Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Patient

Patient Quotes (116 quotes)

He who doth with the greatest exactness imaginable, weigh every individual thing that shall or hath hapned to his Patient, and may be known from the Observations of his own, or of others, and who afterwards compareth all these with one another, and puts them in an opposite view to such Things as happen in a healthy State; and lastly, from all this with the nicest and severest bridle upon his reasoning faculty riseth to the knowledge of the very first Cause of the Disease, and of the Remedies fit to remove them; He, and only He deserveth the Name of a true Physician.
Aphorism No. 13 in Boerhaave’s Aphorisms: Concerning The Knowledge and Cure of Diseases (1715), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (231)  |  Disease (257)  |  Exactness (18)  |  Name (118)  |  Observation (418)  |  Physician (232)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Remedy (46)  |  True (120)

In a 1852 letter, Nightingale records the opinion of a young surgeon:
The account he gives of nurses beats everything that even I know of. This young prophet says that they are all drunkards, without exception, Sisters and all, and that there are but two whom the surgeon can trust to give the patients their medicines.
Letter to Miss H. Bonham Carter (8 Jan 1852), quoted in Edward Tyas Cook, The Life of Florence Nightingale (1914), Vol. 1, 116.
Science quotes on:  |  Drunkard (4)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Nurse (19)  |  Surgeon (43)  |  Trust (40)

Male secum agit æger, medicum qui hæredem ficit.Br>That sick man does ill for himself, who makes his physician his heir.
In 'Ornamenta Rationalia, or, Elegant Sentences' (1625). As given in Essays, Moral, Economical, and Political: A New Edition, With the Latin Quotations Translated (1813), No. 31, 364. A century later, Benjamin Franklin included this in his Poor Richard’s Almanac as “He’s a Fool that makes his Doctor his Heir.”
Science quotes on:  |  Heir (6)  |  Ill (11)  |  Physician (232)  |  Sick (23)

[Trousseau regarded as the chief aim of medicine:] Get that patient well.
As quoted by F.H. Garrison in editorial, 'The Evil Spoken of Physicians and the Answer Thereto', Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine (Feb 1929), 5, No. 2, 145.
Science quotes on:  |  Health (136)  |  Treatment (88)

Macbeth: How does your patient, doctor?
Doctor: Not so sick, my lord,
As she is troubled with thick-coming fancies,
That keep her from her rest.
Macbeth: Cure her of that.
Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,
Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
Raze out the written troubles of the brain,
And with some sweet oblivious antidote
Cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff
Which weighs upon the heart?
Doctor: Therein the patient
Must minister to himself.
Macbeth: Throw physic to the dogs; I'll none of it.
Macbeth (1606), V, iii.
Science quotes on:  |  Antidote (6)  |  Bosom (8)  |  Brain (181)  |  Cleanse (3)  |  Disease (257)  |  Dog (39)  |  Heart (110)  |  Memory (81)  |  Mind (544)  |  Minister (6)  |  Oblivious (6)  |  Peril (6)  |  Physic (5)  |  Pluck (4)  |  Psychiatry (19)  |  Root (48)  |  Sorrow (8)  |  Trouble (55)  |  Writing (72)

A doctor is a man who writes prescriptions till the patient either dies or is cured by nature.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Cure (88)  |  Die (46)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Prescription (14)  |  Write (87)

A doctor who doesn’t say too many foolish things is a patient half-cured. (1921)
'Le Côté de Guermantes', À la recherche du temps perdu (1913-27).
Science quotes on:  |  Cure (88)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Fool (70)

A patient pursuit of facts, and cautious combination and comparison of them, is the drudgery to which man is subjected by his Maker, if he wishes to attain sure knowledge.
In 'Productions Mineral, Vegetable and Animal', Notes on the State of Virginia (1787), 112.
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (21)  |  Cautious (4)  |  Combination (69)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Drudgery (4)  |  Fact (609)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Maker (10)  |  Pursuit (55)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Subject (129)  |  Wish (62)

A physician advised his patient that had sore eyes, that he should abstain from wine; but the patient said, “I think rather, sir, from wine and water; for I have often marked it in blue eyes, and I have seen water come forth, but never wine.”
In 'A Collection of Apophthegms, New and Old' (1625). As given in Essays, Moral, Economical, and Political: A New Edition, With the Latin Quotations Translated (1813), No. 52, 279.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstain (2)  |  Advice (33)  |  Eye (159)  |  Physician (232)  |  Sore (3)  |  Tear (20)  |  Water (244)  |  Wine (23)

A reference to the two sorts of doctors is also found in the Republic: “Now you know that when patients do not require medicine, but have only to be put under a regimen, the inferior sort of practitioner is deemed to be good enough; but when medicine has to be given, then the doctor should be more of a man.”
Osler is referring to Plato’s Dialogues, iii, 153. In Address (1893) to the Johns Hopkins Hospital Historical Club, 'Physic and Physicians as Depicted in Plato', collected in Aequanimitas: With Other Addresses to Medical Students, Nurses and Practitioners of Medicine (1904), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Deem (2)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Give (117)  |  Good (228)  |  Inferior (14)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Physician (232)  |  Practitioner (12)  |  Require (33)  |  Sort (32)

Again and again, often in the busiest phases of the insulin investigations, he [Frederick Banting] found time to set a fracture or perform a surgical operation on one of his army comrades or on some patient who was in need.
In 'Obituary: Sir Frederick Banting', Science (14 Mar 1941), N.S. 93, No. 2411, 248.
Science quotes on:  |  Army (22)  |  Sir Frederick Grant Banting (10)  |  Comrade (3)  |  Fracture (4)  |  Insulin (8)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Operation (96)  |  Surgery (39)

And science, we should insist, better than other discipline, can hold up to its students and followers an ideal of patient devotion to the search to objective truth, with vision unclouded by personal or political motive.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Better (131)  |  Devotion (24)  |  Discipline (38)  |  Follower (7)  |  Hold (56)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Insist (13)  |  Motive (26)  |  Objective (49)  |  Personal (49)  |  Political (31)  |  Science (1699)  |  Search (85)  |  Student (131)  |  Truth (750)  |  Vision (55)

Apprehension, uncertainty, waiting, expectation, fear of surprise, do a patient more harm than any exertion. Remember he is face to face with his enemy all the time.
In Notes on Nursing: What it is, and What it is Not (1860), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  Apprehension (9)  |  Enemy (52)  |  Exertion (8)  |  Expectation (46)  |  Face (69)  |  Fear (113)  |  Harm (31)  |  Remember (53)  |  Surprise (44)  |  Uncertainty (37)  |  Waiting (9)

Before you tell the ‘truth’ to the patient, be sure you know the ‘truth’ and that the patient wants to hear it.
Chinese proverb.
Science quotes on:  |  Truth (750)

Break the chains of your prejudices and take up the torch of experience, and you will honour nature in the way she deserves, instead of drawing derogatory conclusions from the ignorance in which she has left you. Simply open your eyes and ignore what you cannot understand, and you will see that a labourer whose mind and knowledge extend no further than the edges of his furrow is no different essentially from the greatest genius, as would have been proved by dissecting the brains of Descartes and Newton; you will be convinced that the imbecile or the idiot are animals in human form, in the same way as the clever ape is a little man in another form; and that, since everything depends absolutely on differences in organisation, a well-constructed animal who has learnt astronomy can predict an eclipse, as he can predict recovery or death when his genius and good eyesight have benefited from some time at the school of Hippocrates and at patients' bedsides.
Machine Man (1747), in Ann Thomson (ed.), Machine Man and Other Writings (1996), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Ape (39)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Death (270)  |  René Descartes (43)  |  Eclipse (16)  |  Experience (268)  |  Genius (186)  |  Hippocrates (49)  |  Idiot (14)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Imbecile (4)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mind (544)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (258)  |  Prejudice (58)  |  Recovery (18)

Building goes on briskly at the therapeutic Tower of Babel; what one recommends another condemns; what one gives in large doses another scarce dares to prescribe in small doses; and what one vaunts as a novelty another thinks not worth rescuing from merited oblivion. All is confusion, contradiction, inconceivable chaos. Every country, every place, almost every doctor, have their own pet remedies, without which they imagine their patients can not be cured; and all this changes every year, aye every mouth.
Weekly Medical Gazette, of Vienna
Science quotes on:  |  Babel (3)  |  Briskly (2)  |  Build (80)  |  Change (291)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Condemn (6)  |  Confusion (34)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Country (121)  |  Cure (88)  |  Dare (22)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Dose (12)  |  Give (117)  |  Imagine (40)  |  Inconceivable (7)  |  Large (82)  |  Merit (25)  |  Mouth (16)  |  Novelty (19)  |  Oblivion (7)  |  Pet (7)  |  Place (111)  |  Prescribe (6)  |  Recommend (4)  |  Remedy (46)  |  Rescue (8)  |  Scarce (5)  |  Small (97)  |  Therapeutic (2)  |  Think (205)  |  Tower (12)  |  Worth (74)  |  Year (214)

Dermatology is the best specialty. The patient never dies and never gets well.
Anonymous
J. Dantith and A. Isaacs, Medical Quotes: A Thematic Dictionary (1989)
Science quotes on:  |  Dermatologist (2)

Doctors in all ages have made fortunes by killing their patients by means of their cures. The difference in psychiatry is that is the death of the soul.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (137)  |  Cure (88)  |  Death (270)  |  Difference (208)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Fortune (23)  |  Kill (37)  |  Means (109)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Psychiatry (19)  |  Soul (139)

Doctors think a lot of patients are cured who have simply quit in disgust.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Cure (88)  |  Disgust (6)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Lot (23)  |  Quit (7)  |  Simply (34)  |  Think (205)

Each patient ought to feel somewhat the better after the physician’s visit, irrespective of the nature of the illness.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Better (131)  |  Feel (93)  |  Illness (22)  |  Irrespective (3)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Physician (232)  |  Visit (15)

Eugen Bleuler (who in 1911 coined the word 'schizophrenia') once said that in the end his patients were stranger to him than the birds in his garden. But if they're strangers to us, what are we to them?
Hurry Down Sunshine (2009), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Bird (96)  |  Coin (9)  |  Garden (23)  |  Psychology (125)  |  Schizophrenia (2)  |  Strange (61)  |  Word (221)

Every consideration that did not relate to “what is best for the patient” was dismissed. This was Sir William [Gull]’s professional axiom. … But the carrying of it out not unfrequently involved him in difficulty, and led occasionally to his being misunderstood. … He would frequently refuse to repeat a visit or consultation on the ground that he wished the sufferer to feel that it was unnecessary.
In Memoir, as Editor, prefacing Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), xviii.
Science quotes on:  |  Axiom (26)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Consultation (4)  |  Dismiss (6)  |  Feel (93)  |  Good (228)  |  Sir William Withey Gull (39)  |  Refuse (14)  |  Sufferer (3)  |  Unnecessary (11)  |  Visit (15)

I have failed in finding parasites in mosquitoes fed on malaria patients, but perhaps I am not using the proper kind of mosquito.
Letter to his wife (14 Aug 1897). In Memoirs, With a Full Account of the Great Malaria Problem and its Solution (1923), 221.
Science quotes on:  |  Failure (118)  |  Feeding (7)  |  Find (248)  |  Kind (99)  |  Malaria (8)  |  Mosquito (12)  |  Parasite (28)  |  Proper (27)  |  Using (6)

I have lived myself to see the disciples of Hoffman, Boerhaave, Stalh, Cullen, Brown, succeed one another like the shifting figures of a magic lanthern, and their fancies, like the dresses of the annual doll-babies from Paris, becoming from their novelty, the vogue of the day, and yielding to the next novelty their ephemeral favor. The patient, treated on the fashionable theory, sometimes gets well in spite of the medicine.
In letter to Caspar Wistar (21 Jun 1807), collected in Thomas Jefferson Randolph (ed.), Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson (1829), Vol. 4, 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Hermann Boerhaave (21)  |  Sir Thomas Browne (16)  |  William Cullen (5)  |  Disciple (4)  |  Doll (2)  |  Dress (6)  |  Ephemeral (2)  |  Fancy (16)  |  Favor (22)  |  Figure (32)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Novelty (19)  |  Recovery (18)  |  Shifting (3)  |  Spite (10)  |  Georg Ernst Stahl (8)  |  Succession (39)  |  Treatment (88)  |  Vogue (4)

I have long since come to see that no one deserves either praise or blame for the ideas that come to him, but only for the actions resulting therefrom. Ideas and beliefs are certainly not voluntary acts. They come to us—we hardly know how or whence, and once they have got possession of us we can not reject or change them at will. It is for the common good that the promulgation of ideas should be free—uninfluenced by either praise or blame, reward or punishment. But the actions which result from our ideas may properly be so treated, because it is only by patient thought and work, that new ideas, if good and true, become adopted and utilized; while, if untrue or if not adequately presented to the world, they are rejected or forgotten.
In 'The Origin of the Theory of Natural Selection', Popular Science Monthly (1909), 74, 400.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Belief (400)  |  Blame (17)  |  Change (291)  |  Idea (440)  |  Possession (37)  |  Praise (17)  |  Punishment (10)  |  Reject (21)  |  Rejected (2)  |  Result (250)  |  Thought (374)  |  Treated (2)  |  True (120)  |  Untrue (3)  |  World (667)

I have sometimes experienced from nitrous oxide, sensations similar to no others, and they have consequently been indescribable. This has been likewise often the case with other persons. Of two paralytic patients who were asked what they felt after breathing nitrous oxide, the first answered, “I do not know how, but very queer.” The second said, “I felt like the sound of a harp.”
Referring to his investigation of the effects of nitrous oxide (laughing gas).
Science quotes on:  |  Breathing (7)  |  Feeling (79)  |  Harp (3)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Nitrous Oxide (3)  |  Sensation (22)

I must … explain how I was led to concern myself with the pathogenic protozoa. … I was sent to Algeria and put in charge of a department of the hospital at Bone. A large number of my patients had malarial fevers and I was naturally led to study these fevers of which I had only seen rare and benign forms in France.
From Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1907), 'Protozoa as Causes of Diseases', collected in Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1901-1921 (1967, 1999), 264.
Science quotes on:  |  Benign (2)  |  Explain (61)  |  Fever (11)  |  Form (210)  |  France (21)  |  Hospital (33)  |  Malaria (8)  |  Naturally (7)  |  Pathogen (4)  |  Protozoa (3)  |  Rare (31)  |  Study (331)

I prefer the spagyric chemical physicians, for they do not consort with loafers or go about gorgeous in satins, silks and velvets, gold rings on their fingers, silver daggers hanging at their sides and white gloves on their hands, but they tend their work at the fire patiently day and night. They do not go promenading, but seek their recreation in the laboratory, wear plain learthern dress and aprons of hide upon which to wipe their hands, thrust their fingers amongst the coals, into dirt and rubbish and not into golden rings. They are sooty and dirty like the smiths and charcoal burners, and hence make little show, make not many words and gossip with their patients, do not highly praise their own remedies, for they well know that the work must praise the master, not the master praise his work. They well know that words and chatter do not help the sick nor cure them... Therefore they let such things alone and busy themselves with working with their fires and learning the steps of alchemy. These are distillation, solution, putrefaction, extraction, calcination, reverberation, sublimination, fixation, separation, reduction, coagulation, tinction, etc.
Quoted in R. Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 150. [Spagyric is a form of herbalism based on alchemic procedures of preparation.]
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemy (28)  |  Apron (2)  |  Busy (21)  |  Calcination (3)  |  Charcoal (7)  |  Chatter (3)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Coagulation (3)  |  Coal (41)  |  Cure (88)  |  Dagger (3)  |  Day And Night (2)  |  Dirt (8)  |  Distillation (9)  |  Extraction (5)  |  Finger (38)  |  Fire (117)  |  Fixation (2)  |  Glove (3)  |  Gold (55)  |  Gossip (5)  |  Hand (103)  |  Help (68)  |  Hide (36)  |  Laboratory (120)  |  Leather (3)  |  Loafer (2)  |  Master (55)  |  Patience (31)  |  Physician (232)  |  Praise (17)  |  Putrefaction (4)  |  Recreation (11)  |  Reduction (35)  |  Remedy (46)  |  Reverberation (3)  |  Ring (14)  |  Rubbish (8)  |  Satin (2)  |  Separation (32)  |  Show (55)  |  Sick (23)  |  Silk (5)  |  Silver (26)  |  Smith (2)  |  Solution (168)  |  Soot (7)  |  Step (67)  |  Velvet (3)  |  White (38)  |  Wipe (6)  |  Word (221)  |  Work (457)

I tell [medical students] that they are the luckiest persons on earth to be in medical school, and to forget all this worry about H.M.O.'s and keep your eye on helping the patient. It's the best time ever to be a doctor because you can heal and treat conditions that were untreatable even a couple of years ago.
From Cornelia Dean, 'A Conversation with Joseph E. Murray', New York Times (25 Sep 2001), F5.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (33)  |  Best (129)  |  Condition (119)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Forget (40)  |  Heal (4)  |  Help (68)  |  Luck (25)  |  Student (131)  |  Time (439)  |  Treat (17)  |  Worry (27)

I think it perfectly just, that he who, from the love of experiment, quits an approved for an uncertain practice, should suffer the full penalty of Egyptian law against medical innovation; as I would consign to the pillory, the wretch, who out of regard to his character, that is, to his fees, should follow the routine, when, from constant experience he is sure that his patient will die under it, provided any, not inhuman, deviation would give his patient a chance.
From his researches in Fever, 196. In John Edmonds Stock, Memoirs of the life of Thomas Beddoes (1810), 400.
Science quotes on:  |  Death (270)  |  Deviation (11)  |  Egypt (18)  |  Experience (268)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Fee (9)  |  Innovation (38)  |  Justice (24)  |  Law (418)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Physician (232)  |  Routine (11)  |  Treatment (88)  |  Wretch (4)

I trust I may be enabled in the treatment of patients always to act with a single eye to their good.
Letter to his sister Jane (3 Mar 1857). In John Vaughan, 'Lord Lister', The Living Age (1918), 297, 361. Reprinted from The Fortnightly Review (1918), 109, 417- .
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Eye (159)  |  Good (228)  |  Single (72)  |  Treatment (88)

I'm not a wizard or a Frankenstein tampering with Nature. We are not creating life. We have merely done what many people try to do in all kinds of medicine—to help nature. We found nature could not put an egg and sperm together, so we did it. We do not see anything immoral in doing that in the interests of the mother. I cannot see anything immoral in trying to help the patient’s problem.
As quoted by thr Associated Press after the birth of Louise Brown, the first baby born by in vitro fertilization. Reprinted in, for example,'First test-tube baby born in England', Toledo Blade (27 Jul 1978), 1. As reported, the first sentence was given in its own quote marks, followed by “Dr. Steptoe said,” so the quote may not have been delivered as a single statement.
Science quotes on:  |  Create (98)  |  Egg (41)  |  Fertilization (15)  |  Frankenstein (3)  |  Help (68)  |  Immorality (4)  |  In Vitro (2)  |  Interest (170)  |  Life (917)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Mother (59)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Sperm (6)  |  Tamper (5)  |  Try (103)  |  Wizard (3)

If a patient is cold, if a patient is feverish, if a patient is faint, if he is sick after taking food, if he has a bed-sore, it is generally the fault not of the disease, but of the nursing.
In Notes on Nursing: What It Is and What It Is Not (1859), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Cold (38)  |  Disease (257)  |  Faint (5)  |  Fault (27)  |  Fever (11)  |  Food (139)  |  Nursing (3)  |  Sick (23)

If a patient is poor he is committed to a public hospital as a 'psychotic.' If he can afford a sanitarium, the diagnosis is 'neurasthenia.' If he is wealthy enough to be in his own home under the constant watch of nurses and physicians, he is simply 'an indisposed eccentric.'
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Afford (11)  |  Commit (17)  |  Constant (40)  |  Diagnosis (61)  |  Eccentric (10)  |  Home (58)  |  Hospital (33)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Nurse (19)  |  Physician (232)  |  Poor (46)  |  Psychotic (2)  |  Public (82)  |  Simply (34)  |  Watch (39)  |  Wealthy (4)

If I have done the public any service this way, ’tis due to nothing but industry and a patient thought.
From opening of letter to Richard Bentley (17 Jan 1692/3). Collected in Four Letters From Isaac Newton to Doctor Bentley, Containing Some Arguments in Proof of a Deity, (1756), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Public (82)  |  Service (54)  |  Thought (374)

If I were a physician I would try my patients thus. I would wheel them to a window and let Nature feel their pulse. It will soon appear if their sensuous existence is sound. The sounds are but the throbbing of some pulse in me.
(26 Feb 1841). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: I: 1837-1846 (1906), 224.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (55)  |  Existence (254)  |  Feel (93)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Physician (232)  |  Pulse (8)  |  Sensuous (3)  |  Sound (59)  |  Throb (4)  |  Window (25)

If Melancholy increases so far, that from the great motion of the Liquid of the Brain the Patient be thrown into a wild Fury, it is call’d Madness.… The greatest Remedy for it is to throw the Patient unwarily into the Sea, and to keep him under Water as long as he can possibly bear without being quite stifled.
Aphorism No. 1118 and 1123 in Boerhaave’s Aphorisms: Concerning The Knowledge and Cure of Diseases (1715), 302-303.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (181)  |  Depression (15)  |  Fury (5)  |  Greatest (53)  |  Liquid (25)  |  Madness (26)  |  Melancholy (8)  |  Motion (127)  |  Remedy (46)  |  Sea (143)  |  Stifled (2)  |  Throw (31)  |  Water (244)  |  Wild (39)

If the patient dies, the doctor has killed him; if he gets well, the saints have saved him.
In H. Pullar-Strecker, Proverbs for Pleasure (1954), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Death (270)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Killing (14)  |  Saint (10)  |  Saving (19)  |  Well (13)

If three simple questions and one well chosen laboratory test lead to an unambiguous diagnosis, why harry the patient with more?
Anonymous
Editorial, 'Clinical decision by numbers'. Lancet (1975) 1, 1077.
Science quotes on:  |  Diagnosis (61)  |  Test (96)

If you are too fond of new remedies, first you will not cure your patients; secondly, you will have no patients to cure.
Attributed. In Peter McDonald, Oxford Dictionary of Medical Quotations (2004), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Cure (88)  |  Remedy (46)

In a Dublin hospital, many years ago, it was noticed that the death-rate was markedly higher in the ground-floor wards than it was in the wards upstairs. This fact was commented on in an official report, and marked down as requiring investigation. Then it was discovered that, when new patients came in, the porter of the hospital was in the habit of putting them upstairs if they could walk by themselves, and downstairs if they could not.
From 'Figures Can Lie', Science Digest (Sep 1951), 30, No. 3, 53. (As condensed from The Listener). Excerpted in Meta Riley Emberger and Marian Ross Hall, Scientific Writing (1955), 407.
Science quotes on:  |  Comment (8)  |  Death Rate (2)  |  Discover (115)  |  Downstairs (2)  |  Fact (609)  |  Habit (78)  |  Higher (28)  |  Hospital (33)  |  Investigation (123)  |  New (340)  |  Official (5)  |  Porter (2)  |  Report (31)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Walk (56)  |  Ward (4)  |  Year (214)

In psychoanalytic treatment nothing happens but an exchange of words between the patient and the physician.
From a series of 28 lectures for laymen, Part One, 'The Psychology of Errors'. Lecture 1, 'Introduction' collected in Sigmund Freud and G. Stanley Hall (trans.), A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis (1920), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Exchange (11)  |  Happen (63)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Physician (232)  |  Psychoanalytic (2)  |  Psychology (125)  |  Treatment (88)  |  Word (221)

In the first papers concerning the aetiology of tuberculosis I have already indicated the dangers arising from the spread of the bacilli-containing excretions of consumptives, and have urged moreover that prophylactic measures should be taken against the contagious disease. But my words have been unheeded. It was still too early, and because of this they still could not meet with full understanding. It shared the fate of so many similar cases in medicine, where a long time has also been necessary before old prejudices were overcome and the new facts were acknowledged to be correct by the physicians.
'The current state of the struggle against tuberculosis', Nobel Lecture (12 Dec 1905). In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1901-1921 (1967), 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (13)  |  Agreement (29)  |  Bacillus (8)  |  Contagious (4)  |  Disease (257)  |  Fact (609)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Prejudice (58)  |  Tuberculosis (8)

In the patient who succumbed, the cause of death was evidently something which was not found in the patient who recovered; this something we must determine, and then we can act on the phenomena or recognize and foresee them accurately. But not by statistics shall we succeed in this; never have statistics taught anything, and never can they teach anything about the nature of the phenomenon.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 138.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (231)  |  Death (270)  |  Determine (45)  |  Find (248)  |  Foresee (8)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Recovery (18)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Success (202)  |  Succumb (4)  |  Teaching (99)

It is a curious and painful fact that almost all the completely futile treatments that have been believed in during the long history of medical folly have been such as caused acute suffering to the patient. When anesthetics were discovered, pious people considered them an attempt to evade the will of God. It was pointed out, however, that when God extracted Adam's rib He put him into a deep sleep. This proved that anesthetics are all right for men; women, however, ought to suffer, because of the curse of Eve.
In An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish (1943), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Acute (6)  |  Adam And Eve (3)  |  Anesthetic (3)  |  Curse (9)  |  Folly (27)  |  Futile (4)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Pain (82)  |  Pious (3)  |  Rib (4)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Sleep (42)  |  Suffering (26)  |  Treatment (88)

It is a good thing for a physician to have prematurely grey hair and itching piles. The first makes him appear to know more than he does, and the second gives him an expression of concern which the patient interprets as being on his behalf.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (55)  |  Behalf (2)  |  Concern (76)  |  Expression (82)  |  First (174)  |  Give (117)  |  Good (228)  |  Grey (6)  |  Hair (19)  |  Interpret (15)  |  Itch (5)  |  Know (321)  |  Physician (232)  |  Pile (8)  |  Premature (17)  |  Second (33)

It is no part of a physician's business to use either persuasion or compulsion upon the patients.
Aristotle
Politics, VII, ii.
Science quotes on:  |  Physician (232)

It is not what disease the patient has but which patient has the disease.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Disease (257)

It is the patient workers, and the active, kindly sympathetic men and women who hold the balance of things secure.
Aphorism in The Philistine (Apr 1905), 20, No. 5, 160.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (17)  |  Balance (43)  |  Kind (99)  |  Secure (13)  |  Sympathetic (3)  |  Worker (23)

It is the unqualified result of all my experience with the sick that, second only to their need of fresh air, is their need of light; that, after a close room, what hurts them most is a dark room and that it is not only light but direct sunlight they want.
Notes on Nursing: What it is and what it is not (1860), 120.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (151)  |  Health (136)  |  Hospital (33)  |  Light (246)

It may seem a strange principle to enunciate as the very first requirement in a Hospital that it should do the sick no harm.
First sentence of Preface to Notes on Hospitals (1859, 3rd. Ed.,1863), iii.
Science quotes on:  |  Harm (31)  |  Hospital (33)

It was above all in the period after the devastating incursions of the Goths that all branches of knowledge which previously had flourished gloriously and been practiced in the proper manner, began to deteriorate. This happened first of all in Italy where the most fashionable physicians, spurning surgery as did the Romans of old, assigned to their servants such surgical work as their patients seemed to require and merely exercised a supervision over them in the manner of architects.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem: (1543), Book I, i, as translated by William Frank Richardson, in On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book I: The Bones and Cartilages (1998), Preface, xlviii.
Science quotes on:  |  Architect (15)  |  Deterioration (8)  |  Devastation (5)  |  Fashion (24)  |  Flourish (10)  |  Glorious (17)  |  Italy (4)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Physician (232)  |  Proper (27)  |  Requirement (45)  |  Roman (16)  |  Servant (11)  |  Supervision (3)  |  Surgery (39)

Let no one suppose that the words doctor and patient can disguise from the parties the fact that they are employer and employee.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Disguise (8)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Employee (3)  |  Fact (609)  |  Let (30)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Party (16)  |  Suppose (29)  |  Word (221)

Let the young know they will never find a more interesting, more instructive book than the patient himself.
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (181)  |  Physician (232)

Life is short, the Art long, opportunity fleeting, experience treacherous, judgment difficult. The physician must be ready, not only to do his duty himself, but also to secure the co-operation of the patient, of the attendants and of externals.
Aphorisms, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1931), Vol. 4, 99.
Science quotes on:  |  Life (917)  |  Nurse (19)  |  Physician (232)

M.D.—Make Do.— Quaint idea! … Work for the handicapped … who is handicapped, your patients, or you? Both. Helping the survival of the unfit.… With more to come. What in the world was the solution. Where to find a formula for head and heart too?
Quoted in M.C. Winternitz, 'Alan Gregg, Physician', Science (20 Dec 1957), 1279.
Science quotes on:  |  Find (248)  |  Formula (51)  |  Head (52)  |  Heart (110)  |  Help (68)  |  Idea (440)  |  Quaint (5)  |  Solution (168)  |  Survival (49)  |  Unfit (9)  |  Work (457)  |  World (667)

Medicine, poor science! Doctors, poor philosophers! Patients, poor victims!
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Doctor (100)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Poor (46)  |  Science (1699)  |  Victim (8)

Men cannot help feeling a little ashamed of their cousin-german the Ape. His close yet grotesque and clumsy semblance of the human form is accompanied by no gleams of higher instinct. Our humble friend the dog, our patient fellow-labourer the horse, are nearer to us in this respect. The magnanimous and sagacious elephant, doomed though he be to all fours, is godlike compared with this spitefully ferocious creature. Strangely enough, too, the most repulsive and ferocious of all apekind, the recently discovered Gorilla is, the comparative anatomist assures us, nearest to us all: the most closely allied in structure to the human form.
In 'Our Nearest Relation', All Year Round (28 May 1859), 1, No. 5, 112. Charles Dickens was both the editor and publisher of this magazine. The author of the article remains unknown. The articles were by custom printed without crediting the author. Biographers have been able to use extant office records to identify various authors of other articles, but not this specific one. Dickens and Richard Owen were friends; they read each other’s work. Owen is known to have found at least a little time to write a few articles for Dickens’ magazines. Owen had given a talk at the Royal Institution (4 Feb 1859) titled 'On the Gorilla.' This would suggest why Dickens may have had a definite interest in publishing on this subject, regardless of who in fact wrote the article.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomist (14)  |  Ape (39)  |  Assurance (8)  |  Clumsy (4)  |  Comparative (8)  |  Cousin (3)  |  Creature (127)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Dog (39)  |  Elephant (16)  |  Fellow (29)  |  Form (210)  |  Friend (63)  |  Gleam (9)  |  Gorilla (16)  |  Grotesque (3)  |  Horse (40)  |  Human (445)  |  Humble (23)  |  Instinct (50)  |  Nearest (4)  |  Repulsive (7)  |  Sagacious (2)  |  Semblance (3)  |  Shame (12)  |  Structure (191)

My friend was sick: I attended him.
He died; I dissected him.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomist (14)  |  Disease (257)

My interest in the biology of tissue and organ transplantation arose from my [WW II] military experience at Valley Forge General Hospital in Pennsylvania … a major plastic surgical center. While there, I spent all my available spare time on the plastic surgical wards which were jammed with hundreds of battle casualties. I enjoyed talking to the patients, helping with dressings, and observing the results of the imaginative reconstructive surgical operations.
As a First Lieutenant with only a nine-month surgical internship, randomly assigned to VFGH to await overseas duty. In Tore Frängsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 556.
Science quotes on:  |  Battle (30)  |  Biography (227)  |  Biology (150)  |  Casualty (3)  |  Experience (268)  |  Help (68)  |  Hospital (33)  |  Imaginative (6)  |  Interest (170)  |  Military (24)  |  Observe (48)  |  Operation (96)  |  Result (250)  |  Talk (61)  |  Tissue (24)  |  Transplantation (4)

My life as a surgeon-scientist, combining humanity and science, has been fantastically rewarding. In our daily patients we witness human nature in the raw–fear, despair, courage, understanding, hope, resignation, heroism. If alert, we can detect new problems to solve, new paths to investigate.
In Tore Frängsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 565.
Science quotes on:  |  Courage (39)  |  Despair (25)  |  Detect (9)  |  Fear (113)  |  Heroism (7)  |  Hope (129)  |  Human Nature (51)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Investigate (49)  |  New (340)  |  Path (59)  |  Problem (362)  |  Resignation (2)  |  Rewarding (2)  |  Science (1699)  |  Solve (41)  |  Surgeon (43)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Witness (18)

Nature bears long with those who wrong her. She is patient under abuse. But when abuse has gone too far, when the time of reckoning finally comes, she is equally slow to be appeased and to turn away her wrath.
'What We Owe to the Trees', Harper's New Monthly Magazine (Apr 1882), 46, No. 383, 686.
Science quotes on:  |  Abuse (9)  |  Appease (2)  |  Climate Change (56)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Environment (138)  |  Equal (53)  |  Final (33)  |  Global Warming (26)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Reckoning (4)  |  Slow (36)  |  Time (439)  |  Wrath (2)  |  Wrong (116)

Neurosis has an abosolute genius for malingering. There is no illness which cannot counterfeit perfectly … If it is capable of deceiving the doctor, how should it fail to deceive the patient.
'Le Côté de Guermantes', À la recherche du temps perdu (1913-27).
Science quotes on:  |  Counterfeit (2)  |  Deceive (8)  |  Disease (257)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Genius (186)  |  Illness (22)  |  Neurosis (7)

Never forget that it is not a pneumonia, but a pneumonic man who is your patient.
In Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), xxiii.
Science quotes on:  |  Forget (40)  |  Pneumonia (6)  |  Treatment (88)

No one thinks of concealing the truth from a cardiac patient: there is nothing shameful about a heart attack. Cancer patients are lied to, not just because the disease is (or is thought to be) a death sentence, but because it is felt to be obscene—in the original meaning of that word: ill-omened, abominable, repugnant to the senses.
In Illness as a Metaphor (1978), 8,
Science quotes on:  |  Abominable (4)  |  Attack (29)  |  Cancer (44)  |  Conceal (10)  |  Disease (257)  |  Feel (93)  |  Heart (110)  |  Lie (80)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Obscene (2)  |  Omen (2)  |  Repugnant (4)  |  Sense (240)  |  Shameful (2)  |  Think (205)  |  Truth (750)

No physician, in so far as he is a physician, considers his own good in what he prescribes, but the good of his patient; for the true physician is also a ruler having the human body as a subject, and is not a mere money-maker.
Plato
In Plato and B. Jowett (trans.), The Dialogues of Plato (1875), Vol. 3, 211.
Science quotes on:  |  Consideration (65)  |  Good (228)  |  Human Body (30)  |  Mere (41)  |  Physician (232)  |  Ruler (12)  |  Subject (129)  |  True (120)

Nurses, as well as midwives, ought to be of middle age, sober, patient, and discreet, able to bear fatigue and watching, free from external deformity, cutaneous eruptions, and inward complaints that may be troublesome or infectious.
In A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Midwifery (1766), 444.
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (28)  |  Complaint (7)  |  Eruption (5)  |  Fatigue (3)  |  Middle Age (6)  |  Midwife (2)  |  Sober (8)  |  Troublesome (3)  |  Watch (39)

O you who believe!
Seek help in patience and prayer.
Truly! Allah is with the patient.
Quran
Surah al-Baqarah 2:153. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 178
Science quotes on:  |  Allah (2)  |  Belief (400)  |  Help (68)  |  Patience (31)  |  Prayer (19)  |  Seek (57)  |  Truly (19)

Only one rule in medical ethics need concern you - that action on your part which best conserves the interests of your patient.
Science quotes on:  |  Ethics (30)  |  Treatment (88)

Our laboratory work involved close contact with many non-clinical scientists. Sir Peter Medawar, 1960 Nobel Laureate, was a frequent visitor to our lab and to the hospital. He once commented, after visiting an early renal transplant patient, that it was the first time he had been in a hospital ward.
In Tore Frängsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 556.
Science quotes on:  |  Comment (8)  |  First (174)  |  Hospital (33)  |  Laboratory (120)  |  Sir Peter B. Medawar (54)  |  Nobel Laureate (3)  |  Renal (4)  |  Transplant (8)  |  Visitor (3)  |  Ward (4)

Palliative care should be an integral part of cancer care and not be associated exclusively with terminal care. Many patients need it early in the course of their disease.
Anonymous
Improving the Quality of Cancer Care. A Report of the Expert Advisory Group on Cancer to the Chief Medical Officers of England and Wales (1995). Quoted in Jessica Corner and Christopher Bailey, Cancer Nursing (2001),543.
Science quotes on:  |  Cancer (44)  |  Treatment (88)

Patients and their families will forgive you for wrong diagnoses, but will rarely forgive you for wrong prognoses; the older you grow in medicine, the more chary you get about offering iron clad prognoses, good or bad.
Anonymous
David Seegal, Journal of Chronic Diseases (1963), 16, 443.
Science quotes on:  |  Diagnosis (61)  |  Prognosis (3)

Post-operatively the transplanted kidney functioned immediately with a dramatic improvement in the patient’s renal and cardiopulmonary status. This spectacular success was a clear demonstration that organ transplantation could be life-saving. In a way, it was spying into the future because we had achieved our long-term goal by bypassing, but not solving, the issue of biological incompatibility.
Referring to the pioneering first kidney transplant. It was well-matched since it was between twins. In Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1990). Printed in Tore Frängsmyr and Jan Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1981-1990 (1993).
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  Biological (21)  |  Demonstration (51)  |  Dramatic (5)  |  Function (90)  |  Future (229)  |  Goal (81)  |  Immediate (27)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Incompatibility (3)  |  Issue (37)  |  Kidney (13)  |  Long-Term (6)  |  Operation (96)  |  Organ (60)  |  Renal (4)  |  Solving (6)  |  Spectacular (8)  |  Status (18)  |  Success (202)  |  Transplant (8)  |  Transplantation (4)

Psychoanalysis has changed American psychiatry from a diagnostic to a therapeutic science, not because so many patients are cured by the psychoanalytic technique, but because of the new understanding of psychiatric patients it has given us and the new and different concepts of illness and health.
News summaries 29 Apr 56
Science quotes on:  |  American (34)  |  Change (291)  |  Concept (102)  |  Cure (88)  |  Diagnostic (2)  |  Different (110)  |  Give (117)  |  Health (136)  |  Illness (22)  |  New (340)  |  Psychiatry (19)  |  Psychoanalysis (37)  |  Psychoanalytic (2)  |  Science (1699)  |  Technique (41)  |  Therapeutic (2)  |  Understand (189)

Psychotherapy–the theory that the patient will probably get well anyhow.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Probably (21)  |  Psychotherapy (2)  |  Theory (582)

Somewhere between 1900 and 1912 in this country, according to one sober medical scientist [Henderson] a random patient, with a random disease, consulting a doctor chosen at random had, for the first time in the history of mankind, a better than fifty-fifty chance of profiting from the encounter.
Anonymous
Quoted in New England Journal of Medicine (1964), 270, 449.
Science quotes on:  |  Disease (257)  |  Lawrence Joseph Henderson (8)  |  Physician (232)

The art of medicine consists of amusing the patient while nature cures the disease.
Attributed. Webmaster has found no other citation. See, for example, Bill Swainson, Encarta Book of Quotations (2000), 961.
Science quotes on:  |  Amusement (20)  |  Cure (88)  |  Disease (257)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Nature (1029)

The best patient is a millionaire with a positive Wassermann [antibody test for syphilis]. In Carl Malmberg , 140 Million Patients (1947), 30. Medical proverb before the discovery of antibiotics.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Money (125)  |  Syphilis (4)

The bitterness of the potion, and the abhorrence of the patient are necessary circumstances to the operation. It must be something to trouble and disturb the stomach that must purge and cure it.
In Tryon Edwards (ed.), A Dictionary of Thoughts (1908), 339.
Science quotes on:  |  Abhorrence (8)  |  Bitterness (3)  |  Circumstance (48)  |  Cure (88)  |  Disturbance (19)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Operation (96)  |  Potion (2)  |  Purge (8)  |  Stomach (18)  |  Trouble (55)

The custom of giving patients appointments weeks in advance, during which time their illness may become seriously aggravated, seems to me to fall short of the ideal doctor-patient relationship.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  Appointment (5)  |  Become (100)  |  Custom (24)  |  Fall (89)  |  Give (117)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Illness (22)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Seem (89)  |  Seriously (13)  |  Short (31)  |  Time (439)  |  Week (8)

The diseases which are hard to cure in neighborhoods… are catarrh, hoarseness, coughs, pleurisy, consumption, spitting of blood, and all others that are cured not by lowering the system but by building it up. They are hard to cure, first, because they are originally due to chills; secondly, because the patient's system being already exhausted by disease, the air there, which is in constant agitation owing to winds and therefore deteriorated, takes all the sap of life out of their diseased bodies and leaves them more meager every day. On the other hand, a mild, thick air, without drafts and not constantly blowing back and forth, builds up their frames by its unwavering steadiness, and so strengthens and restores people who are afflicted with these diseases.
Vitruvius
In De Architectura, Book 1, Chap 6, Sec. 3. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Blood (95)  |  Catarrh (2)  |  Chill (7)  |  Consumption (11)  |  Cough (8)  |  Cure (88)  |  Disease (257)  |  Draft (5)

The doctor may also learn more about the illness from the way the patient tells the story than from the story itself.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Doctor (100)  |  Illness (22)  |  Learn (160)  |  Story (58)  |  Tell (67)

The fact that your patient gets well does not prove that your diagnosis was correct.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Correct (53)  |  Diagnosis (61)  |  Fact (609)  |  Prove (60)

The first [quality] to be named must always be the power of attention, of giving one's whole mind to the patient without the interposition of anything of oneself. It sounds simple but only the very greatest doctors ever fully attain it. … The second thing to be striven for is intuition. This sounds an impossibility, for who can control that small quiet monitor? But intuition is only interference from experience stored and not actively recalled. … The last aptitude I shall mention that must be attained by the good physician is that of handling the sick man's mind.
In 'Art and Science in Medicine', The Collected Papers of Wilfred Trotter, FRS (1941), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Aptitude (10)  |  Attainment (35)  |  Attention (76)  |  Control (93)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Experience (268)  |  Greatness (34)  |  Handling (7)  |  Impossibility (50)  |  Interference (12)  |  Interposition (2)  |  Intuition (39)  |  Mention (12)  |  Mind (544)  |  Monitor (5)  |  Oneself (3)  |  Physician (232)  |  Quality (65)  |  Recall (7)  |  Sickness (20)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Store (17)  |  Strive (35)

The ideal doctor is patient.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Doctor (100)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Medicine (322)

The native hospital in Tunis was the focal point of my research. Often, when going to the hospital, I had to step over the bodies of typhus patients who were awaiting admission to the hospital and had fallen exhausted at the door. We had observed a certain phenomenon at the hospital, of which no one recognized the significance, and which drew my attention. In those days typhus patients were accommodated in the open medical wards. Before reaching the door of the wards they spread contagion. They transmitted the disease to the families that sheltered them, and doctors visiting them were also infected. The administrative staff admitting the patients, the personnel responsible for taking their clothes and linen, and the laundry staff were also contaminated. In spite of this, once admitted to the general ward the typhus patient did not contaminate any of the other patients, the nurses or the doctors. I took this observation as my guide. I asked myself what happened between the entrance to the hospital and the wards. This is what happened: the typhus patient was stripped of his clothes and linen, shaved and washed. The contagious agent was therefore something attached to his skin and clothing, something which soap and water could remove. It could only be the louse. It was the louse.
'Investigations on Typhus', Nobel lecture, 1928. In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1922-1941 (1965), 181.
Science quotes on:  |  Clothes (8)  |  Contagion (4)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Disease (257)  |  Hospital (33)  |  Louse (5)  |  Research (517)  |  Shave (2)  |  Soap (11)  |  Typhus (2)  |  Ward (4)  |  Wash (6)

The Ocean Health Index is like a thermometer of ocean health, which will allow us to determine how the patient is doing. The Index will be a measure of whether our policies are working, or whether we need new solutions.
As quoted in press release (14 Aug 2012), 'Ocean Health Index Provides First-Ever Global Benchmark of 171 Coastal Regions', on web page of Conservation International, conservation.org.
Science quotes on:  |  Determine (45)  |  Measure (70)  |  Need (211)  |  New (340)  |  Policy (23)  |  Solution (168)  |  Thermometer (6)  |  Work (457)

The only English patients I have ever known refuse tea, have been typhus cases; and the first sign of their getting better was their craving again for tea.
'Tea, Coffee, and Cocoa for the Sick', Scientific American (2 Jul 1860), New Series, 3, No. 1, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Disease (257)  |  English (23)  |  Medication (6)  |  Tea (4)  |  Treatment (88)  |  Typhoid (6)

The only weapon with which the unconscious patient can immediately retaliate upon the incompetent surgeon is hemorrhage.
Des MacHale, In Wit (2003), 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Hemorrhage (2)  |  Retaliation (2)  |  Unconscious (13)

The ordinary patient goes to his doctor because he is in pain or some other discomfort and wants to be comfortable again; he is not in pursuit of the ideal of health in any direct sense. The doctor on the other hand wants to discover the pathological condition and control it if he can. The two are thus to some degree at cross purposes from the first, and unless the affair is brought to an early and happy conclusion this diversion of aims is likely to become more and more serious as the case goes on.
Address, opening of 1932-3 session of U.C.H. Medical School (4 Oct 1932), 'Art and Science in Medicine', The Collected Papers of Wilfred Trotter, FRS (1941), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (24)  |  Aim (58)  |  Case (64)  |  Comfort (42)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Condition (119)  |  Control (93)  |  Discomfort (2)  |  Discover (115)  |  Diversion (7)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Early (39)  |  Happiness (82)  |  Health (136)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Other Hand (2)  |  Pain (82)  |  Pathology (11)  |  Pursuit (55)  |  Sense (240)  |  Seriousness (9)  |  Want (120)

The patient does not care about your science; what he wants to know is, can you cure him?
Science quotes on:  |  Cure (88)  |  Medicine (322)

The patient has two sleeves, one containing a diagnostic and the other a therapeutic armamentarium; these sleeves should rarely be emptied in one move; keep some techniques in reserve; time your manoeuvres to best serve the status and special needs of your patient.
Chinese proverb.
Science quotes on:  |  Diagnosis (61)  |  Therapy (10)  |  Treatment (88)

The poor are my best patients. God pays for them.
As quoted, without citation, in John Walker, A Fork in the Road: Answers to Daily Dilemmas from the Teachings of Jesus Christ (2005), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (129)  |  God (454)  |  Pay (30)  |  Poor (46)

The principles of medical management are essentially the same for individuals of all ages, albeit the same problem is handled differently in different patients. ... [just as] the principles of driving an automobile are uniform, but one drives in one manner on the New Jersey Turnpike and in another manner on a narrow, winding road in the Rocky Mountains.
Quoted in Joseph Earle Moore, The Neurologic and Psychiatric Aspects of the Disorders of Aging (1956), 247.
Science quotes on:  |  Treatment (88)

The progress of Science consists in observing interconnections and in showing with a patient ingenuity that the events of this ever-shifting world are but examples of a few general relations, called laws. To see what is general in what is particular, and what is permanent in what is transitory, is the aim of scientific thought.
In An Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (58)  |  Called (7)  |  Consist (22)  |  Event (97)  |  Example (57)  |  General (92)  |  Ingenuity (27)  |  Interconnection (7)  |  Law (418)  |  Observing (2)  |  Particular (54)  |  Permanent (18)  |  Progress (317)  |  Relation (96)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific (169)  |  See (197)  |  Showing (6)  |  Thought (374)  |  Transitory (3)  |  World (667)

The psychiatric interviewer is supposed to be doing three things: considering what the patient could mean by what he says; considering how he himself can best phrase what he wishes to communicate to the patient; and, at the same time, observing the general pattern of the events being communicated. In addition to that, to make notes which will be of more than evocative value, or come anywhere near being a verbatim record of what is said, in my opinion is beyond the capacity of most human beings.
From The Psychiatric Interview (1954, 1970), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (129)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Communication (58)  |  Considering (6)  |  Doing (36)  |  Event (97)  |  General (92)  |  Human (445)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Note (22)  |  Observation (418)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Pattern (56)  |  Phrase (21)  |  Psychiatry (19)  |  Record (56)  |  French Saying (61)  |  Supposition (33)  |  Value (180)  |  Verbatim (2)  |  Wish (62)

The sooner patients can be removed from the depressing influence of general hospital life the more rapid their convalescence.
Lancet (1916).
Science quotes on:  |  Depression (15)  |  Hospital (33)  |  Influence (110)  |  Rapidity (14)

The surgeon is a man of action. By temperament and by training he prefers to serve the sick by operating on them, and he inwardly commiserates with a patient so unfortunate as to have a disease not suited to surgical treatment. Young surgeons, busy mastering the technicalities of the art, are particularly alert to seize every legitimate opportunity to practice technical maneuvers, the more complicated the better.
American Journal of Surgery.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Alert (5)  |  Art (205)  |  Better (131)  |  Busy (21)  |  Complicated (38)  |  Disease (257)  |  Legitimate (8)  |  Maneuver (2)  |  Master (55)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Operate (12)  |  Opportunity (43)  |  Particularly (12)  |  Practice (67)  |  Prefer (18)  |  Seize (10)  |  Serve (34)  |  Sick (23)  |  Suit (7)  |  Surgeon (43)  |  Surgical (2)  |  Technical (26)  |  Technicality (4)  |  Temperament (8)  |  Training (39)  |  Treatment (88)  |  Unfortunate (6)  |  Young (72)

The surgeon may harden himself whilst performing an operation, for he knows that he is acting for the good of his patient; but if we were intentionally to neglect the weak and helpless, it could only be for a contingent benefit, with an overwhelming present evil.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Act (80)  |  Benefit (54)  |  Contingent (8)  |  Evil (67)  |  Good (228)  |  Helpless (6)  |  Intentionally (3)  |  Know (321)  |  Neglect (23)  |  Operation (96)  |  Overwhelming (18)  |  Perform (27)  |  Present (103)  |  Surgeon (43)  |  Weak (36)  |  Whilst (3)

The trained nurse has given nursing the human, or shall we say, the divine touch, and made the hospital desirable for patients with serious ailments regardless of their home advantages.
Collected Papers of the Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation (1913).
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (42)  |  Ailment (4)  |  Desire (101)  |  Divine (42)  |  Home (58)  |  Hospital (33)  |  Human (445)  |  Nurse (19)  |  Touch (48)  |  Training (39)

Theories rarely arise as patient inferences forced by accumulated facts. Theories are mental constructs potentiated by complex external prods (including, in idealized cases, a commanding push from empirical reality) . But the prods often in clude dreams, quirks, and errors–just as we may obtain crucial bursts of energy from foodstuffs or pharmaceuticals of no objective or enduring value. Great truth can emerge from small error. Evolution is thrilling, liberating, and correct. And Macrauchenia is a litoptern.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulate (18)  |  Arise (32)  |  Burst (17)  |  Case (64)  |  Command (14)  |  Complex (78)  |  Construct (25)  |  Correct (53)  |  Crucial (8)  |  Dream (92)  |  Emerge (16)  |  Empirical (15)  |  Endure (12)  |  Energy (185)  |  Error (230)  |  Evolution (482)  |  External (45)  |  Fact (609)  |  Force (194)  |  Great (300)  |  Include (27)  |  Inference (26)  |  Liberate (8)  |  Mental (57)  |  Objective (49)  |  Obtain (21)  |  Often (69)  |  Pharmaceutical (3)  |  Potentiate (2)  |  Push (22)  |  Quirk (2)  |  Rarely (9)  |  Reality (140)  |  Small (97)  |  Theory (582)  |  Thrill (14)  |  Truth (750)  |  Value (180)

There are only two classes of mankind in the world - doctors and patients.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Class (64)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Medicine (322)  |  World (667)

There are some modern practitioners, who declaim against medical theory in general, not considering that to think is to theorize; and that no one can direct a method of cure to a person labouring under disease, without thinking, that is, without theorizing; and happy therefore is the patient, whose physician possesses the best theory.
Zoonomia, or, The Laws Of Organic Life (1801), Vol. 2, ix.
Science quotes on:  |  Diagnosis (61)  |  Disease (257)  |  Happiness (82)  |  Physician (232)  |  Theory (582)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Treatment (88)

To study the phenomenon of disease without books is to sail uncharted sea, while to study books without patients is not to go to sea at all.
Address for the Dedication of the New Building of the Boston Medical Library (12 Jan 1901). Printed as 'Books and Men', The Boston Medical and Surgical Journal (17 Jan 1901), 144, No. 3, 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (181)  |  Disease (257)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Sailing (4)  |  Sea (143)  |  Study (331)  |  Uncharted (5)

Too often a sister puts all her patients back to bed as a housewife puts all her plates back in the plate-rack—to make a generally tidy appearance.
British Medical Journal (1947), 2, 967.
Science quotes on:  |  Bed (20)  |  Hospital (33)  |  Nurse (19)

Treat the patient, not the X-ray
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Treat (17)  |  X-ray (18)

Unfortunately, only a small number of patients with peptic ulcer are financially able to make a pet of an ulcer.
Journal of the American Medical Association (1922).
Science quotes on:  |  Pet (7)  |  Ulcer (2)  |  Unfortunately (14)

We are, of course, extremely concerned that if this did, in fact, happen, that there is going to be a tremendous public outcry, and we will be concerned with what the Congress does, … Obviously, we are concerned about there being a backlash against the medical applications of this technology, which have, of course, the potential to cure millions of patients.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Concern (76)  |  Congress (9)  |  Cure (88)  |  Extremely (10)  |  Fact (609)  |  Happen (63)  |  Medical (18)  |  Millions (13)  |  Obviously (9)  |  Of Course (11)  |  Outcry (3)  |  Potential (34)  |  Public (82)  |  Technology (199)  |  Tremendous (11)

We must really agree with Bamberger, who thinks that the greater part of patients who die, of endocarditis even, have succumbed not to the disease, but to the remedy.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agree (19)  |  Die (46)  |  Disease (257)  |  Great (300)  |  Part (146)  |  Really (50)  |  Remedy (46)  |  Succumb (4)  |  Think (205)

When Death lurks at the door, the physician is considered as a God. When danger has been overcome, the physician is looked upon as an angel. When the patient begins to convalesce, the physician becomes a mere human. When the physician asks for his fees, he is considered as the devil himself.
In Harper's Magazine (1931-32), 164, 512.
Science quotes on:  |  Angel (25)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Danger (62)  |  Death (270)  |  Devil (18)  |  Fee (9)  |  God (454)  |  Human (445)  |  Looking (25)  |  Lurking (2)  |  Overcoming (3)  |  Physician (232)

When he can render no further aid, the physician alone can mourn as a man with his incurable patient. This is the physician's sad lot.
Attributed
Science quotes on:  |  Physician (232)

When the disease is stronger than the patient, the physician will not be able to help him at all, and if the strength of the patient is greater than the strength of the disease, he does not need a physician at all. But when both are equal, he needs a physician who will support the patient’s strength and help him against the disease.
Rhazes
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Both (52)  |  Disease (257)  |  Equal (53)  |  Great (300)  |  Help (68)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Need (211)  |  Physician (232)  |  Strength (63)  |  Strong (47)  |  Support (63)

When the patient dies the kidneys may go to the pathologist, but while he lives the urine is ours. It can provide us day by day, month by month, and year by year, with a serial story of the major events going on within the kidney.
Glomerular Nephritis, Diagnosis and Treatment (1948), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Day (38)  |  Death (270)  |  Diagnosis (61)  |  Event (97)  |  Kidney (13)  |  Life (917)  |  Major (24)  |  Month (21)  |  Pathologist (4)  |  Provision (15)  |  Serial (2)  |  Story (58)  |  Urine (8)  |  Year (214)

When you see the natural and almost universal craving in English sick for their 'tea,' you cannot but feel that nature knows what she is about. ... [A] little tea or coffee restores them. ... [T]here is nothing yet discovered which is a substitute to the English patient for his cup of tea.
'Tea, Coffee, and Cocoa for the Sick', Scientific American (2 Jul 1860), New Series, 3, No. 1, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Coffee (10)  |  Craving (5)  |  English (23)  |  Medication (6)  |  Tea (4)  |  Treatment (88)

You are in service to your patients, and a servant should know his place.
In Letters to a Young Doctor (1982), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  Know (321)  |  Place (111)  |  Servant (11)  |  Service (54)

You Surgeons of London, who puzzle your Pates,
To ride in your Coaches, and purchase Estates,
Give over, for Shame, for your Pride has a Fall,
And ye Doctress of Epsom has outdone you all.

Dame Nature has given her a doctor's degree,
She gets all the patients and pockets the fee;
So if you don't instantly prove it a cheat,
She'll loll in a chariot whilst you walk the street.
Cautioning doctors about the quack bone-setter, Mrs. Mapp (d. 22 Dec 1737), who practiced in Epsom town once a week, arriving in a coach-and-four.
Anonymous
Verses from a song in a comedy at the Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre, called The Husband's Relief, or The Female Bone-setter and the Worm-doctor. In Robert Chambers, The Book of Days (1832), 729.
Science quotes on:  |  Money (125)  |  Physician (232)  |  Quack (12)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.