  Antonia Maury (2)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Property (168)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Together (387)  |  Trial (57)  |  Whale (32)  |  Zoologist (12)

In the experimental sciences, the epochs of the most brilliant progress are almost always separated by long intervals of almost absolute repose.
In François Arago, trans. by William Henry Smyth, Baden Powell and Robert Grant, 'Fourier', Biographies of Distinguished Scientific Men (1859), Vol. 1, 411.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Interval (13)  |  Long (790)  |  Most (1731)  |  Progress (465)  |  Repose (6)  |  Science (3879)

In the pursuit of the physical sciences, the imagination supplies the hypothesis which bridges over the gulf that separates the known from the unknown.
Presidential Address to Anniversary meeting of the Royal Society (30 Nov 1859), Proceedings of the Royal Society of London (1860), 10, 165-166.
Science quotes on:  |  Bridge (47)  |  Gulf (18)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Known (454)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Separate (143)  |  Unknown (182)

Kriegman says … “Think binary. When matter meets antimatter, both vanish, into pure energy. But both existed; I mean, there was a condition we’ll call ‘existence.’ Think of one and minus one. Together they add up to zero, nothing, nada, niente, right? Picture them together, then picture them separating—peeling apart. … Now you have something, you have two somethings, where once you had nothing.”
In Roger's Version (1986), 304.
Science quotes on:  |  Anti-Matter (4)  |  Binary (12)  |  Both (493)  |  Call (769)  |  Condition (356)  |  Energy (344)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Minus One (4)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Picture (143)  |  Pure (291)  |  Right (452)  |  Say (984)  |  Something (719)  |  Think (1086)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Vanishing (11)  |  Zero (37)

Language is simply alive, like an organism. We all tell each other this, in fact, when we speak of living languages, and I think we mean something more than an abstract metaphor. We mean alive. Words are the cells of language, moving the great body, on legs. Language grows and evolves, leaving fossils behind. The individual words are like different species of animals. Mutations occur. Words fuse, and then mate. Hybrid words and wild varieties or compound words are the progeny. Some mixed words are dominated by one parent while the other is recessive. The way a word is used this year is its phenotype, but it has deeply immutable meanings, often hidden, which is its genotype.... The separate languages of the Indo-European family were at one time, perhaps five thousand years ago, maybe much longer, a single language. The separation of the speakers by migrations had effects on language comparable to the speciation observed by Darwin on various islands of the Galapagos. Languages became different species, retaining enough resemblance to an original ancestor so that the family resemblance can still be seen.
in 'Living Language,' The Lives of a Cell: Notes of a Biology Watcher, (1974, 1984), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Animal (617)  |  Behind (137)  |  Body (537)  |  Compound (113)  |  Different (577)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Family (94)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Galapagos (5)  |  Genotype (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hybrid (14)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Individual (404)  |  Island (46)  |  Language (293)  |  Leg (34)  |  Living (491)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Migration (11)  |  More (2559)  |  Mutation (37)  |  Observed (149)  |  Occur (150)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Phenotype (5)  |  Progeny (15)  |  Recessive (6)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Separate (143)  |  Single (353)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Species (401)  |  Still (613)  |  Tell (340)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wild (87)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)

Listen now for the sound that forevermore separates the old from the new.
[Introducing the beep-beep chirp transmitted by the Sputnik satellite.]
NBC Radio
NBC radio announcer on the night of 4 Oct 1957. In 'The Nation: Red Moon Over the U.S.', Time (14 Oct 1957), 70, 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Listen (73)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Satellite (28)  |  Separate (143)  |  Sound (183)  |  Sputnik (4)

Modern discoveries have not been made by large collections of facts, with subsequent discussion, separation, and resulting deduction of a truth thus rendered perceptible. A few facts have suggested an hypothesis, which means a supposition, proper to explain them. The necessary results of this supposition are worked out, and then, and not till then, other facts are examined to see if their ulterior results are found in Nature.
In A Budget of Paradoxes (1872), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Collection (64)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (998)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Large (394)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Modern (385)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Other (2236)  |  Proper (144)  |  Render (93)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Work (1351)

My main thesis will be that in the study of the intermediate processes of metabolism we have to deal not with complex substances which elude ordinary chemical methods, but with the simple substances undergoing comprehensible reactions... I intend also to emphasise the fact that it is not alone with the separation and identification of products from the animal that our present studies deal; but with their reactions in the body; with the dynamic side of biochemical phenomena.
'The Dynamic Side of Biochemistry', Address (11 Sep 1913) in Report on the 83rd Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1914), 653.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Animal (617)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Body (537)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Complex (188)  |  Deal (188)  |  Elude (10)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Identification (16)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Metabolism (14)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Present (619)  |  Product (160)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Side (233)  |  Simple (406)  |  Study (653)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thesis (15)  |  Will (2355)

Nirvana is a state of pure blissful knowledge ... It has nothing to do with the individual. The ego or its separation is an illusion. Indeed in a certain sense two ‘I’s are identical namely when one disregards all special contents–their Karma. The goal of man is to preserve his Karma and to develop it further ... when man dies his Karma lives and creates for itself another carrier.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Blissful (3)  |  Carrier (5)  |  Certain (550)  |  Content (69)  |  Create (235)  |  Develop (268)  |  Die (86)  |  Disregard (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ego (17)  |  Far (154)  |  Goal (145)  |  Identical (53)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Individual (404)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Namely (11)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Pure (291)  |  Sense (770)  |  Special (184)  |  State (491)  |  Two (937)

No science is immune to the infection of politics and the corruption of power. … The time has come to consider how we might bring about a separation, as complete as possible, between Science and Government in all countries. I call this the disestablishment of science, in the same sense in which the churches have been disestablished and have become independent of the state.
In 'The Disestablishment of Science', Encounter (Jul 1971), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Call (769)  |  Church (56)  |  Complete (204)  |  Consider (416)  |  Corruption (15)  |  Country (251)  |  Government (110)  |  Immune (3)  |  Independent (67)  |  Infection (27)  |  Politics (112)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  State (491)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time Has Come (8)

One of the earliest questions asked by an intelligent child is: “What is this made of?” “What is that made of?” And the answer is generally more or less satisfactory. For example, if the question relates to butter, the reply may be, “From cream.” It may be explained, besides, that when cream is beaten up, or churned, the butter separates, leaving skim-milk behind. But the question has not been answered. The child may ask, “Was the butter in the milk before it was churned? or has it been made out of the milk by the churning?” Possibly the person to whom the question is addressed may know that the milk contained the butter in the state of fine globules, and that the process of churning breaks up the globules, and causes them to stick together. The original question has not really been answered; and indeed it is not an easy one to reply to. Precisely such questions suggested themselves to the people of old, and they led to many speculations.
Opening paragraph of Modern Chemistry (1900, rev. 1907), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Beat (41)  |  Behind (137)  |  Break (99)  |  Butter (8)  |  Cause (541)  |  Child (307)  |  Churn (4)  |  Cream (6)  |  Earliest (3)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Globule (5)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Know (1518)  |  Milk (22)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Old (481)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Process (423)  |  Question (621)  |  Reply (56)  |  Satisfactory (17)  |  Separate (143)  |  Speculation (126)  |  State (491)  |  Stick (24)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Together (387)

One of the main causes of our artistic decline lies beyond doubt in the separation of art and science.
In Marco Treves, Artists on art, from the XIV to the XX century (1945), 437.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Artistic (23)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Cause (541)  |  Decline (26)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Lie (364)  |  Science (3879)

Our atom of carbon enters the leaf, colliding with other innumerable (but here useless) molecules of nitrogen and oxygen. It adheres to a large and complicated molecule that activates it, and simultaneously receives the decisive message from the sky, in the flashing form of a packet of solar light; in an instant, like an insect caught by a spider, it is separated from its oxygen, combined with hydrogen and (one thinks) phosphous, and finally inserted in a chain, whether long or short does not matter, but it is the chain of life. All this happens swiftly, in silence, at the temperature and pressure of the atmosphere, and gratis: dear colleagues, when we learn to do likewise we will be sicut Deus [like God], and we will have also solved the problem of hunger in the world.
Levi Primo and Raymond Rosenthal (trans.), The Periodic Table (1975, 1984), 227-228. In this final section of his book, Levi imagines the life of a carbon atom. He calls this his first “literary dream”. It came to him at Auschwitz.
Science quotes on:  |  Activate (3)  |  Activation (6)  |  Adherence (2)  |  All (4108)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Atom (355)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Catch (31)  |  Chain (50)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Collision (15)  |  Combination (144)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Decisive (25)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enter (141)  |  Flash (49)  |  Form (959)  |  God (757)  |  Gratis (2)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Insect (77)  |  Insertion (2)  |  Instant (45)  |  Large (394)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Likewise (2)  |  Long (790)  |  Matter (798)  |  Message (49)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Other (2236)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Packet (3)  |  Phosphorus (16)  |  Photon (11)  |  Photosynthesis (19)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Problem (676)  |  Receive (114)  |  Short (197)  |  Silence (56)  |  Simultaneity (3)  |  Sky (161)  |  Solar (8)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spider (14)  |  Sun (385)  |  Swiftness (4)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Think (1086)  |  Uselessness (22)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Physical science enjoys the distinction of being the most fundamental of the experimental sciences, and its laws are obeyed universally, so far as is known, not merely by inanimate things, but also by living organisms, in their minutest parts, as single individuals, and also as whole communities. It results from this that, however complicated a series of phenomena may be and however many other sciences may enter into its complete presentation, the purely physical aspect, or the application of the known laws of matter and energy, can always be legitimately separated from the other aspects.
In Matter and Energy (1912), 9-10.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Being (1278)  |  Community (104)  |  Complete (204)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Complication (29)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Enter (141)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Inanimate (16)  |  Individual (404)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Legitimacy (5)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obey (40)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Purely (109)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Series (149)  |  Single (353)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Whole (738)

Physio-philosophy has to show how, and in accordance indeed with what laws, the Material took its origin; and, therefore, how something derived its existence from nothing. It has to portray the first periods of the world's development from nothing; how the elements and heavenly bodies originated; in what method by self-evolution into higher and manifold forms, they separated into minerals, became finally organic, and in Man attained self-consciousness.
In Lorenz Oken, trans. by Alfred Tulk, Elements of Physiophilosophy (1847), 1.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accordance (10)  |  Attain (125)  |  Body (537)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Creation (327)  |  Definition (221)  |  Derivation (13)  |  Development (422)  |  Element (310)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Existence (456)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Material (353)  |  Method (505)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Organic (158)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origination (7)  |  Period (198)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Portrayal (2)  |  Self (267)  |  Show (346)  |  Showing (6)  |  Something (719)  |  World (1774)

Returning now to the Malay Archipelago, we find that all the wide expanse of sea which divides Java, Sumatra, and Borneo from each other, and from Malacca and Siam, is so shallow that ships can anchor in any part of it, since it rarely exceeds forty fathoms in depth; and if we go as far as the line of a hundred fathoms, we shall include the Philippine Islands and Bali, east of Java. If, therefore, these islands have been separated from each other and the continent by subsidence of the intervening tracts of land, we should conclude that the separation has been comparatively recent, since the depth to which the land has subsided is so small. It is also to be remarked that the great chain of active volcanoes in Sumatra and Java furnishes us with a sufficient cause for such subsidence, since the enormous masses of matter they have thrown out would take away the foundations of the surrounding district; and this may be the true explanation of the often-noticed fact that volcanoes and volcanic chains are always near the sea. The subsidence they produce around them will, in time, make a sea, if one does not already exist.
Malay Archipelago
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Anchor (10)  |  Archipelago (7)  |  Borneo (3)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chain (50)  |  Comparatively (8)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Continent (76)  |  Depth (94)  |  District (9)  |  Divide (75)  |  East (18)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Exceed (9)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expanse (6)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Far (154)  |  Fathom (15)  |  Find (998)  |  Forty (4)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Include (90)  |  Intervene (8)  |  Island (46)  |  Java (2)  |  Land (115)  |  Line (91)  |  Mass (157)  |  Matter (798)  |  Notable (5)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Philippines (3)  |  Produce (104)  |  Rarely (21)  |  Recent (77)  |  Remark (28)  |  Return (124)  |  Sea (308)  |  Separate (143)  |  Shallow (8)  |  Ship (62)  |  Small (477)  |  Subside (5)  |  Subsidence (2)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Surround (30)  |  Take Away (5)  |  Thrown Out (2)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tract (5)  |  True (212)  |  Volcano (39)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)

Since the discovery of oxygen the civilised world has undergone a revolution in manners and customs. The knowledge of the composition of the atmosphere, of the solid crust of the earth, of water, and of their influence upon the life of plants and animals, was linked to that discovery. The successful pursuit of innumerable trades and manufactures, the profitable separation of metals from their ores, also stand in the closest connection therewith.
Familiar Letters on Chemistry (1851), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Composition (84)  |  Connection (162)  |  Crust (38)  |  Custom (42)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Earth (996)  |  Influence (222)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Metal (84)  |  Ore (12)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Plant (294)  |  Profitable (28)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Solid (116)  |  Stand (274)  |  Successful (123)  |  Water (481)  |  World (1774)

Students of the heavens are separable into astronomers and astrologers as readily as the minor domestic ruminants into sheep and goats, but the separation of philosophers into sages and cranks seems to be more sensitive to frames of reference.
Theories and Things (1981), 192.
Science quotes on:  |  Astrologer (10)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Crank (18)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Frame of Reference (5)  |  Goat (7)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Minor (10)  |  More (2559)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Sage (23)  |  Sheep (11)  |  Student (300)

Suppose that you are in love with a lady on Neptune and that she returns the sentiment. It will be some consolation for the melancholy separation if you can say to yourself at some possibly pre-arranged moment, “She is thinking of me now.” Unfortunately a difficulty has arisen because we have had to abolish Now. There is no absolute Now, but only the various relative Nows, differing according to their reckoning of different observers and covering the whole neutral wedge which at the distance of Neptune is about eight hours thick. She will have to think of you continuously for eight hours on end in order to circumvent the ambiguity “Now.”
In The Nature of the Physical World (1929), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Abolish (12)  |  Absolute (145)  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Ambiguity (17)  |  Consolation (9)  |  Continuously (7)  |  Covering (14)  |  Different (577)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Distance (161)  |  End (590)  |  Hour (186)  |  Lady (11)  |  Love (309)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  Moment (253)  |  Neptune (13)  |  Neutral (13)  |  Observer (43)  |  Order (632)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Relative (39)  |  Return (124)  |  Say (984)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Unfortunately (38)  |  Various (200)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

The arithmetization of mathematics … which began with Weierstrass … had for its object the separation of purely mathematical concepts, such as number and correspondence and aggregate, from intuitional ideas, which mathematics had acquired from long association with geometry and mechanics. These latter, in the opinion of the formalists, are so firmly entrenched in mathematical thought that in spite of the most careful circumspection in the choice of words, the meaning concealed behind these words, may influence our reasoning. For the trouble with human words is that they possess content, whereas the purpose of mathematics is to construct pure thought. But how can we avoid the use of human language? The … symbol. Only by using a symbolic language not yet usurped by those vague ideas of space, time, continuity which have their origin in intuition and tend to obscure pure reason—only thus may we hope to build mathematics on the solid foundation of logic.
In Tobias Dantzig and Joseph Mazur (ed.), Number: The Language of Science (1930, ed. by Joseph Mazur 2007), 99.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Aggregate (23)  |  Association (46)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Begin (260)  |  Behind (137)  |  Build (204)  |  Careful (24)  |  Choice (110)  |  Circumspection (5)  |  Conceal (18)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Concept (221)  |  Construct (124)  |  Content (69)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Entrench (2)  |  Firmly (6)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Influence (222)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Language (293)  |  Latter (21)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Most (1731)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Origin (239)  |  Possess (156)  |  Pure (291)  |  Purely (109)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Solid (116)  |  Space (500)  |  Spite (55)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Tend (124)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Use (766)  |  Vague (47)  |  Karl Weierstrass (9)  |  Word (619)

The artificial products do not have any molecular dissymmetry; and I could not indicate the existence of a more profound separation between the products born under the influence of life and all the others.
Quoted in Joseph S. Fruton, Proteins, Enzymes, Genes: The Interplay of Chemistry and Biology (1999), 135.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Artificiality (2)  |  Do (1908)  |  Existence (456)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Indication (33)  |  Influence (222)  |  Life (1795)  |  Molecule (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Other (2236)  |  Product (160)  |  Profound (104)  |  Symmetry (43)

The bird which is drawn to the water by its need of finding there the prey on which it lives, separates the digits of its feet in trying to strike the water and move about on the surface. The skin which unites these digits at their base acquires the habit of being stretched by these continually repeated separations of the digits; thus in course of time there are formed large webs which unite the digits of ducks, geese, etc., as we actually find them. In the same way efforts to swim, that is to push against the water so as to move about in it, have stretched the membranes between the digits of frogs, sea-tortoises, the otter, beaver, etc.
On the other hand, a bird which is accustomed to perch on trees and which springs from individuals all of whom had acquired this habit, necessarily has longer digits on its feet and differently shaped from those of the aquatic animals that I have just named. Its claws in time become lengthened, sharpened and curved into hooks, to clasp the branches on which the animal so often rests.
We find in the same way that the bird of the water-side which does not like swimming and yet is in need of going to the water's edge to secure its prey, is continually liable to sink into the mud. Now this bird tries to act in such a way that its body should not be immersed in the liquid, and hence makes its best efforts to stretch and lengthen its legs. The long-established habit acquired by this bird and all its race of continually stretching and lengthening its legs, results in the individuals of this race becoming raised as though on stilts, and gradually obtaining long, bare legs, denuded of feathers up to the thighs and often higher still.
Philosophie Zoologique (1809), Vol. 1, 249-50, trans. Hugh Elliot (1914), 119-20.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Act (272)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aquatic (5)  |  Bare (33)  |  Base (117)  |  Beaver (7)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Bird (149)  |  Body (537)  |  Claw (8)  |  Course (409)  |  Duck (3)  |  Edge (47)  |  Effort (227)  |  Find (998)  |  Foot (60)  |  Form (959)  |  Frog (38)  |  Goose (12)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Habit (168)  |  Individual (404)  |  Large (394)  |  Leg (34)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Move (216)  |  Mud (26)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Other (2236)  |  Otter (2)  |  Perch (7)  |  Push (62)  |  Race (268)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Sea (308)  |  Separate (143)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Side (233)  |  Sink (37)  |  Skin (47)  |  Spring (133)  |  Still (613)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Strike (68)  |  Surface (209)  |  Swim (30)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tortoise (10)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trying (144)  |  Unite (42)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)

The development of the nucleoplasm during ontogeny may be to some extent compared to an army composed of corps, which are made up of divisions, and these of brigades, and so on. The whole army may be taken to represent the nucleoplasm of the germ-cell: the earliest cell-division … may be represented by the separation of the two corps, similarly formed but with different duties: and the following cell­divisions by the successive detachment of divisions, brigades, regiments, battalions, companies, etc.; and as the groups become simpler so does their sphere of action become limited.
In 'The Continuity of the Germ-plasm as the Foundation of a Theory of Heredity' (1885), Essays upon Heredity and Kindred Biological Problems (1891), Vol. 1, 195.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Army (33)  |  Battalion (2)  |  Become (815)  |  Brigade (3)  |  Cell Division (5)  |  Company (59)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Corps (2)  |  Detachment (8)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Division (65)  |  Duty (68)  |  Extent (139)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Germ (53)  |  Germ Cell (2)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Nucleoplasm (2)  |  Ontogeny (10)  |  Regiment (2)  |  Represent (155)  |  Representation (53)  |  Similarly (4)  |  Simpler (8)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Successive (73)  |  Two (937)  |  Whole (738)

The epoch of intense cold which preceded the present creation has been only a temporary oscillation of the earth’s temperature, more important than the century-long phases of cooling undergone by the Alpine valleys. It was associated with the disappearance of the animals of the diluvial epoch of the geologists, as still demonstrated by the Siberian mammoths; it preceded the uplifting of the Alps and the appearance of the present-day living organisms, as demonstrated by the moraines and the existence of fishes in our lakes. Consequently, there is complete separation between the present creation and the preceding ones, and if living species are sometimes almost identical to those buried inside the earth, we nevertheless cannot assume that the former are direct descendants of the latter or, in other words, that they represent identical species.
From Discours de Neuchâtel (1837), as translated by Albert V. Carozzi in Studies on Glaciers: Preceded by the Discourse of Neuchâtel (1967), lviii.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alp (9)  |  Alps (8)  |  Animal (617)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Century (310)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complete (204)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Creation (327)  |  Descendant (17)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Earth (996)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Existence (456)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Former (137)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Geology (220)  |  Ice Age (9)  |  Identical (53)  |  Lake (32)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Mammoth (9)  |  More (2559)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Organism (220)  |  Oscillation (13)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phase (36)  |  Present (619)  |  Represent (155)  |  Species (401)  |  Still (613)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Temporary (23)  |  Valley (32)  |  Word (619)

The essence of knowledge is generalization. That fire can be produced by rubbing wood in a certain way is a knowledge derived by generalization from individual experiences; the statement means that rubbing wood in this way will always produce fire. The art of discovery is therefore the art of correct generalization. ... The separation of relevant from irrelevant factors is the beginning of knowledge.
The Rise of Scientific Philosophy (1951), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Certain (550)  |  Correctness (12)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Essence (82)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fire (189)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Individual (404)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Produced (187)  |  Production (183)  |  Statement (142)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wood (92)

The frontiers of science are separated now by long years of study, by specialized vocabularies, arts, techniques, and knowledge from the common heritage even of a most civilized society; and anyone working at the frontier of such science is in that sense a very long way from home, a long way too from the practical arts that were its matrix and origin, as indeed they were of what we today call art.
Address at the close of the year-long Bicentennial Celebration of Columbia University (26 Dec 54). Printed in 'Prospects in the Arts and Sciences', Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Feb 1955), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Call (769)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Common (436)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Heritage (20)  |  Home (170)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Long (790)  |  Matrix (14)  |  Most (1731)  |  Origin (239)  |  Practical (200)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Sense (770)  |  Society (326)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Study (653)  |  Technique (80)  |  Today (314)  |  Vocabulary (8)  |  Way (1217)  |  Year (933)

The meaning of human life and the destiny of man cannot be separable from the meaning and destiny of life in general. 'What is man?' is a special case of 'What is life?' Probably the human species is not intelligent enough to answer either question fully, but even such glimmerings as are within our powers must be precious to us. The extent to which we can hope to understand ourselves and to plan our future depends in some measure on our ability to read the riddles of the past. The present, for all its awesome importance to us who chance to dwell in it, is only a random point in the long flow of time. Terrestrial life is one and continuous in space and time. Any true comprehension of it requires the attempt to view it whole and not in the artificial limits of any one place or epoch. The processes of life can be adequately displayed only in the course of life throughout the long ages of its existence.
The Meaning of Evolution: A Study of the History of Life and of its Significance for Man (1949), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Artificiality (2)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Awesome (14)  |  Chance (239)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Course (409)  |  Depend (228)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Display (56)  |  Enough (340)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Existence (456)  |  Extent (139)  |  Flow (83)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Glimmering (2)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Importance (286)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Measure (232)  |  Must (1526)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Past (337)  |  Place (177)  |  Plan (117)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Precious (41)  |  Present (619)  |  Process (423)  |  Question (621)  |  Random (41)  |  Read (287)  |  Require (219)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Special (184)  |  Special Case (9)  |  Species (401)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)

The radius of space began at zero; the first stages of the expansion consisted of a rapid expansion determined by the mass of the initial atom, almost equal to the present mass of the universe. If this mass is sufficient, and the estimates which we can make indicate that this is indeed so, the initial expansion was able to permit the radius to exceed the value of the equilibrium radius. The expansion thus took place in three phases: a first period of rapid expansion in which the atom-universe was broken into atomic stars, a period of slowing-down, followed by a third period of accelerated expansion. It is doubtless in this third period that we find ourselves today, and the acceleration of space which followed the period of slow expansion could well be responsible for the separation of stars into extra-galactic nebulae.
From 'La formation des Nebuleuses dans l’Univers en Expansion', Comptes Rendus (1933), 196, 903-904. As translated in Helge Kragh, Cosmology and Controversy: The Historical Development of Two Theories of the Universe (1996), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceleration (12)  |  Atom (355)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Broken (56)  |  Consist (223)  |  Down (456)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Galactic (6)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Mass (157)  |  Origin Of The Universe (16)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Period (198)  |  Permit (58)  |  Phase (36)  |  Present (619)  |  Slow (101)  |  Space (500)  |  Stage (143)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Today (314)  |  Universe (857)  |  Value (365)  |  Zero (37)

The sciences have sworn among themselves an inviolable partnership; it is almost impossible to separate them, for they would rather suffer than be torn apart; and if anyone persists in doing so, he gets for his trouble only imperfect and confused fragments. Yet they do not arrive all together, but they hold each other by the hand so that they follow one another in a natural order which it is dangerous to change, because they refuse to enter in any other way where they are called. ...
Les Préludes de l'Harmonie Universelle (1634), 135-139. In Charles Coulston Gillespie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1974), Vol. 9, 316.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apart (7)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Danger (115)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Enter (141)  |  Follow (378)  |  Following (16)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Hold (95)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Inviolable (2)  |  Natural (796)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Partnership (4)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Refusal (22)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Science (3879)  |  Separate (143)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Tear (42)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Together (387)  |  Torn (17)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Way (1217)

The separation of state and church must be complemented by the separation of state and science, that most recent, most aggressive, and most dogmatic religious institution.
Against Method: Outline of an Anarchistic Theory of Knowledge (1975), 295.
Science quotes on:  |  Church (56)  |  Complement (5)  |  Government (110)  |  Institution (69)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Recent (77)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Science (3879)  |  State (491)

The tendency of the sciences has long been an increasing proclivity of separation and dismemberment … The mathematician turns away from the chemist; the chemist from the naturalist; the mathematician, left to himself divides himself into a pure mathematician and a mixed mathematician, who soon part company … And thus science, even mere physical science, loses all traces of unity. A curious illustration of this result may be observed in the want of any name by which we can designate the students of the knowledge of the material world collectively. We are informed that this difficulty was felt very oppressively by the members of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, at their meetings at York, Oxford and Cambridge, in the last three summers. There was no general term by which these gentlemen could describe themselves with reference to their pursuits … some ingenious gentleman [William Whewell] proposed that, by analogy with artist, they might form Scientist, and added that there could be no scruple … when we have words such as sciolist, economist, and atheist—but this was not generally palatable.
In Review of Mrs Somerville, 'On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences', The Quarterly Review (1834), 51, 58-61.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (62)  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Artist (90)  |  Association (46)  |  Atheist (15)  |  British (41)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Company (59)  |  Curious (91)  |  Describe (128)  |  Description (84)  |  Designation (13)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Dismemberment (3)  |  Divide (75)  |  Division (65)  |  Economist (17)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Himself (461)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Inform (47)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Long (790)  |  Lose (159)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Name (333)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Observed (149)  |  Oxford (16)  |  Palatable (3)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Proposal (17)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sciolist (2)  |  Soon (186)  |  Student (300)  |  Summer (54)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Term (349)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Trace (103)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unity (78)  |  Want (497)  |  William Whewell (70)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

The world’s first spaceship, Vostok (East), with a man on board was launched into orbit from the Soviet Union on April 12, 1961. The pilot space-navigator of the satellite-spaceship Vostok is a citizen of the U.S.S.R., Flight Major Yuri Gagarin.
The launching of the multistage space rocket was successful and, after attaining the first escape velocity and the separation of the last stage of the carrier rocket, the spaceship went in to free flight on around-the-earth orbit. According to preliminary data, the period of revolution of the satellite spaceship around the earth is 89.1 min. The minimum distance from the earth at perigee is 175 km (108.7 miles) and the maximum at apogee is 302 km (187.6 miles), and the angle of inclination of the orbit plane to the equator is 65º 4’. The spaceship with the navigator weighs 4725 kg (10,418.6 lb), excluding the weight of the final stage of the carrier rocket.
The first man in space was announced by the Soviet newsagency Tass on 12 April 1961, 9:59 a.m. Moscow time.
Tass
Quoted in John David Anderson, Jr., Hypersonic and High Temperature Gas Dynamics (2000), 2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  According (237)  |  April (9)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Data (156)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  Equator (6)  |  Escape (80)  |  Final (118)  |  First (1283)  |  Flight (98)  |  Free (232)  |  Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin (13)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Last (426)  |  Launch (20)  |  Major (84)  |  Man (2251)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Period (198)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Satellite (28)  |  Soviet (9)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Flight (25)  |  Stage (143)  |  Successful (123)  |  Time (1877)  |  Union (51)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Weight (134)  |  World (1774)

There exists no separation between gods and men; one blends softly casual into the other.
Dune Messiah. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 141
Science quotes on:  |  Blend (9)  |  Casual (7)  |  Exist (443)  |  God (757)  |  Other (2236)  |  Softly (6)

To be whole. To be complete. Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to rather than what we are separate from.
Testimony before the Senate Subcommittee on Forest & Public Lands Management regarding the Utah Public Lands Management Act of 1995, Washington, D.C. (13 Jul 1995).
Science quotes on:  |  Complete (204)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Human (1468)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Reminder (13)  |  Separate (143)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wildness (4)

To be worthy of the name, an experimenter must be at once theorist and practitioner. While he must completely master the art of establishing experimental facts, which are the materials of science, he must also clearly understand the scientific principles which guide his reasoning through the varied experimental study of natural phenomena. We cannot separate these two things: head and hand. An able hand, without a head to direct it, is a blind tool; the head is powerless without its executive hand.
In Claude Bernard and Henry Copley Greene (trans.), An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1927, 1957), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Blind (95)  |  Completely (135)  |  Direct (225)  |  Directing (5)  |  Establish (57)  |  Executive (3)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Guide (97)  |  Hand (143)  |  Head (81)  |  Master (178)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Material (353)  |  Must (1526)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Powerless (6)  |  Practitioner (20)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Separate (143)  |  Study (653)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Tool (117)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Various (200)

Treading the soil of the moon, palpating its pebbles, tasting the panic and splendor of the event, feeling in the pit of one’s stomach the separation from terra … these form the most romantic sensation an explorer has ever known … this is the only thing I can say about the matter. … The utilitarian results do not interest me.
In 'Reactions to Man’s Landing on the Moon Show Broad Variations in Opinions', The New York Times (21 Jul 1969), 6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Do (1908)  |  Event (216)  |  Explorer (28)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Form (959)  |  Interest (386)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Matter (798)  |  Moon (237)  |  Most (1731)  |  Panic (2)  |  Pebble (25)  |  Pit (19)  |  Result (677)  |  Romantic (13)  |  Say (984)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Soil (86)  |  Splendor (17)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Taste (90)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tread (17)  |  Utilitarian (3)

True science and true religion are twin sisters, and the separation of either from the other is sure to prove the death of both. Science prospers exactly in proportion as it is religious; and religion flourishes in exact proportion to the scientific depth and firmness of its basis.
As quoted from the close of a recent lecture by Huxley in 'What Knowledge is of Most Worth'. Lectures in Education, by Herbert Spencer, delivered at the Royal Institution (1855). In The Westminster Review (Jul 1859), 22. Collected in Essays on Education and Kindred Subjects (1911), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Basis (173)  |  Both (493)  |  Death (388)  |  Depth (94)  |  Other (2236)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Prosper (6)  |  Prove (250)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  True Science (23)  |  Twin (15)

We can trace the development of a nervous system, and correlate with it the parallel phenomena of sensation and thought. We see with undoubting certainty that they go hand in hand. But we try to soar in a vacuum the moment we seek to comprehend the connexion between them … Man the object is separated by an impassable gulf from man the subject.
In 'Address Delivered Before The British Association Assembled at Belfast' (19 Aug 1874), in Fragments of Science for Unscientific People: A Series of Detached Essays, Lectures, and Reviews (1892), Vol. 2, 194-195.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (174)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Connection (162)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Development (422)  |  Gulf (18)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moment (253)  |  Nervous System (34)  |  Object (422)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  See (1081)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Soar (23)  |  Subject (521)  |  System (537)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trace (103)  |  Try (283)  |  Vacuum (39)

We come therefore now to that knowledge whereunto the ancient oracle directeth us, which is the knowledge of ourselves; which deserveth the more accurate handling, by how much it toucheth us more nearly. This knowledge, as it is the end and term of natural philosophy in the intention of man, so notwithstanding it is but a portion of natural philosophy in the continent of nature. And generally let this be a rule, that all partitions of knowledges be accepted rather for lines and veins, than for sections and separations; and that the continuance and entireness of knowledge be preserved. For the contrary hereof hath made particular sciences to become barren, shallow, and erroneous; while they have not been nourished and maintained from the common fountain. So we see Cicero the orator complained of Socrates and his school, that he was the first that separated philosophy and rhetoric; whereupon rhetoric became an empty and verbal art. So we may see that the opinion of Copernicus touching the rotation of the earth, which astronomy itself cannot correct because it is not repugnant to any of the phenomena, yet natural philosophy may correct. So we see also that the science of medicine, if it be destituted and forsaken by natural philosophy, it is not much better than an empirical practice. With this reservation therefore we proceed to Human Philosophy or Humanity, which hath two parts: the one considereth man segregate, or distributively; the other congregate, or in society. So as Human Philosophy is either Simple and Particular, or Conjugate and Civil. Humanity Particular consisteth of the same parts whereof man consisteth; that is, of knowledges that respect the Body, and of knowledges that respect the Mind. But before we distribute so far, it is good to constitute. For I do take the consideration in general and at large of Human Nature to be fit to be emancipate and made a knowledge by itself; not so much in regard of those delightful and elegant discourses which have been made of the dignity of man, of his miseries, of his state and life, and the like adjuncts of his common and undivided nature; but chiefly in regard of the knowledge concerning the sympathies and concordances between the mind and body, which, being mixed, cannot be properly assigned to the sciences of either.
The Advancement of Learning (1605) in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1887-1901), Vol. 3, 366-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Accurate (86)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Art (657)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Barren (30)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Body (537)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Civil (26)  |  Common (436)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Continent (76)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Delightful (17)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Distribute (15)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Empty (80)  |  End (590)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  First (1283)  |  Fit (134)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Intention (46)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Portion (84)  |  Practice (204)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Regard (305)  |  Repugnant (8)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rhetoric (12)  |  Rotation (12)  |  Rule (294)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Simple (406)  |  Society (326)  |  State (491)  |  Term (349)  |  Touching (16)  |  Two (937)  |  Vein (25)

Without preparing fluorine, without being able to separate it from the substances with which it is united, chemistry has been able to study and to analyze a great number of its compounds. The body was not isolated, and yet its place was marked in our classifications. This well demonstrates the usefulness of a scientific theory, a theory which is regarded as true during a certain time, which correlates facts and leads the mind to new hypotheses, the first causes of experimentation; which, little by little, destroy the theory itself, in order to replace it by another more in harmony with the progress of science.
[Describing the known history of fluorine compounds before his isolation of the element.]
'Fluorine', lecture at the Royal Institution (28 May 1897), translated from the French, in Proceedings of the Royal Institution (1897). In Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution to July 1897 (1898), 262.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Classification (97)  |  Compound (113)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Element (310)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Fluorine (5)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harmony (102)  |  History (673)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Known (454)  |  Lead (384)  |  Little (707)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Order (632)  |  Periodic Table (17)  |  Preparing (21)  |  Progress (465)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Regard (305)  |  Replacement (12)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientific Theory (24)  |  Separate (143)  |  Study (653)  |  Substance (248)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Usefulness (86)

…separation of the observer from the phenomenon to be observed is no longer possible.
Quoted in Robert J. Scully, The Demon and the Quantum (2007), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possible (552)  |  Uncertainty Principle (8)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.