Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “God does not care about our mathematical difficulties. He integrates empirically.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index W > Category: Waiting

Waiting Quotes (43 quotes)

A very interesting set of compounds that were waiting for the right disease.
[Commenting on AZT and similar drugs he had synthesized.]
Quoted in 'Jerome Horwitz, AZT Creator, Dies at 93', New York Times (21 Sep 2012).
Science quotes on:  |  AIDS (3)  |  Compound (113)  |  Disease (328)  |  Drug (57)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Right (452)  |  Set (394)  |  Wait (58)

A wonderful exhilaration comes from holding in the mind the deepest questions we can ask. Such questions animate all scientists. Many students of science were first attracted to the field as children by popular accounts of important unsolved problems. They have been waiting ever since to begin working on a mystery. [With co-author Arthur Zajonc]
In George Greenstein and Arthur Zajonc, The Quantum Challenge: Modern Research on the Foundations of Quantum Mechanics (2006), xii.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Animate (6)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attract (23)  |  Author (167)  |  Begin (260)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Exhilaration (6)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  Important (209)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Popular (29)  |  Problem (676)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Student (300)  |  Unsolved (15)  |  Wait (58)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Work (1351)

Always preoccupied with his profound researches, the great Newton showed in the ordinary-affairs of life an absence of mind which has become proverbial. It is related that one day, wishing to find the number of seconds necessary for the boiling of an egg, he perceived, after waiting a minute, that he held the egg in his hand, and had placed his seconds watch (an instrument of great value on account of its mathematical precision) to boil!
This absence of mind reminds one of the mathematician Ampere, who one day, as he was going to his course of lectures, noticed a little pebble on the road; he picked it up, and examined with admiration the mottled veins. All at once the lecture which he ought to be attending to returned to his mind; he drew out his watch; perceiving that the hour approached, he hastily doubled his pace, carefully placed the pebble in his pocket, and threw his watch over the parapet of the Pont des Arts.
Popular Astronomy: a General Description of the Heavens (1884), translated by J. Ellard Gore, (1907), 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Admiration (59)  |  All (4108)  |  André-Marie Ampère (11)  |  Anecdote (21)  |  Approach (108)  |  Art (657)  |  Become (815)  |  Boil (23)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Course (409)  |  Egg (69)  |  Find (998)  |  Forgetfulness (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hastily (7)  |  Hour (186)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Number (699)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Pace (14)  |  Pebble (25)  |  Precision (68)  |  Profound (104)  |  Proverbial (8)  |  Research (664)  |  Return (124)  |  Show (346)  |  Value (365)  |  Vein (25)  |  Watch (109)

Andrade [who was looking after wartime inventions] is like an inverted Micawber, waiting for something to turn down.
As quoted by C.P. Snow in his Lectures at Harvard University (1960), in which he spoke extensively about Henry Tizard. Collected in print as Science and Government (1960), 6. Snow gave this quote to exemplify what he called Tizard's “lively satirical tongue,” but Tizard probably did not originate the epigram. The article 'A Spectator's Notebook' The Spectator (21 Dec 1944), 4, states it was coined by Philip Guedalla, “unless, indeed, which is unlikely, it goes back farther still.” As early as during the first World War, Guedalla “applied it to the Inventions Board under Lord Fisher, sitting in an office in Cockspur Street, and ‘waiting like a kind of inverted Mr. Micawber, for something to turn down.’” Webmaster assumes Tizard's quote refers to Edward Neville da Costa Andrade, also a wartime science consultant.
Science quotes on:  |  Down (456)  |  Invention (369)  |  Inverted (2)  |  Looking (189)  |  Something (719)  |  Turn (447)  |  Wartime (4)  |  World War II (8)

Anton Chekhov wrote that ‘one must not put a loaded rifle on stage if no one is thinking of firing it.’ Good drama requires spare and purposive action, sensible linking of potential causes with realized effects. Life is much messier; nothing happens most of the time. Millions of Americans (many hotheaded) own rifles (many loaded), but the great majority, thank God, do not go off most of the time. We spend most of real life waiting for Godot, not charging once more unto the breach.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  American (46)  |  Breach (2)  |  Cause (541)  |  Charge (59)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drama (21)  |  Effect (393)  |  Fire (189)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happen (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Link (43)  |  Linking (8)  |  Load (11)  |  Majority (66)  |  Messy (6)  |  Millions (17)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Potential (69)  |  Real Life (7)  |  Realize (147)  |  Require (219)  |  Rifle (2)  |  Sensible (27)  |  Spare (9)  |  Spend (95)  |  Stage (143)  |  Thank (46)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unto (8)  |  Wait (58)  |  Write (230)

Apprehension, uncertainty, waiting, expectation, fear of surprise, do a patient more harm than any exertion. Remember he is face to face with his enemy all the time.
In Notes on Nursing: What it is, and What it is Not (1860), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Exertion (15)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Face (212)  |  Fear (197)  |  Harm (39)  |  More (2559)  |  Patient (199)  |  Remember (179)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Time (1877)  |  Uncertainty (56)

Aristippus said; “That those that studied particular sciences, and neglected philosophy, were like Penelope’s wooers, that made love to the waiting women.”
In 'A Collection of Apophthegms, New and Old' (1625). As given in Essays, Moral, Economical, and Political: A New Edition, With the Latin Quotations Translated (1813), No. 271, 341.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aristippus The Cyrenaic (4)  |  Love (309)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Neglected (23)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Science (3879)

As every circumstance relating to so capital a discovery as this (the greatest, perhaps, that has been made in the whole compass of philosophy, since the time of Sir Isaac Newton) cannot but give pleasure to all my readers, I shall endeavour to gratify them with the communication of a few particulars which I have from the best authority. The Doctor [Benjamin Franklin], after having published his method of verifying his hypothesis concerning the sameness of electricity with the matter lightning, was waiting for the erection of a spire in Philadelphia to carry his views into execution; not imagining that a pointed rod, of a moderate height, could answer the purpose; when it occurred to him, that, by means of a common kite, he could have a readier and better access to the regions of thunder than by any spire whatever. Preparing, therefore, a large silk handkerchief, and two cross sticks, of a proper length, on which to extend it, he took the opportunity of the first approaching thunder storm to take a walk into a field, in which there was a shed convenient for his purpose. But dreading the ridicule which too commonly attends unsuccessful attempts in science, he communicated his intended experiment to no body but his son, who assisted him in raising the kite.
The kite being raised, a considerable time elapsed before there was any appearance of its being electrified. One very promising cloud passed over it without any effect; when, at length, just as he was beginning to despair of his contrivance, he observed some loose threads of the hempen string to stand erect, and to avoid one another, just as if they had been suspended on a common conductor. Struck with this promising appearance, he inmmediately presented his knuckle to the key, and (let the reader judge of the exquisite pleasure he must have felt at that moment) the discovery was complete. He perceived a very evident electric spark. Others succeeded, even before the string was wet, so as to put the matter past all dispute, and when the rain had wetted the string, he collected electric fire very copiously. This happened in June 1752, a month after the electricians in France had verified the same theory, but before he had heard of any thing that they had done.
The History and Present State of Electricity, with Original Experiments (1767, 3rd ed. 1775), Vol. 1, 216-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Access (20)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attend (65)  |  Authority (95)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Body (537)  |  Carry (127)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Common (436)  |  Communication (94)  |  Compass (34)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Despair (40)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electrician (6)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Evident (91)  |  Execution (25)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Extend (128)  |  Field (364)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  France (27)  |  Benjamin Franklin (91)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Judge (108)  |  Key (50)  |  Kite (4)  |  Large (394)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Moment (253)  |  Month (88)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observed (149)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Past (337)  |  Philadelphia (3)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Preparing (21)  |  Present (619)  |  Proper (144)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rain (62)  |  Ridicule (23)  |  Sameness (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Silk (13)  |  Spark (31)  |  Spire (5)  |  Stand (274)  |  Storm (51)  |  String (21)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thread (32)  |  Thunder (20)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Verification (31)  |  View (488)  |  Walk (124)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whole (738)

Doctor Thomas …
Said, “Cancer’s a funny thing.
Nobody knows what the cause is,
Though some pretend they do;
It’s like some hidden assassin
Waiting to strike at you.
Childless women get it.
And men when they retire;
It’s as if there had to be some outlet
For their foiled creative fire.”
In 'Miss Gee', in Collected Shorter Poems, 1930-1944 (1950), 242.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Assassin (2)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Cause (541)  |  Creative (137)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Fire (189)  |  Foiled (2)  |  Funny (11)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Outlet (3)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Retirement (7)  |  Strike (68)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Woman (151)

Dreams are renewable. No matter what our age or condition, there are still untapped possibilities within us and new beauty waiting to be born.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Bear (159)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Condition (356)  |  Dream (208)  |  Matter (798)  |  New (1216)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Renewable (6)  |  Still (613)  |  Untapped (2)  |  Wait (58)

Ever since celestial mechanics in the skillful hands of Leverrier and Adams led to the world-amazed discovery of Neptune, a belief has existed begotten of that success that still other planets lay beyond, only waiting to be found.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Amazed (4)  |  Begotten (2)  |  Belief (578)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Celestial Mechanics (4)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Exist (443)  |  Find (998)  |  Hand (143)  |  Lead (384)  |  LeVerrier_Urbain (3)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Neptune (13)  |  Other (2236)  |  Planet (356)  |  Skillful (14)  |  Still (613)  |  Success (302)  |  Wait (58)  |  World (1774)

Genetics has always turned out to be much more complicated than it seemed reasonable to imagine. Biology is not like physics. The more we know, the less it seems that there is one final explanation waiting to be discovered.
John Mitchinson and John Lloyd, If Ignorance Is Bliss, Why Aren't There More Happy People?: Smart Quotes for Dumb Times (2009), 275.
Science quotes on:  |  Biology (216)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Discover (553)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Final (118)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Know (1518)  |  Less (103)  |  More (2559)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Seem (145)  |  Turn (447)  |  Turned Out (4)  |  Wait (58)

In a library we are surrounded by many hundreds of dear friends, but they are imprisoned by an enchanter in these paper and leathern boxes; and though they know us, and have been waiting two, ten, or twenty centuries for us,—some of them,—and are eager to give us a sign and unbosom themselves, it is the law of their limbo that they must not speak until spoken to; and as the enchanter has dressed them, like battalions of infantry, in coat and jacket of one cut, by the thousand and ten thousand, your chance of hitting on the right one is to be computed by the arithmetical rule of Permutation and Combination,—not a choice out of three caskets, but out of half a million caskets, all alike.
In essay 'Books', collected in Society and Solitude (1870, 1871), 171
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Battalion (2)  |  Box (22)  |  Century (310)  |  Chance (239)  |  Choice (110)  |  Coat (5)  |  Combination (144)  |  Compute (18)  |  Cut (114)  |  Dressed (3)  |  Eager (15)  |  Friend (168)  |  Hit (20)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Imprison (10)  |  Jacket (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Library (48)  |  Million (114)  |  Must (1526)  |  Paper (182)  |  Permutation (5)  |  Right (452)  |  Rule (294)  |  Sign (58)  |  Speak (232)  |  Surround (30)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Three (10)  |  Two (937)

It is better for all the world, if instead of waiting to execute degenerate offspring for crime, or to let them starve for their imbecility, society can prevent those who are manifestly unfit for continuing their kind. The principle that sustains compulsory vaccinations is broad enough to cover cutting Fallopian tubes. Three generations of imbeciles are enough.
Chief Justice Holmes contributed this opinion to the judgment by which the sterilization law of Virginia was declared constitutional. Quoted from Journal of Heredity (1927), 18, 495. In Henry Ernest Sigerist, Civilization and Disease (1970), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Better (486)  |  Crime (38)  |  Enough (340)  |  Eugenics (6)  |  Execute (7)  |  Generation (242)  |  Imbecility (5)  |  Kind (557)  |  Manifestly (11)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Principle (507)  |  Society (326)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Vaccination (6)  |  World (1774)

It is of interest to inquire what happens when the aviator’s speed… approximates to the velocity of light. Lengths in the direction of flight become smaller and smaller, until for the speed of light they shrink to zero. The aviator and the objects accompanying him shrink to two dimensions. We are saved the difficulty of imagining how the processes of life can go on in two dimensions, because nothing goes on. Time is arrested altogether. This is the description according to the terrestrial observer. The aviator himself detects nothing unusual; he does not perceive that he has stopped moving. He is merely waiting for the next instant to come before making the next movement; and the mere fact that time is arrested means that he does not perceive that the next instant is a long time coming.
In Space, Time and Gravitation: An Outline of the General Relativity Theory (1920, 1921), 26.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  According (237)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Become (815)  |  Coming (114)  |  Detect (44)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Direction (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Flight (98)  |  Happen (274)  |  Himself (461)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Instant (45)  |  Interest (386)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Making (300)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Merely (316)  |  Movement (155)  |  Next (236)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Speed (65)  |  Speed Of Light (17)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Zero (37)

Let him [the author] be permitted also in all humility to add … that in consequence of the large arrears of algebraical and arithmetical speculations waiting in his mind their turn to be called into outward existence, he is driven to the alternative of leaving the fruits of his meditations to perish (as has been the fate of too many foregone theories, the still-born progeny of his brain, now forever resolved back again into the primordial matter of thought), or venturing to produce from time to time such imperfect sketches as the present, calculated to evoke the mental co-operation of his readers, in whom the algebraical instinct has been to some extent developed, rather than to satisfy the strict demands of rigorously systematic exposition.
In Philosophic Magazine (1863), 460.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Alternative (29)  |  Arithmetical (11)  |  Arrears (2)  |  Author (167)  |  Back (390)  |  Brain (270)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Call (769)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Demand (123)  |  Develop (268)  |  Drive (55)  |  Evoke (12)  |  Existence (456)  |  Exposition (15)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fate (72)  |  Forego (4)  |  Forever (103)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Humility (28)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Large (394)  |  Leave (130)  |  Let (61)  |  Matter (798)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Operation (213)  |  Outward (7)  |  Perish (50)  |  Permit (58)  |  Present (619)  |  Primordial (10)  |  Produce (104)  |  Progeny (15)  |  Reader (40)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Sketch (8)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Still (613)  |  Stillborn (2)  |  Strict (17)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Venture (18)  |  Wait (58)

Like truths of Science waiting to be caught—
Catch me who can…
In poem, 'The Golden Year', collected in The Poetical Works of Alfred Tennyson (1861), 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Catch (31)  |  Caught (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Wait (58)

Mars is there, waiting to be reached.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Mars (44)  |  Reach (281)  |  Wait (58)

Modern science has been a voyage into the unknown, with a lesson in humility waiting at every stop. Many passengers would rather have stayed home.
Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space (1994), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Home (170)  |  Humility (28)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Passenger (10)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Voyage (11)

Nobody … took me seriously. They wondered why in the world I wanted to be a chemist when no women were doing that. The world was not waiting for me.
Quoted in interview by Mary Ellen Avery (1997).
Science quotes on:  |  Chemist (156)  |  Doing (280)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Want (497)  |  Why (491)  |  Women Scientists (13)  |  Wonder (236)  |  World (1774)

One morning a great noise proceeded from one of the classrooms [of the Braunsberger gymnasium] and on investigation it was found that Weierstrass, who was to give the recitation, had not appeared. The director went in person to Weierstrass’ dwelling and on knocking was told to come in. There sat Weierstrass by a glimmering lamp in a darkened room though it was daylight outside. He had worked the night through and had not noticed the approach of daylight. When the director reminded him of the noisy throng of students who were waiting for him, his only reply was that he could impossibly interrupt his work; that he was about to make an important discovery which would attract attention in scientific circles.
In Karl Weierstrass: Jahrbuch der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung (1897), 6), 88-89. As quoted, cited and translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (108)  |  Attention (190)  |  Attract (23)  |  Circle (110)  |  Classroom (10)  |  Daylight (22)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Glimmer (5)  |  Glimmering (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Home (170)  |  Important (209)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Interrupt (6)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Morning (94)  |  Night (120)  |  Noise (37)  |  Notice (77)  |  Outside (141)  |  Person (363)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Reply (56)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Student (300)  |  Through (849)  |  Wait (58)  |  Karl Weierstrass (9)  |  Work (1351)

Organization is simply the means by which the acts of ordinary men can be made to add up to extraordinary results. To this idea of progress that does not wait on some lucky break, some chance discovery, or some rare stroke of genius, but instead is achieved through systematic, cumulative effort, the engineer has contributed brilliantly.
In A Professional Guide for Young Engineers (1949, 1967), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Act (272)  |  Add (40)  |  Break (99)  |  Brilliance (13)  |  Chance (239)  |  Cumulative (14)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Effort (227)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Genius (284)  |  Idea (843)  |  Luck (42)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Organization (114)  |  Progress (465)  |  Rare (89)  |  Result (677)  |  Simply (53)  |  Stroke (18)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Through (849)

Researchers keep identifying new species, but they have no idea about the life cycle of a given species or its other hosts. They cut open an animal and find a new species. Where did it come from? What effect does it have on its host? What is its next host? They don't know and they don't have time to find out, because there are too many other species waiting to be discovered and described.
Talk at Columbia University, 'The Power of Parasites.'
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Cut (114)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Effect (393)  |  Find (998)  |  Host (16)  |  Idea (843)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Life Cycle (4)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Species (401)  |  Time (1877)

Sir W. Ramsay has striven to show that radium is in process of transformation, that it contains a store of energy enormous but not inexhaustible. The transformation of radium then would produce a million times more heat than all known transformations; radium would wear itself out in 1,250 years; this is quite short, and you see that we are at least certain to have this point settled some hundreds of years from now. While waiting, our doubts remain.
In La Valeur de la Science (1904), 199, as translated by George Bruce Halsted, in The Value of Science (1907), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Certain (550)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Inexhaustible (24)  |  Known (454)  |  Million (114)  |  More (2559)  |  Point (580)  |  Process (423)  |  Radium (25)  |  Sir William Ramsay (6)  |  Remain (349)  |  See (1081)  |  Settled (34)  |  Short (197)  |  Show (346)  |  Store (48)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Year (933)  |  Years (5)

Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.
In Larry Chang, Wisdom for the Soul: Five Millennia of Prescriptions for Spiritual Healing (2006), 561, but without source reference. Although widely seen, webmaster has found no authoritative reference or primary print source for its origin. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Incredible (41)  |  Known (454)  |  Research (664)  |  Something (719)

Somewhere, there is something incredible waiting to be known.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Incredible (41)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Something (719)  |  Wait (58)

The aim of poetry is to give a high and voluptuous plausibility to what is palpably not true. I offer the Twenty-third Psalm as an example: ‘The Lord is my shepherd: I shall not want.’ It is immensely esteemed by the inmates of almshouses, and by gentlemen waiting to be hanged. I have to limit my own reading of it, avoiding soft and yielding moods, for I too, in my way, am a gentleman waiting to be hanged, as you are.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Esteem (15)  |  Example (94)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Give (202)  |  Hang (45)  |  High (362)  |  Inmate (3)  |  Limit (280)  |  Lord (93)  |  Mood (13)  |  Offer (141)  |  Palpably (2)  |  Plausibility (7)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Psalm (3)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Shepherd (6)  |  Soft (29)  |  True (212)  |  Voluptuous (3)  |  Wait (58)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)  |  Yield (81)

The essence of modernity is that progress no longer waits on genius; instead we have learned to put our faith in the organized efforts of ordinary men. Science is as old as the race, but the effective organization of science is new. Ancient science, like placer mining, was a pursuit of solitary prospectors. Nuggets of truth were found, but the total wealth of knowledge increased slowly. Modern man began to transform this world when he began to mine the hidden veins of knowledge systematically.
In School and Society (1930), 31, 581.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Effective (59)  |  Effort (227)  |  Essence (82)  |  Faith (203)  |  Finding (30)  |  Genius (284)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Increased (3)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mine (76)  |  Mining (18)  |  Modern (385)  |  New (1216)  |  Nugget (3)  |  Old (481)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Organization (114)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prospector (4)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Race (268)  |  Science (3879)  |  Slowly (18)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Systematically (7)  |  Total (94)  |  Transform (73)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vein (25)  |  Wealth (94)  |  World (1774)

The land! That is where our roots are. There is the basis of our physical life. The farther we get away from the land, the greater our insecurity. From the land comes everything that supports life, everything we use for the service of physical life. The land has not collapsed or shrunk in either extent or productivity. It is there waiting to honor all the labor we are willing to invest in it, and able to tide us across any dislocation of economic conditions.
Advice during the Great Depression, placed in an advertisement, 'Henry Ford on Self-Help', Literary Digest (29 Jun 1932), 113, No. 12, 29, and various other magazines.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (68)  |  All (4108)  |  Basis (173)  |  Collapse (17)  |  Condition (356)  |  Depression (24)  |  Dislocation (2)  |  Distance (161)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economy (55)  |  Everything (476)  |  Extent (139)  |  Farther (51)  |  Food Security (6)  |  Greater (288)  |  Honor (54)  |  Insecurity (3)  |  Invest (18)  |  Labor (107)  |  Land (115)  |  Life (1795)  |  Physical (508)  |  Productivity (21)  |  Root (120)  |  Service (110)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Support (147)  |  Tide (34)  |  Use (766)  |  Willing (44)

The major gift of science to the world is a mighty increase of power. Did science then create that power? Not a bit of it! Science discovered that power in the universe and set it free. Science found out the conditions, fulfilling which, the endless dynamic forces of the cosmos are liberated. Electricity is none of man’s making, but man has learned how to fulfill the conditions that release it. Atomic energy is a force that man did not create, but that some day man may liberate. Man by himself is still a puny animal; a gorilla is much the stronger. Man's significance lies in another realm—he knows how to fulfill conditions so that universal power not his own is set free. The whole universe as man now sees it is essentially a vast system of power waiting to be released.
In 'When Prayer Means Power', collected in Living Under Tension: Sermons On Christianity Today (1941), 78-79.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Animal (617)  |  Atomic Energy (24)  |  Condition (356)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Create (235)  |  Discover (553)  |  Dynamic (14)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Endless (56)  |  Energy (344)  |  Essentially (14)  |  Force (487)  |  Free (232)  |  Fulfill (19)  |  Gift (104)  |  Gorilla (18)  |  Himself (461)  |  Increase (210)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Liberate (10)  |  Liberated (2)  |  Lie (364)  |  Major (84)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Power (746)  |  Puny (8)  |  Realm (85)  |  Release (27)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Set (394)  |  Significance (113)  |  Still (613)  |  Stronger (36)  |  System (537)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

The men you see waiting in the lobbies of doctors’ offices are, in a vast majority of cases, suffering through poisoning caused by an excess of food.
In Love, Life and Work (), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Doctor (187)  |  Excess (22)  |  Food (199)  |  Lobby (2)  |  Majority (66)  |  Man (2251)  |  Office (71)  |  Poison (40)  |  See (1081)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Through (849)  |  Vast (177)

The universe is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper.
A Shadow Passes (1919), 173.
Science quotes on:  |  Grow (238)  |  Invention (369)  |  Magic (86)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wit (59)

The X-ray spectrometer opened up a new world. It proved to be a far more powerful method of analysing crystal structure…. One could examine the various faces of a crystal in succession, and by noting the angles at which and the intensity with which they reflected the X-rays, one could deduce the way in which the atoms were arranged in sheets parallel to these faces. The intersections of these sheets pinned down the positions of the atoms in space.… It was like discovering an alluvial gold field with nuggets lying around waiting to be picked up.… It was a glorious time when we worked far into every night with new worlds unfolding before us in the silent laboratory.
In The History of X-ray Analysis (1943), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Alluvial (2)  |  Analyse (3)  |  Angle (20)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Atom (355)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Discover (553)  |  Down (456)  |  Examine (78)  |  Face (212)  |  Field (364)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Gold (97)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Intersection (2)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Located (2)  |  Lying (55)  |  Method (505)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Night (120)  |  Nugget (3)  |  Open (274)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Pick Up (4)  |  Position (77)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Ray (114)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Sheet (7)  |  Space (500)  |  Structure (344)  |  Succession (77)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unfolding (16)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  X-ray (37)

There are no shortcuts to moral insight. Nature is not intrinsically anything that can offer comfort or solace in human terms–if only because our species is such an insignificant latecomer in a world not constructed for us. So much the better. The answers to moral dilemmas are not lying out there, waiting to be discovered. They reside, like the kingdom of God, within us–the most difficult and inaccessible spot for any discovery or consensus.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Better (486)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Consensus (8)  |  Construct (124)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Dilemma (11)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  God (757)  |  Human (1468)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Insight (102)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Intrinsically (2)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Lie (364)  |  Lying (55)  |  Moral (195)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Offer (141)  |  Reside (25)  |  Shortcut (3)  |  Solace (7)  |  Species (401)  |  Spot (17)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Wait (58)  |  World (1774)

There may be some interest in one of my own discoveries in physics, entitled, “A Method of Approximating the Importance of a Given Physicist.” Briefly stated, after elimination of all differentials, the importance of a physicist can be measured by observation in the lobby of a building where the American Physical Society is in session. The importance of a given physicist varies inversely with his mean free path as he moves from the door of the meeting-room toward the street. His progress, of course, is marked by a series of scattering collisions with other physicists, during which he remains successively in the orbit of other individuals for a finite length of time. A good physicist has a mean free path of 3.6 ± 0.3 meters. The shortest m.f.p. measured in a series of observations between 1445 and 1947 was that of Oppenheimer (New York, 1946), the figure being 2.7 centimeters. I know. I was waiting for him on the street.
In 'A Newsman Looks at Physicists', Physics Today (May 1948), 1, No. 1, 33.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Building (156)  |  Collision (15)  |  Course (409)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Door (93)  |  Elimination (25)  |  Figure (160)  |  Finite (59)  |  Free (232)  |  Good (889)  |  Importance (286)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interest (386)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lobby (2)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mean (809)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Meeting (20)  |  Method (505)  |  Move (216)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  J. Robert Oppenheimer (39)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Progress (465)  |  Remain (349)  |  Scattering (4)  |  Series (149)  |  Session (3)  |  Shortest (16)  |  Society (326)  |  Time (1877)

Arthur Stanley Eddington quote: There was a time when we wanted to be told what an electron is. The question was never answered.
Background image credit: Lu Viatour, www.lucnix.be (source)
There was a time when we wanted to be told what an electron is. The question was never answered. No familiar conceptions can be woven around the electron; it belongs to the waiting list.
The Nature Of The Physical World (1928), 290.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Belong (162)  |  Conception (154)  |  Electron (93)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Never (1087)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Question (621)  |  Time (1877)  |  Want (497)  |  Weave (19)

They are babies in waiting, life on ice.
On sperm cells frozen for preservation
'Quickening Debate over Life on Ice' Time (2 Jul 1984)
Science quotes on:  |  Baby (28)  |  Cell (138)  |  Freeze (5)  |  Ice (54)  |  Life (1795)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Sperm (7)  |  Wait (58)

We live only to discover beauty. All else is a form of waiting.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Discover (553)  |  Form (959)  |  Live (628)  |  Wait (58)

Willis Rodney Whitney ... once compared scientific research to a bridge being constructed by a builder who was fascinated by the construction problems involved. Basic research, he suggested, is such a bridge built wherever it strikes the builder's fancy—wherever the construction problems seem to him to be most challenging. Applied research, on the other hand, is a bridge built where people are waiting to get across the river. The challenge to the builder's ingenuity and skill, Whitney pointed out, can be as great in one case as the other.
'Willis Rodney Whitney', National Academy of Sciences, Biographical Memoirs (1960), 351.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Research (2)  |  Basic (138)  |  Basic Research (14)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Builder (12)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Construct (124)  |  Construction (112)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ingenuity (39)  |  Involved (90)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Research (664)  |  River (119)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Skill (109)  |  Strike (68)  |  Wait (58)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Willis R. Whitney (17)

Winter opened its vaults last night, flinging fistfuls of crystalline diamonds into the darkening sky. Like white-tulled ballerinas dancing gracefully on heaven’s stage, silent stars stood entranced by their intricate beauty. Motionless, I watched each lacy gem drift softly by my upturned face, as winter’s icy hands guided them gently on their swirling lazy way, and blanketed the waiting earth in cold splendor. The shivering rustling of reeds, the restless fingers of the trees snapping in the frosty air, broke the silent stillness, as winter quietly pulled up its white coverlet over the sleepy earth.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Ballerina (2)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Blanket (10)  |  Break (99)  |  Cold (112)  |  Crystalline (2)  |  Dance (32)  |  Darken (2)  |  Diamond (21)  |  Drift (13)  |  Earth (996)  |  Entrance (15)  |  Face (212)  |  Finger (44)  |  Fling (5)  |  Frosty (3)  |  Gem (16)  |  Guide (97)  |  Hand (143)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Icy (3)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Last (426)  |  Lazy (9)  |  Motionless (2)  |  Night (120)  |  Open (274)  |  Pull (43)  |  Quietly (5)  |  Reed (8)  |  Restless (11)  |  Rustle (2)  |  Shiver (2)  |  Silent (29)  |  Sky (161)  |  Snap (7)  |  Softly (6)  |  Splendor (17)  |  Stage (143)  |  Stand (274)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stillness (5)  |  Swirl (10)  |  Tree (246)  |  Vault (2)  |  Wait (58)  |  Watch (109)  |  Way (1217)  |  White (127)  |  Winter (44)

[A woman waiting for him in the Kremlin asked Gobachev] “Was communism invented by a politician or a scientist?” [He replied] “Well, a politician.” She said, “That explains it. The scientist would have tried it on mice first.”
A story concluding his 'Remarks to Jewish Leaders During a White House Briefing on United States Assistance for the Nicaraguan Democratic Resistance', (5 Mar 1986). He said was “told in the Communist countries among themselves, which reveals the cynicism of their own people,” and it was brought to him by George Shultz returning from the Soviet Union. Collected in Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Ronald Reagan, 1986 (1988), 297. He repeated this joke during 'Remarks to Elected Officials During a White House Briefing on United States Assistance for the Nicaraguan Democratic Resistance' (14 Mar 1986), ibid. 340.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Communism (11)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Explain (322)  |  First (1283)  |  Invention (369)  |  Joke (83)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Politician (38)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Woman (151)

[Lifting off into space] I wasn’t really scared. I was very excited, and I was very anxious. When you’re getting ready to launch into space, you’re sitting on a big explosion waiting to happen. So most astronauts getting ready to lift off are excited and very anxious and worried about that explosion—because if something goes wrong in the first seconds of launch, there's not very much you can do.
Interview conducted on Scholastic website (20 Nov 1998).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anxious (3)  |  Astronaut (32)  |  Big (48)  |  Do (1908)  |  Excited (8)  |  Explosion (44)  |  First (1283)  |  Happen (274)  |  Launch (20)  |  Lift (55)  |  Lift Off (3)  |  Most (1731)  |  Ready (39)  |  Scared (2)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Something (719)  |  Space (500)  |  Wait (58)  |  Worry (33)  |  Wrong (234)

[The teaching of Nature] is harsh and wasteful in its operation. Ignorance is visited as sharply as wilful disobedience—incapacity meets with the same punishment as crime. Nature’s discipline is not even a word and a blow, and the blow first; but the blow without the word. It is left to you to find out why your ears are boxed.
The object of what we commonly call education—that education in which man intervenes, and which I shall distinguish as artificial education—is to make good these defects in Nature’s methods; to prepare the child to receive Nature’s education, neither incapably, nor ignorantly, nor with wilful disobedience; and to understand the preliminary symptoms of her displeasure, without waiting for the box on the ear. In short, all artificial education ought to he an anticipation of natural education. And a liberal education is an artificial education, which has not only prepared a man to escape the great evils of disobedience to natural laws, but has trained him to appreciate and to seize upon the rewards, which Nature scatters with as free a hand as her penalties.
From Inaugural Address as Principal, South London Working Men’s College, in 'A Liberal Education; and Where to Find it', Macmillan's Magazine (Mar 1868), 17, 370.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Blow (44)  |  Box (22)  |  Call (769)  |  Child (307)  |  Crime (38)  |  Defect (31)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Disobedience (4)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Ear (68)  |  Education (378)  |  Escape (80)  |  Evil (116)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Free (232)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harsh (8)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Incapacity (3)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Law (41)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Operation (213)  |  Penalty (6)  |  Punishment (14)  |  Receive (114)  |  Reward (68)  |  Short (197)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Train (114)  |  Understand (606)  |  Why (491)  |  Word (619)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.