Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY™
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I believe that this Nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to earth.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index M > Category: Maintain

Maintain Quotes (22 quotes)

A nurse is to maintain the air within the room as fresh as the air without, without lowering the temperature.
In Notes on Nursing: What It Is and What It Is Not (1859), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (151)  |  Fresh (21)  |  Nurse (19)  |  Room (29)  |  Temperature (42)

A star is drawing on some vast reservoir of energy by means unknown to us. This reservoir can scarcely be other than the subatomic energy which, it is known exists abundantly in all matter; we sometimes dream that man will one day learn how to release it and use it for his service. The store is well nigh inexhaustible, if only it could be tapped. There is sufficient in the Sun to maintain its output of heat for 15 billion years.
Address to the British Association in Cardiff, (24 Aug 1920), in Observatory (1920), 43 353. Reprinted in Foreward to Arthur S. Eddington, The Internal Constitution of the Stars (1926, 1988), x.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Atomic Power (7)  |  Billion (52)  |  Dream (92)  |  Energy (185)  |  Existence (254)  |  Heat (90)  |  Inexhaustible (10)  |  Learning (174)  |  Matter (270)  |  Output (9)  |  Release (15)  |  Reservoir (4)  |  Service (54)  |  Star (251)  |  Store (17)  |  Subatomic (6)  |  Sufficiency (13)  |  Sun (211)  |  Tap (8)  |  Unknown (87)  |  Year (214)

By denying scientific principles, one may maintain any paradox.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Deny (29)  |  Paradox (35)  |  Principle (228)  |  Scientific (169)

Fanatical ethnic or religious or national chauvinisms are a little difficult to maintain when we see our planet as a fragile blue crescent fading to become an inconspicuous point of light against a bastion and citadel of the stars.
Cosmos
Science quotes on:  |  Bastion (2)  |  Become (100)  |  Blue (30)  |  Citadel (4)  |  Crescent (2)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Fade (5)  |  Fanatical (2)  |  Fragile (7)  |  Inconspicuous (3)  |  Light (246)  |  Little (126)  |  National (20)  |  Planet (199)  |  Point (72)  |  Religious (44)  |  See (197)  |  Star (251)

For me, the first challenge for computing science is to discover how to maintain order in a finite, but very large, discrete universe that is intricately intertwined. And a second, but not less important challenge is how to mould what you have achieved in solving the first problem, into a teachable discipline: it does not suffice to hone your own intellect (that will join you in your grave), you must teach others how to hone theirs. The more you concentrate on these two challenges, the clearer you will see that they are only two sides of the same coin: teaching yourself is discovering what is teachable.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (36)  |  Challenge (37)  |  Clear (52)  |  Coin (9)  |  Compute (10)  |  Concentrate (11)  |  Discipline (38)  |  Discover (115)  |  Discrete (6)  |  Finite (22)  |  First (174)  |  Grave (20)  |  Important (124)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Intertwine (3)  |  Join (15)  |  Large (82)  |  Less (54)  |  Mold (26)  |  Order (167)  |  Problem (362)  |  Same (92)  |  Science (1699)  |  Second (33)  |  See (197)  |  Side (36)  |  Solve (41)  |  Suffice (3)  |  Teach (102)  |  Theirs (3)  |  Universe (563)

Former arbiters of taste must have felt (as so many apostles of ‘traditional values’ and other highminded tags for restriction and conformity do today) that maintaining the social order required a concept of unalloyed heroism. Human beings so designated as role models had to embody all virtues of the paragon–which meant, of course, that they could not be described in their truly human and ineluctably faulted form.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Apostle (3)  |  Concept (102)  |  Conformity (9)  |  Describe (38)  |  Designation (10)  |  Embody (13)  |  Fault (27)  |  Feel (93)  |  Form (210)  |  Former (18)  |  Heroism (7)  |  Human (445)  |  Human Beings (19)  |  Ineluctably (2)  |  Mean (63)  |  Of Course (11)  |  Paragon (4)  |  Require (33)  |  Restriction (6)  |  Social Order (7)  |  Taste (35)  |  Today (86)  |  Traditional (9)  |  Truly (19)  |  Value (180)  |  Virtue (55)

How would we express in terms of the statistical theory the marvellous faculty of a living organism, by which it delays the decay into thermodynamical equilibrium (death)? … It feeds upon negative entropy … Thus the device by which an organism maintains itself stationary at a fairly high level of orderliness (= fairly low level of entropy) really consists in continually sucking orderliness from its environment.
In 'Organization Maintained by Extracting “Order” from the Environment', What is Life? : The Physical Aspect of the Living Cell (1944), 74.
Science quotes on:  |  Device (24)  |  Entropy (40)  |  Environment (138)  |  High (78)  |  Level (51)  |  Negative (24)  |  Orderliness (5)  |  Organism (126)  |  Stationary (3)  |  Suck (3)

I maintain that the human mystery is incredibly demeaned by scientific reductionism, with its claim in promissory materialism to account eventually for all of the spiritual world in terms of patterns of neuronal activity. This belief must be classed as a superstition. ... We have to recognize that we are spiritual beings with souls existing in a spiritual world as well as material beings with bodies and brains existing in a material world.
In Evolution of the Brain: Creation of the Self (1991), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (45)  |  Activity (97)  |  Being (39)  |  Belief (400)  |  Body (193)  |  Brain (181)  |  Claim (52)  |  Classification (79)  |  Existence (254)  |  Human (445)  |  Incredible (18)  |  Material (124)  |  Materialism (6)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Neuron (9)  |  Pattern (56)  |  Recognition (62)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Soul (139)  |  Spiritual (45)  |  Superstition (50)  |  World (667)

In many ways the performances of Donald Trump remind me of male chimpanzees and their dominance rituals. In order to impress rivals, males seeking to rise in the dominance hierarchy perform spectacular displays: stamping, slapping the ground, dragging branches, throwing rocks. The more vigorous and imaginative the display, the faster the individual is likely to rise in the hierarchy, and the longer he is likely to maintain that position.
As quoted in magazine article by James Fallows, 'When Donald Meets Hillary', The Atlantic (Oct 2016). The reporter stated “Jane Goodall … told me shortly before Trump won the GOP nomination.”
Science quotes on:  |  Branch (61)  |  Chimpanzee (11)  |  Display (22)  |  Dominance (5)  |  Drag (2)  |  Faster (10)  |  Hierarchy (11)  |  Imaginative (6)  |  Impress (9)  |  Individual (177)  |  Longer (5)  |  Male (24)  |  Performance (27)  |  Position (54)  |  Remind (5)  |  Rise (51)  |  Ritual (8)  |  Rival (9)  |  Rock (107)  |  Seek (57)  |  Slap (2)  |  Spectacular (8)  |  Stamp (14)  |  Throw (31)  |  Donald Trump (3)  |  Vigorous (11)

Inventions are best developed on your own. When you work for other people or borrow money from them, maintaining freedom of intellect is difficult.
As quoted by Franz Lidz in 'Dr. NakaMats, the Man With 3300 Patents to His Name', Smithsonian Magazine (Dec 2012).
Science quotes on:  |  Borrow (12)  |  Develop (55)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Freedom (76)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Invention (283)  |  Money (125)

It is therefore easy to see why the churches have always fought science and persecuted its devotees. On the other hand, I maintain that the cosmic religious feeling is the strongest and noblest motive for scientific research. Only those who realize the immense efforts and, above all, the devotion without which pioneer work in theoretical science cannot be achieved are able to grasp the strength of the emotion out of which alone such work, remote as it is from the immediate realities of life, can issue. What a deep conviction of the rationality of the universe and what a yearning to understand, were it but a feeble reflection of the mind revealed in this world, Kepler and Newton must have had to enable them to spend years of solitary labor in disentangling the principles of celestial mechanics! Those whose acquaintance with scientific research is derived chiefly from its practical results easily develop a completely false notion of the mentality of the men who, surrounded by a skeptical world, have shown the way to kindred spirits scattered wide through the world and through the centuries. Only one who has devoted his life to similar ends can have a vivid realization of what has inspired these men and given them the strength to remain true to their purpose in spite of countless failures. It is cosmic religious feeling that gives a man such strength. A contemporary has said, not unjustly, that in this materialistic age of ours the serious scientific workers are the only profoundly religious people.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (36)  |  Acquaintance (13)  |  Age (137)  |  Alone (61)  |  Celestial Mechanics (2)  |  Century (95)  |  Chiefly (7)  |  Church (30)  |  Completely (19)  |  Contemporary (22)  |  Conviction (57)  |  Cosmic (34)  |  Countless (13)  |  Deep (81)  |  Derive (18)  |  Develop (55)  |  Devote (23)  |  Devotee (3)  |  Devotion (24)  |  Disentangle (3)  |  Easily (16)  |  Easy (56)  |  Effort (94)  |  Emotion (62)  |  Enable (25)  |  End (141)  |  Failure (118)  |  False (79)  |  Feeble (21)  |  Feel (93)  |  Fight (37)  |  Give (117)  |  Grasp (43)  |  Immediate (27)  |  Immense (28)  |  Inspire (35)  |  Issue (37)  |  Kepler (2)  |  Kindred (3)  |  Labor (53)  |  Life (917)  |  Materialistic (2)  |  Mentality (5)  |  Mind (544)  |  Motive (26)  |  Newton (9)  |  Nobl (4)  |  Notion (32)  |  On The Other Hand (16)  |  Ours (4)  |  People (269)  |  Persecute (4)  |  Pioneer (23)  |  Practical (93)  |  Principle (228)  |  Profoundly (11)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Rationality (11)  |  Reality (140)  |  Realization (33)  |  Realize (43)  |  Reflection (50)  |  Religious (44)  |  Remain (77)  |  Remote (27)  |  Research (517)  |  Result (250)  |  Reveal (32)  |  Say (126)  |  Scatter (5)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific (169)  |  See (197)  |  Serious (37)  |  Show (55)  |  Similar (22)  |  Skeptical (6)  |  Solitary (13)  |  Spend (24)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Spite (10)  |  Strength (63)  |  Strong (47)  |  Surround (17)  |  Theoretical Science (2)  |  True (120)  |  Understand (189)  |  Universe (563)  |  Vivid (16)  |  Wide (14)  |  Work (457)  |  Worker (23)  |  World (667)  |  Year (214)  |  Yearn (8)

Philosophers no longer write for the intelligent, only for their fellow professionals. The few thousand academic philosophers in the world do not stint themselves: they maintain more than seventy learned journals. But in the handful that cover more than one subdivision of philosophy, any given philosopher can hardly follow more than one or two articles in each issue. This hermetic condition is attributed to “technical problems” in the subject. Since William James, Russell, and Whitehead, philosophy, like history, has been confiscated by scholarship and locked away from the contamination of general use.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Academic (12)  |  Article (15)  |  Attribute (22)  |  Condition (119)  |  Contamination (4)  |  Cover (23)  |  Fellow (29)  |  Follow (66)  |  General (92)  |  Give (117)  |  Handful (6)  |  Hardly (12)  |  Hermetic (2)  |  History (302)  |  Intelligent (35)  |  Issue (37)  |  William James (42)  |  Journal (13)  |  Learn (160)  |  Lock (9)  |  Long (95)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Problem (362)  |  Professional (27)  |  Scholarship (13)  |  Seventy (2)  |  Subdivision (2)  |  Subject (129)  |  Technical (26)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Whitehead (2)  |  World (667)  |  Write (87)

Rulers and generals muster their troops. Magnates muster the sums of money which give them power. The fascist dictators muster the irrational human reactions which make it possible for them to attain and maintain their power over the masses. The scientists muster knowledge and means of research. But, thus far, no organization fighting for freedom has ever mustered the biological arsenal where the weapons are to be found for the establishment and the maintenance of human freedom. All precision of our social existence notwithstanding, there is as yet no definition of the word freedom which would be in keeping with natural science. No word is more misused and misunderstood. To define freedom is the same as to define sexual health. But nobody will openly admit this. The advocacy of personal and social freedom is connected with anxiety and guilt feelings. As if to be free were a sin or at least not quite as it should be. Sex-economy makes this guilt feeling comprehensible: freedom without sexual self-determination is in itself a contradiction. But to be sexual means—according to the prevailing human structure—to be sinful or guilty. There are very few people who experience sexual love without guilt feeling. “Free love” has acquired a degrading meaning: it lost the meaning given it by the old fighters for freedom. In films and in books, to be genital and to be criminal are presented as the same thing.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (21)  |  Acquire (19)  |  Admit (22)  |  Anxiety (15)  |  Arsenal (4)  |  Attain (21)  |  Biological (21)  |  Book (181)  |  Comprehensible (4)  |  Connect (15)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Criminal (14)  |  Define (29)  |  Definition (152)  |  Degrade (4)  |  Dictator (3)  |  Establishment (29)  |  Existence (254)  |  Experience (268)  |  Far (77)  |  Fascist (2)  |  Feel (93)  |  Feelings (11)  |  Fight (37)  |  Fighter (4)  |  Film (8)  |  Find (248)  |  Free (59)  |  Freedom (76)  |  General (92)  |  Give (117)  |  Guilt (8)  |  Guilty (4)  |  Health (136)  |  Human (445)  |  Irrational (7)  |  Keep (47)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Least (44)  |  Lose (53)  |  Love (164)  |  Maintenance (13)  |  Mass (61)  |  Mean (63)  |  Means (109)  |  Misunderstand (2)  |  Misuse (9)  |  Money (125)  |  Natural Science (62)  |  Nobody (38)  |  Old (104)  |  Openly (2)  |  Organization (79)  |  People (269)  |  Personal (49)  |  Possible (100)  |  Power (273)  |  Precision (38)  |  Present (103)  |  Prevail (13)  |  Reaction (59)  |  Research (517)  |  Ruler (12)  |  Same (92)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Sexual (4)  |  Sin (27)  |  Social (93)  |  Structure (191)  |  Sum (30)  |  Troop (3)  |  Weapon (57)  |  Word (221)

Science asks no questions about the ontological pedigree or a priori character of a theory, but is content to judge it by its performance; and it is thus that a knowledge of nature, having all the certainty which the senses are competent to inspire, has been attained—a knowledge which maintains a strict neutrality toward all philosophical systems and concerns itself not with the genesis or a priori grounds of ideas.
Originally published in North American Review (1865). 'The Philosophy of Herbert Spencer,' repr. In Philosophical Writings of Chauncey Wright (1963), p. 8.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (16)  |  Ask (99)  |  Attain (21)  |  Certainty (97)  |  Character (82)  |  Competent (10)  |  Concern (76)  |  Content (39)  |  Genesis (13)  |  Ground (63)  |  Idea (440)  |  Inspire (35)  |  Judge (43)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Neutrality (3)  |  Pedigree (3)  |  Performance (27)  |  Philosophical (14)  |  Question (315)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sense (240)  |  Strict (7)  |  System (141)  |  Theory (582)  |  Toward (29)

That which lies before the human race is a constant struggle to maintain and improve, in opposition to State of Nature, the State of Art of an organized polity; in which, and by which, man may develop a worthy civilization
'Prolegomena', Evolution and Ethics, and Other Essays (1897), 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Constant (40)  |  Development (228)  |  Human Race (49)  |  Improve (39)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Opposition (29)  |  Organization (79)  |  Polity (2)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  State (96)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Worth (74)

The dogma of the Ghost in the Machine ... maintains that there exist both bodies and minds; that there occur physical processes and mental processes; that there are mechanical causes of corporeal movements and mental causes of corporeal movements.
The Concept of Mind (1949), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (193)  |  Cause (231)  |  Dogma (25)  |  Existence (254)  |  Ghost (20)  |  Machine (133)  |  Mechanical (31)  |  Mental (57)  |  Mind (544)  |  Movement (65)  |  Physical (94)  |  Process (201)

The Greeks made Space the subject-matter of a science of supreme simplicity and certainty. Out of it grew, in the mind of classical antiquity, the idea of pure science. Geometry became one of the most powerful expressions of that sovereignty of the intellect that inspired the thought of those times. At a later epoch, when the intellectual despotism of the Church, which had been maintained through the Middle Ages, had crumbled, and a wave of scepticism threatened to sweep away all that had seemed most fixed, those who believed in Truth clung to Geometry as to a rock, and it was the highest ideal of every scientist to carry on his science 'more geometrico.'
In Space,Time, Matter, translated by Henry Leopold Brose (1952), 1
Science quotes on:  |  Antiquity (12)  |  Belief (400)  |  Certainty (97)  |  Church (30)  |  Cling (4)  |  Crumble (2)  |  Epoch (12)  |  Expression (82)  |  Fixed (11)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Greek (46)  |  Grow (66)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Later (11)  |  Middle Ages (7)  |  Powerful (51)  |  Pure Science (18)  |  Rock (107)  |  Science (1699)  |  Seem (89)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Skepticism (18)  |  Sovereignty (6)  |  Space (154)  |  Subject (129)  |  Supreme (24)  |  Sweep (11)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Threaten (6)  |  Truth (750)  |  Wave (55)

The living being is stable. It must be so in order not to be destroyed, dissolved, or disintegrated by the colossal forces, often adverse, which surround it. By apparent contradiction it maintains its stability only if it is excitable and capable of modifying itself according to external stimuli and adjusting its response to the stimulation. In a sense it is stable because it is modifiable—the slight instability is the necessary condition for the true stability of the organism.
In Dictionnaire de Physiologie (1900), Vol. 4, 72. English as quoted in Walter Bradford Cannon, The Wisdom of the Body (1932), 21, with French source citation footnoted on 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Adjust (5)  |  Adverse (2)  |  Biology (150)  |  Capable (26)  |  Colossal (10)  |  Condition (119)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Destroyed (2)  |  External (45)  |  Force (194)  |  Instability (3)  |  Life (917)  |  Modify (11)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Organism (126)  |  Response (24)  |  Stability (17)  |  Stable (15)  |  Stimulation (12)  |  Stimulus (18)

The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition, we must lead it. We cannot cede to other nations the technology that will power new jobs and new industries, we must claim its promise. That’s how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national treasure—our forests and waterways, our crop lands and snow-capped peaks. That is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by God. That’s what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared.
In Second Inaugural Address (21 Jan 2013) at the United States Capitol.
Science quotes on:  |  America (74)  |  Care (73)  |  Cede (2)  |  Claim (52)  |  Command (14)  |  Creed (10)  |  Declare (18)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Economic (21)  |  Father (44)  |  Forest (88)  |  God (454)  |  Industry (91)  |  Job (33)  |  Lead (101)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Nation (111)  |  National (20)  |  Path (59)  |  Peak (15)  |  Planet (199)  |  Power (273)  |  Preserve (38)  |  Promise (27)  |  Resist (10)  |  Source (71)  |  Sustainable Energy (2)  |  Technology (199)  |  Transition (15)  |  Treasure (35)  |  Vitality (10)  |  Wind (52)  |  Wind Power (8)

Thus the system of the world only oscillates around a mean state from which it never departs except by a very small quantity. By virtue of its constitution and the law of gravity, it enjoys a stability that can be destroyed only by foreign causes, and we are certain that their action is undetectable from the time of the most ancient observations until our own day. This stability in the system of the world, which assures its duration, is one of the most notable among all phenomena, in that it exhibits in the heavens the same intention to maintain order in the universe that nature has so admirably observed on earth for the sake of preserving individuals and perpetuating species.
'Sur l'Équation Séculaire de la Lune' (1786, published 1788). In Oeuvres complètes de Laplace, 14 Vols. (1843-1912), Vol. 11, 248-9, trans. Charles Coulston Gillispie, Pierre-Simon Laplace 1749-1827: A Life in Exact Science (1997), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Ancient (68)  |  Cause (231)  |  Certainty (97)  |  The Constitution of the United States (7)  |  Destroy (63)  |  Duration (9)  |  Exhibit (12)  |  Foreign (20)  |  Gravity (89)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Individual (177)  |  Intention (25)  |  Law (418)  |  Mean (63)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Observation (418)  |  Order (167)  |  Oscillation (6)  |  Perpetuate (5)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Preservation (28)  |  Species (181)  |  Stability (17)  |  State (96)  |  System (141)  |  Time (439)  |  Undetectable (2)  |  Universe (563)  |  World (667)

To conclude, therefore, let no man out of a weak conceit of sobriety, or an ill-apply'd moderation, think or maintain, that a man can search too far or be too well studied in the book of God’s word, or in the book of God’s works; divinity or philosophy; but rather let men endeavour an endless progress or proficience in both.
In Of Proficience and Advancement of Learning Divine and Human (1605), collected in The Works of Francis Bacon (1711), Vol. 2, 417. Charles Darwin placed this quote on the title page of his On the Origin of Species.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (181)  |  Both (52)  |  Conceit (9)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Divinity (11)  |  Endeavour (24)  |  Endless (20)  |  God (454)  |  Moderation (2)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Progress (317)  |  Search (85)  |  Sobriety (2)  |  Study (331)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Weak (36)  |  Word (221)  |  Work (457)

To the extent that remaining old-growth Douglas fir ecosystems possess unique structural and functional characteristics distinct from surrounding managed forests, the analogy between forest habitat islands and oceanic islands applies. Forest planning decision variables such as total acreage to be maintained, patch size frequency distribution, spatial distribution of patches, specific locations, and protective measures all need to be addressed.‎
In The Fragmented Forest: Island Biogeography Theory and the Preservation of Biotic Diversity (1984), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Address (7)  |  Analogy (46)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Decision (58)  |  Distinct (29)  |  Distribution (21)  |  Douglas Fir (2)  |  Ecosystem (21)  |  Forest (88)  |  Frequency (13)  |  Function (90)  |  Habitat (10)  |  Island (17)  |  Location (5)  |  Manage (10)  |  Measure (70)  |  Need (211)  |  Patch (6)  |  Plan (69)  |  Protective (4)  |  Remain (77)  |  Size (47)  |  Spatial (4)  |  Specific (30)  |  Structural (8)  |  Surround (17)  |  Unique (24)  |  Variable (9)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

who invites your feedback

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.